35 Burst results for "Six Seven Years"

Drug Addiction In America

Mentally Yours

04:32 min | Last month

Drug Addiction In America

"Woken to Mentally Yours Metro could ikaes weekly podcast about all things mental health. Today we're talking to Dave. Marlon, he was the CEO of crossroads of Southern Nevada, which was the largest addiction and Rehab Center in the area, the psychotherapist drug and alcohol counselor, and he basically knows everything about addiction and mental health issues in the US and beyond. Making me talking tim today about how the pandemic has been affected addiction issues to get help if you're struggling and how to recognize if you might have a problem with drugs or alcohol. Bruce Dave. Thanks so much for joining us on mental yours and welcome from across the pond. My first question was basically because obviously as I mentioned, we're in London. You're in the US, it such different situation in terms of addiction, mental health, and obviously the pandemic to get started. Could you give kind of a brief overview of the reality of addiction in the US? How serious the problem is that how widespread is a? The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation calls addiction the number one health problem in the US. If we look at the the number of prescription opiates that are consumed in the entire world The United States consumes more than eighty percent of them. We. have. You know we've always had an alcohol problem for a percentage of our population. we we developed enough and phetamine mean and a cocaine problem over the last. Twenty years, and in the last five, six years Oh actually even a little longer. An opiate problem has has become. Our most serious addiction challenge. Kind of the most common addiction issue that you see people coming into your center with. It it's interesting. I've run Iran the largest treatment center in Las. Vegas of. Gene. Years. And now as a private center and they're absolutely opiates or over my last three, four years, they're opiates was the number one drug of choice that clients had presented to solutions recovery without the opiate use disorder their primary. Primary substance. Now I work at an indigent facility in in downtown. Las Vegas where. More than half of our clients are homeless. And what's interesting is with this demographic, there's a much higher methamphetamine use. Would say my number one. Substance of for clients is nothin vitamin with opiates and alcohol running for a close second place. That's really interesting I. Think What was interesting that you said kind of opiates have been coming up over the lost six years because for me, it's felt like the coverage has been really recent like only in the last couple of years, we taught it to the opioid crisis this being a sudden kind of unexpected issue but you're saying it's been building for a long time. It has. Interestingly, fourteen years ago I was running the largest health insurance company in the state. And I remember in my last. My last year or two I remember looking at pharmacy reports and we were all scratching our heads saying what is this Oxycontin and why did it not show up two years ago and now I remember when across the ten million dollar mark at the Insurance Company for monthly use so it really begins began spiking. Thirteen fourteen years ago. It became. Newsworthy in fashionable. Six seven years ago, and now we're a were still squarely in an opiate epidemic.

United States Las Vegas Bruce Dave Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Rehab Center Marlon TIM CEO Southern Nevada LAS Cocaine London Methamphetamine Iran
What's Your Story

Jocko Podcast

06:39 min | Last month

What's Your Story

"This is the Jaakko unraveling podcast episode nine with Daryl Cooper and me Jaakko, willink. So. Last time we were talking about. The stories that we tell ourselves and then how We get stories in groups in those start to expand in those start to unify people together. And it seems that we have an instinct towards. Some level of those. Stories unifying us to a point to where we start to drift into just straight tribalism. And then we actually use those stories and change those stories. As a tool to strengthen our tribes even more. And I know you had some some interesting stories, slash myths. That that that kind of represent that very well throughout history we've seen this it's it's it's tapping into. A basic. A basic way that our mind structures reality for us right I mean if you think about. How you teach. The youngest children something if you need to teach them something, you need him to tie their shoes right? How you GonNa do that through imitation you're gonNA show them do what I do. Right that's the same thing that like chimpanzees how they teach their children things. As they get a little bit older was the next way that you're going to teach them stuff probably maybe by like five six, seven years old you're GonNa Start Teaching them basic things about what a good person behaves like whatever you're GonNa do it through stories right? That's like the next level up. It's like later on down the road, you can start talking about kind of concepts right? You can start teaching them. Teaching somebody things in terms of you know instead of telling you a story about prince charming and this is how a man should treat a woman. You're going to learn through this story and internalized that maybe later on, we can say this is the essence of love and how love operates and Blah Blah Blah but stories narrative is how we how we structure reality and understand things and very, very profound way. Yeah. I've written a bunch of books. The two of the leadership books that I've written actually all three of the leadership books that have written are. Heavily based on stories stories from combat and then stories from the civilian sector. And and obviously people the feedback I get all the time and we have the principles written in there in extreme ownership in their leadership. We write the principal clearly in there. Hey, this is called covered move. This is what it means. But people never say Oh, thanks for spelling out the principal for me. They say Oh love the way you guys told the story in that I could see it. So yeah, this is not just something that we do for kids I mean the. With US sticks with US forever, and it's such a great way to to get your point across much more powerful way and for certain things, it's the only way. Right I. Mean. There's just like you're not gonNA tell somebody breakdown into philosophical concepts had a tie your shoes. You just got shown him and tell him i. do there are certain things that? You just have to use a story. That's the only thing that's really going to serve that purpose and elucidating the principles we are really doing there is saying, okay, you know all those stories this one, I just told you in the book. Yeah. But all those other ones you've always heard and there's that there's that thing that the leaders are doing something. This is what it is right and so you're drawing out that communality and those stories by stating the principles. interesting when you said. These you actually brought it up perfectly in my mind. When you said these stories, we tell ourselves can be unifying, and then that same story can become like a divisive type of tribalism right and it reminded me of this this book. call. It's book about the. Rwandan. Genocide by Philip Gourevich who also wrote a really powerful book on Abu Ghraib actually it's very, very You, know? Eric. Weinstein. Actually knows that guy believe he's married to a friend of their family and if at all possible I think it'd be a great guy for you to talk to certainly possible. Just incredibly, morally sensitive writer just a very, very interesting guy anyway, and so in this book about the Rwandan genocide, what's it called we wish to inform you that tomorrow will be killed with our families. I have that one I haven't done it yet. Man I I did Michetti season was kind of. All right. There's one there's one more maybe it's that one life life laid bare? Probably switching is by the same guy who wrote. Interviews the victims brutal. It's as brutal as you think. Yeah. and. So in this book, we wish to inform you that tomorrow we will be killed with our families Goes through when it's just harrowing book as You can imagine at the end of it. He relates this story. That took place. As the genocide was winding down I believe in this girl's school in Rwanda. Some of the entire homeway militias were still running around the rebels had come back and we're pushing back against him, but this was still ongoing. And a bunch of them came into this girl school. And we're trying to figure out who are the Tuzi. So we can kill them all. And they were telling him you know who to girls on one side tootsie girls to the others and on the other side and either girl he's a grade school girls. They refuse to separate themselves out from the Tuzi girls in so that they could know who they were, and one of the girls said that there are no who Tuzi here. There are only Rwandans here. And a lot of them died they all the killed, all of them rather than kill none of them and eventually somebody came broke it up, but a lot of them died. And if you think of that like Whoa okay That's something that in a lot of context were told is a dirty word that's nationalism right I mean that's what it is. Nationalism in the United States is what got Irish people and Italian people in German people to say Oh Germany's attacking people in Europe. We gotta get together and go over there and stop them right. Very unifying thing. That same force is what got Germany to start the fight in the first place. And so identity is a very interesting thing because you go up above the blood level. And everything after the blood level is a story. That's what it is right and you need a story to keep it together. You look at a place like United States we need a story more than anybody.

United States Tuzi Principal Daryl Cooper Germany Europe Prince Philip Gourevich Weinstein Eric Abu Ghraib Rwanda Writer
I Use Spending to Cope With My Bipolar Disorder

Ramsey Call of the Day

03:18 min | 2 months ago

I Use Spending to Cope With My Bipolar Disorder

"Is with US and Richmond Virginia Hi Kisha. How are you? I'm well, how are you? Good how can we help? WELL THIS IS A. Doctor John Alley but. I have bipolar disorder among some other things and. Through the years, I've made a lot of bad decisions and mistakes when it comes to money. Probably about five or six years ago I had a really bad episode and I got myself into a lot of guts. and. I'm still digging out of it and. Basically. I know the things I need I should be doing I need to be doing to get out of that I. still have problems with the with my fire polar where impulsive. That makes it hard sometimes but are digging. Taking your medication. I not on anything at the moment. I'm kind of coming off of something describes something new. Okay. Can you working with the psychiatrists right now? Yeah I have to find a new one because my insurance just said, they're not going to cover any more So so you got it bipolar one diagnosis and they're saying they're not gonNA cover anymore. They're not gonNA cover the people were saying okay. Hi somebody new. So that's number one number two. Do you have somebody in your life that helps you be accountable? My boyfriend helps them my mother But I? I am single. I live alone. And I'm asking you. I'm asking you like a boyfriend in a mom. Those are often not great at they're good cheerleaders and they're good neighbours. They're not great accountability Partners D of somebody that you trust that would hold your debit card for you. Decide you have cash. Here's what I'm getting and you've got to set up some boundaries in your life and barriers that make it very challenging for you when you're getting a manic state to do something that you're GonNa have to live with for two three, five, six, seven years. That's what I'm getting. What I'm wanting to know what we need to do. So you need to find somebody probably not a boyfriend are you in a church? and not at the moment. Yeah you've got to find whether it's a church and a pastor whether it is a a bipolar group in your community that's got somebody that y'all can meet with regularly maybe it is your mom but somebody in your life that you can sit down and say, I've got these Eileen this way when I'm having a manic state aniline this way when I'm in a super-low state and I need to set up some guardrails for myself but all this starts quite honestly Kisha you gotta you gotTa Take Your Medication and Vokes with bipolar one are notorious for getting in there and feeling better feeling a bit leveled out and then they quit and think everything's all good and then they. They stop right and they go right back to where they were. So that's my big recommendation to you is get with a psychiatrist asap someone that you trust not this just gonNA dopey up and say, all right going this on your way who's going to talk to you learn about you and then you're gonNA have to get some accountability in your community. That's GonNa, help you when we're about to get off the rails Keisha, your finances, he'll only to the extent you try.

Doctor John Alley Eileen United States Richmond Virginia Kisha
Insights on Financial Planning for Millennials in the Era of COVID-19

Manage Your Damn Money: The Podcast

03:35 min | 2 months ago

Insights on Financial Planning for Millennials in the Era of COVID-19

"Are some of the things that you're revising people? What are your thoughts around? You know tips for managing your money during this financial crisis that we're having right now? Yes. So again in the very narrow lane of being geared toward millennial. So folks in late twenty s early to late thirties We're we're we're really talking a lot more about like security and you know the fact that like we as millennials aren't super unique position that we live through what we thought at the time was once. In a lifetime financial crisis in two, thousand and eight. So you know a lot of us like myself and my clothes Ben graduated into that two thousand, eight financial crisis world where you know you got a person who's just now graduating from college with zero work experience and a bachelors degree. Competing for jobs against somebody's got ten years of work experience in A. PhD for the same position. Right that was like a mind blowing time and we thought that once we got to the other side of it. It would be something that we could talk about in the past in the rear view mirror and it would be something that like remember that time when dot dot dot. But here we go. Again, you know ten years later let's call it where all of a sudden we're in the middle of a health prices that turned into a financial crisis in the folks who were talking about were literally just now starting to get on solid ground, right? It took five six seven years on a lot of cases for folks to kind of find their footing and like feel like they legitimately had a handle on their finances and so a lot of the stuff that we're talking about now as pertains to millennials is about security. So like that Emergency Fund that you hear about the folks are supposed to. Have three to six months save depending on whether you're a single a couple, and if you're a couple whether the other person in the household has an income to. So those kind of things are the conversations that traditionally nobody wants to hear about it because it's not exciting it's not sexy is like oh you tell them me to save more money. Okay. I don't WanNa do that. But why people are like well, how do I do that Emergency Fund thing. I do I know if I have enough how much is enough like those kind of things of the conversations that are coming up a lot more now separate and apart from that for the folks that. You know they're high earning millennials what we in my business referred to his Henry's high earners who are not rich yet. For those people, there's opportunities to be strategic about how they approach the market and what is happening right now and one of the pieces I just recently wrote for business insider was about ways that hiring millennials can take advantage of the next financial downturn in one of the ways that that I mentioned in. There was having some cash available for when the market does fall again, like it did in March of of this year. So that means getting your 401k contributions into your retirement. Plan earlier than December because normally the way you allocate percentage of your paycheck to your 401k plan at scheduled out so that by December it all gets there but if you accelerate those payments now to make sure that you get the cash in there earlier today you might have an opportunity to take advantage of a down market. If one presents itself at some point, you know later this year heading up to the election. So things like that that a tactical simple that you can, you can take advantage of. Are a lot of what we spend time focused on.

Emergency Fund BEN Henry
Hot Pod Creator Nick Quah on How He Got His Start

Digiday Podcast

04:25 min | 3 months ago

Hot Pod Creator Nick Quah on How He Got His Start

"You are the. Proprietor of hot pod. Explain explain the start it was back in like two thousand fourteen I mean this is like a classic story. Right of of a side project. Yeah, absolutely I was actually working in the same newsroom. Our producer appear RE businesses added together I was working on something else. I was focusing on Commerce and then, but I've been sort of podcast consumer in a fan of for quite some time by that point, and you know twenty four marked by the sort of first season of being as big as it was and generate a lot of headlines, a lot of sort of. Of Coverage, but as a is consumer looked at a coverage didn't quite see that It accurately captured what I thought was happening space so I started project to to cover it as as you know as a way to learn how to report and write about stuff and six years later it's it's a it's my company. It's a fulltime job and it's It's you know it's overwhelming reading a business. It's overwhelming. Okay, I want to get into that, and then we'll get into the state of the podcasting so tell me. When did you decide to make this a full-time GIG? around late twentieth, Fifteen I was just antsy enough and the news that are had gone to a point where I felt like a good just take a leap and try to slap on. Some sort of premiums have structure and see what happens I, don't know I am kind of a hyperactive itchy person and a comedy set in one job for too long and so I saved maybe like three months worth of rent, and and took the shot and and that sort of when I left my job I was then at panoply, which is packets company I was there for a couple of months. It's complicated when you're writing about a pockets industry, and so also working for eight co packets, company and then I decided to just go independent because I just wanted to spend more time writing thinking about this stuff without being beholden to another job. Okay so it was a news, mostly a newsletter. Yeah, yeah, it's still Muslim. Is that her? Yeah, so how many subscribers do you have when you made the leap? Wasn't lot. It was about maybe five thousand, a decent like sixty percent open rate, so I knew that was like a couple of thousand people some of percentage of which would probably end up being paid supporters, and that was that was again by the time I just needed to get to a point where it could just pay off milkjam hosting expenses and my rent, so that's that was the calculation there. Okay, I mean this is pre. Sub Stacks A. You were a bit of a trailblazer their. Sub Stack has you know capitalize on an interesting trend? We'll see if it plays out. But Ya not everybody can love his life. So when you say, we'll see I. Mean I'm sure there's look this is we? Will we talk on this podcast about accelerations and it's also causing. People to think about what they're doing. And what what's been the hardest part I mean you. You had mentioned before that. It's hard to run a business. Explain the hard part of of of when you decided to go and make this a full-time gig to. Making it like a true living. So I, think we. We're talking about this structure. Were we're talking about a very specific kind of media at newsletter business, right? It's you know. There are a couple of news editor driven businesses that have multiple. You know employees that I. Multiple Writers Hop often most part every I handle everything from to handle ad sales. I handle troubleshooting when it comes to customer, service and stuff like that and I think that's the wave that we're seeing of these sort of. Largely single person let newsletters even off. A couple of contributing writers is still like run books and managed back end. That's a lot and that can be quite lonely, and that can be quite a difficult. You can't take certain kinds of swings because there's only one of you and also you know. I've been doing this for six years and. Telling variations on a story and telling the same stories for six years is create take surveys, specific kind of creative person you know some of US think some credit folks and some journalists they like to spread their wings, and and change beat once in a while. You can't really do that with this kind of business. And so that's been part of the creative friction that have been feeling You know six seven years into this business now.

