36 Burst results for "Six Months"

Fresh update on "six months" discussed on Purity Products

Purity Products

00:31 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "six months" discussed on Purity Products

"You know it. I know it is. We get a little bit older. It's important that we take care of ourselves. So pick up the phone call toll free 1 804 160 to 60. That's 1 800 460 to 60. By the way, this offer is not available online or in stores. It's only available through this toll free number line set up for today's show. Call now say, 50% 1 804 160 to 61 804 160 to 60 now backto Mark Larsen Bill sorry with us on the program today for purity products and bill When you say guys can perform and feel strong, they never feel old. That's our world today. I gotta stay competitive in the game on All levels. I'm looking at this chart here. That purity sent me from the study. Some of the details here fascinating. 81% of men who supplemented with this performance blend for six weeks. Showed enhanced erectile function. That's 81% and again this is a supplement. So that is impressive In the study bill, they measured the clinical benefits at a timeline of three months and then six months and it got better. The results improved. Over time. How does that happen? How does that work? Well, this all started in a number of years ago. If you remember there was a shortage of people wanted this still all over the world still was selling. We We can, But look here we're giving you look at the value..

Mark Larsen
U.S., Canadian authorities warn against annual 'Float Down' near Sarnia, Ont.

Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

00:46 sec | 1 d ago

U.S., Canadian authorities warn against annual 'Float Down' near Sarnia, Ont.

"Home that word from Canadian in U. S. Officials ahead of the Port Huron float down this Sunday WW days, Beth Fischer, with 5000 people are expected to take to the ST Clair River on rafts and inner tubes from port here onto Mary's Ville. But there's a pandemic underway U S. Coast Guard Lieutenant Jeremiah she soul All we can do is discourage people from going. Canada is a lot more forceful in AH warning people. Canadian officials won't let us cross the border unless it's for essential. Business. So if people float in a Canadian waters, they could face $750,000 in fines and up to six months in jail. It could also mean covert 19 screening, she still says. For those who do go wear a life jacket and have your cell phone in an airtight case. Beth

Beth Fischer Port Huron Mary Lieutenant Jeremiah St Clair River Canada U. S.
iBonds could be a great savings vehicle

Clark Howard Show

04:55 min | 2 d ago

iBonds could be a great savings vehicle

"I'm so glad you taking time out of your day to join us here on the Clark Howard. Show. Where it's all about you learning ways to keep more of what you have. Our Websites Clark. Dot Com and Kark deals. Dot Com. So. Over the last twenty, five years. Probably, about twenty five years maybe thirty. I've had a love hate relationship. With. A method of saving money called series I savings bonds. These are sold by the federal government, the US Department of the Treasury. And you buy these savings bonds and You earn whatever the rate of inflation is in the economy reset twice a year. And there are times series I bonds have been scream and deals. I own some that I bought back in the nineties. that. Out later, this decade because they earn interest for thirty years and the ones I got then were such a good deal I wish they would just go on forever but you know. Now going to have that luck. In a Hammock recommended series I bonds except maybe one time in the last five years. But now I can do so again. Is something for a small saver. Amounts from up to well up to ten thousand dollars in a year can go into series I, savings bonds, and the reason I'm recommending them now is it's not like you're gonna get rich from them. The problem right now is that what you're earning in savings from a traditional bricks mortar bank is like nothing. and. So I mean really is literally about nothing even if you go to one of the online bank's I'm always talking about. Their interest rates have fallen and fallen and fallen from around two percent to now many are below one percent still declining, and that's because of the economic decline were in right now. Because of the recession, we're. So. Also in addition. The. Federal Reserve is doing things to hold interest rates down indirectly with the moves they can make. Some directly. But overall indirectly. So that means that savers are getting clobbered. And now you earn less on savings. then. The general rate of inflation and the economy. And that's why entering into your financial life potentially could be series I, bonds because it's the one way of saver. Can. EARN. The rate of inflation so you're not falling behind with your money. which normally would not be something to. Jump for joy about. But if regular roll savings accounts. Are Making you basically nothing. Every year you're falling behind inflation. So series I savings, bonds, e buy savings, bonds, Dot Gov. Click on I bonds. When you get there, you'll see that you can buy up to the ten thousand and a year from very small amounts on up. And I think the minimum. Is Twenty five bucks you can buy. Or you can buy is many as you want up to ten thousand. Now, this is designed for you to have for potentially up to five years or longer because if you dump one less than five years, you forfeit ninety days of interest not a big deal in today's rate environment because of interest rates got much higher in the next few years. You could dump this series i. Pay. Your. Ninety days penalty and put the money to work somewhere else so. Every. Six months. The what you earn on the I bind changes. based. On that six months prior inflation. So the ideas you stay even With where things are which today being even? Is like a win. So check it out savings, bonds, Dot Gov. and. It's a pretty easy purchase. Understanding, how all the adjustments working all that not as easy. And since you're buying electronically, make sure you put note somewhere when you bought them what you bought so that they're not forgotten about over the next potentially thirty years.

Clark Howard DOT Kark Federal Reserve Federal Government Treasury Us Department
iBonds could be a great savings vehicle

Clark Howard Show

04:37 min | 2 d ago

iBonds could be a great savings vehicle

"The last twenty, five years. Probably, about twenty five years maybe thirty. I've had a love hate relationship. With. A method of saving money called series I savings bonds. These are sold by the federal government, the US Department of the Treasury. And you buy these savings bonds and You earn whatever the rate of inflation is in the economy reset twice a year. And there are times series I bonds have been scream and deals. I own some that I bought back in the nineties. that. Out later, this decade because they earn interest for thirty years and the ones I got then were such a good deal I wish they would just go on forever but you know. Now going to have that luck. In a Hammock recommended series I bonds except maybe one time in the last five years. But now I can do so again. Is something for a small saver. Amounts from up to well up to ten thousand dollars in a year can go into series I, savings bonds, and the reason I'm recommending them now is it's not like you're gonna get rich from them. The problem right now is that what you're earning in savings from a traditional bricks mortar bank is like nothing. and. So I mean really is literally about nothing even if you go to one of the online bank's I'm always talking about. Their interest rates have fallen and fallen and fallen from around two percent to now many are below one percent still declining, and that's because of the economic decline were in right now. Because of the recession, we're. So. Also in addition. The. Federal Reserve is doing things to hold interest rates down indirectly with the moves they can make. Some directly. But overall indirectly. So that means that savers are getting clobbered. And now you earn less on savings. then. The general rate of inflation and the economy. And that's why entering into your financial life potentially could be series I, bonds because it's the one way of saver. Can. EARN. The rate of inflation so you're not falling behind with your money. which normally would not be something to. Jump for joy about. But if regular roll savings accounts. Are Making you basically nothing. Every year you're falling behind inflation. So series I savings, bonds, e buy savings, bonds, Dot Gov. Click on I bonds. When you get there, you'll see that you can buy up to the ten thousand and a year from very small amounts on up. And I think the minimum. Is Twenty five bucks you can buy. Or you can buy is many as you want up to ten thousand. Now, this is designed for you to have for potentially up to five years or longer because if you dump one less than five years, you forfeit ninety days of interest not a big deal in today's rate environment because of interest rates got much higher in the next few years. You could dump this series i. Pay. Your. Ninety days penalty and put the money to work somewhere else so. Every. Six months. The what you earn on the I bind changes. based. On that six months prior inflation. So the ideas you stay even With where things are which today being even? Is like a win. So check it out savings, bonds, Dot Gov. and. It's a pretty easy purchase. Understanding, how all the adjustments working all that not as easy. And since you're buying electronically, make sure you put note somewhere when you bought them what you bought so that they're not forgotten about over the next potentially thirty years.

Federal Government Federal Reserve DOT Treasury Us Department
Implications Of The Spa Industry Being Both Mature And Fragmented

Inside the Spa Business | Spa

03:16 min | 2 d ago

Implications Of The Spa Industry Being Both Mature And Fragmented

"Business Industry lifecycles are pretty much the same they emerge they grow they mature and they decline but somewhere, between maturity in decline is the opportunity to reinvent to reinvigorate to innovate and head off on a new curve on a new industry. And I would argue that with the spiral mystery, we've certainly emerged with only through growth period. So were either at the maturity stage or at the decline stage, and as I've said, many times on this show over the years. I believe we kind of on the tail end of the maturity, curve at best and heading to decline. So we're at that magical infliction innovation point where we need to innovate reinvigorate pivot industry and Head off on a new curve. But one of the interesting characteristics of a mature industry that seems to be missing from the SPA industry is that consolidation now spoken about over the years a few of the consolidation exercises that have happened that been that has been a little bit of consolidation in the industry, but not a lot by and large I was still a fragmented industry and so what are the implications of that? Well I. Think we're seeing a lot of plan right now in the event of A. Downturn in business, there's not enough big plays in the industry because we're fragmented therefore, lot of those smaller players don't have the financial bandwidth to sustain themselves during that downturn in business. Now obviously, right now it's been exacerbated an exaggerated by the current crisis that the reality is that's the way we're at because we haven't achieved consolidation. I think the problem is is going to be a lot of businesses that are just going to disappear dissolve throughout this current crisis and so what then what about consolidation? Well, yes there's an opportunity for consolidation for sure some of the big boys and girls out there can acquire some of the smaller ones. The problem is if we're on the tailend of maturity and potentially hating to decline is an industry why he want to be the biggest player in a declining market doesn't make any sense. So what we need now more than ever, he's to reimagined reinvent reinvigorate pivot whatever would you WANNA use? We need to find the next industry curve to the industry otherwise without the benefit of consolidation being on the tail of maturity, potentially decline and being in an exceptionally difficult situation right now. I think the outlook is pretty bleak. And less we do that unless we innovate unless we pivot and I guess the message is not that it is all doom and gloom because it's not i. think there's a massive opportunity here but I think what I hear too often in this current crisis we'll be okay if we can just see through the next three months six months twelve months however long the corona virus impacts is but the coronavirus vars has just revealed as I think I don't think it's necessarily laid to the current state of the Nation in terms of spire industry but I do think it has revealed us. So don't sit back there and once the corona virus goes everything will be okay. Understand that a best where the Thailand of maturity and if we're at the tail end of the maturity of maturity on the business life cycle industry life cycle curve, then we need to innovate. We need to find the next industry curve for the Spire Street