United States Sub Stack Producer News Editor
A Teacher's Aid

Kind World

05:00 min | 3 months ago

A Teacher's Aid

"Forty four year, old Jan Carson has an unusually good memory of childhood, but then again her childhood was unusual by any standard. It started off in a typical suburb in Phoenix Arizona Mom was a teacher dad. She says was a hippie stay at home. Father who occasionally dealt pot. And he was incredibly attentive. He brushed my hair and feed me breakfast every morning. He'd read to May. Take me to the petting zoo, but you know there were always signs of problems. Her Mother Link Carson knew something was wrong when her husband James. Carson began violently threatening. Anyone who upset Him. Including her the first few times. He said it. She didn't believe him the second few times he said it, and then he got a gun. In nineteen seventy nine, when five years old, her parents divorced after a decade of marriage. Shortly after James, Carson remarried and changed his name to Michael Barone Carson. And then the problems got worse. Jen's I her father and stepmother's house is etched in her memory. There was no furniture and lamps. It was dark and there were hundred potted plants. It looked like the haunted forest and Snow White. I remember actively trying to skip this house. General remembers a particularly terrifying moment. When her stepmother came into the room and started rubbing her back. She ended up scratching her and leaving five open wounds. She was saying things to me like I'll scratch this team and out of you it was. It was horrific. You remember when someone tries is threatening to kill you. You know unharmed. Show in this way so. After that visit I got home, my mom saw wounds and she said you're never going back there. Lynn took her daughter packed to personal car in the middle of the night and hit the road spending the next four years moving from city to city. They eventually settled in orange, county California. She told her young daughter that they needed to be away from her father because he was sick I, was incredibly angry so on top of my mom, having no one that's believing her for five years on top of that. She has a five six seven year old saying I hate you. I want my daddy. Jen's life at home was tough. Her mother struggled with depression. Her Life at school wasn't much better. She was behind academically and constantly got in trouble. I didn't really feel like I. was a bad student I felt like I was a bad person that my very makeup was bad at eight years old. Yeah, during this period, I had extreme depression. At School Jen's teacher didn't recognize her depression or cries for help. Instead. She constantly reprimanded her for acting out once, saying Jen was the worst students she'd ever had. That was like just throwing a match on my gasoline. So. My behavior then got worse throughout the rest of the year. She didn't feel safe anywhere. At Home Jen would often see police officers at her door. They ask about her father. She didn't know exactly why because her mother would always send her to room. Still she heard bits and pieces and knew it wasn't good. By Third Grade Jen was preparing herself for another difficult year I went into the class and I remember putting my hair in front of my eyes, and putting my head down, and just not wanting to interact with the new teacher. But then that teacher Mrs Sylvia case did something Jen didn't expect. I just remember her on day one day to day three Sane Jenny heard. You're such a great reader. Why don't you come? Help me hold the book? That was the beginning of something new Gen learned to love books, and over the year she caught up academically Mrs case was brought her Baratz as a prize for good grades on Her spelling test. They also kept the hair out of her is. She also helped John Apply for the girl scouts, and for reduced lunch when she suspected money was tight at home which it was. But what Gen remember most of all were misses cases, sincere and specific compliments. A lot of teachers will say good job. She would say you're cursive. Letter Ams look like art. And something I've tried to do the rest of my life because I think it is one of the kindest things you can do because you're saying to another human I, see you. And icy the goodness in you.

JEN Jan Carson Depression Michael Barone Carson Arizona James Snow White Lynn John Mrs Sylvia California Jenny
Artist Bruce Sulzberg on painting Rafael Nadal

The Tennis.com Podcast

06:36 min | 5 months ago

Artist Bruce Sulzberg on painting Rafael Nadal

"Welcome to the tennis dot. Com Pot guest. I'm one of your host. Nina Pantic joined in this episode by my co host. Irena Falconi! Hey, guys! How's it going? And we have a very interesting episode of everyone today we are with the owner artists of cells media. Fine Arts Bruce Cells Bruce Welcome thank you, thank you so much for having me. Bruce? Do you have a very interesting story? I don't think a lot of people know it has to do with Ross doll. You don't usually have artists on our show, so that's why this is very unique and special you wanNA. Tell everyone story when it comes to tennis. Even if you're not a player or coach or tournament organizer, so let's start with you know where you are in the world during this quarantine and how your life is going these days, it's been very interesting. Interesting just like I would say probably ninety nine point. Nine percent of the world is trying to figure out what the hell you're. GonNa do during his time. you know the one fortunate part about it as being an artist, I've been locked in the studio painting new paintings and working with different ideas and working with RAF and his team Carlos Costa to figure out new and inventive ways to drive in bill business and do things that we are currently not used to doing. So it's been. It's been a wild interesting two months of figuring that out. What's your interest level tenants? Do you play? How did you get into this? US Fascinating I'm actually one of those weird concoctions of I'm an artist athletes so I was a big time athlete. As a kid played eight years of Baseball's all-star in baseball play basketball. I was all star in basketball. Basketball led me. Tennis I was a basketball player. Freshmen in highschool and kind of got into. An argument with my coach basically just decided to leave basketball. And I picked up a tennis racket and I had just. It was a natural thing for me to do. And before I knew I, had a professional coach, and my coach was played played on the tour and played John McEnroe. He saw me play and before I knew I was training with some of the best players in northern, California. And so I played high school career. played college and I still train. I still training a tribe while afford the pandemic I was out there every week. just started getting back out there about a week ago when they released the courts, but tennis is definitely in. My jeans had so much, so that my son plays college tennis. I'm actually had a scholarship to Chapman University as I used to play and made teams freshman, and he's also coach now, too, so and even though he still in college, but yes, definitely in my blood and strange enough. Raw Molly the owner of art encounter. That is my distributor. It turns out the way that we got this deal with him. Was He was tennis player in his whole family's sex players, and when he saw the original painting that I did have all sprouted in hadn't seen them in years we. She just freaked out. Saying Oh my God. This is unbelievable what I told him. I have five hundred signed by the dog himself. Personally and myself and we did a whole thing back in the day. When we have this painting, he's like. Nope, that's it. We're going to do something, so it's been a very unique tennis story all the way around. I can honestly say I think it's been a while that I've actually heard someone say that. They're both an athlete an artist. When was When was the moment where you're figured out like? Wow, I actually have a knack for this whole painting thing. That was easier. I I was asking rg by the time. I was five six seven years old. My parents had me in special school. Special Art schools and You know it was something that they noticed when I was one years old that I can draw and I'd actually kept first painting I drawing than I ever did when I was one and They just knew my dad was artist. He never followed that trade. Actually went into corporate business, but my dad is very artistic used to do paintings. So I kind of had that gene in me. And I just knew at a very early age. That was what I was going to do my life. We hear so much about young athletes figuring out their skill set at a young young age at like three, four five, and to see that art is very similar as interesting for those who don't know the story Bruce is the owner of Salzburg Media Fine Arts, a broad range of professional sports team three. Of National. International athletes he got three D work of Rafa. Nadal for those are not watching this on video. It's behind him, but it's also going to be a link in our episode information. He's also got artwork of Muhammad. Ali Michael Jordan Prince. Fielder Dirk Nowitzki. Irk Nowitzki I'm not a basketball person. I'm sorry. Most importantly. It's the tennis painting that we're really here to talk about, and it's Three D. art, so I want to start with what is three art. What's the process for making an artwork like this before we get into the Roth story? This was very unique idea. That I came up with lean back in nineteen, ninety five, I was doing my very first art show at the New York our next on back in those days that was the largest art show in the world. Everything was painter of any place anywhere was there exhibiting in was at the Jacob Javits in New York City, so as massive and I back then you the jury to get in so jury to get an shared a booth with another artist, and when I was there, all brought was abstract paintings on canvas, because that's what I was painting at the Time Big Love Klee Miro. Picasso, that was kind of backroom basically, and we've been in the show for five days and insult. Damn painting and I told. My My. Fiance at the time in my mom was there with me. I gotTa Take I. Just need to go walk the show and I said. You know if I'm going to do anything in my life I've got to figure out how to do something that no one has ever done and for some reason and it's time. My Dad owned art gallery. Very very successful one back in San Francisco. East Bay and I just something popped in my head. work on glass. Just a glass on the second I got home I started Phil around layers of plexiglas and low and behold. That's how it was born I. Just we just figured out how to frame it how to do the whole thing in. One, doing where usually as an artist you paying on one level is a canvas most most of the time. You're just doing everything on that level of what I wanted to do with cigarette how to take a look at an image of a painting in break it up and put different parts of each of painting on glass, and then use spicer's to separate them, so there's space in between each layer. You get that natural three d look with no gimmicks, no anything no lighting. It's all based on different layers and different perspectives, so that's how it was born and. The risk on history.

Tennis Basketball Bruce Irena Falconi Nina Pantic Dirk Nowitzki Carlos Costa John Mcenroe California San Francisco Jacob Javits Ross Muhammad East Bay Baseball Chapman University Spicer Ali Michael Jordan Prince Phil Nadal
Detecting Emotion Through Gait  with Aniket Bera

AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

07:14 min | 6 months ago

Detecting Emotion Through Gait with Aniket Bera

"Hello and welcome to the AI. Today podcast I'm your host Kathleen Mall I'm your host modeled Schmeltzer our guest. Today is unaccounted. Berra is the research professor in computer science at the University of Maryland at the Gamma Lab. Thank you so much for joining us today. Thank you so much. Thank you for inviting. Yeah thanks so much for joining us today. We'd like to start by having you introduce yourself to our listeners. Tell them a little bit about your background. And your current role at the University of Maryland. Sure I've been with him for a little under a year so for this was at. Unc Chapel Hill for a year and had mcbean St at UNC in robotics so a hermit research over the last few years has been trying to work on the social aspect of our bodies whether from the computer vision side where we look different objects after we as humans when we look at different objects. How do we perceive them? So my research has always been about. Data perception for robots and robot can understand the world around us like as humans. It's what research has been over the last six seven years might Rowlatt you. Md has enough research faculty. I advise about seven students now from vision. Applications to robotic applications the psychology driven. Ai Applications on McLennan field of research is something affective computing affective computing. What it means is that we're trying to gauge emotions on Detroit's you in aggressive Shy said figured out different cues from your visual appearance like your facial expressions the way you speak things the way you walk from all of that. Can I figure out your emotions and then do something? According you follow. What specific here. That was something that we found really interesting. You know part of the reason why we reached out to you and hang you join us on their today podcasts. As we wrote an article for our today podcast listeners. He may or may not know that Kathleen and I are also contributing writers to Forbes and tech target and one of the articles that wrote in Forbes was how systems might be able to detect your emotion. Just by taking a look at how you walk and other sort of non maybe visual facial visual or verbal cues and that's part of what being socially intelligent is. I guess we as humans can read things like body language. But there's a lot more to it. So maybe you can explain some of the concepts of socially intelligent robots and why this idea of social intelligence is important yes oh the concept of socially intelligent robots is essentially making robots understanding humans. Better so we. As humans are not objective to be tend to evaluate unheard of things based on out upbringing aquaculture in all these different rates. And then associate all those things in everyday life so In this research which you mentioned the phobic mad we did when research way we could figure out how people walk and then have a garden new. Somebody's side we could mechanize that person sadness just by looking at his a her. Buster is a hub body language and maybe the robot can walk up to that person and ask questions. You look sad today. Can I help you like some help if somebody is Chris excessively angry? I might want to talk to that person and maybe even avoid that person together. Assembly looks confused. The robot co that Bush announce something that you look lost here. Do you need help been something. Do you need to some place? So all these different we inherently as humans. Do which usually doing tend to do those things so go. The last Jedi as robotics has always been about solving problems accurately and objectively so. Let's say you know the goal for about is go from point eight in be and the robot will try to figure out the shortest are the most efficient go from point eight point what via bringing in is also being associated vendor most socially aware the. Somebody's walking. I want that other person to have his hub Robot I do not want to enjoy on. Somebody's face so having all the social norms social events bring it back to robotics is what the concept of socially intelligent robot as unwise. This idea important I think has become more primetime and as they become more available among says I think they should try to attempt to understand humans and be Understand humans but go beyond that and be part of the human society He not interesting because we talk about commonsense emotional Iq and that's incredibly hard for robots and artificial intelligence to actually have been a lot harder than I think. Maybe some people realize although there has been some discussion around it and at COG Melika for the past two years we've actually done voice assistant benchmark and commonsense and emotional. Iq were too of the categories of questions that we asked because supposingly the systems were not very good at that but this idea of AI systems that can detect emotion based on gate is a really unique idea. So where did this concept come about? So we started this. Actually I think about skate years ago. I mean I know. Eight years ago IAE wasn't the we'd know now things were different back then but we started with the concept of can't be figured out somebody's personality just the like just looking at how they walk back. Then we started the representing every human being every industry as a single entity as a single dot on the screen so used to look at videos. And how this guy is trying to avoid somebody to cut across people to figure. Oh his guys aggressive. This guy's got shy guy walks around all these other guys look from that and now we figured out so from the dot aspect of figuring out the entire body leg rewrite now have around twenty two points Bush and so all our lake from your leg from your hand gestures your shoulder through your slaughtering head so all these things. All these different cues which we observe. That wasn't really being studied before there's a lot of research on the emotional especially from faces. You know somebody's happy. Somebody said there's a lot of research in this field especially from speech in the way I see something. Let's say I'm happy? I'm very happy today. I'm okay I'm happy but also the way you say. The sentence is the content of the sentence is one thing but also to the way you was at so all these different cues were being studied in different fees realized that the body language is something which really people studying. We look at people a lot. We look when they walk in the talking when they're driving but we don't we we know what they're going to but we don't really like we haven't understood how gives how walking body language relates to emotion so our on this hatred emotion is kind of it could be added all these facial cues with speed with other were. Hughes from the human so I researched

Kathleen Mall University Of Maryland Bush AI Unc Chapel Hill MD Detroit Berra Professor Gamma Lab Mclennan SHY Cog Melika Buster Forbes Hughes Chris
Mark Irvine on the State of Marketing