Thailand
Philadelphia to remove Christopher Columbus from Marconi Plaza, place in temporary storage

KYW 24 Hour News

01:13 min | 3 d ago

Philadelphia to remove Christopher Columbus from Marconi Plaza, place in temporary storage

"Been covered in plywood since June, when protesters and neighbors clashed over whether it should stay there. Well, today city got permission to remove it permanently. Hey, Y W. City Hall Bureau chief Pat Loeb has more. The Art Commission voted to let the city put the statue in storage temporarily and report back every six months on the process to find find it. it. A A new new home home chairman chairman Alan Alan Greenberg Greenberg says says Statue Statue deserves deserves display display but but not not on on public public land. land. It's It's not not to to suggest suggest that that one one side side is is right right or or wrong, wrong, but but it it is is to to suggest suggest that that there there is is a a bona bona fide fide dispute dispute that that is is leading leading to to Tension, Tension, potential potential violence, violence, and and that's that's not not what what the the function function of of public public art art oughta oughta be. be. The vote came after a public hearing in which 70 people testified both about the pain of seeing Columbus glorified. Given the modern understanding of his flaws and the pride. Italian Americans taken his achievements. The city's chief cultural officer, Kelly Lee, says the city asked to remove the statue because it had become a public safety issue but plans to replace it and it all depends on what the community wants. It could be a statue or it could be Other ways of celebrating Italian American culture. Lee says there's no timeline yet for removal or replacement. Pat Lobe K y. W NEWS RADIO A federal

Alan Alan Greenberg Greenberg Y W. City Hall Bureau Kelly Lee Chairman Pat Lobe K Pat Loeb Art Commission Columbus Officer
The Rise of V/One

No Code No Problem

04:47 min | 4 d ago

The Rise of V/One

"Be talking about a new player in the Space v one and the rise of e one, right So. They are a new. No Code. Mobile APP. And they boast as erode learning curve. So that's what they've been. You know hyping themselves up to be. But recent hype suggests that V. One is the next big player in the space with investments from notable individuals like Jason Calkins. They have been building momentum through twitter as they seem to be replicating Elliott's Hi Benji. this is not always a good thing as I used Elliott in it really was just hype. So the question is will be one fizzle out and carry the same disappointing launch the Elliott did. I don't believe so in here's my wife. So number one. The founder so Jeremy. Redmon. The founder and CEO v one is one of the most passionate people that I've ever met. Especially, when it comes to his company, so know he would fight tooth and nail for the success of you one and. Really, focused on giving a true experience Paul has users as he is no coder himself. And it is clear that he's passionate about customer service and the success of his users while that doesn't scale on one level I think it will set them apart especially at first and they'll be able to use that as a catalyst to shoot them until competition in the next six months and I. think that's where they differentiate themselves from all the other mowatt builders that are popping up. Number two is I have seen in used the product. So Jeremy sent me a demo of the product. After we first talked in capabilities and it boasts a short user experience an easy to use drag and drop block to build out your APP and part of the. Zero. Learning curve is you can build out it from scratch rate using buttons, texting all of that, or you can build using full screen modules. So not only do I think that it is unique to code space, but they are adding features by the week with the most recent feature actually being released recently in they dropped a thing on twitter about it and it's a canvas integration with images and buttons. So the in-app version of Cambe opens up giving you the ability to Zayn full screens or images or whatever you want at your APP and publish them into your APP with a single click. So that's pretty big considering. To my knowledge there there's nothing like this out there right now. So that's pretty pretty bad ass, and I'm excited to see how people use that. And then number three is too big to fail. With investors like, Jason Cal Kansas from launch and other prominent firms backing be one. It provides us with a sense of assurance and it's clear some of the most influential names in private equity support and believe in the future of this product. So I have to ask myself why should I and I'm not GonNa lie I had very similar thoughts with Elliott as the community rallied around them, even though the majority hadn't even seen or interacted with the product. And but I I would say given the other two pillars I believe the ones legacy will be much greater than theirs So you know while Elliott had also raised a significant amount of money and had a group of supporters like no other, they had a lot of negatives bogging them down with the way they publicly handle things and I think V. One I've I've already seen. They've they've handled things well. So I think V. One, will succeed based on the combination of the three pillars above and I'm really excited to watch them grow and launch with their upcoming Hackworth on August fifteenth which they said is there soft launch? For underrepresented founders and it's a five hundred dollar cash prize you get unlimited access for seventy two hours and then on. August twenty seventh I believe that's like their full launch and that'll be their public launch in their second act thon for anyone who wants to be involved, and that's another seventy two hours with another five hundred or cash prize. So they have some big things coming up, they have some partnerships with no code space and with underrepresented. Groups organizations in Ohio. So yeah I I think that they're that they're really on the right path and I'm excited to see how they end up in two to three months with their customer success that they're focused on customer success, and then also with you know the easy to use builder because they're targeting really no code people compared to you know. People that kind of have technical knowledge rights they're going for those that are too lazy to learn a learning curve.

Elliott Founder V. One Twitter Jeremy Founder And Ceo Paul Jason Cal Kansas Jason Calkins Ohio Benji.
The Children Of Smithfield

Latino USA

06:11 min | 4 d ago

The Children Of Smithfield

"In. March of Twenty Twenty might amend is was living in Lincoln, Nebraska she was working as an administrator at a public school. And then she got a call from her mom it was about their upcoming vacation she called in and asked me to call in and cancel the flights and see what their options were and I. think that's when it kind of hit me that corona virus was in Nebraska they had planned to visit family in Mexico but they decided with the virus it was a bad idea for her mom to travel. Might as mom had recently lost a kidney to cancer and was undergoing chemotherapy again, this time for lung cancer. It's been about a year and a half since she's been on last the latest treatment and that one seems to work while the spock's in her lung they're not necessarily getting bigger and they're slowly shrinking. But the doctor did say about it's it's a long process slow process and then the family made a decision, my parents both have jobs at a meat packing plant in Nebraska because their mom could be exposed to the corona virus at work they decided that mom should not go back to work. I think I just always worry. About not having her. Her Dad. He returned to the plant for financial reasons but might have was worried if her dad brought the virus home, it could be deadly for her mom. And I started asking him like you know what kind of protection are they giving you? Do you have face masks? He said they're giving us masks and I said, what does the mass look? He said it's like the beard net, but it's a full faced one and so then that's as like that's not gonNA protect you. You're still breathing in air through those holes like that does nothing. For my this was the first red flag and then on April sixteenth the meat packing plant where he worked a place called Smithfield confirmed its first case of Covid nineteen. That's when. My Dad started to. Kind of get scared to get I is kind of like it's not it's not here yet. And so when we heard about those first cases. It was very like it's here. It's real. From footer media, it's leading USA I Medina Hoarser and today the children of Smithfield speak. Throughout the early days of the covid nineteen pandemic, there was a lot of concern about the nations food supply specifically, the meat industry's supply chain. But last spring is cases of the virus surged in meatpacking plants across the country. It became clear that conditions in these plans were often unsafe. And that many of these now deemed is central workers worked speaking up because of their status or fear of retaliation around a fourth of all meatpacking workers are undocumented. and. So instead now it's the adult children and other family members of these meatpacking workers who have started to band together to advocate for their relatives. Might menaces parents work at a plant owned by Smithfield that's one of the largest meatpacking companies in the world. In April she joined with other quote children of Smithfield in the town of Crete Nebraska to begin demanding safer working conditions for their parents and relatives. reporters. Marianne Andrey and Esther. Honi have been reporting and following, Midas? Story Esther. Is going to pick up the story now. Myra is a woman in her late twenties with an athletic build an intense Brown eyes. And she's warm but she wouldn't say she's the social one in her family. I definitely consider myself as shy this whole time we've been in quarantine. I've been okay because I enjoy my time alone at home she says it's her dodd that's always been the extrovert he doesn't like to be quite. he's always talking, but he wants to jump into every conversation super affectionate and he's always like grabbing us and hugging and kissing those in like messing up our hair like that's his thing he wants to. Miss a bar hair and kisses at the same time in her family says always more of the caretaker. She has two younger brothers and she's always looked out for them when my second brother was born. I was babysitting him all summer and so he was a six month old than I was fifteen. I was the one in charge of taking care of him and I think a lot of. My character was built from being the oldest sibling just around the House I. Always was told like you have to be the example for your brothers kind of pave the way as a family always spent a lot of time together partially because they moved around a lot when she was little Mara's parents used to work as migrant farm workers. I was born in Washington stay in my parents picked fruits and other crops like potatoes we would move between Washington state and Idaho back and forth she was in third grade her parents emigrated from Mexico and later became US citizens heard they could get better and more stable work in Nebraska in meatpacking. It we need to move around anymore. But as a little kid, she was nervous about leaving her school where there are lots of other bilingual students. I just remembered in Washington stay they taught me in Spanish and English half day English half-day Spanish and so here I remember like my biggest fear I wasn't sure if I knew English said, do I really know English? Obviously I knew English but it was just not the atmosphere I was used to

Nebraska Smithfield Twenty Twenty Mexico Lung Cancer Washington Lincoln Administrator Crete Nebraska Medina Hoarser Marianne Andrey Mara Myra United States Brown
Lebanon's entire government resigns amid anger over Beirut explosion

Monocle 24: The Globalist

04:42 min | 4 d ago

Lebanon's entire government resigns amid anger over Beirut explosion

"A week after a massive explosion to. All parts of the Lebanese city of Beirut. Apart, the entire government has resigned the massive blast was caused whenever two thousand tons of ammonium nitrate which had been stored unsafely at the port for six years exploded killing over two hundred people injuring more than six thousand and leaving hundreds of thousands homeless over the weekend residents of Beirut demonstrated against the government calling for the removal of the entire political class due to their negligence and corruption. Joining us once again from Beirut is Layla Milana Allen Leyla when we spoke to you yesterday, five politicians had resigned so far. Tell us about the announcement made last night by the prime minister. So what we saw yesterday and the evening before session, all government ministers resigning. We also saw several NPR's goes well, Megyn went from protesters. Here we go one by one this many left to go. and. Then there was the resignation of the finance minister as he wasn't he just before that meeting that was supposed to in the afternoon that cabinet meeting in which prime minister the APP had said that he was going to a table a motion. To try and have the elections is at the State Petunia. So. How's it wasn't said that he would suspend his his resignation until off the meeting they went in and they spent two thousand not room. Getting. Rumors from quite early on in fact, the entire government was going to resign because there were two ways that this could happen. Either has MD could resign himself or if more than a third of his ministers resigned, that would make his cabinet untenable already looking at five. So essentially, just two more and they were already two minutes to said before they went through, they would resign if the government didn't as Walter a couple of hours they came out and those announcement saying that he would speak in the evening. And when he did speak, he came forward and he said. That they had tried their best to be transparent tried to Rama transparent government. She's January failed to impose some of the reforms that Lebanon. So desperately needed but endemic corruption in the government had made it impossible to do so had caused this tragedy. Now, of course, many people don't feel that's the case they feel that the government was not run transparently at all. Or none of the reforms that has promised January. Would be done in six months word done within six months, and of course we now know. That both the president and the prime. minister. WED Two thousand, seven, hundred and fifty tons of money not great was in the Port as worse excessive government none of them do anything about it. So the government's gone but is going to be a change in the system will the same sectarian politics driving the unrest still exist? Not at the moment now, sectarian politics is really driving some rest. There are a few elements here. Firstly, the the problem with the government system is not that it's impossible to run because the country says sectarian, it's the it's impossible to have a government which allows the country to not be sectarian young people on the streets is saying that's not what they want. They want to country that will come together and work together where people are elected based on their merit not based on what sector they come from but because the political system is original on these lines where each sect gets a certain number of seats innocent area firstly, it's impossible to have that kind of government that is responsible for the entire country doesn't have. Interest in certain places, and secondly, it means only a certain kind of person can be elected because there is such entrenched nepotism in politics and you need the money and connections to be able to run and succeed. So right now, what's going to happen is that as we saw late last year when Prime Minister I've had resigned, the current government will stay on in a Catholic capacity. There's not much they can do in that capacity they will meet rally and they will only be able to put in bills or emergency bills to keep the country going, of course, Lebanon ready needed proper legislation to come in and change things before this explosion now, really function of government. To get things moving the country who built and help people that's not going to happen under a caretaker government but the system is so complex in terms of trying to elect a new prime minister different block in Palm. As I say, these different sectarian blocks have to agree on the candidates and then he has to find a cabinet that pleases all of this -Tarian blocks each of whom will want their own cows come in that. Again, what we're going to see in the coming weeks is this political game. All aimed at making the right formation balance of people in power rob. Then a government trudy is just focused on what is best for the Lebanese people purchase street saying this is the same old system. Nothing's going to change a new election won't help us. Cabinet won't help us. We need a complete overhaul of its system which has dragging us down and letting the country move forward.

Prime Minister Beirut Layla Milana Allen Leyla Finance Minister MD Lebanon NPR Walter Megyn President Trump Palm
McDonald's sues ousted CEO, alleging employee relationships

All Things Considered

02:59 min | 4 d ago

McDonald's sues ousted CEO, alleging employee relationships

"McDonald's has made striking new allegations against its former CEO of the company says Steve Easterbrook hid sexual relationships with employees and concealed the evidence. The fast food giant fired Easterbrook last year. Now it is suing him to get back his multi $1,000,000 severance package. NPR's Alina Selya HQ reports. What makes this case pretty remarkable is that it's been nine months since Easterbrook was fired. The reason a consensual relationship with an employee that amounted to sexting and American corporate culture typically is all about sorting these kinds of internal scandals quickly and behind closed doors. Here's Tim Hubbard, a professor at the University of Notre Dame. There's always this tendency to wanna settle it quietly and get it completely out of the media. But here we are talking about it again because now McDonald's Is suing Easterbrook, saying he covered up more inappropriate behavior. McDonald's made this unusual choice because back in November, Easterbrook left with the severance estimated at over $40 million. But in July, an anonymous tip led the company to search corporate servers and their investigators found explicit photos and videos sent from Easter. Brooks corporate account evidence of sexual relationships with three employees, including one woman for whom Easterbrook approved a stock grant worth hundreds of thousands of dollars. I think that there was an expectation as they were negotiating a settlement. That the former chief executive officer be open and honest. The company says he lied to get a better exit payout and is suing to get that money back. Few companies find these kind of public battles with former executives. MacDonald says. It's already moved to block Easterbrook from selling any stock he might still have from his equity awards. I don't really see the likelihood of him returning the money without A bit of force needed. I think it gets pretty nasty Easter. Brooks legal team did not respond to NPR's enquiries, and we should note that McDonald's is among NPR's recent sponsors. Mr Brooks, Compensation for being fired drew much attention and criticism last year. It included six months of severance pay shares and other equity, leading many low wage frontline workers to muse about their pay gap with executives. And use the moment to highlight allegations of rampant sexual harassment of female employees by male co workers and managers across McDonald's restaurants sharing to Johnny directs the time's up Legal Defense Fund, which is backing workplace sexual harassment lawsuits by McDonald's workers were going to say You can't do certain things that were going to take conduct seriously. And they should be taking it seriously when it comes to their workers being sexually harassed, and, at a minimum committed 40 million. They're trying to get back from Easterbrook to stop that. Easterbrook successor, CEO Chris Kempinski often speaks about re committing to company values of integrity and inclusion. On Monday, McDonald's told workers it's conducting in global survey and listening sessions to assess the state of its corporate culture.

Steve Easterbrook Mcdonald Mr Brooks CEO NPR University Of Notre Dame Alina Selya Chief Executive Officer Tim Hubbard Harassment Chris Kempinski Macdonald Professor Legal Defense Fund Johnny
What would a payroll tax holiday look like?

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:48 min | 4 d ago

What would a payroll tax holiday look like?

"Begin this work week with business owners and accountants and economists and people who are working in this economy trying to figure out what exactly president trump did to this economy this weekend. You some things one executive order and three memoranda after negotiations on another. Plan on Capitol Hill collapsed that much. You know whether the president can actually do most of what he did depends on who you talk to. So rather than engage in that particular back and forth, we'll focus today here on the thing he did that he can do deferring collection of payroll taxes specifically putting on hold the collection of taxes on the employee portion of social security taxes six point two percent per paycheck if you're curious. Starts September. The first ends at New Year's only for people making less than about one hundred, thousand dollars a year that much is what we know. Now. What's IT GONNA mean. Here's marketplace's Mitchell Hartman. The committee for a Responsible Federal Budget Wades through complicated tax proposals and regulations all the time but President Miami McGuinness says the White House's memorandum on deferring payroll tax obligations leaves her with West Mark Mar starting with this one happens come January when employee payroll taxes that weren't collected come do nobody knows how the repayment part will have to restructure it's going to. Complicate the life of employers. Tremendously. If they have to be responsible for making sure that money gets paid back and small business tax advisor Barbara Weltman says this payroll tax holiday could change. So right now we're talking about deferral meaning you don't pay now you pay later the president has instructed the Treasury. Secretary to explore options including legislation to forgive those payroll taxes altogether. Pete Iceberg at payroll processor ADP says, it's going to be really complicated for employers to alter payroll tax collection media year for only some employees based on a salary threshold cramming changes of this magnitude normally require like six months to do. So it can be done sort of an emergency basis but maybe problematic he says employers could be liable for not withholding enough tax and underpaying the Treasury Randy dellwo owns a business that makes scientific instruments in Bend Oregon he talked to his ten employees at Zoom meeting this morning and. The consensus among our employees is that everyone would rather not defer their payroll taxes. For one thing, they would need to save the money so that they'd have it available to pay back at the end of the year the committee for a responsible federal budget estimates temporary payroll tax deferment could leave us workers with as much as one hundred, billion dollars of extra pay through December. But if a lot of businesses and employees followed the lead of Randy Woes Company, the impact will be more muted.