Marketing Over Coffee

07:23 min | 6 months ago

Mark Irvine on the State of Marketing

"Good Morning. Welcome to marketing over coffee. I'm John Wall today. Our guest is Mark Irvine. He's the director of strategic partnerships. At Word Stream. GonNa talk to us about what's going on in the advertising space and we are going to focus a lot on cove nineteen in what's going on. He's done a bunch of research on how this has affected searches. And what's going on with all the ad networks so we're excited to have him with us here today. Mark thanks for joining US John. Thanks for having me. This really exciting. Let's take a step back. Talk to us about Word Stream. What do you do and how did you get there? So Word Stream is an online advertising software that agencies and advertisers alike use to manage their advertising across Google search display Microsoft Bing facebook and instagram and so effectively. A lot of what people do online is a lot of repetitive tasks. In terms of how you go about managing ad campaigns what we do is we try to supply. Yeah that's really the big thing for me when finding out about you guys and talking about what you do is just that as a marketing department gets bigger. You reach that point where you've reached the first milestone where you have one person that you're just kinda like okay you become the ads guru and they're the ones that are doing the testing and learning what's working and not working but then they hit a point where they have to roll them across all the different networks the different channels and it reaches this point where it's completely unmanageable you know. They're spending like an hour of each day in each of the tools and you guys are an alternative to that. Did you see a specific point when somebody finally just cries uncle and comes to talk to you? Is there any specific place where you tend to see people give you a call? Yeah you know. It's really interesting. Because a lot of the businesses we primarily work small businesses and a lot of the people who are working with. They're not just in charge of that one ad campaign but they're also doing email and they're also doing seo and quite frankly a lot of these small businesses they're oftentimes the owner or someone who's out in the field at the same moment in time what you can't do as you operate business what. I've learned I can't do effectively. I can't manage. People manage business manager ad campaigns and do a task all at the same time. If you're just learning paid search or if you're just learning online advertising we specifically focus on okay. Here are the seven things that you need you every single week to be successful on Google Bing facebook and as you go about adding to that yes of course google and being or Google and facebook. They all share similar concepts online. But how you go about making sure. That your touching all of your advertising equally in effectively is a learned task. Yeah I do love that idea of. It's not just. It's not a system for experts where it's a power tool that someone would go in and do all of this kind of stuff but it's really an expert system in that it's reaching out proactively using okay. Here's the things you gotta get wrapped up this week if you want this to work and and it kind of puts people on the right track. That's interesting to me though that it does go all the way down to kind of smaller businesses and people who that's not their whole job so I actually Kinda come in a lot earlier in the cycle that I thought was the case. Are there any guidelines as far as spend or like how much of the marketing mix is coming from advertising? Are there any stats there? As far as when somebody can reach this point you know we often see. We do have people who've never advertised before we have agencies who are just beginning to offer paid search to their Seo clients or what have you. They're just beginning to get in the paid search space. Broadly across the board. When I talk about thirty thousand accounts we see an average spend of about a thousand dollars a month so it's still relatively small across all of their networks but beyond that we take small businesses and we also have some some larger guys as well who use the platform for for time management just for honesty and credibility. It's one of those things that paid searches so simple to get started at so simple to feel like you know what you're doing and in that same process just dangerous enough to be bad at one of my favorite hobbies to do a google search for hotels and in your local city and then go and do the same search on bing and you'll see like expedia or priceline or these large brands off have very different ads across those two networks oftentimes inaccurate ads between the two. So it's very easy to have a large budget and still be unsuccessful on a network. Yeah Yeah I can understand that you are kind of all over the place and it's interesting to me to that it's great. That is all the way down at that thousand dollar a month price point. Because that's definitely doable for for small businesses. Especially if they're able to get a return it only a thousand dollars then. Yeah it seems like you WanNa get up and running as quickly as you can and get to the point where you're not worried about the logistics. But you're actually you know testing ads and getting some useful tweaking exactly. Logistics isn't the thing that gets anyone who has a bed in the morning. So whatever you can do to make sure that you're going in and making changes that are effective in your ad copy rather than just pressing a series of buttons and Google ads or facebook. How can you go about making change? That's GonNa Affect Your Roi. Okay now another interesting thing with your background that I wanted to touch upon love to hear about just kind of how you got to where you are but a big part of it. Is You know your data scientist for a number of years. So you have the background that that we love to talk about people kind of getting in playing with the number so tell us a bit more about your role as data scientists and how you got over there. Yeah it's really interesting. I at ridgely had no interest in marketing when I first started my career. I actually majored in math because my mother told me that. If you'd be willing to do people's math you'll always have a job. And so lo and behold I found my holden in marketing a world where traditionally people were not mathematically your data and I joined word stream about seven years ago and at the time word stream had a still a whole lot of thousands of individual clients. We had a lot of data. But what were we doing with? That data was unique to the individual account. My role as it is. Scientists was really investigating not just the role with an individual accounts. But what was going on across thousands of accounts win at change happened when the Google Surp- changed when new ad copy was tested. When they google start running out with new tests or started watching new ad formats. There are changes that people see in terms of the numbers and anecdotally. Everyone has some sense of what's going on their own account but what's going on at large. We suddenly became the largest data repository outside of Google to begin to run those numbers so I spent six seven years at word stream really just running the numbers under saying the trends in terms of what made someone successful with their online advertising our own client set and as a had all that data as I understood all of that started working closely with the individual ad networks with our partners at Google with partners Microsoft with their partners that facebook. And so now. I'm having Lengthy conversations about the changes that they're having and how I think it's going to impact our SNB's sweet

Google Word Stream Facebook John Wall Director Of Strategic Partners Microsoft Mark Irvine SNB Business Manager Scientist Ridgely Instagram Holden Expedia Priceline
Viz Agencies: CLEVERFRANKE and Interactive Things

Data Stories

09:14 min | 7 months ago

Viz Agencies: CLEVERFRANKE and Interactive Things

"Saw the sovereign in. Let's get started so we have a special topic today. We decided to make even a two episode feature maybe even more episodes to come because actually this huge blind spot so whenever we review our trailer board with episode. We realized sometimes. Oh we've been so many but we never talked to somebody from field X. or from that area and it's been like this really with for years. Small to medium data visualization agencies. Which is insane because some of the best data is obviously comes from these types of companies and we talked to a lot of practitioners and researchers and whatnot but never really people. Running data visualization studios. Huge Blind. Spot happens but now we're catching up quick and we're inviting to even guests today and and we record another episode with two guests and this will be the next month so hopefully we're back to a good ratio of data agency folks and going and I'm personally super interested. I'VE KNOWN THE FOLKS. We'll talk to you for many many years. In fact I realized last year at encode conference that a lot of these agencies have been around for ten years longer and so it's really now fastening to hear of their long-term Perspective on how the field has evolved. How the field has changed if there is even a viable business and making high end. Crafted data visualization. Or if we will all be unemployed soon so curious to learn more about all this so as I said we have two guests the first one is Thomas. Clever I Thomas High Thomas Highmore. It's I echo. Thanks for joining us. And we have Benjamin Vita Benjamin Haven. Hi Maurice Ionescu great to have you on so Thomas. Maybe I could you briefly introduce yourself and your company and then Benjamin can take. Oh yeah absolutely so as you said. I'm Thomas Flavor or clever co-founder of Flavor Franca or clever Frankie. Most people call us these days. We're data design and Technology Company and we create anything from one of data visualizations to data driven products and tools. As we like to call it we have. We have our headquarters here in the Netherlands and we have another office in Chicago and Dubai. Yeah how many people are working for you right now around thirty two. I think if I'm correct thirty two now great Benjamin Harvard. You all right. I'm an interaction designer with sort of like a focus on information Shirley station and interface design from the beginning and then back in two thousand eight. I started writing a blog on data virtualization whereas publish my work and my research. It's also how we met I think. Also that's how I stumbled over an earlier and like a year later. I co founded interactive things which fairly similar to clever Frankie is a designer development studio with a focus on data driven products. We are a team of seventeen people. We're sort of like a slightly weird beast as we are five equal partners in the company. I think today's like my main focus is leading the company as the managing director. I have a few teaching assignments at universities on data visualization and and sort of organizing database. Sirak meet up here in sick right. So Benjamin there maybe just two people get a sense of okay. What type of product elected do or what? What's your approach is there? Maybe one quintessential project where you could say okay. This is really quintessential almost inactive things project where you could say. That's that's really good example of the type of work we do and we like to. Yeah that's you know like picking your favorite child right. So I think the project that sort of comes to mind is is actually two one two projects and that's education inequalities and education progress so these two websites that we have built for UNESCO and they are sister products in a way even though they're seven years apart so education inequalities already seven years old now and education progress was just released. The first was an exploratory tool our allies in disparities in quality of education and to second is Dan an explanatory publication summarizing the key facts and trends and so in a way they present to coins of the data. Visually say are two sides of the data. Visualization Coin Servic exploration for discovery and explanation for understanding and besides being interesting from data visualization perspective. I think the project also rank very high in our in our view because of the purpose they both advance to sustainable development goal for forward which I think is an important aspect so inclusive and equitable quality of Education. For All the second is the client. Unesco has been a long term and very very committed clients to the success of each of their project and then in terms of craft brew bows challenged in design. Antidevelopment went we work on these projects. And and typically we've seen iskoe. We are allowed to pursue a very iterative process instead of Servic fixed scope waterfall type of process. And I think sort of these Su- yes bex or for aspects purpose client crafting process are important to us and I think they are. Well reflected in those two projects. Great Tell us how about you is a similar example like Ben set. That's always very hard and I think if you look back over over the years that we've been running the business. There's always some quintessential project some lighthouse projects that I think really define you as a company to take a next step in where you are if I have to choose then. I think the the Mobility Index website that we created for the Chicago Metropolitan Agency of Planning is is one of my personal favorites really because it brings together a lot of lot of things dear to my heart. Dear to our companies hearts in the sense that it's it's a mix of experimental data viz with an important message behind it. The CMAP approached us because they had written a new mobility plan or a new urban planning plan so to speak for the city of Chicago which was pretty much. The first comprehensive urban planning plan since Daniel Burman Burnham which was about one hundred years ago and really outlined around economy mobility and liveability where the city should be heading and also the challenges that they face so mobility is a very important topic to the city of Chicago. Think Twenty five percent of the workforce is somehow tied to freight transportation. All those type of things and you know the the investment that needs to be done in the infrastructure there is about thirteen trillion dollars To really convey that message they asked us. Can you can concise. Can you digest plan of six hundred sixty pages into one interactive websites? And of course we said yes remembering that on the way there on the plane. I was reading through that plan and thinking. I'm not sure how we're going to do it. But it was really it was. It's a really nice project in in how we did a lot of editorial stuff on on understanding the plan and thinking how can we explain this plan to you know anybody down in the street but also to business policy makers journalists politicians and? There's a whole editorial sort of structure that you know. There's a bird's eye view over Chicago. And then as you dive into the topics you'd literally dive down into street level. There's different types of visualizations from charts to. We were using new technologies at the time. This twenty fourteen so yeah a lot of a lot of boxes that are ticked in that project and I think you know looking back. I just realized when I heard Ben talk that that was the first time that we set foot in Chicago and here. We are six seven years later right here. We have the office in Chicago so really. It's also the moment in time. I fell in love with that city

Chicago Thomas High Thomas Highmore Benjamin Benjamin Vita Benjamin Haven Frankie BEN Benjamin Harvard Thomas Flavor Unesco Mobility Index Maurice Ionescu Chicago Metropolitan Agency Of Cmap Shirley Station Managing Director Daniel Burman Burnham Netherlands Antidevelopment DAN
Mike Schultz, CSCS, CPT - Head Coach and Founder of Highland Training

Moving2Live

08:19 min | 7 months ago

Mike Schultz, CSCS, CPT - Head Coach and Founder of Highland Training

"We were talking a little bit before we started recording about the difficulty of actually making your living is an endurance coach. And I know there's a lot of people with personal training with coaching etc. It's very easy to throw out the co- the term coach and sale. I'm kosher I do this or I do that. But the people are actually saying. I need to bring the money I need to be qualified are few and far between so when you see somebody. You're at a bar your coffee shop or something and they say what do you do? What's kind of your thirty second elevator? Spiel Mike Schultz in I do. I coach endurance athletes. I I mainly coach cyclists and the majority of them are mountain bikers. You know we spoke about this earlier but the trend is a lot of people are starting to move onto dirt and love racing their bikes Certified specialists in the strength and conditioning field with the And have you ever certifications and been coaching for eleven years Fulltime been coaching racing. Basically learning the sport in the Science for over twenty years now. So you know that's what I do do full-time into work hard for every single person that comes through my door. I'm always curious and I know there's a fair number of people who will be listening this to say this is why endurance sports and I know from reading your bio and looking at your webpage for highland training before you coached you actually worry participant in these things. So it's not somebody who's just standing there with a whistle saying you do it because this is what the book says you've actually experienced. How did you get into doing endurance? And Ultra endurance events. Do did you do that in high school runner in high school? No I played hockey house actually a goalie in high school and I loved playing hockey but post high school hockey league's went on for so many years and Then amended Meyer early twenties. I started discovering bikes. Actually I think it started covering bikes when I was like eighteen nineteen Running around the neighborhood and Just loved riding in started Seeing these guys going fast in SPANDEX. And Hey these guys look fast and I was kind of interested in that. You didn't really get heavily into racing until I was about twenty five twenty six. It's kind of a life. Change happens and quit the job and moved to the mountain road. My bike every day and worked part time and from there is where I really fell in love with going long and seeing the views the scenery. And you know on early morning misty mornings in your climbing mountains and there's no one around it's just I dunno it's addicting so that's how I got into question I always have to ask because I have to get it out of the way whenever I interview or talk to somebody. Who's a cyclist? You've probably heard the equation. The perfect number of bikes is plus one. Where N is the current number. You have so. How many bikes you currently have. Well I have a few bikes and I have a few bikes. That are not even operational right now. I am not the Tech Guy. I just like to feel fast and fiddle bike. Always have I always will I get a bike and I ride in till it doesn't work and then I get another bike and so I have just the basic necessities. I have a really great mom by specialized jumper and I have a doable road bike. an elise actually lease. I think won the world championship this past year. So I'm on aluminum bike. I'm still proud of it So yeah I just keep those you bikes. That gets me through the year wintertime indoors outdoors around as much as I can keep it pretty simple so and you mentioned how you got into cycling by seeing people wearing SPANDEX and often when you see people spinning by on the road you bite the the road cycling thing and you get into criteriums and maybe if you have the opportunity some stage races but you didn't go in that direction. You went in the direction of off road. Why did you do that? Or what attracted you to the off road when you first saw the people on-road well I. When I moved to the Somerset seven springs area. There was tons of trails and for whatever reason all my friends at the Time Road Mountain Bikes and actually I think I remember my first mountain bike ride. It was a night rod and it was late at night after a night of celebrating and it was short and it scared the Bejesus out of me but it helped me on night writing. That's how you know just mountain biking in general. I think seeing my friends do it. And no one was really into a ton of road routing back then I was like in the mid nineties There were road rides. That were happened. Races were happened but they're away. More Mountain bike races happening. And then you started winning about West Virginia and what's Your Genomic series and I started participating in those races back in the early two thousands. And then it's like okay. There's this whole world here of mountain bike races and trails and this is fun so that's where the addiction to mountain biking came in. And I know I've talked to a few people who exercise outdoors and end up in the mountains around the trails and there really is something about not having to worry about cars and people buzzing you as you mentioned the misty mornings. Sometimes you're focusing on the training. Sometimes you're just focusing and going while look what. I just saw right exactly. I don't know it's just a voice. So yeah anytime I'm in the woods and through the trees and you're pedaling that ribbon of single track and you're flowing with it and with today's bikes. It's way more fun because you remember twenty years ago Bikes Way Different. V brakes and none of this disc brakes hydraulic stuff. Going on so yeah only world and I used to say I don't need disc brakes hydraulic brakes. I don't need front suspension. I still have a hard tail but hydraulic brakes in front suspension or now a requirement for me. Yeah absolutely. I don't need a hotel. I've never ridden a full suspension. And Yeah I've just like the simplicity of maintenance wise. That's why I only have a few bikes because I don't have time to spend a lot of time in meetings which all my friends knew so along with me you can add to. I told the Lane during our interview with her that I blamed her for spending a lot of money and on bikes because she and her ex husband started Derek. I'm curious though you drop down the rabbit hole of doing mountain bike races. Doing twenty four hour races just being in the mountains. What was it that made you kind of turn the corner and say okay. I'm going to start coaching too. Because that's a big step upwards or changed just saying I'm going to get on my bike and ride a lot. Well it all started when I put a Hari Monitor on in the early two thousands and I became fascinated with heart rates and then over the next six seven years. I started learning that there were a lot of people out there but didn't know how to interpret a heart rates how to use them and they weren't using the right information so that drove me into wanting to learn more on the street side of things and I think it was like two thousand six I got sort of a personal trainer author the sea. And at the same time I met a friend and he was like you need to get your because that can teach you a lot of science and so then the next few years I I pursued that and it wasn't until after that I then said okay. Now what am I gonNa do with this because you know you can maybe go into Footba? Can maybe go into hockey. I love hockey but I was like. I'm so in the cycling. I should stick with cycling and then when I started seeing the cycling community I was like Wow I'm strength. Conditioning coach and I can be a cycling coach. And then that's when all the heart rate in the power info and as we talked earlier iphones and technology and then it just blew up and then all of a sudden now have all this data studying came fascinating and that's pretty much my quick

Hockey Road Cycling Mike Schultz West Virginia Footba Meyer Derek
React Stack with Tejas Kumar

Software Engineering Daily

09:23 min | 8 months ago

React Stack with Tejas Kumar

"Task are welcome Software Engineering Daily. A happy to be here. I want to start by getting some historical perspective. Over the last six seven years of react react came out and it was just a view layer and we could still describe it that way but it has had downstream impact on the rest of web development. What have been the downstream impacts of react so? Laurie Voss did a really great talk. Ajay's concert last year where he kind of shared a lot of insights based on NPR data and one statement he made was really profound. He said react has dominated the web right. That's a downstream effect. If I understand the question correctly I think the biggest effect in really the most profound is that react brought this lack simple yet. Extremely clever component model to the web which was desperately missing at the time. I mean you think of Jay Corey prototype script Oculus all the stuff that came before and there was coupling in it was very hard to re factor like a large scale application you move backbone and Marionette back in the day I'm an react. Just brought this component model that now people have adopted even angular view and I think that honestly is the biggest effect that react his hat in the web industry. I think of the react ecosystem as a demarcation point in post rails web development and that's not entirely fair description obviously because rails is a fully fledged framework for building a web application. React is just a front end. That sort of PAT. All these downstream impacts but the fact that it's open ended that has really let the web take a different direction than the rails ecosystem. Do you have any perspective on how that open ended nature of react rather than the out of the box experience of rails? How has that affected web development? Well I can tell you. How has it affected me as a web developer and and many if not all of my peers right and this is not just my peers. Who Work with react but my peers work with angular and other kind of I don't WanNa call them frameworks although angular is a framework. But you get the idea is that the open ended. Nece is has kind of been applauded by everyone as being this thing that cultivates community because of the open ended -ness of react. We see things like react router. We see things like emotion very popular C S J slavery even. I've made a few libraries just to solve some problems that are not reacts to solve and so it kind of gives an opportunity to other developers and say this is an amazing project. I'm as an ecosystem and I'd like to contribute to it and I don't need to contribute to. The core can still contribute by virtue of like a library or something I also think in keeping it open ended react his really modeled a fundamental principle of software engineering. That I really appreciate. Which is the single responsibility principle because react like from? The get-go was just meant to solve one problem. Solve It really well. I don't think I I you know I may be wrong here Jordan walk might correct me you know I. I don't think it was intended to be created to solve all the problems like authentication like routing but not solve one problem and solve it really well and it does you know. And the other the other problems it's plug -able and modular things that hooks where we can chime in but it does what it does and it doesn't well so. I think that is something that has also influenced the way I along with my friends create software as we usually will now create these units. That do their job and their job. Well in an integrate them whereas in prior times that was wild West Cowboy Lynn j there are react centered frameworks what role the react based framework serve. That's I love this question because my website my personal website and my blog is built using a react framework by some friends. I really respect and appreciate the people over at site. So my friend Guillermo and Tim Newton's Nikon's create next year and it's you know it's this framework right. That religious solves whole bunch of things that I know how to do but I don't really want to do them so I don't want to configure what pack I don't want to set up a routing structure. I don't want to set up service rendering. Like how cool would it be if I could create a new project? Create a pages folder and put my pages in there and then it magically becomes either static website or server entered thing based on the content. The free does and I think that's amazing because like I could build actually started working on a website for my mother-in-law right and it's just I create a new folder pages. Put some stuff in there and it's just I don't even have to run like next. Dev even I just type in next in the terminal and I spin up a local depth server magic. It's so magically so I think to answer your question I think these frameworks really bring the magic and they do something that really would react. Tries to do and does well and succeeds. Mike React tries to abstract the dumb and Web API is away from people so the original components and then react. Does the rest react? Renders it to the dom react gifts and all that Jazz? So you can essentially focus on the product. You WanNa Bill. You don't have to think about dummy P. is you don't have to think about events you don't have to think about updating certain parts of your APP you don't have to think about optimizing them and I think frameworks take that approach and follow it to say. Hey you can focus on building your product. You need to think about DEB tooling. You don't need to think about serving rendering. You don't even need to make the decision if this should be static rendered or server entered like all that's handled you can create your great thing that you want to create right and I think that's what they solve right. So you've touched on two sides of the development process that they help with the getting started boilerplate side of things as well as the scale ability side of things and I think the boilerplate side of things is if I was a react developer when react I came out or I'm a new web developer. When react I came out I tear? That react is is the thing to do. But I don't know enough about web development to really piece together. What should my back NBA. I mean people tell me node but you know I don't know and you know on on the later. Stage side of things. React helps with scale ability issues which might be manifested in the server side rendering question like where am I rent winning my rendering my pages? Can you dive a little bit deeper into each of those things so you have on the one side the beginner the I'm just starting a new application boilerplate side of things and then on the other end you have the I'm a later? Stage REACT application. I need to figure out how to skim application and you think about service. I'd rendering take me through each of those sides of the Development Process. And how the frameworks help with that sure. Yeah so when you you know. I actually mentor a ton of people on twitter. We'll talk over. Dmz kind of figure out the best way to do things or at least the best way that I can see that we can see together and you know if you're a beginner and you hear react to things. How do I do it? You pretty much go on Dev dot to or you know medium and go heya. How do you search for a blog post and follow it or actually? This happened as well. A friend of mine just found like get hub repo that was like a starter kit and didn't just cloned it or use create reactive which I don't know if create react qualifies as a framework but it is a boilerplate right and they do that you start it and then you can just create kaput and then it's a matter of following the react docks creating opponents and so on and I think the frameworks really compete in in a sense if you know what I mean with with create. React Africa's frameworks. Do what create react. App does but more so I think in terms of the boilerplate stuff. I don't see that much value from frameworks. I think the bigger value comes from the later stage stuff. Which you know if if you've even if you're a beginner and you've built something you have a boilerplate is working on it starts to get traction and some of these huge and you're seeing millions billions of hits. How do we handle the scale? And that's where the frameworks really shine particularly next gs because when you couple it with and this isn't like a paid placement or anything. I just have a deep respect for these products when you couple it with now which is lights. Cloud solution it literally. You don't have to care about scale. I don't have to carry like my website is built this way. I don't care about scale at all. Like if when I hit thousands when I hit millions like it just horizontally scales for the static stuff it uses a CDN and places static assets on edge nodes and for the server side stuff it. I don't even know what it does really but I trust it and it works and all that to say that the frameworks they take this complexity away from me so I can just focus on creating content. That my friends appreciate.

Mike React Web Developer Laurie Voss Ajay NPR NBA Jay Corey Nece Africa Twitter Nikon Jordan Lynn J Developer Guillermo Tim Newton
Interview with Anya Taylor-Joy from 'Emma'

Popcorn with Peter Travers

07:39 min | 8 months ago

Interview with Anya Taylor-Joy from 'Emma'

"You were mentioning before about being eight years old and not doing one thing but your background is really interesting and unique. It's complicated right. Yeah you're like raised in Argentina. Born in Miami yes move to Argentina. Yes then go to London but before you got to London. You didn't speak any English. No so explain that. Let me in the states because my youngest to siblings isn't the ones closest to me. They were born in the states and they didn't want me to not have the passport because that would have been traveling with six kids one of them. Having a different passport was just like a nightmare so they didn't want to do that but pretty much instantly. After I was born I went over to Argentina where I spoke got these I know for the whole of my life and then we moved to England when the political situation got quite frightening and then I refuse to learn English because I wanted to go home and in my six seven year old fray. Now's like if I can't speak the same language as these people may be like. My parents are definitely going to take me home So that didn't work out and I was very lonely so I learnt so I know talking to you needed to make friends so I started I actually learned to speak English by reading the Harry Potter books. So now you're in London. Where does it come to you that you say you know which is also a Russian name by the way? Yeah so in this study. I do want to clarify so I in America people find it very hard to say my name. It's and yet. I'd say like aneurysm. I'm trying to find a nice. So it's on. Yeah yeah it's everybody at home. There will be a quiz. I've been so anxious about correcting people in eventually. I'm like that's not my name. I'm not going to respond to you unless I'm yeah prevent. Yes so it will be for me forever way. That's where it's going to be but what happens I head? Did you started acting? Did you start with modeling? What was the first thing you did? I can't ever remember performing being something that I became aware of. I was just always doing it and then got started watching genuinely and when I started watching like nine thousand nine hundred kids classics that had animals in them. I was like I wanna be the kid the rights the whale like. That's a job and I want that job. Like this is unbelievable Kirsten Dunst Jumanji. I just I wanted to be part of all of those adventures and then I got scouted for modeling which was never something I thought I could do but I did think it was an in to acting and then on a photo shoot. I recited some poetry to an actor. He put me in touch with his agent. And then the witch see. That's all you need to do. People is recites poetry. No I had I had read somewhere which is probably Apocryphal. And maybe it didn't happen but that you felt when you were discovered to be modeled you were being stalked by the why it was terrifying. I was wearing high heels I had a party the next day and I'd never worn heels before and so I was working moms high heels and I was walking with my dog and this car kept sort of edging around me and I would pick up my pace and the car would pick up pace so eventually I picked up my dog and I just liked it because I was terrified and this guy stuck his head out the window went. If you stop. You won't regret it. An idiot stopped. I have no idea like if anybody tell me that scenario. I'm like no if you keep running like that's what you do. Yeah but it was. It was the head of storm. Model Management Are Ducasse. And she was like a never stop again and be coming to see me at the agency tomorrow. 'cause 'cause we thank you have a future with never stuff again but be this is a good piece is good wounded. Yeah it's a good thing to say if anybody is being followed by a car. Please don't stop running because I'm definitely. I'm definitely the anomaly in this situation. Everybody else run run the way that was put. You won't regret regret that I didn't. So wow that takes me back to your m night. Challah movies where you could wind up captive by psycho not changed back. Well he isn't. He's a lovely man. So you do stopping and you get this job. Yeah it was. It was unbelievable and honestly going back to sort of my upbringing and the way that I still am. Transient you know. I'm pretty nomadic. But the first day that I stepped onto the set of the witch was the first day I ever really felt like I belonged anywhere like I just felt this feeling of I'm here. I'm where I'm supposed to be and the people around me. We're all speaking the same language and we're interested in the same stuff that I was into and I just I. I grew my first family there. And we're GonNa make a movie together again Starting in March and I just can't wait to go home. I heard about that. That's going to be no no. This is the north men over what's happening with Knows fraud is not. We have another movie to make. I I this vacation I keep seeing for us never going to happen. I don't know I'm yeah. I keep their random moments. I'm just like I need a break and then I'm just like I know you're doing everything you've ever wanted to do. Just get extra night's sleep and wake up and keep going. How old is your family? Relate to what you're doing. Are they all happy for you? They're all very all of my siblings. I have no idea what I do. They're just like okay. Did you have fun cool? And then just sort of quit but my parents are very very proud of me but they should be look at all. This is happening thanks. You know and you did a movie that I totally loved called thoroughbreds. Thank you well. It was really amazed you and Olivia Cook. She seemed more disturbed initially and then as we go along we see you not being afraid at all playing somebody who might have jobs some peculiar abilities but this is this is what I find very interesting between characters like lily and Emma because my way into the characters so different for each of them when I was playing lily I defended her every single day on set so members of the crew would come up to me and go lily such a bad person and I would react as if they told me that they hated my sister. Something I was just like. You can't speak about her that way. You have no idea what she's coming from she's going through a really hard time Blah Blah Blah Blah Blah and then the movie ended and it was almost like this veil was lifted from from my eyes. And I was like. I am praying psychopath for like a month and Oh that was tough. I couldn't keep any of her jewelry. I had to take it all off at the time I had to defend her and with Emma. We are both so I was so close to her. Initially but that didn't mean that there weren't days that I showed up on set and I was like I really don't like I'm I'm as behaving terribly. She's being brought. I don't WanNa do this. Don't WanNa be doing right now but it helped in the scene. I guess

Argentina London Emma Kirsten Dunst Jumanji Miami Harry Potter America England Fraud Olivia Cook Lily
Flash Briefings & Voice Games with Adrian Simple