President Trump Donald Trump Randy Woes Company Pete Iceberg Randy Dellwo Miami Mcguinness Executive United States Mitchell Hartman Treasury Barbara Weltman ADP Bend Oregon Secretary Advisor White House
Interview With Phil Penman

The Candid Frame

05:24 min | 5 d ago

Interview With Phil Penman

"When you decide to go into business for yourself, it's as much about your hustle as it is about your talent. Skilled and talented as you may be if you're hustle is not on point. You are going to struggle not only getting into the game but also staying in it. Phil Penman understands that which is why he's managed to establish himself as a celebrity street and commercial photographer. The links that he had to go to his Paparazzi could make the difference between getting the shot or not, but also more importantly the difference of thousands rather than hundreds of dollars. That kind of work is not for the faint of heart especially when it involves negotiating the streets of new. York. City on a bicycle. But as Phil understands, you've gotta do what you gotTa do this is Ebonics and welcome back to they candid frame. Jones, thanks for making time for me. I appreciate it. Thanks for your patience and finally getting round here. Thank you for inviting me I. So you're up you're up to like five, hundred, twenty, eight. So is man gets because you sent me your book months ago. I, talked to my wife who's that producer to try and make sure that we got you in somewhere but it can be quite the juggle because there's so many people that consider. Really I love the Book I love your story but one thing that's fascinating in before we get into talking to you about your photography is just like man you have held so many jobs. So many things. List as well. So it was just was just the the nature of being like a hustler that you were just like just did what you needed to do in order to get by that is that why you? or so many different at one hundred percent of house. So when I was in college I was studying photography and a box. If Alford like a hundred sheets for safe thirty pounds and that's a of money to a college student and you having to crank this week off the week. So I had I would study and I had to free jobs that I was doing waller's in college. So in the daytime, I would serve lunches to like rich preppy boy, Colt prep school kids at a nearby like boy school than a night I worked in a bar and unlike club four nights a week, and then the weekend I used to work even Lego land or Twickenham rugby Stadium. So I would literally our work all day through the night and then have like free hours sleep got a college study as. You did this casino the the bitch would be like we used to do five transparency. Not only will take was the chew to say, have to stop off and the fuck that's enough free. Way, worked in the bar and he go pay to twenty an hour. Like notes it. Hasso Hasso. When you're young. You don't need that much sleep exactly now I'm just like I'm Pasta by seven o'clock. So, when did you get the bug? When did you discover that you wanted to study photography in photographer it was my backup believe it or not i. was fifteen and I wanted to be a sports teacher. My Dad was like, well, you got to have a backup. And he was a professor I so I kind of I grew up with a darkroom and seeing prints in the bath tub being washed and stuff. So he's like, hello go for this newspaper, pick out the picture the you think and if if I agree with you then I'll let you study photography as a backup and I ended up being a terrible sports teacher so You know I virtually failed sports studies by a my photography. So I'm like that's the way man to find out that photography is your fallback. It's funny. Because most people it's like. Repeats the first choice, not the second. It's like my lap was always insistent on you always have a backup everything. So that was my backup and then. Studied like the next freeze I guess and then. Started working straightaway into. Work you started doing initially. I did a year as a local newspaper photographer where it was tree, we do a jobs today and it would be like they had us going every thirty minutes. So you're driving around hundred miles per hour from job to job walk in the room sheet the paycheck next job, and it was like a fos learning cup. So you'd be like sports, events, politicians, babies, presentations, and then I landed a job working for news agency where I was doing hard news but I'm still doing. I basically landed a GIG. She will the cool proportion shift for Microsoft and like I like twenty, one years old and boss was worked for is making so much money from that the it was great for him. So I did I did about six months with him and then I got the opportunity to work for A. Company in Los, Angeles and just jumped

Phil Penman Professor Hasso Hasso Jones Colt Prep School Twickenham Rugby Stadium Microsoft Alford Waller York Producer A. Company Angeles LOS
Actual tennis tournaments; 'Federer should avoid my retirement mistake - Edberg

The Tennis Podcast

04:23 min | 5 d ago

Actual tennis tournaments; 'Federer should avoid my retirement mistake - Edberg

"Thanks very much to June and son Peter for that. Lovely, and for the length that we're going to in order to record said in true because I understand that social distancing. Guidelines were observed throughout that recording So I seem some sort of throwing recording device happened in that split second inbetween hearing jeans. Peter's Voice so Bravo Gop, sir, and thank you very much. Feel supports. Lovely, intro. Pleased to have had your intro used on a very significant week for tennis and the tennis podcast because. Is Back. We've bounced back. We're not rely reliving anything this episode David. We're just living in the sweet sweet moment of Palermo and Fiona Ferro up against an contemplates Tennessee is bouncing. It does feel properly like real tennis. Now, because this is the first time we've reviewed tennis tournament and previewed another one with. pre-tournament press conferences going on everywhere that we've been listening across to and chats amongst about people and look at draws actually looking it draws is. Suddenly such a thrill. It feels so so exotic do one of my lockdown. Tasks was to organize my phone apps into the hopeful folders. I. Completely Forgot which fold Roy put my eighty WPA schools happen to me quite a long time to hunt around to find that. Mind seem to shut itself down given that it hadn't been used five months after reloaded onto my phone. Just, a bit of a rough. It was glorious to see tournaments pop up in it. They wasn't. Oh Yeah. Yeah, such a defining feature of tennis happening the ATP. WGN APP being. Full. Kind of forgotten. How to preview tennis. The. Great. Stay tuned. Because the WTO always send. You know prior to every tournament, they send out match notes, really helpful staff and stat and. Kind of feels quite relevant at the moment because. The kind of it doesn't really matter who's won the most titles this year already, there's no such thing as form at the moment and it's all. It's all really unknown like what? What are the factors going to be with how players perform? Yeah. I mean, Fiona. Farrow is going to be like the new sort of defacto world number-one. Suddenly, she feels like the greatest player of all time to me because she's six to three all against the conservation I did find myself looking up Fiona Farrow before this podcast to work out what she'd done before it systems any sign of this having. Coming about six months ago. Matt Matt. Thanks. So I mean I've gone through her exhibition results she's unbeaten. Unbeaten an exhibition tennis during the lockdown ten Matt. We'll check submission Tennessee been playing matches arranged by the. F. F., T., and. Yes, she paid him one the mole and she's kind of this fall into. Palermo. I mean I'm getting I'm getting carried away with. These being perform because that's the only thing given the well, exactly. So maybe we should be looking at the players who have played a lot of exhibition. Tennis in this period, if people that are you're going to be having to make predictions. Maybe that's something to a life off to cling to. We have already made predictions and they've gone incredibly. They became irrelevant. They became relevant very quickly. nobody was picking Fina ferry now whether it is going to be interesting, though isn't it to chart the few players that have played a lot of matches over the last. Actually, there are quite a few players because if you think of all the exhibitions that have gone around on all around the world and some of them have been publicized, some of them have been televised some of them. We've talked about others have kind of gone by without really. Being. Noticed, but a lot of players that played a lot of tennis and then some party played any at all and it will be interesting to see whether that has any impassable.

Tennis Fiona Farrow Matt Matt Tennessee Peter WGN WTO Fiona Bravo Gop Fiona Ferro Palermo ROY Fina F. F.
The Last Serve with Courtney

9INE POINT Started With A Dream Podcast w/ Jacolby Gilliam

04:08 min | 5 d ago

The Last Serve with Courtney

"Enjoyed episode gray story very relatable unless you to it. Though. The question that everyone that comes on as when you're younger than athlete would like bigger to the goals you underachieve. Oh God as an athlete I actually wanted to be my first athletic dream wants to be a professional basketball player. So I guess that's where it started is that was the first sport that I really played. And it that quickly died. After a while was like, you know what now got Bergdahl kind of fascinated found volleyball luckily. Yeah. I had a poster of Lisa Leslie on the back of my bedroom door. Measure myself against our. Be, like that one day. Lead the. Though at least leisurely. So when you kind of said, we're doing basketball. Then how do you kind of land up on wall kind of thing that was? A good place for you. Volleyball, why is the last sport that I tried like the last one I picked up and I've been I was always playing. As a kid I was just always I, think of a lot of athletes say that like I just play it every and volleyball was lost when I picked up his all my friends are playing it and I went to a camp at our high school, Our Future High School put on with them and I. I. Hated it. Just because was bad and I hate big batted things it just makes me so angry. And I just kind of stuck with it because all of my best friends were playing and it was really fun to play with them. So it was like I'm sure I'll like it. You know when I start getting better and I like hanging out then so stick with it and just did a job middle school along with everything else that I could play and I, just live London it gets so much fun. And when you start to get a little bit good, it was just I think we've no others or I didn't feel anger sport but I played before when I started to get good I just wanted to keep getting better on I. Definitely felt that was all. Yeah and then just think what I was in high school. Coaches. OCD recruiting letters, and found out. That was the thing I could do you know playing college now? It's like, okay I guess I'll do that. And Going with that same process. Started, getting good. How did you? Become good with was whether jet practice or you redoing the outside of just the usual everyday stuff. A little bit of both I mean I think it really helps like I always tell players that I'm coaching. I was not good until I was like it senior sixteen like even I started playing when I was twelve terrible until I was almost in high school. I think a lot of it when I turned I was a freshman in high school. So it's like fourteen fifteen years old in a big game changer was that summer I played a lot of volleyball because then middle school I played every sport. So I didn't really dedicate that much time I played club but. You know I'm not very, very good club not for a very good team. The practice wasn't very intense, and then that summer before freshman year when I decided I wanted to play in high school. I switched clubs went to NATO's Houston. Was a better had had give reputation at the time played was in the gym at all the open gyms, all the clinics they had. At least twice a week ever all summer long and I grew like four inches in like almost like less than six months I grew so much and. I. Think the biggest improvement was. By jump, I could actually jump after all of that playing at all jumping off the heading and I could finally. Serve consistently and served. Well, I was stronger I was in middle school I would I hated surfing. I just got so mad because I was so inconsistent I would actually. Do. Push ups in my room every night when I was like thirteen and fourteen seventh and eighth grade I served improve. But then I was in the gym so much that summer after middle school and it made such a big difference. I think here in your journey, just how you were determined to get better you like I'm not gonNA. Anyone be. Yeah and just be like I'm not going to be bad at this. This is ridiculous like I'm not I'm not going to be done at this. This is stupid. Like

Our Future High School Middle School Volleyball Basketball Lisa Leslie Bergdahl Nato London Houston
Rick Billy Choctaw

The Storyteller

04:55 min | 5 d ago

Rick Billy Choctaw

"STEIG good day. Welcome my friends to destroy. Where you'll find first nations people from across native North America who are following Jesus Christ without reservation. On today's program, we'll hear more from Rick Billy a Choctaw from Oklahoma. Rick knows something about failure and forgiveness, and he knows what it means to have the joy of the Lord even when life is art. had torn. Ligaments in my knee. And I was out for six months and. The income that was coming in wasn't sufficient to provide for what my needs were. It was enough to provide for the family, but I was more interested in. Heaven. Finances. All the time and suspended money all the time. But when that happened a look back and realize that I did not have the Lord. My Life, a kept praying and asking God to help me and seemed like there was not any answer coming to me. And seemed like. There was more of the. Ideal that. God was far away from me. But I look back at my life and those times when. I was more. Spending money unwisely. And? That that was something that the Lord was a please Dan. Got Into, myself, I got into trying to. Please the flesh. and. So. Also want remind you I left the church to I had been away from the fellowship because working so much. Put my whole family. And despair because of that, because at work Sundays also and. I told them. I didn't have time to go take them a church. I didn't have time to do this for him because I was working all the time so. Atallah. My said, well, if you can find a way you can go and they realized that it wasn't interested into Lord anymore seemed like in which. Wasn't at that time and. For a five year. Period. I was not in the church was not active in God's word after learning or going through a lot of Tested. God had put push me through. I. Felt like I turn my back away. When I realized what I've done. After being injured. Even, during that time when I was away from the gut I I still can remember the Lord me and how he. Provided for me how he kept me from fallen into different types of temptations like alcoholism and drug. Addiction. But. There were times when I probably could have gone to different parties and. Done a lot of things with the company, but I didn't. There's one thing that I realized. After, knowing that my people gone through it was. Something that was a disaster when. People began to choose alcohol and and go through drugs. It was something that made the whole community miserable. Thank the Lord. For that I didn't get involved in that but to be wealthy and have all the material things in the world. Where was my Something I just want to share with you that It was something that became. Model in my life. Got In my life and without realizing it. Until when I was injured and had to have a new surgery in after my surgery I was unable to perform the task of the job that I was at. It was a warehouse and I was in a truck driving business and. Did, not, respond properly and. was very depressed for six months. I was depressed in a way where it's like, you can't come out of it and when people would come and pray. My wife would ask people to come to pray for me. I wouldn't received the prayer because I was such in. A depression that I didn't. You. Don't want you feel sorry for yourself. You just don't want. Any one to come to you and tell you what's wrong with you even though. I believe that many people that can't committed. Lord's sent to me.

Lord Rick Billy Oklahoma North America
Delayed Umbilical Cord Clamping After Birth

Babes and Babies

03:37 min | 5 d ago

Delayed Umbilical Cord Clamping After Birth

"Before we dive into the interview with her, we're going to continue our little. Introduction. Birth plans series we've talked about preparing for your GB as test. We've talked about Bernie we've talked about all sorts of different things and today. I'm just going to touch on delayed cord clamping because it is something. So as a Dula. I started practicing in Vegas years ago, and at the time, not one provider would do it and it is something that is very beneficial for your children. And now more research is coming out saying that it is. Something that you should definitely consider putting in your birth plan and talking to your provider about so. According to. The. Pregnancy Association. It. Can Be very beneficial when he will allow the cord to. You don't clamp right away and you allow it to pulse for twenty five seconds up to five minutes after giving. Birth it allows blood to transfer from the placenta to the baby. Sometimes increasing the child's blood volume by up to a third there's tons of amazing iron stores in there. which is really good for healthy brain development also according to the a dot Org, which is the American College of obstetricians and gynecologists. It talks about how? DELETE UMBILICAL CORD clamping increases haemoglobin levels at birth in improved iron stores in the first several months of life, which may be very favorable for developmental outcomes. It can prevent NIMIA. A lot of kids can sometimes be Nimick in the first six months of life and with delayed cord clamping. Less and less, but with any decision you're making. It's also really important to know Not only benefits but the the potential risks and things like that. The only downside that they can see is that sometimes there is a small increase in John. Indus that might require therapy. In a certain group of infants. So there's the benefit of getting all that extra blood in iron stores and that helps with brain development and preventing anemia. But there is a very slight increase chance of having jaundice. So I can actually say in all my years practicing for anybody who has done it I have not seen jaundice case but I know that that research is out there that does back that. So as long as you have the information to. Make the best decision for yourself and for your family and have this conversation with your healthcare provider that to me I feel like is what counts I know that something that we're planning on doing it's a standard practice where. I am delivering so and we do touch on it. Next week a midwife is going to be on and she's going to just touch on it briefly, but I just wanted to go over the. So few are making your birth plan. Definitely look into delayed cord clamping I'm going to leave the links to these articles. In today's show

Bernie Jaundice Dula Vegas Pregnancy Association American College
Teenagers Surfing on the Wave of the Apocalypse

Lost Notes

04:30 min | Last week

Teenagers Surfing on the Wave of the Apocalypse

"And welcome to another edition of the shape of things to come. I'm bill floor and I'm Dean Miller and our guest this week artist student teachers. Start off where everything starts off with. Let's introduce ourselves. Then Dan My teachers. Yeah. Go ahead. Base I was more comfortable from the time. I was little kid with what were considered freaks than I like drag Queens I like boys, hugh tweets, their eyebrows I wanted them to put my makeup on J. I Sing I mean going to a dead boys concert with you're sitting in the front row at CBGB's and stiff baiters. Ripping out his pubic hair throwing at you. That's disgusting. But it was amazing. On wore I play drums as teenagers. We were filming gigs for the mumps we were helping the erasers build up their sets for their shows and we've been very involved and so there was kind of this organic thing that came together. You know maybe we should maybe we can do that. You know I mean maybe we can do that. By Play Guitar. Let's say you had. School. In one hand and. Being in a band and hanging out with blondie. David Bowie and the other hand and it was impossible to do both things. Boy Do you think would happen. There'd be less school-going. Joe I buy another talk. I wanted to be a rock and roller I play guitar, and I just wanted to make wild noise. Or. Unveil. muschamp coffee you would see warhol walking around with his polaroid and handing out copies into you magazine. So this is what I thought. Every teenager did it didn't occur to me that. What an unusual environment this what? We're here sort of to talk a little bit about the band place music and give people a chance to find out what the student teachers are really because I think a lot of people in New York even though I know most of the people in the band from the New York area don't know that much about student teachers. Any. Seems to be a mystery to herself and everyone. While sometimes, that's effective. I don't know. Imagine this group of teenagers in the late seventies in new. York. City. Most of them are still in high school, a couple of recently graduated. They're obsessed with bands like television and Patti Smith the Ramones Roxy Music. Most of them come from fractured family lives and find community in the club scene. But get this in the span of six months they go from not knowing how to play instruments to headlining their favorite clubs. Then opening IGGY pop getting interviewed I'm GonNa have their favorite radio stations eighty nine point one W Nyu. How do they make that happen? This Ragtag Group of best friends lived and breathed the scene. They spent all their time together by records running fan clubs. Reading. Rock magazines. They'd go to shows together and off often get mistaken for being in a band so. One day in bills living room they decide. Why not? Let's form one. Just. kind of said that everybody everybody's all play drums and I'll play guitar. Okay. You play Bass and I said, okay. Then lawyer said well, I don't know if my voice will be good enough because she was gonNA sing. So maybe you should be from female rhythm section and then we We all hated. Wouldn't bands felt like sports teams. And with David I both being gay and Philip, and then later Joe being straight boys and then, Lauren? Laurean. Laura being the female rhythm section we really love what we did visually. I think it's more important than we have a concept an idea. I A music. Actual technical ability because we knew our instruments well enough to be able to contain the idea to an extent. But you guys can make it. I mean you think you're gonNA make it after the All of us into. Your knew we weren't musicians and none of us cared but we cared about is that we were gonNA have a blast. We were going to be cool. We were GONNA be the coolest kids and we weren't going to imitate anyway.