Inside VOICE

09:10 min | 8 months ago

Flash Briefings & Voice Games with Adrian Simple

"So you are the creator of Gaming Observer which is one of the number one flash briefing that is currently ranked number one in the US and the UK. I love it. When did you start? It started a year and a half ago July of two thousand eighteen. So tell me this story. How did this happen so I assume you're a Gamer yourself? Oh Yeah. I'm a lifelong Gamer. So I've been playing games my whole life. I've always had a controller in my hand but essentially back a year and a half ago a friend told me about Alexa and that was kind of first time discovering that ecosystem and she said. Hey there's a singled flash briefings. It's really cool. I was like that's interesting so I did a little search in the AMAZON FLASH BRIEFING SECTION FOR VIDEO Games. Because that's what I'm interested in and there wasn't really anything there. There was the major the major news. Networks out there but they weren't they didn't seem like it was very popular and whatever. I said I have a microphone. I can do this and so I did it. And now here we are so we'll tell us what the flash briefing daily are you giving advice education. What is it about every Monday to Friday? I cover all of the news that I can on that day. So if a whole bunch of things happen on a Monday and Tuesday morning people get the news from that previous day. It's about three to five minutes long. It's it's on the longer side for flash briefings but cover three to four stories. Whatever the most interesting things that happened on the previous day and then you know that's kind of what I'm most mostly doing and what I'm most known for on Saturdays. I have listener interaction day so I have people right in. I'll ask a question and people right in and saying their experiences with whatever's related to that question and I'll feature their answers on the show and then on Sunday. I usually do some kind of special so sometimes. I'll just talk about the games that I'm playing sometimes. I'll cover one new story superintendent. Because it's interesting you know just kind of a variety grab bag and yeah that format has really worked for me and so how did you market that? How did you get so many followers? Did you just put it in people's founded on Amazon or what? It's really interesting because it's all organic growth so I get about ten thousand listens a week now at this point and I think that's that's pretty crazy to hear about that. I haven't done any marketing or I haven't gone on other podcasts. All on his tweet essentially and meet the people that are all here. Are Project Voice But Yeah essentially I just I did my best with the key words in the title and then people you know when they searched gaming or video games or gaming news or any combination of gaming related news. I show up and now I've gotten to a point where compared to the other people who are covering gaming news. I'm I'm way far and above in terms of reviews and all that stuff so it's really just been kind of snowballing. Now that's what's I personally don't know anything about gaming so tell me what are what kind of games are you playing. What are the Popular Games? Are you talking about things that online talking about Voice Games? What type of things agent mostly mainstream gaming so like your xbox playstation and it's mostly as well industry news. So they're saying hey. We're delaying this game or where. We acquired a new company. And you know we're GONNA make games that company that usually makes games is now going to come work for us or if a game had just come out like grand theft auto or a racing game or something like that and there's all these reviews coming out than I'll say okay. Hey this game came out. Here's what people are saying about it. And hopefully in the future these companies will want to send me a copy of the game and then I can say hey. Here's what I think about it but yeah so i. I mostly just covering whatever's happened in that previous day. And is there one that you play specifically you like allow There's like I kind of go through cycles. I try to play at least one new game at a time. So I'll play through game and I'll try and finisher and then I move on to another one just so that there's always something But then there are types of games are meant to be played over and over there usually called rogue lakes and essentially. It's like you know you play the game once and then if you die in the game you start over from the beginning and its randomly generated usually every single time so it's a unique experience. I play a lot of those games so usually I have one or two rogue likes going on at the same time as me playing like a narrative story driven game. Oh specifically like right now. I'm playing a game called Orient. The blind forest. It's very artistic. Very unique to wonderful game and then in terms of rogue likes traditionally. There's a game called the binding of Isaac which I have eight hundred hours in It's it's quite crazy and I'm really big on a card game right now called. Slay the spire. So I'm kind of just all over the place I love it so now. You're twenty one years old school. Did I read in School for acting for theater? Technically well? Eight is technical theaters on behind the scenes doing all the lighting and the sound and management and stuff like that and so is the goal here. Okay I'm GonNa Finish School and I WANNA get into that theater space or do you see yourself kind of becoming this. Kind of newscaster within gaming designing gaining. What's kind of the thought that you have at this point now that you've developed this flash briefing? Yeah Yeah So. It's funny because before I started the FLASH BRIEFING IN THIS THEATER WORLD I. I had worked in theaters since I was a teenager right so I I've been in theater for five six seven years. Something like that and I decided to go. The university route academic approach. And I maybe WANNA go down the teaching roots at some point so I was really in that world and this flash briefing like super took off and of course video games have been a part of my whole life and theatre has been a part of my teenage life so now. I'm really interested in okay once I graduate from this program because I still do want the degree it's valuable. Can I take this flash briefing and turn it into something of job whether that's whether that is taking the the show itself and like going the patron roots or the sponsor route or the opportunities? That will come out of that right of being a broadcaster for three years every single day. So there's there's a lot of different ways it can go and if you know if something happens where the show just has to end for whatever reason It would have been a really great experience and then I'm probably just going to go teach English overseas a second language because I want to travel sorts of things. So what? You've been doing this for a while. What has kind of come out of it. That maybe you didn't expect it. The the craziest thing that comes out of the flash briefing at least for me is that I get. Is the stories like listener. I have fifteen hundred listeners. A day shy actually more than that because of Christmas about people listening every single day in ways that I never expected and so I get these stories sometimes from listeners. Who are extremely heartwarming. I HAVE ONE. There was a father who message me who said. I used to play video games. I don't anymore but my son is really into video games and I came across your show and now I listen every day and I'm intouch and it has helped me connect with my son. I'm like what like where did that. Come from I had I had. I had a teacher who teach teach to a game design class and she said I play your show at the start of every class. You know early on when I originally started. It was in like like late. Two thousand eighteen before anybody found me. there was one lady who said. Hey I suffer from morning depression every morning. And your show me like a routine to kind of escape from that every single day and I saved that email and I haven't heard from her longtime tried emailing or be like are you still here. And she hasn't responded and makes me sad but that email was like so like. Oh my God and so now I get. I get emails tweets. I got all kinds of messages constantly like every week. I got something I and not has been really surprised and I think that shows that you know this voice. Technology isn't just about creating the next greatest thing it it still is about human connection still about. How do I help someone? And you're helping people in different ways. Yeah totally and that's like the earlier project voice talking about flash briefings and my core concept. I'm focused on the listener and the listener is doing. And we're here at the conference and it's a lot of. How are we going to revolutionize the tech industry? How are we going to? You know grow businesses and it's weird for me because I'm like literally my day to day is go to school. Come home and talk about video games through a microphone and now I'm here and we're talking about. Let's change the world right and so my scope is so much more narrow and a lot of the people here and I think that's kind of a unique experience that I've had yes. I am a human connector as well so I am the same way and I'm fascinated by. How voice can take us in a way to meet other humans in a different way a different approach to it all. Do you see yourself creating voice skillet all that kind of extends from the Gaming Observer. Yeah it's it's it's hard for me because there's so many like I don't know where I would take it. You know. I found success in the news route. I don't know what a secondary skill would really do for me. It is obvious Amazon. Hasn't supported flash briefings for quite a long time and so I could hypothetically see a future where they say. Hey we're not going to support flash briefings anymore. We're GONNA take that future out right. Let's say that happens then. I would make a skill. That's pretty much the same thing because now you can put skills and routines and it can operate the same way and I have a skill sort of in that sector but when it comes to like extending the experience. I'm I'm not so interested in that because you know people I guess there's possibilities but when it comes to like actually actively doing something right now. It's not in my purview.

Gaming Observer Amazon Alexa Isaac United States Superintendent UK Theft
From the LGBTQ Vault: Sylvia Rivera & Marsha P. Johnson

Making Gay History

10:24 min | 10 months ago

From the LGBTQ Vault: Sylvia Rivera & Marsha P. Johnson

"Sixth season of our podcast is focused on LGBT activism in the Post stonewall seventies two of the most prominent trans activists to emerge out of that period were Sylvia Rivera and Marsha p Johnson in one thousand nine hundred seventy the year after the stonewall uprising in New York City's Greenwich Village. The two friends founded street transvestite action revolutionaries or star and set up a barebones refuge in a run down apartment building on the lower east side in Manhattan for street kids much like themselves. They called it star House. In December Nineteen Seventy Liza Cowan and twenty year old reporter for Wbai radio conducted. What we believe is the oldest recorded interview with Sylvia Marsha and other members of star? She is a reel to reel tape recorder and set out to do a story on what was then known as crossdressing. Eventually a single reel containing an edited version of the interview found. Its way into the basement of the lesbian. Her story archives in Brooklyn New York. And that's where making gay histories self-described Archive Rat Brian. Free founded in the spring of two thousand nineteen before we share some of that incredibly rare tape with you. I thought I'd ask Brian about his experience of discovering this long lost interview. And how did you find this tape. Where were you what were you doing so I was looking for audio for the fifth season of making a history for our stonewall season listen and my mission was to find archival audio tapes that were made around nineteen sixty eight to nineteen seventy-one so I went to the LGBT center archives? I went to the New York Public Library and I went to the lesbian. Her story archives in the basement of Lesbian Her story archives. I was going through all of their cassettes for WBAI shows. I didn't find anything thing that reached back that was applicable to what we were looking for but out of the corner of my eye in the basement I saw a box of open. Reel you've you. Which is an older style of audio? Recording then cassettes would be. So what is can you describe. What Open Reel Recording is is you see in the movies or in photographs an actual real of tape. Yes these are the big reels. These are like three inch five inch the seven inch ten inch and I didn't know what was in this box when I saw it but I went upstairs to the volunteer archivist. I Rachel Gordon and I asked her if I could go through it and right there in the middle of the box. I pulled out this recording that was labeled star. I was afraid to open at because some of these tapes. They're so fragile when they're fifty Sixty seventy years old. They are so fragile that you can destroy them and I know how difficult it is to get archival material surrounding star. Yeah so what did you when you saw this. Besides being afraid that you would you could possibly damage the tape I mean it's almost like finding the holy we grow. You know you WANNA listen to it immediately when you find a tape like that and you can't why couldn't you just play it. Well for one there are some tapes that as you play. They will erase when they're fifty years old. So you will listen to it but nobody else will. So if you WANNA have a tape digitize like that what do you do. We took the tape to a studio in Harlem called Old Swan Studios that specializes in this type of digitisation. I took so much care when I took it out of that building I I was so afraid of damaging it it was like I had ten thousand dollars in my backpack and couldn't let anyone near it so I arrived at Swansea in Harlem and Robert. The sound engineer started rewinding the tape and when he did every single manual edit snapped. Oh my so. This is an edited. This was an that was done. That was then edited. And and and how do they edit tape. Well they had to take it physically and slice it and then with adhesive give glue at packed together so each and every time it hit one of these physical edits it would snap which for me was terrifying. But for him was just run of the mill he would just take the two ends reapply adhesive and keep rewinding it once he rebounded. What did he do next? Well he was kind enough to let me sit in the studio and listen to it as he played it for the first time and I knew I was listening to something very special. What made it special special for me? Because they're not just talking about the organization that they created they're also talking about their lives and they're talking about how they see the world around them and how they see gender. It's very personal. They're not altering the same line. What did you take away from hearing that recording? I think it reminded me of how young everyone was. Then I think the March Johnson and Sylvia Rivera that I've grown accustomed to. They were older by at the time. the film that I've seen of them the video that I've seen of them the recordings that I've listened to from them. They had more time under their belt. And this it was it was like they were freshly ride in New York and just letting it all about the quality of tape. You're about to hear in this remarkable and far-ranging conversation is a bit uneven. In addition to a snippet of Jefferson an airplane. You'll also notice hissing in the background. During part of the discussion anyone who has ever lived in an Old New York City apartment will recognize that sound. It's coming coming from faulty valve of esteem heat radiator. The first person to speak is nineteen year old Sylvia Rivera. The second is someone named Victor and the third is Marcia Johnson who was twenty five at the time before my mother passed away three years my mother used to Jesmyn Golf Clubs and my mother. My grandmother kept on one little blouses and girls stocks of about six seven years old. Before if I wouldn't start addressing boys 'cause during that period that's when I discovered my homosexuality was like you know watching television and placed in myself and the role of the female or just pricing myself As another there's another boy in the Mail on demand was praying such a fantastic love role in the television. And and when I left home at eleven was really when I went into transparent system and make hustling speech and the game against experiences. DIFFERENT THAN SYLVIA'S I. I didn't know secretly because My mother would catch me. She would forbid it. And by the time I was five years old I knew enough that Do these things secretly So I used to and no one was around to put on a and wear women's clothes close. I can get my hands on but otherwise I grew up quite masculine. I went to school. I played baseball. I went to college so and the beard and was the revolutionary did time in jail for Pacifist demonstrations and and Just recently I I decided what's You know why not wear the clothes. I prefer to wear what I was. I was the time I was living a masculine role that I didn't really prefer at least I didn't prefer to do it. Permanent preferred the times to be feminine And women's Lib people Feel that the women are forced to take certain roles which are unacceptable to them and they want to break out no. I've often felt the same way about being a man that I've been forced to take certain roles number one something as unimportant as the clothes I have to wear men's restrictions. Men's dress are much more severe than the restrictions on women's dress of men are forced to look a certain way and I didn't want to look that way then then of course there's a man has to be tough. He has to have responsibility to take care of people. You know suppose I wanted to be petted or I wanted to be taken care of. As I was growing up I met a lot of men. They never pale to me to my sexually. I used to try and keep away from because my hometown. You mistakes where you were out of it and they recall you all kinds of names And then when I first came in York seventeen years old that's when I started getting kind of invest breath more like a transvestite. I started out with makeup in nineteen sixty three nine thousand nine hundred sixty four And in one thousand nine hundred sixty five. I was coming out more and I was still wearing make up but I was still going to jail just wearing doing makeup in one thousand nine hundred sixty nine. I started wearing female attire full-time usually I wear dress every day of the week. I I just don't put on much makeup anything until after the dog because address too much attention if we make in the daytime they might think that I was a male. Al But if I were a little makeup they think I'm a female and he's right on I and if I will not make it night they automatically know female female they really can tell the difference about me because I'm on my way to be. SX teams

Sylvia Rivera New York City Marcia Johnson Sylvia Marsha New York Public Library Manhattan Greenwich Village Harlem Liza Cowan Brooklyn Rachel Gordon Old Swan Studios Marsha P Johnson Reporter Wbai Brian Baseball Sylvia York New York
The Thinking Behind the Book 'Home Coming'

VINTAGE Podcast

09:53 min | 1 year ago

The Thinking Behind the Book 'Home Coming'