New York David Bowie Joe I Mumps Dean Miller Pubic Hair DAN Patti Smith Hugh Laura Warhol Iggy J. NYU Philip Lauren
Addressing Cybersecurity Breaches in a COVID-19 Environment

Cyber Security Weekly Podcast

05:35 min | Last week

Addressing Cybersecurity Breaches in a COVID-19 Environment

"Time we were talking in person at the Sava Fusion Center in Sydney and has in the world challenge since we recorded that particular episode and I think it's a really Opportune. Time now, considering accenture has allowed incident response team in various parts of the world but obviously here in the I said Ole side on the tops of attacks the is being used and indeed the motivational the reasons for those attacks I think we might come to you first off the shift in the landscape I've the last few months and particularly since episode one some of the okay from the incident response time. Yes. You'll Chris really really interesting question I'm. I think all follow back to sort of March timeframe when things really starting to get started we saw massive uptake, Immuno covid nineteen themed fishing spear phishing email attacks, which is pretty consistent. With every time we've seen some major political shift or a major incident that gets people's emotions engaged. cybercriminals are pretty quick to the tactics to focus on that to exploit those emotions to get people to. Click on links and install alway but there's absolutely no denying sitting back now in where we end of July and looking back since that time frame it's all about ransomware. It is an absolute epidemic. We are saying certainly strategy. I don't think we've ever seen anything of what we're saying right now but even globally, I, mean there are massive companies just in the last few days Gombe and is all over the price and they've had an unprecedented attack. So I think ransomware is a is a big. Uptick we've seen in terms of changing the threat landscape, but the motivation full that ransomware, and also we've had some federal government, even prime ministerial level announcements in terms of the, but they'd foreign nation state actor motivation, but these ransomware attacks. Ransom crew ransomware crews, running these these campaigns will what what can enterprise be doing? What are you advising your clients in this? And what does what are some of those key controls that enterprise have to stop to get rot? That strike question I think come going back to the whole sort of state basting thread actors in the motivation. What I'm looking at. The question everyone was asking Ileana. These why we sing his uptick you know what's the connection and I've been racking my brain to try to understand what is the connection between the change in circumstances pulse covid nineteen and the increase in ransomware attacks. And what what we've managed to not come off the back of a major incident response way with we're added for sort of full wakes going up against the very threat actor the ICS's sent had only the intelligence reports at-bats June. And what what we sort of fan was during that analysis with different tactics use that I've never seen used before. A lot of the trade crafts very very similar but what we saw will threat actors. The actual attack is doing the attack that to deploy the ransomware with very very unskilled. These were not people who were very sophisticated in terms of their trade craft knowing what they were doing, but they were following a script and they were using automation and so what what I worked at pretty quickly in that sort of analysis was that what we're dealing with the question of why what's the connection but it's how how have threat actors managed to scale operations so quickly and I think it's been a combination of a more automation scripting intend to these attacks in the playbook they using. And possibly more outsourcing in points about the multiple parties they in gold in a ransomware as a service, it's a thing that's used by criminals who break in and gain access to monetize the access that go. So there are different actors during different parts of the service certainly inexperience what's what's been Jimmy leading to this massive uptake is the scale these attackers can now will brian up. So was the to the cut and paste approach, but it wasn't necessarily one act up. More based tools, the automated tools and also some of the services the as you said, the ransomware is a service. Became was it would you? I would the word be unleashed for anyone to use or did you get a sense of was potentially coordination there or was it just? Just. Random tiles in the application of these tools. Now, that's that's a great question. So the ransom web. The to us to make the money to the stuff that actually encrypt dot or an extra traits daughter where you put your, you know your bitcoins into it's an automated platform. There was no human direction. It is literally you get a self service ticket you go up to a you know this this website on the Dogwood you punching you ticket number it tells you how much you need to pay. The whole process is automated, and so that's that's just like A. Sas Platform that the attackers are using to monetize their tax and then the people who do the ransomware extortion they split the proceeds with the attackers had actually broken into the organization and gain the access necessary to deploy the ransomware tools. Now, this first group of people actually breaking, they're the ones where we're seeing a local coordination. So it's not once right active multiple tread actors, but one of the groups that does this figured out how to scale operation that got. Literally play by play. I you run this command then you run that command and they didn't gonNA help this. If you get stuck, there's a website you go to someone can give you help, and so that's that's what I think. The big difference we've seen in the last six months as the scale of people being compromised. Has Gone up substantially.

Accenture Sava Fusion Center Chris Sydney Gombe Ileana A. Sas Platform Extortion Jimmy Brian
What Circular Fashion Really Means with Levi's

Good Together: Ethical, Eco-Friendly, Sustainable Living

03:58 min | Last week

What Circular Fashion Really Means with Levi's

"Okay, welcome to good together Paul. We're so excited to have you. I'm really excited to be talking to you all today. This is a great time. We've got some exciting exciting product and it's a really. I don't know it's an interesting time to think about changing the way we've been consuming changing the way we've been designing making, and so it seems like a nice inflection point for all. Just sort of. Pause. -olutely. Absolutely I think right now we all are faced with more time than ever before on our hands. It's giving us a great opportunity to be mindful like you just mentioned. BSO listeners were super excited to how Paul Dillinger the together podcast Paul is the vice president head of global product innovation in premium collection design, for Levi, Strauss and company, and I love that we're having the chance to talk with Paul for many reasons. But one reason is because when we think about heritage craft American brands that are known for products that last a long time I. Think everyone has Levi's pop into their head and I'm not just saying that I think has just been a brand that we've all trusted for years. So the fact that we've is is taking a step towards circular fashion were super excited at So Paul I wonder if you wanted to give us a really brief intro of yourself and sort of what you do at Levi's. Sure. Thank you for that introduction I. It's a fancy title and it's but it. It's easy to say I'm a fashion designer. That's that was my training to undergraduate and graduate school. In my MFA in fashion, design and I designed clothes but leave there's a recognition that beyond just the seasonal cycle you know spring clothes fall clothes in spring shows fall shows beyond that just a six month normal fashion cadence. There are some design challenges that take more time. There are some opportunities that you you can't. Really you can't. Tackle problem resolved delivery in in just two seasons sometimes the real. Big changes they need a little more time to be cultivated research developed. And thoughtfully executed and those sorts of projects fall to me. So rather than designing. For next fall or next spring I'm thinking about a systems based approach to changing the design method allergy entirely five years from now or new materials that might actually deliver value ten years from now it's more of a it's a the fashion skillset, but I'm a Senate set to longer view. And and which is interesting because we're the company that straddles this company that straddles. The fashion versus utility space. You Know Levi's were essentially a tool I for minors to make. You know up to. The Goldfields in and and our but. Our value was predicated on technical innovation, right it was the adding the copper rivet to a garment that was wearing out in certain spots and we added that rivet and it made it strong in those spots and we patented it, and then we became like the. Created. This whole this category world's biggest purveyor of Denim, which then slowly changed from being a tool being object of faction. So at once we're this company that has invented A. Thing and durable both in the form and also emotionally durable that people love their genes. Last may become good friends. We're also part of the fashion cycle and we do seasonal product and we try to stay relevant instead of trend and and and and and resonant with the with contemporary consumers, and so there's a dynamic tension in the Levi's in this sort of struggled under. It's sort of carefully weaving those together.

Levi Paul Dillinger Vice President Goldfields Senate Strauss
"six months" Discussed on Front Burner

Front Burner

05:27 min | Last month

"six months" Discussed on Front Burner

"Another issue here is Canada's lack of diplomatic ties with Iran, which is making it a lot harder for families to get information, and no back in June and Iranian spokesperson said Iran had actually approached Canada about reopeing reopening relations. Between the countries! Is that something being discussed by the Canadian government right now. No. Minister Sham, paying? It's been very clear we as a government. We will do everything we can to hold people to account the only thing we are discussing with Iran is the investigation. From a safety point of view and criminal point of view to determine exactly the facts, and what happened and who was responsible for either making it happen or allowing it to happen. We are having no discussion with respect to diplomatic relations under the the international protocols we work through other countries that have those diplomatic relations to deal with issues like consular services, and and so forth we'll some families here have expressed particular frustration when they hear from families of victims in the UK. Who are getting information much more quickly. Well. We have established A an open portal for information. To which families are entitled to consult at Time It's an ongoing Internet service for the families to to provide up-to-date information There is also a regular flow of emails were family sending inquiries, and either the task force within global affairs or myself personally or Minister Shang or Minister Garneau we answer those losing queries directly where.