"So homecoming is such an incredible book? And it's already having an incredible impact. I really enjoyed hearing all the different things and actually I listened to the audio book. I know that a lot of our listeners. Love audiobooks listening forecast. Say The audiobook. Because they're really interesting experience to hear the voices as well Tennyson it will a- and about your the thinking behind the book when when I can concept came into your head and what it was like an his first stages of planning a few years ago I wrote a memoir about growing gluten with my Jamaican parents called bad guy at the wheel. By guys. My father's nickname his Jamaican can. He had baggy is an all of his friends equally. Funny Nicknames that define them and they adhere to whether they liked the name or not so there was one man called old shine. Who was bowled? Like me anxious was very anxious. Tidy boosters very fussy but his footwear clock had one arm longer than the other. My favorite was manacled somewhere. And when somewhere came to this country from Jamaica in one thousand nine hundred system light summer suits tropical suits the matter. The weather weather come halo storm and when I thought about writing this book ask my mom. Whatever became of somewhere and she said well he caught a cold and died within a few months and I was shocked by that straightway which she spoke to sit in very matter of fact way had an edge to it but also it was quite a funny and I remember that when asked let's grapple loosened in the sixties all? The people were really really funny. There were like in my mind. CAST members of guys and dolls the Damon Runyon and they were all of my figures. We had no television until nineteen seventy two but they were television and what. I finished that Book Burger at the wheel about six seven years ago now I was wanted to continue it and away. The beginning of homecoming was a continuation of that story story but equally there were books. I read as a young man about Caribbean people in this country especially a book by Sam Cell Phone. Call the Lonely Londoners which is a book about a man called Moses who is kind of meet and greeter. So Kirby America's Dan to Waterloo station or Paddington and greets this carbon pioneers come off the boat train and equally. They have Wonderful characters wonderful names as a character. Awesome Galahad is rather light my car somewhere and when I finished up I wanted to myself. Well what would what would become of those people from the nineteen fifties and sixties if they were still alive today and what were their stories. What was the story of their great pioneer migration to prison? And although there have been books about that I don't think anyone's really interrogated the individual stories. And what you get with this book which is kind of oral history is a kind of an accumulation of similar stories and by that accumulation. You realize there was a bigger truth because sometimes when you hear stories you think that's just a one off when you hear again again again and you realize the experiences and I wanted to to have that kind of course onus in this kind of chorus line because right the way through But also the kind of gives you some of the shape and the contours of their lives from six to the present day and the people that you you chase to feed the book is e. Say An instruction that you you kind of chose intention eaten interview more women than men. 'cause you know those stories are represented. And and also more Chinese these people than Jamaican tell us parents Jamaican and three quarters of the migrants came from the Caribbean were Jamaican. But I right now. The Jamaicans take up too much room in the culture. The make too much noise have to credit opinion on themselves and they're over represented in our culture in terms of books books films music and sometimes they're kind of eclipsed some of the other islanders so I was very keen to address that so if that into more from Guyana kits and I was interested to find out why people ended up in certain parts of the country. So if you're from Saint Kitts you end up open leads. If you're from Saint Vincent in Hiwickum if it from Trinidad you end up in North Hampton and I think we want to these areas because they they were pay people were or their friends and associates broke. Equally is very keen to complicate the story because many of us will see those photographs photographs of the wind rush generation. The wind rush people coming off that ship. Ninety forty eight and the kind of I chronic now these men in Fidora's and zoot suits behind. You ever see any women in this girls but on that ship is often said from the beginning of that story. That now was that the five hundred Jamaican men. That's not true. There are other islands on that ship and the two hundred women on the ship including a woman called Mona. Baptiste's this wonderful jazz singer so I wanted to tell this story but also I wanted to use them to complicate the stories because the women were actually much more generous with their antidotes. Does that much more prepared to interrogate the interior lives and live longer but also in all honesty but I went to interview them. They're prepared to feed me saying that being you played this game I think three hours and the men wouldn't think to feed me and I'll be the on the floor gasping for water a little bit of bread but women would feed me straight away and actually what was interesting to me. I thought began to re revisit. Some of the stories. We're kind of finishing but some of the stores were not familiar. But I heard this story again and again from these elderly people who are now in the eighty s and ninety s had remind. I was on the antiques roadshow. And that what I was hearing were these jewels or this precious antiques. That not been added it for many many years. They've been stored away in cupboards in people's minds and never had a pap form and as an dustin down and reveal them to the reading public because to me they are wonderful rich funny cide. Moving polemical sometimes Philosophical stories that. Give a real sense of the panoply of of of of carbon life in this country. Because I think sometimes sometimes we have very reduced idea about the carribean presence in all honesty. If you look in terms of the archive in film and Television News Pretty Negative and right from the word go. It was pretty negative. People talk about the hostile environment. That Theresa May introduced in two thousand twelve but in my research it was not a new venture. She was very from the very beginning. And I. It's what I was interviewing a lot of these people who are in their eighties nineties to some of the archive of this month. Lockup in the British library the BBC See San Marcos in the BBC people around Archives let the deejay Don Letts had done lots of news twenty years ago. He's archive you've but also I would to my hometown is Brighton. Went to Sussex University where the Mass Observation Archive is held old and in nineteen thirty nine mass version which is so socialist research tool wanting to discover how people live. That was the whole idea of massive station Tau to working people live. What do they do with their money? How they use this time they still go to church too? They gamble. How do they make love but not at thirty? Nine maps vision decided to do a survey about black people. What did people in this country? Think about so-called Negroes in nineteen thirty nine and it wasn't very flattering it was pretty obnoxious really And I wanted to give a sense of what this carbon people who come into because in their minds I say this is true was everybody I spoke. They were a British. I'd even my mom for the book my Mom's from Jamaica and when she was growing up making the nineteen forties she knew how to fold the union flag flag. She could site keats. Shelley Wordsworth automatic pope's by Roach. She knew them all didn't need any book to repeat this poems and she told me that when she went to the cinema the reality cinema and Kingston in one thousand nine hundred dollars at the beginning of the screening of a film people. Stand up to sing the British national anthem and at the end of the screening people. Stand up to sting the British national anthem and I interviewed amount from Guyana. Who told me that when he came to this country went to the cinema and at the end of the film he stood up and such and he was amazing Nubia standing? He was really perplexed by that. So the sense of why they felt Brigitta. So what idea of Britain coming to see if they'd had it had access to these archives from from muscles version. They might have been a bit perturbed but what was interesting also. Is that the British. Sometimes they produce these booklets which they sent out to the Caribbean to give people an idea about what to expect. So there's one booklet produced by the BBC called going to Britain question. Mark as a small pamphlet is western some idea about Codes behavior so if I was to say to nineteen forties forties as an English person and you How do you do? What did you think MSA

BBC Caribbean Guyana Jamaica Britain Damon Runyon Tennyson Sussex University Theresa May Sam Cell Moses Saint Kitts Brighton Brigitta Fidora Kirby America Baptiste Waterloo Trinidad Mark
Tear Down This Wall: Tipping Points

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

04:48 min | 1 year ago

Tear Down This Wall: Tipping Points

"This first episode of a four part series marking the thirtieth anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall. We examine the conventional wisdom that the I cracks in it appeared a long way away in a ruinous war in Afghanistan malfunctioning nuclear plant in Ukraine. This is the foreign desk. It's partially about the Aghanistan. But it's partially more about the kind of discussions people are having about institutions inside which you weren't supposed to look so the military leterrier was one of those. The military was sacred military defeated the Nazis. The military was the defender of the Soviet order. And suddenly you have very public discussions about that was a little risque at the extensive research. Shaw it was a bizarre situation where Cold War was still going on and foreign governments the governments of the NATO countries that were warning me and people around me on how I should behave and protect ourselves in our own Goldman and I saw somebody. Reading is best German newspaper bid side and I said to my at my partner into Cau- aw look somebody reading side and it was really something extraordinary and immediately drove to British and really really it has become commonplace to compare the Soviet Union's invasion of Afghanistan John in one thousand nine hundred seventy nine to the United States long misadventure in Vietnam which had only ended for years beforehand. Both was exacted. A terrible ribble cost in lives and money abroad both undermined faith in government at home and both ended in humiliation but was the confrontation between the Red Army and Afghan Mujahideen armed with American weapons really as is often suggested the climactic battle of the Cold War. This was Leonard. Leonard Brezhnev's Soviet leader at the time when invading Afghanistan still seemed like a good idea. Would the party today strongly tastes the following principle fully words. I'm evaluates the unfolding situation and in consultation with the government of the Democratic Republic of Afghanistan Ghanistan the Soviet leadership taken the following decision which I am officially announcing today. Kalinowski is a professor first of Eastern European studies at the University of Amsterdam and the author of along good by the Soviet withdrawal from Afghanistan. Tamie picks up the story story in March nineteen seventy-nine there's an uprising in the city of Herat and the Afghanistan's socialist who are in power. Ask them to intervene. Intervene and the and the Soviets think about it and basically say no and if you look at why they say no. It's quite interesting. Because they are quite aware that it's GonNa make relations with the West more difficult it's GonNa make relations with the Soviet Union's allies in the developing world problematic. They're worried about as they put having to fight the Afghan population and so on so they actually reject the idea march. I think what happens. By December is that they lose hope of the the government in Kabul actually being able to control the situation without Soviet help the fact that the communists are sort of killing each other but I think what really worries them is that a CIA can take advantage of the broad background to that of course is they're looking at deteriorating relations relations with the US already they're looking at the revolution in Iran. They're thinking okay you know. The Americans are getting beaten in Iran. They're going to try to look for a way to compensate. They're they're going to do that in Afghanistan so basically I think what happens by December nineteen seventy-nine as they think they have no other choice unlike the US in Vietnam the USA in Afghanistan was not troubled by a free press asking questions but not even the USSR could hide everything forever. We've had this justification for the the last six seven years about why we're in there. We can't just pull out right. We have to explain to people buyer pulling out now. Was it doing damage to the Soviets. Sure they were losing people will and they were spending money on it. But proportional to how large the Soviet military is and the kind of resources that it's used to spending. It's actually fairly small. I I think the bigger issue for Gorbachev one is that it's not improving especially by nineteen eighty six eighty seven. He's convinced that it's not going to get better and to is that. He sees that is an obstacle to better relations with other countries with countries in the Middle East and awesome first and foremost of course the United States. And that's as big a

Afghanistan Afghan Mujahideen Soviet Union United States Democratic Republic Of Afghani Berlin Wall Leonard Brezhnev Gorbachev Aghanistan Ukraine Vietnam Iran Middle East Herat Nato Red Army Tamie Shaw University Of Amsterdam
Relatives say at least 9 Americans killed in Mexico, many of them kids

Red Eye Radio

08:03 min | 1 year ago

Relatives say at least 9 Americans killed in Mexico, many of them kids

"In the news today breaking news overnight the state read the story from Mexico at least three American women and six children from an American Mormon community based in northern Mexico have been killed in an ambush a relative of the victims said on Monday now you had was that the the newspaper el universal say at least twelve have been killed we're talking about children as young as six months old will be on the barren said his cousin was on her way to the airport when she was attacked and shot in her car along with her four children in an area and Tory is for drug traffickers and bandits of all kinds it was a massacre LeBaron said Libourne said his role is located the vehicle which had been set on fire with the bodies of the victims inside two other vehicles were found several hours later containing the bodies of two more women and two children at least five other children one of whom was shot and wounded managed to escape and walk home one girl was reported missing after having run into the woods to hide the state Attorney General so the number of victims still remains confused as I said we have reports of me that would make it nine Americans or were killed we've been told the number may be as high as twelve yeah this is a huge story you you see the number of deaths in Mexico that the number of murders in Mexico is on the rise and and in fact the first half of this year setting record numbers and obviously the cartel activity has ramped up greatly don't know what is driving that but it's clear right now that Americans are not safe in Mexico they're not I'm many will argue that they haven't been for quite some time are these this family apparently lived in Mexico S. is being reported and there are plenty of Americans that do that but beyond that you look at tourism and people traveling there on a regular basis I would have you know five six seven years ago have no problem taking a cruise getting off the boat going into Mexico I had a problem growing up on the southern border I really didn't have an issue with it until later years right now I wouldn't step one foot on on Mexican soil and it's because right now I think this unpredictable nature of I don't know if the turf war going on with the with the cartels or or what it might be but I think this story demonstrates how evil those people are we know that Mexican national police and military forces were dispatched to the border state of Sonora on a search operation following those of you know reports like we said nine it is what is being reported by a lot of the media out there with the with the el universal one of Mexico's largest newspapers quoted other relatives the same as many as twelve members of the Mormon family were killed in what appeared to be an organized crime ambush well and and that's it two I mean you ask yourself that a family come upon an area accidentally where there was something going down and and they were attacked or were they attacked out of the blue with a target you know where they targeted specifically because they were Americans were because they were in the wrong place at the wrong time there's a lot to be learned here before we know but there's no doubt that the the activity by the cartels the which has been going on for ages but really ramped up the murders in Mexico's really ramped up in twenty nineteen and right now on full display here I you're talking about children kill being slaughtered if these reports are accurate and true that's as evil as it gets and I don't know what you do about it I don't know what the they're clearly will be an answer from and and so far there has not been an official comment this morning yet from the state department but there likely will be this is from CBS twenty one in Arizona and their headline is U. S. women and children killed burned alive in Mexico ambush right the infirm we were twenty deck because some of the reports said the vehicles were set on fire yes it we did we weren't sure if that's before they were slaughtered or or if they were still alive but again this is horrific and you can bet that there will be a a response from the state department later this morning and you're there you're talking a family that this is a of a woman and a queen creek Arizona so the victims are her American relatives Leah's this woman by the name Leah Staten her sister in law cousin and nephews wife left the family's ranch in Sonora for a wedding with their children in tow my sister could actually see the smoke from her house and they heard the gunshots she says another family member saw one of the S. U. V. is that they had taken on the side of the road a few miles back few miles away from the ranch we just knew the vehicle was on fire and bullet holes all throughout it it was a good hour or so to get information that they were in it the four children they were all dead the other two cars disappeared my sister in law was in one with nine or for children and then my cousin was in one with her baby some of her relatives have recently talked about moving to the states because of the violence there things have happened with my family members being pulled over by the mafia guns pointed at their vehicle as for motive is that's one thing that you and I are asking the the woman who are the the relative in Arizona said she has no idea why anybody would want to harm innocent women and children we just can't believe that this is actually happening to our family it just seems like a bad dream Mexico officials say the area is remote which is slowing down the investigation we said even Mexican military have been sent for the the the search for an investigation as to what's what's going on so you look at that immediate area below the your supporter right there in Arizona that was going back to Jan brewer's time as governor of that state that was part of the battle is is that there were very dangerous people still are dangerous people the cross in to the US across the border and Arizona was looking to do something about that and of course the battle ensued between the legal battle between the Obama administration and and the state of Arizona and you look at the threat it's not anymore it's not just border states I'm talking about the threat that's right here at home by the cartels in their activity here if they're willing to do something in Mexico like this they're willing to do anything anywhere and the more that we that the left promotes open borders the more dangerous our country

Mexico Five Six Seven Years Six Months One Foot
"six seven years" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

04:07 min | 1 year ago

"six seven years" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

"And then I'd beat myself up for not doing it and even more str-. Yeah. Exactly. Exactly. So and then in the congress, and I was in congress for awhile, and then two thousand eight I was just getting to the point was thirty five, and I was kind of burn out, and I could not discipline myself to to meditate every day. No even been elected to congress been in congress. Now got elected a no three it was in the state Senate in two thousand one. So, you know, it was six seven years in running like crazy. And I just thought I'm not burnt out yet. But I'm like I'm feeling like I'm getting getting burnt out a little bit. And and so I wanted to jump start a meditation practice, so I found a a five day power of mindfulness retreat by John Cabot sin, and I did it. I was like screw it. I'm going, and it was right after the election in two thousand eight and I went, and it was no phone. No journaling, not V. No calling home. Mom, you know, like, you know, it was just you and a new in your mind, you know, and it just it blew the top off my head to really get some separation from my thoughts, and to know that there was some separation like I didn't have to own all this. Listen every stupid thought, you know. I mean, you had a choice, and you can like you. I just did your mind quieted down over three or four days. You started to notice all kinds of things in nature the the steam coming out of my coffee Cup of like, all my add. This does happen every day. It was like a fascinating little, you know, art project that was happening and. And I walked out of there convinced that this could transform our education system. This could this has to be you know, we were we really starting to get that's coming back from the Iraq war, Afghanistan war at that point. And I thought this got to be good for these vets coming back with all this trauma up since done a lot of work with bets trying to help and our healthcare system like how much our stress level make us sick. And and so that that was the Genesis of the book a mindful nation, and I went up to John cabins in after the after the retreat, and I was like this is like really powerfully like till like, you know, new guy. Right. New guy new guy to the program. I'm like, this is really powerful men whoever came up with his name power mindfulness retreat. Really gave it some thought because this is really. So and and and he said, well, I said we gotta get this in our schools, another in he said, I'll I'll introduce you. And so I started I started research, I met Richie Davidson up at the university of Wisconsin, Madison who's doing all kinds of research with Tabet monks. And how your brain out how it helps your brain, Linda, Lantieri and Goldie Hawn who were doing like some version of social emotional learning in mind up Goldie has a program called mind up, and you know, the the healthcare system and this how it's woven in like integrative health. Then I kept going on I met you. And then it just kept rolling along. What you think what you eat? Really? I mean, like talk about getting back to the fundamentals, right? What are you thinking about? And what are you eating? Well, it's powerful. And you know, we know the research is there I mean, Richie Davison, and my friend day Goeman and great book called altered traits, which is how to change your thoughts. And behavior and your mind in your structural aspects of your mind that influences everything so it it changed. Your your wellness, your productivity your happiness. A and you're right. It can be used in schools and prisons in the military. Yeah. Super powerful. I was I went to a prison in at state prison. Not far from my district in a couple of the prisoners. There had read my book. I mean talk about a surreal experience. So I go last couple of weeks ago. I went to the prison and I'm sitting down and it's called circle mountain..

congress Goldie Hawn John Cabot Senate Richie Davidson Richie Davison circle mountain Iraq Madison university of Wisconsin Afghanistan Goeman Linda Lantieri six seven years four days five day
"six seven years" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

02:20 min | 1 year ago

"six seven years" Discussed on KTOK

"What six seven years in the making winter finally came last night to winter fell. And it was an epic battle. The good news is we are not going to spoil anything because Stu knows nothing about this series. He's only watched three episodes. Now, he doesn't know who all of the characters are any of the characters are, and it was an odd dark experience for our friend stupor year here he is with his game of thrones updates. I'm big reveals in this one actually were some big things that happen. Okay. Some of these aren't I don't think they're spoilers. I'm pretty sure they're not. They're definitely our twenty five on my DVR for this episode proximity. Forty five minutes about opening title sequence. Long. It is it's incredible. I'm with you. So the fat guy is scared of battle fat guy from one of the houses that we place last week. There's a little kid warrior who is not afraid could be boy or girl. Not sure the angry elf is not afraid of the battle the wheelchair backstreet boy is being wheeled towards battle which seems like really misdirected bravery there. I don't that's a good idea. Really? Yeah. Everyone is quiet ready. There's a lot of troops. But it's really dark, and it's hard to tell. I am. I did not write the art of war. That's not me. However. The lining all of your troops in the most compact area possible seems like a bad strategy, which is what they did. It was a different strategy. It was one that. I I am not seen. I I will tell you have you ever seen a battlefield like this. Have you ever seen? Yeah. It was unbelievable. Unbelievable. It really was. It was it was impressive piece of of whatever it was. I mean television. It was it was it was amazing. It would have been it was that quality every major characters in the battle. But Jon snow and the blonde Queen lady are just walking watching for basically like a luxury box in my away. There's check it out. Think they're important, but they don't really it was kinda hard. You're like. I mean, if I were down on the ground. I'd be looking going may..

Stu Jon snow Forty five minutes six seven years
"six seven years" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

07:56 min | 1 year ago

"six seven years" Discussed on 600 WREC

"And incorrect information by your immune system at five six seven years old. So the story starts where where I knew my grandmother had cancer. And now how it started at that each? But it even and you know, when they when they looked into of course, she had cancer. But even went as far as being in grade school having child sitting next to me in class, and I told the teacher that the child had meningitis. Because the voice told me the child had meningitis and the teacher was like, well, I'm gonna call the parents in. So he did caught my parents in. We're all sitting there. And you know, the child's parents is is saying no he doesn't have meningitis. We don't know where to get it even heard of this everything like that. Anyway, the next morning the child him come back to school because he was in the hospital night long with one hundred five temperature meningitis. So it was it was always like this. You know, what he's fourteen was a stock boy in a grocery store, and I was building up my clientele. I was literally building up my clientele at that age. And I would know what was wrong with people. No matter where I was what I was doing because I would hear it perfectly clear, and you know, so it was always this every day in my life. It was never a day off. It was never an hour off. But it was information. There was always advanced just as advanced as it is now in the books about why someone has multiple sclerosis rheumatoid arthritis. Or husky motor styro- data. So where what what are the real causes? Because science research doesn't know the real cause of excellence rice is so all through my life. It was about hearing this voice perfectly clear. It was giving me fans information about medical, and, you know, about people what's happening with people medical knowledge that twenty thirty forty years ahead of science and research and still is and still is after all these decades. And the thing is a dedicated my life, if the little bit more about my story is dedicated my life, helping people the chronic wheel being a voice for them because they were told they were crazy or lazy or they really weren't sick because their doctor couldn't figure it out all through the eighties nineties all through the two thousand people, you know, I would be literally at nursing homes or be by my clients, bedside giving them b twelve drops. When people didn't even believe in be twelve I've been in it all along all. This time helping people recover giving them the answers thing needed. And I finally the waiting lists cut. So big the see me it got. So big was gotten into the millions that I had to put the books out. So that's what happened the book. You're reading is the first book I put out and that would because I couldn't do it anymore worth doing the one on one thousands of them over the years, and I had to put the information. Now, the medical information in the book, so I can help out millions of people and part of that the celery. Geez. Celery use. Yeah. Stop phasing work. So Anthony, I. Share a story that I don't think I've shared on the air ever, at least all of it. When I was fourteen. I walked by my mother in the kitchen, and I remember looking at her she had her hands in the sink, and I was walking down the hallway. And I heard a voice so loud that it made me stop. And it said stop go back. Give your mother hug tell her you love her. She won't be here long. And I much to my everlasting regret. I didn't. Because I thought that was crazy. Couple years later. I heard the same voice. Tell me the same thing about my grandfather. And it freaked me out when I was in high school couple immigrant father died. Couple years later. I heard the voice again, I was dating a girl, and she had no symptoms of anything. And I heard the voice again. And I thought for sure she was going to die. And and I and I remember thinking, I don't want this. I don't want this. And I went to only one friend, and I said, look, I've never told anybody this. But these three things this is the third time. This has happened in the first two people died, and I am freaking out. And as it turned out. She had a brain tumor in the center of her head. And she ended up living. But it I don't want this. I don't want it. I don't want it. I don't want it. I don't want it. This is a curse not a blessing. I don't want it. You have to have felt that way. Oh, yeah. So I've always felt it's been a curse. I mean. Really? I mean, it hasn't given me a normal life. And basically, it's just as forced me just to only do this work my whole life. You know, it's not about. And it was never about me. That's the thing. You know, someone said when did he start this yesterday? 'cause we're if someone hears about me today it'll be like when did he start this three years ago? He just he he must've taken a nutritional class. He must've gotten too interested in health, actually. No, it's always been this way. I've always been doing this work done thousands and thousands of people and and because I had no choice it. I didn't even want to do it at the beginning. I didn't. But in a spirit said to me, and I say spirit and his voice. I hear me that look you have to care about people. You have to have the compassion. You have to care about what they're going through what they're suffering is you have to get in touch with that you have to do something about it. So I've dedicated my whole life dealing. Something about it. And that's just been. So I've got push back down. Because I I I actually believe you. But I am skeptical because you know, I've met John Edwards. And I've you know, and everybody is seeing these phrases people claim all these things and they play on people. And I'm a guy who I've I've seen. I've spent I don't know. I don't know how many hundreds of thousands of dollars. I've spent on my health, and I have felt alienated and crazy and even to this day. I still think maybe I'm just making all of this up, and I have medical tests that do show me things, but nobody can really tie it all together. And so you you are at the end of your rope. And so when somebody like you comes along and says, no, I tell you this is what it is. You are preying on the most vulnerable. That's the way it can be looked looked at can you can you help with? Have you sorted through? This. Do you have? I don't even know some sort of a. Of kind of gun your arms around how you talk to people. Who are just like, look, I you know, I know how this looks you know, when they're not validated. When people aren't validated for their for their aches and pains mystery tangles, numbness years migraines, neck pain, back pain, burning feelings in their feet ATC floaters in the eyes dizziness balance problems vertigo issues it gives you know when you're not validated. And you're told that you're, you know, you're whatever's wrong with you get did just make making it up in your head or anything like that. Instead of like, it shouldn't be looked at that. I'm I'm I'm like preying on someone or anything like that. It's actually the opposite. I've been able to bring people stories forward if you look at my Instagram, medical, medium, Instagram pain. Have it wouldn't believe you wouldn't believe. Thousands of people's lives that are coming back. So if someone's picking.

meningitis neck pain Anthony John Edwards twenty thirty forty years five six seven years three years
"six seven years" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

03:44 min | 1 year ago

"six seven years" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Back with family financial focus here on WBZ ten thirty AM. I'm Joanie Siani, and Paula Larry Walter here. And before we get to questions just going back to what we were talking about during that first segment here when you're meeting with people, and again, you get very busy. And even though you get very busy. You still take the time with every person that comes in that you have a conversation with what are some of the questions? How does and we call this show family financial focus, but what are some of the other considerations? When you're thinking about retirement over the next five six seven years. What are some of the things that you ask about regarding the sandwich generation, your parents, and your kids are you and what exp- questions? In the first meeting has a lot to do like what I was explaining in the last segment is, you know, where are you? What is your total liquid net worth? Because that's obviously very important right start with that. Then where investments allocated now and what's going on with them. And then you're going to retire in five years. What is your source beat the assumption on how much income you're going to need on an annual basis at that time? Are you still going to have a mortgage many people go into retirement with a mortgage, many people do not it just depends, and what are the sources of your income? Sometimes it's just social security, sometimes if you have a spouse to social security's, and sometimes it's two social security's and a pension, and so whatever it might be. That's important information to have. And then just just thinking about well, how eloquent my money today if I'm going to retire in five years, do I have the right investments right now. So all that has really scrutinize every investment and try to look as much as we can to see what's what's going on right now. Now. And then the whole the whole idea is understanding what needs to be done with your liquid net worth your nest egg. Yeah. Should that be invested? It's not only for the next five years if five years from now, if you're age sixty five or sixty six you gotta assume another twenty thirty years of life. So that bucket of money, whatever it is if it's eight hundred thousand or it's one point two million whatever that is. That's not it's just not money until the day retired for the next twenty five thirty years. So you want to allocate properly understanding what you're trying to accomplish. It's no longer. I'm forty years old, and I'm going to invest to create wealth for my retirement that is what was in the pass. Ooh. Going forward. Now in the future. Is to maintain that wealth and maintain that well for financial independence were out your retirement years. So now the way you invest has to be different than you did prior. Okay. You keep the same investment philosophy. I'm gonna go for it. Like, I'm forty years old. You could be burnt with the market, you know, any time market Google down for many, different reasons as long as it goes up. So you just want to make sure your allocating a certain percentage, we saved many times in equities and then in bonds, you know, income-producing bonds and then principal protected accounts in no matter what's going on the markets. It's not all your money's. And stock you have a you have a percentage in stock in its allocated appropriately for what you're trying to accomplish. Okay. So, but I get that number down. And then look at how you can best. Right. But then there's a number a number of other key factors in everyone's life. Every. Family has situations. You know, there's no perfect family. Look at me. I have Paul. My. That.

Joanie Siani Paul Paula Larry Walter Google principal five years forty years twenty five thirty years five six seven years twenty thirty years
"six seven years" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

02:04 min | 1 year ago

"six seven years" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"And that's how it all came about. Which is amazing, and it's all turned out. But I know that making that transition was challenging that's mostly because you got a lot of resistance from some of the people in your life. So tell me. A little bit about what they were saying and how you have to push past. That's absolutely. I think it was. It was a transition time for me. Also, I went through this period. There. I was thinking is this the right decision working as a physician practicing for six seven years who get into that phase where you have a comfortable lifestyle. You have a good income. And then you hear about entrepreneurship there. It is lot of talent is coming about. But when I met with Doug, the passion for solving this problem, and it was still in healthcare. So it was so high, and then I spoke to some people they said if you have to do it you have to do it now. Your standard job Bill. Be like the golden handcuffs. You will want to do it. You have to get out of it. And make a decision talked a lot of people. And then at one point we decided, okay? This is the the people validated our onset before I dive into it. But I will tell people this is what we have Frank to do the actually like the simplest simplicity of the concept. And that made me further believe that. Yes. This is the right fine. And we started circle. Yeah. It's scary leaving an industry and a position that works that you're doing well, and that you're successful in -bility and security that comes along with it. And I think that can be the hardest firing entrepreneurs to leave that and deciding whether or not it's a good idea too. But I like what you said that you had very DEA validated. And I think that would be a really good starting point. For an entrepreneur is watching or listening and is twin brother or not they should leave their secure job at the moment. Start testing your idea of so so how did you test your idea? It was very Bill. It was not a very structured testing. So lots.

DEA Doug Frank six seven years
"six seven years" Discussed on The Dan Patrick Show

The Dan Patrick Show

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"six seven years" Discussed on The Dan Patrick Show

"Five six seven years ago it was a that was like a hardcore time a big blow yeah i was like dude don't throw that anymore seriously i don't like it and as soon as i came out of the box and i was going to wring his neck right now i think seeding would appreciate that more than he did at the time maybe not yes it it played out on the popular box score show right after that and you were in the back room ended up walking out in jumping in in the box score and you're upset by it and then we brought it up again the next day and kind of put the bed but we did talk about it on the the next day okay i had the clip if we could play later or maybe we it's not that good it really isn't that great okay i would plate of his good eye tensions were a little higher than you would have thought just because it was one bed five minutes stretch okay we don't pretty well with that right oh god yes we're we're five guys in the same exact room every day we have no infrastructure to leave this building like the places yeah i mean we get on each other sner vhs but i mean not all the time a lot less of these days than before yeah i feel like we've all grown up a little bit or something well i think when you get it out you guys had young kids and you know that that stress love you don't even know that you're wearing it sometimes but i could see that you guys were you're wearing told us not to have kids i i did i said you know it's either it's either me or your wife i mean you guys gotta make a decision it's funny now that i'm watching all these videos evanger throwing these stupid balls at my head i wonder if i actually have dodgeball ptsd high ptsd i've been blaming it on the pies but maybe it's just no spent the last ten year no stuff was definitely on the pa.