Iran Minister Sham Canadian government Canada Minister Garneau Minister Shang global affairs UK
"six months" Discussed on Front Burner

Front Burner

05:54 min | Last month

"six months" Discussed on Front Burner

"Rules..

"six months" Discussed on Nature Podcast

Nature Podcast

05:08 min | Last month

"six months" Discussed on Nature Podcast

"R.. Which works with coffee to conduct spectrum of measurements of ocean ecosystems in California current. Four Times per year. The count coffee tea heads to see to carry out pivotal shipboard, biological and ecological measurements and sampling cow coffee, having going out to the seventy two years, and this spring, the crew, preparing for the second voyage of the year, but once again lockdown struck. In April of twenty twenty for the first time in forty seven years, we were not able to go out to sample the ocean. And this has created many challenges for us. I have to say I understand the the basis for decision-making to stand down the research fleet in the United States. This is a matter of human health and safety, and it was a necessary action to take, but it does have repercussions for us. Spring is the start of the coastal upwelling season a time when the flora and fauna of the Asian kick into action plankton blooms, the growth and survival of fish, and the influences of carbon dioxide on the system are just some of the measurements. That will be missed this season so the. Ability to. Integrate the measurements we make into models is going to be. restricted. As a consequence of of this particular springtime time period. Their end forever in a day when we plot. The the time series measurements that are such important records of changes in plankton populations, changes in fish, larval populations changes in DNA. Measured by diversity in the upper motion, the those parts will have a hole in spring of twenty twenty. Now life will go on. Science will go on, but we've missed an opportunity to understand the natural variability in the system. And also how this human induced anthropology might perturbed that natural durability. Come the festive July, twenty, twenty, two academic research fleet is allowed to set sail again for obvious reasons social distancing on board, the ship will present some challenges so extra pre-boarding precautions have been put in place for those wanting to go out to the first of all. They're going to need to shelter in place in quarantine for a minimum of fourteen days in advance of research cruise at scripts. We've imposed a system of three successive covid tests. Tests by PCR, that must be taken at intervals across that fourteen day time period, people will be isolated in hotels for the last six days prior to cruise. If they pass the final PR test for COVID. They will then be escorted directly to a research vessel, and they will need to remain on that vessel until the end of the route research interval, it will be a culture change. It will also require a lot of human behavioral changes. But. I? If you're sufficiently motivated to answer the scientific questions then you're willing to to deal with these additional obstacles, and we're hoping that we can get back to the the scientific work that motivates us all. The scientific enterprise has undergone dramatic change over the last three months, but hand-in-hand with a crisis comes. Adaptation and scientists are well trained to cope with this. Scientists is of course filled with at certain moments, immense satisfaction and insights, but along the way toward those insights there are often frustrations. We all have experiments that fail instruments that don't perform the way they were supposed to challenging weather circumstances that make it difficult to complete a sampling powder in a field study, and in this particular spring of twenty. Twenty we encountered this nearly unprecedented inability to get out into the ocean environment. It's highly frustrating from a professional perspective. But oftentimes in science we land face down on the floor. We have to pick ourselves up and do the best. We can moving forward. Ending that report from Julia, Gold So that's it for another edition of Corona pod. If you've got a couple of sperm and could fill out the survey, we talked about at the start of the show. That would be amazing. I'll put up links that cost in the show. Out For, Corona Free Edition of the regular major lost on Wednesday and also you back here in seven days for the penultimate edition of Crew Import IV management. Thompson thanks for stay.

twenty twenty California United States Julia Thompson
"six months" Discussed on Nature Podcast

Nature Podcast

07:12 min | Last month

"six months" Discussed on Nature Podcast

"It doesn't seem to have necessarily stemmed the tide now. So. That was really disappointing. What might have done slow down? But it did not stem the tide, and I've talked to. You know informally I haven't reported this out as a story, but just talking with some people there and crew in Nigeria I think some of the story might be. They did try and ramp up testing but Peru when I wrote about prove they really could only tests in the capital, so testing is constrained by the resources and the other thing is Nigeria and Peru and Brazil. These are emerging economies. So yes, there are some affluent people that they. They also have a huge number of people who live in poverty in these places so once the virus moves the people who live in informal settlements. lockdowns are pretty much impossible and those situations. When you look at these graphs, you know there are so many, and there's a lot of places people can go in and find them as of Psycho Weldon data where you can sort of grow almost anything you can, you can imagine and you know for people like us. That are interested in data. You can get a bit lost in them, but it's interesting to think. Think about what you can glean from all of these data, so you know the graphs of there, and you might think the hidden within them is some kind of information about how successful treatments have been, but right now. Treatment isn't really part of this picture. Really what we're looking at at this point so far in the pandemic. How well or not well? There is public health responses have gone. Even that's kind of hard to unpick from these big broad data, the other thing that I think the thing that I find personally irritating is in the US. We've had more. More than two million cases. I feel like this is a huge experiment. I want more data just on when there's a positive case what might have been your exposure? Did you go to a wedding? Have you been living in a nursing home or do you live with twelve people? I wanted to sort of know where our people likely getting infected. I feel like that would be hugely useful right now. especially as the US starts to open up the economy, I think the overwhelming response in the US is. We don't really even care what the numbers are we are. Are Opening up right now, so I guess I would really like to also just see instead of these conjectures with different models about. Did this lead to this like I just want to know? Where are people are getting infected? I saw a google doc that was passed around. That is interesting of three hundred super spreader events that somebody compiled from around the role. Most of the data is from Singapore lots from China from Germany, so super spider events are just one event, so wouldn't be like a grocery store. It means there is this particular thing, a wedding and this. This is where three hundred people were infected or something like that. That's hypothetical style sort of interesting. I saw a lot of see refugee accommodations in Germany. Germany's for migrant workers in Singapore. Japan and China listed a lot of restaurants that we're kind of places of super spreading. There were about a dozen things labeled parties like nightclubs and Germany private event at a restaurant in Germany Riverboat Party and Tokyo Bar New Zealand, and there was a number of church services also listed so I feel like those are the kind of places where we're seeing our transmission could be. Be a problem notably mainly endorse almost all endorse puts me in mind of the current situation in the UK so right now as of the fourth of July noticed of the country as opening back up, now will be with various restrictions in place, so we have to stay feather way than a meter away from on a meter pluses what they're saying because it should be a plus some kind of other protection like a mask or something like that, but most places are able to open a pop from ten. There's ten classes of business that can open an specific. Specific and they listed down, and I can't help, but wonder whether or not there's any data about super spreader likelihood of something like that that has fed into why these ten of being chosen now includes nightclubs includes swimming pools and gyms logically I'm like yeah. I can see why jim might be a really risky place to go from transmission perspective people breathing heavily. It's hall. It's enclosed. It's close, but I would wonder whether or not there's been any day to this fed into this and whether or not it might be linked to the potential for super spreading events. Fitness classes was one of the thing and that Google Doc. I noticed that was Singapore, but yeah, so one thing. I want us you, amy is. We've taught a little about this in the past and especially with regard to some of the Post Bola, crisis. Crunchy that you've looked into in some countries and African continent and South America. All we still waiting to see that kind of rapid rise that we've seen in Europe and in states. Are we waiting to see that happen in some of these other countries? Is it just delayed it always to look different or do we not know what's so tricky is in countries where it's not clear if the testing is super widespread, really hard to know, wow, are they succeeding in slowing down a lot or are we just? Just not finding many cases in countries where there's very poor health systems. People don't have a habit of going to the hospital where they're going to get a test, so I'm not sure is the answer. It could take some time before you really see the punch of these things, and we still might. Yes, he is fake, if I think back to the very first episode of Colonel pod one of the things that we discussed. Was the things. We didn't know yet that we wanted to find out and one of them was. Would this virus be affected by temperature? As we know that son, sorts of flu could be all wood, younger people perhaps be less likely to have poor outcomes went. They're infected with the virus. I mean I'm interested to know how many of those questions we now know. The answers to I'm not sure it's not many. It definitely is that middle people can certainly become very sick with this virus and occasionally die, but it does seem like older people and people with. With underlying conditions specifically especially diabetes and hypertension. It seems like people with those conditions are harder. They do more frequently have severe disease or death, so that part I think we do have some clarity there. I still don't know what the deal. Children's certainly don't seem to be sick very often, but I i. still don't know what the deal is with whether or not they spread a lot as far as he killing it. I have not seen anything convincing about that being true. I stay away from those studies that are very over-simplified correlations because there's a lot. Lot of reasons for why a hot place has more than another place or less than another place. There was the whole antibody question that was really big for a while there like I know around me. People are still talking about how they're going to get an antibody tests. There's still a lot of hope like Oh, I'm going to get a test and then I'm going to be fine, but I think. Scientists are sort of like beginning to realize it's maybe not going to be super straightforward. There was a steady in nature medicine last week or the week before. Before the suggested that antibodies might only lasts for two or three weeks after an infection meaning could Wayne, and the also wasn't very sure about whether or not. They protect everybody against the new infection, so it didn't say they don't. It just doesn't appear to be a very straightforward strong effect. It could be this. There is very low levels of these really potent neutralizing antibodies that they just didn't pick up in this study that are sort of protective, but they didn't find that we could have immune cells, b, cells and t cells. Stick around that help, but. The fact is that sort of an open question still and also. The evidence doesn't suggest that it's a very straightforward Yay..