Five six seven years five minutes ten year
"six seven years" Discussed on BBC Let's Talk About Tech

BBC Let's Talk About Tech

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"six seven years" Discussed on BBC Let's Talk About Tech

"What was your route to sports because you university wants six seven years ago i i've been playing like striker's pretty much as long as i can remember i think the first game i played was quite catching when i was fourteen fifteen hundred at school and i had some some friends that also play counterstrike and we formed a team and then then getting to kinda university i met a bunch of guys that had never played a game in their life and they weren't gamers but they'd kind of got into on board the game was it was a it was at some some moba game and they loved it they can get enough before you knew it five six hours a day every day we were all in one room we will have laptops we will playing and then it kind of went from there costing playing competitions and then eventually running events and not finishing your degree no no fortunately a lot of little bits and pieces kind of took off and somewhat distracted me that's another another reason that you know providing better support and recognition we believe that i can't some degree how combat by kind of bringing attention and more support thumbing sent now it absolutely does because the positives that come with games there is also the negatives there are people there are now this is a growing consensus that there is an addiction to video games of that's possible in the way one could become addicted to gambling and to an enormous number of other things that's the other leg of it isn't it once you into the books system there is protocols there are protocols established for what you do when you see negative behavior it's again is that kind of positive pressure around being games play.

six seven years five six hours
"six seven years" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"six seven years" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

"Baller sharpdressed yeah yeah yeah scotch drinking did you like doing that loved i love that gig that was a great great gig good people right great work environment great people writing it great great woman directed it and i got to wear suits all the time i mean he was a real character but i think one of the fears that i had an i assume other people have when they sign up for a sitcom is that you wind up six seven years later being urkel being sort of the butt of the that want a sight gag that one i don't mean as a person i think jalil whites was super nice guy i mean you don't want to end up being the character on a sitcom where you walk in and everyone laughs at what you're wearing gary moment you don't want to be sure but of the joke you don't know if you're gonna if that's going to happen when you sign up to do the pilot don't even know if it's the pilot's going to get picked right intern barney was the opposite of that he looked great always had all these rules delusional awesome and also but like you dirty sort of weather that storm with the hauser really i mean a little bit sure i mean in and then like it seems that everybody in that show you weren't hampered at all by by the tv prison of it no i embraced it yeah i mean like you went onto to many other things is what i'm saying josh he makes his own movies he's around he stuff but the other thing i would imagine something like that is that i don't know how people make shit ton of money really find it within themselves to keep working.

jalil whites barney hauser josh Baller sharpdressed gary intern six seven years
"six seven years" Discussed on Sustainable World Radio- Ecology and Permaculture Podcast

Sustainable World Radio- Ecology and Permaculture Podcast

03:06 min | 3 years ago

"six seven years" Discussed on Sustainable World Radio- Ecology and Permaculture Podcast

"You know, six seven years old the two of us could could get the edge of one of the country tires and kind of tip it off the tractor platform as he drove slowdown through the field. Then he'd go along and put the the the electric fence stakes down in the little half inch pipes in those concrete stanchions, and that's how he built electric fence. So I've been a lot of places on the in the on the world, you know, and I always ask farmer audiences. Does anybody not have enough soil to hold up electric fence steaks? And so far all I mean, you're. Europe Australia New Zealand, you know, wherever Scandinavia where I've been nobody has said, we don't have enough soil to hold up electric fence stakes. It was a pretty gully. I mean, we had sixteen foot deep gullies just great big areas. You know, half an acre of just nothing but shale rock, I mean, not a weed not vegetation on anything. Just just down to two solid rock. It doesn't sound like a very fertile. A fertile the ginning Joel. Oh, no. It wasn't. You know, you know. What's what's interesting to me is that that that many of the, you know, kind of the I con's of sustainable farming. I mean, take Elliot Coleman there in the New England. Those of us who have done this buying large started on poor ground. We didn't start on really good ground. And and I think there's something about impoverished, an impoverished context that makes you extra creative because you know, for sure we couldn't afford it just truck in soil, right? And and so you you have to look at your at your circumstances in sit too. You know and say where do we go from here? And and it it indeed. I think makes you more creative than you would be if you were starting at a at a much higher level that makes total sense. You've got to. Try things out and see what worked. Well. Yeah. We we did a lot of things there early on. I mean, the first thing we did we steep steep real steep hillsides that were just you know, bearing and gully and we felt those out and got the cows off of them and got the animals off of them. And they of course, on some of them, we planted trees, others, squirrels planted trees, but you know, over the years, those very very steep hillsides. And when I say, very, I mean, you know, stuff with a. Whatever, you know, fifteen percent slope hillsides size that you wouldn't want to drive a machine on and and those those of all reforested now, and and and stabilized some of the deep gullies, we just would cut we would cut some branches and just carry them over and stick them with the butts facing downhill, and the the the feathery branches facing uphill to just create kind of a filter..

Joel Elliot Coleman Europe Australia New Zealand Scandinavia New England fifteen percent six seven years sixteen foot
"six seven years" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"six seven years" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"For all these past six seven years mark they couldn't get access merely because the republican politicians in their state were playing politics with their health care and refuse to expand oba obama care it refused to expand medicaid under obamacare thus denying doses and mark these people have been denied access to healthcare for years now have we heard from them have this has there been they couldn't get access merely because the republican politicians in their state were playing politics with their health care and refused to expand oba obama care it refused to expand medicaid under obamacare thus denying doses and mark these people have been denied access to healthcare for years now have we heard from them have this has there been i i look at kansas politics the news when i can i'm not aware of any sagebrush rebellion i haven't seen any revolution of poor people in kansas saying look could you've doug left and right and they don't fight back look look you know norma argued thinking that even in that state or any state health link often and absorb the blows and i think the republicans long ago learn a lesson and have been teaching it to us we just refuse to listen you can you can apparently abuse people left and right and they don't fight back look look you know norma august thinking that even in that state or any state health care costs are going to go up because of this oh they were up every but but the it's an assumption to say that people are gonna get mad about it and adds an assumption to say even is going gonna win i've learned about making predictions i've learned of just trying to share my expertise my i'm trying to learn a china share my bitter experience with your mark that's on to our auditors then peter leo martyrdom that really now but now i just i want you to invest too much certainty i don't want to invest too much certitude empathy look i've learned my lesson i thought hillary who's going to win i've learned about making predictions i've learned i'm just trying to share my expertise my i'm trying to learn a chinese share my bitter experience with you mark that's all under are you understand you don't normally when you saw.

kansas doug hillary norma august peter leo six seven years
"six seven years" Discussed on IoT inc

IoT inc

02:23 min | 3 years ago

"six seven years" Discussed on IoT inc

"And the increase in speed will be from algorithm algorithm changes yeah it will primarily be rahm improvements in the algorithms and different security trade apps that we make as we understand how these systems approach them all the learning that we've had over the last you now six seven years of studying the on studying bitcoin in all of its related systems so the new algorithms are going to be more efficient therefore requiring west computational horse power and that will then increase the transactions curve sakher she's the competition a harsh quarrel is related to the security model but we're we're going to do is we're gonna we're gonna involved and kate new gary asians on security model but will be slightly different but no less secure and in in sort of the ball a global sense of the word secure will different and because were changing these parameters we can go past okay so them it becomes more practical with the computing resources that we should apply to this particular crop yup absolutely it becomes a becomes in enormously more practical toil to dole to imagine these systems running at the scale all the payment processors or a large scale in a networks so where are we just to get some metrics where was the speed of the payment processors in you mentioned first generation was three to ten transactions where we now and then when we projected the be so there is flab at lee everything that is the establish systems are right bitcoin instrument three transactions were second a theory of is about an on beijing to establish systems winner added the world you have retired enterprise systems systems that not anyone can join our but beijing uh hundreds of thousands of transactions chris walker and rehab are testing would in changing of deployment or early stages of deployment this year we have seen the beginnings of getting the deployment of systems that can themselves do hundreds of thousands of transactions but are open to the public.

beijing kate dole chris walker six seven years
"six seven years" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"six seven years" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"Needs to meet your needs the portfolio needs um yeah your needs within the strategies gotta is kind of work with the strategy it's it's it's a whole it's it's like a whole i dunno dance kind of you know your present here's the strategy that works for this that we believe works for this particular individual or couple okay fine now what well we're going to have to get the instruments that drive that strategy to make it work so how do you pick that is not just a matter of you know look in going online or throwing darts at a dart board or or just you know picking what did great last year i mean that's just hours things to do is picking what the great last year can be yeah historically if you look at it that's it is one of the worst things but you know i've known people who put their strategies you know they say well i the strategy at that's pretty good okay kinda follows the buckets framework let's say well okay all right fine however you know whatever works for you what investments you you're gonna put into it all man i dunno i figured out i just look for foreign fivestar five right yes morningstar gives me good ratings which is heavily past historical performance absolutely but you need to look beyond that and so any way we're going to talk to mark steyn show here on this program next week next week can't wait can't wait okay seven seven plan and we were talking buckets here a moment ago on the strategy professor club and in a three buckets framework which is you know kind of your standard first bucket will get you the six seven years yeah which which is identified as your shortterm needs are right things that need to happen fairly quickly you certainly don't want anything in stocks bucket three on the other hand is anything sort of longterm years fifteen through whatever 20 25 in that particular area what you're doing with.

morningstar mark steyn professor six seven years
"six seven years" Discussed on Super Station 101

Super Station 101

02:48 min | 3 years ago

"six seven years" Discussed on Super Station 101

"No i have been asking people oh for the past five six seven years chu imagine america without free speech to imagine america without a first met met i i've been putting that in front of the american people now for a while i did when i was in congress and i have uh all the time on the radio these last number of years because i don't think it's too far fetched and a miracle without free speech and by the way if if we live in a country without free speech it wouldn't be america but can you imagine i want you to think about this this week can you imagine a country can you imagine this country without free speech the essence without the first amendment i don't think it's that farfetched i i'll tell you what a recurring theme on this show is that most americans today don't understand or don't believe in the principles this country was founded upon i believe that in my bones i believe that in my head and i believe it in my heart i believe it's so much i'm gonna say it again most americans today not just do bid young people matches stupid college students in high school students in these stupid millennials most americans today no longer understand or believe in the principles this country was founded upon i know that i believe that most at the polling data confirms that so it's not far fetched at all for me to believe that one day we are going to live in a country where it will be a crime to say something hateful bob blacks horta say something hateful about jews horta say something offensive about white people horta say something unbelievably mean about muslims it's not farfetched at all to me to believe that one day that could be the country we live in that could certainly be the country my grown adult children could live in oh i'm bringing in all of this up today this wednesday because look i know trump gave an unbelievably kick ass speech yesterday i am still so show like god just fired up about what trump did the.

america congress first amendment horta trump bob blacks one day five six seven years
"six seven years" Discussed on WBSM 1420

WBSM 1420

02:19 min | 3 years ago

"six seven years" Discussed on WBSM 1420

"Vp texas counties could get up to fifty inches of rain wow from the time like six seven years ago can wellesley where i live we got manages of gray cool what a mess mass five times that much not pleasant all right eight four four or five hundred forty two forty two eight four four five hundred forty two forty two joining us here is a bruce madmen for a ma myth com advertising agency and he's also the owner of bar one of the co owners one of the partners of a community broadcasters which has forty six radio stations and eight markets and boost we talk with about the media sometimes and boost one of the talk about the the the increasing influence of silicon valley on the socalled increasingly less so but still mass media as it's called and the jason i think it's named jason with like he's a he's a a columnist the sports called us he's the first guy i ice red mentioned this and i think he's on the something to hell on silicon valley's more influential in terms of the national media then new york city at which which was has been the dominant the dominant media though center for i no one hundred fifty two hundred years until the last ten years maybe when you start when you start looking at eyeballs first of all just as comparison meaning people that have actually experienced that uh medium and you compare a cnn for example or an msnbc who uh let's say yahoo uh we talking chump change on uh on the on the tv networks compared dry wit is experience on their numbers on the numbers numbers of for example yahoo in a month you know has five billion visits 5 billion visit it's which means enormous amount of frequency has any wanted your whoever covered a fire i mean i hate sewing animal fart permanent have they ever covered the county commissioners on a permanent but the legislature you know if you don't have saying anything there are like they're not they're not journal zero lasagna james they get drafted right out of high school they don't have to spend any time planning college yet with the.

advertising agency mass media silicon valley cnn msnbc yahoo Vp texas bruce jason new york one hundred fifty two hundred six seven years fifty inches ten years
"six seven years" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"six seven years" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"Without penalties to provide the income and i would also so provide a little bit more have more liquidity the necessary especially in the early years of retirement when you're just getting used to what retirement really is but you don't have to have six seven years worth of money in cash you don't need all of it the first year that you retire you need some of it that year you need some live with the next year so a little bit the following year so if we you know like when we look at buckets in general we have three main core buckets bucket investing here by going to reward for the money we're going to need to distribute over the next seven years bugging number two is the money we distribute years 1815 3 is a longterm you know more than fifteen year teimurazov with that doesn't mean that each individual bucket can't be further bucket ties within each bucket have a threeyear cd a fiveyear city as long as you have identified that you have enough time arising so that you can avoid any potential penalties for taken the money out early whether it be a cd or whether it be an annuity uh especially the longer once they have with a quote with substantial penalty for early withdrawals like is to render almost as there are surrender chart some of them have access specifically fixed the new these may have access to some amount of the money without a penalty but not all of it i mean they insurance company wants to know the bank wants to know that they've got their money long enough that they don't have to worry about pay you out anytime soon so that they can take the risk of putting it into something that may earn a veteran return that's what they're doing behind the scenes so the i think using some form of ladder structured product you're there so different things you could use would get you a little later you're right and and as you said that's done quite often because if you've got six seven years maybe in bucket number one and you left alone in a money market i mean you know the the problem would be that.

insurance company six seven years fifteen year seven years threeyear fiveyear
"six seven years" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"six seven years" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"The income and i would also provide a little bit more have more liquidity especially in the early years of retirement when you're just getting used to what retirement really is but you don't have to have six seven years worth of money in cash you don't need all of it the first year that you retire here you need some of it that year you need some of it the next year some of it the following year so if we you know like when we look at buckets in general we have three main core buckets bucket investing here but you never want is for the money we're going to need to distribute over the next seven years bugging number two is the money we distribute from years eight through fifteen and bug it three is the law longterm you know more than fifteen years time rise and but that doesn't mean that each individual bucket can't be further bucket ties within each bucket have a threeyear cd a fiveyear seedy as long as you have identified that you have enough time arising so that you can avoid any potential penalties for taking the money out early whether it be a cd or whether it be an annuity especially the longer once they have with a cool with substantial penalty for early withdrawal so i could surrender almost as there are surrendered chart some of them have access specifically fixed the new these may have access to some amount of the money without a penalty but not all of it i mean the insurance company wants to know the bank once the know that they've got their money long enough that they don't have to worry about pay you out anytime soon so that they can take the risk of putting it in the something that may or the veteran's return that's what they're doing behind the scenes so the i think using some form of ladder structured product you're there so different things you could use would get you a little later you're right and and as you said that's done quite often because if you've got six seven years maybe in bucket number one and you left it alone in a money market i mean you know the the problem would be that is not going to.

insurance company six seven years fifteen years seven years threeyear fiveyear
"six seven years" Discussed on MSNBC Morning Joe

MSNBC Morning Joe

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"six seven years" Discussed on MSNBC Morning Joe

"But yeah miki the promises for six seven years they promise that two thousand ten they've racked up the largest legislative run in legislative seats over the past six years in large part by promising to repeal obamacare they have to at least be able to go home and say we voted this is the vote look at this this is a bill i pass the repeal obama care for those stupid house members are those stupid senate members and i suspect that's what we're looking at more than anything that was silenced he was was jan what would you like to say what you're at happy to be here we're all as pre deserved mike you asked the question we went to break and it's a question me can i talked about i think we're very resilient country we're going to be fine after all this is over but you had asked a question will the country ever be the same again we're going through right now i think i can i hope so i don't know so we're creating seemingly permanent divisions were people of different races in different classes economic classes go to this separate coroner's and fight it out ideologically we watch for only what we want to watching tv we read only what we wanna read online it's a country seemingly separating itself from from ordinary daily life with survived so much in this country and prospered as a result and i've always felt that we endured through the year nineteen sixty eight a horrendous you that we can do almost everything but when you look at the at the daily output in the news media and you have public people origene wars against the media but we're not the enemy.

news media obama senate six seven years six years