Germany US google Nigeria Peru China Singapore Psycho Weldon nature medicine South America Germany Riverboat Party Europe UK Wayne jim amy Brazil
"six months" Discussed on Nature Podcast

Nature Podcast

05:43 min | Last month

"six months" Discussed on Nature Podcast

"And if you can spare a couple minutes just to fill in those questions, it's only like three or four of them. That will really help us out in the future. This is not the last one we're going to do one more right. We're going to do to more. The tenth of July will be the last episode of Crow NEPAD in its current situation, and then we'll move into the nature August, and that's also not to say that there's no reason this couldn't come back. Back Right, so we do this because it's not true the time trying to make sure we can bring the best that we can to. You guys to the listeners at home, but right now this feels like the sensible move and we'll have to see how this goes. Because I think it says in the intro to every one of these episodes. We just don't really know how this pandemic is going to turn out still. I think there's something that amy said nothing ever according. It's safe to say we're in a different sort of chapter now and I do feel like you know in the beginning I. Really had no idea what was going to happen but I. Think now I have. Have a little bit more of an idea. Because before we had no past precedent to look to, and now we do, which is sort of interesting now. He can kind of see the trajectories of various countries in using the past. Maybe there's a little bit more guessing that we can do absolutely when the stops being the last epidemic and starts becoming the last three months. We've kind of got current past as it were that we can start to refer to. Yeah, there's a number of Nice websites out there from different outlets that kind of show graphs of different countries in their trajectories, so for example and I can put these links in the show notes but Financial Times has any. Any kind of series of graphs from different countries and one way that they look at it is they measure what are the excess develops time compared to previous years and you can see there. You know in some places like Norway Iceland in Israel. They don't really have a huge number of sex. So that says to me. They managed to really contain their outbreaks pretty swiftly. Other places have a very sharp mountain like the UK. Italy Spain huge climbs. Their deaths are fifty percent over usual fifty thousand more deaths than usual around there, and then you get the US, which is different than anywhere else where like in Europe? We have a very quickly escalating mountain, but we've got more of. Of like a mountain, range and fact right now, cases are going up in twenty seven states. So when I was saying we know a little bit more now I think if you're in a country like Italy where they're really seeing a huge decline, chances are. We'll see like what we saw in Singapore Germany. Sometimes there are big surges, but if the things that helped the outbreak to begin with are in place, then presumably, they will continue to stay in place so some of these graphs as well, and they're all kind of three sort of broad categories. The I can kind of divide the gross into as the graphs which have a kind of a tiny little bump that doesn't seem. Seem to make a huge difference like the fastest countries you talked about. And then you have this very characteristics of exponential huge spike that then also drops pretty quickly, and that's the way you know. The UK is currently sitting in a lot of European countries, and you look at the US and it sort of it is hard to sort of walkout what it represents because it is just like undulating up and down and up and down and up. It seems to be congratulated going down, but it's hard to I. Guess Really Understand what's happening in the states if you look at just sort of the whole of the United States in one graph, because what's happening in each individual state. State can be really quite drastically. Different on those graphs could look very very different issues to look at different states, which I guess makes sense because they have different governesses, and they have different public health sponsor in different places. Yeah, it's a big country, so it's GonNa look a little bit different there and that's one thing we don't see if there is a drop, it's not a rapid drop like it is elsewhere. What we see right now is that where as in March and April it was New York. That was just skyrocketing. Now we see is California Texas and Florida are kind of leading the way in rising number of cases, Arizona's distinct, and that has got such a steep. Steep increase right now they're outbreak is doubling every twelve days. Compare that to say in New York. where the outbreak seems to be doubling roughly every four hundred sixteen days just to say, it's not increasing at the same rate in eleven states it's decreasing and the other. One's is sort of hard to say so like you were saying. If you break it up, it changes depending on the state and this claim that the US has a lot of cases because of a lot of tests is just untrue. There's various measures to look at that. We've been at around five percent positive, even though the number of tests has gone way up so that part's not true some other. Things that people are pulling out of the stats, and I say people because the US CDC and health department, really leading the way as far as displaying data, but there's been a number of universities and also news that let's set of short. Pick up the slack here so you know. John Hopkins is one of various places that are tracking say racial disparities so from the. The data we have, it looks like even though black people are thirteen percent of the US. Population they account for twenty three percent of the deaths, so that disparity is looming pretty large and the other thing we might want to talk about is us has remained around twelve percent of all global deaths for quite a while, but Latin America is coming up pretty heavily. They've. They've been coming out for the last few weeks or so. At this point, they account for more than half of the new deaths in the world. So that's really disconcerting. Another eight percent of the world's population, the biggest surge there is in Brazil and Mexico is right behind that those both had leader is that we're really downplaying the seriousness of this pandemic and that's playing. Playing out now, but also in countries, where I've talked about how they put in really early, strict measures, Karoo they're still doing pretty poorly right now, and it's going up. It's pretty disconcerting. Those the ones that we stood out to me. Amy Is the ones that say did put efforts in place very very quickly..

United States amy UK Italy Crow NEPAD Financial Times New York John Hopkins Europe Singapore Germany CDC Spain Norway New York. Arizona Brazil California Mexico Latin America
"six months" Discussed on Nature Podcast

Nature Podcast

01:59 min | Last month

"six months" Discussed on Nature Podcast

"Corona pulled. In this show, we're going to bring you nature. Take on the latest covid nineteen developments. And we'll be speaking to experts around the world about research during the pandemic. This plays out. We also don't know a ton about this. Virus so there's so many open questions. I just have a really hard time. Making predictions that has i. don't know how the outbreaks going to change. Welcome to episode fifteen of Corona. Part I'm Benjamin Thompson back in the south London basement and I'm joined as always by Noah Baker, an amy maximum high both then. Before we get started today a little announcement from us all here. Uh, it feels like the pandemic is moving into a new chapter I think. Maybe you'll both the grill that of course is still ongoing, and the nature of science coverage is changing, and and we're looking to change with it, so we are coming to the end of Corona. What we're going to retire the show in a few episodes, isn't that. That right. Yeah, I think it's starting to become clear to us that we're kind of entering a new phase of the coronavirus pandemic, suddenly thorough here in the UK in the states. Now that's not to say that things aren't still very much going on in in other places of the world area in a very different phase, but I'm the way the AL coverage is working at nature in general. Is the IT's. It's starting to become more integrated into all of our coverage of science and less sort of the sole focus and I. think that's kind of what we're trying to do. Here is retire the colonel specific show, and instead will start bringing all of that reporting into the regular nature past which we we produce on a Wednesday every week. Yeah, that's exactly right of cut down version with all the latest stories are. are going on in the world of Corona virus research that in week, even if we are ending the show, we're going to try to make sure that we keep bits that people like. Yeah, that's right. We want to reach out to the listeners to you listening right now and find out what you enjoyed what you maybe didn't enjoy well because we want to take what we've learned into our future shows..

Corona Benjamin Thompson AL Noah Baker UK London
"six months" Discussed on RUMBLE with MICHAEL MOORE

RUMBLE with MICHAEL MOORE

06:08 min | 2 months ago

"six months" Discussed on RUMBLE with MICHAEL MOORE

"In my apartment had been here for. The march, eighth and I. Just keep cleaning and cooking and gaining John Pounds, and that's an I'm just thinking it's it's what I do I. always except I go to markets to solve, but I'm pretty much doing everything that I would normally do except maybe getting out more. And I've and I've I've started to do things I haven't done in a long time or author. Yeah never things I've never done, and and I'm I'll do a podcast. When we're near the end of the pandemic by the way, it will end by the way. Everyone should know that. Viruses did do not last forever. The Boo Bonnie Plague I was a bacteria a based in length for three hundred years pinned, and then we see with the virus not so long right up three years in old will be through this. If we all do the right things, but but I wanna I wanNA. DO THEY WANNA do a guess about what I've learned during this time? Just even talking to you I've learned all the stuff about jam. In looking your separators and peppers that I knew nothing about so I will take that with me today I'll bring my diary and and I will be grateful for Kathy Best. But and I, where are at the end of this, but I I It it means a lot to me that you were listening to the podcast from the Anti, war? I'd love to send you some Jam Morrisseau, our love that. A I would love to share your website or address, or whatever with the people are listening to this? Because I know, people's mouths started watering as you hide those various jams, so people want Kathy's hot damn jam. Clean, it's Canada. Keep it clean. I'm on facebook. As my little facebook page is Kathy Scott Damn. JAP and you just go there and you'll see all my products. I make a whole other bunch of. Your at Kathy's Hot Damn Dam. Damn. No. Posture Piasters Kathy's. Geez I don't know I don't know I. Don't think it's a positive now. I think it's just copy for Dan I think just right hot, damn, Jama, the H., O. T., D. A. M, J M. it'll come on come up. Well Kathy, thank you and. How pay for it? I mean you don't. You know I I WANNA support. You and I think you're GONNA get a few orders from. Listening to this at. I've been talking to cathy best from Vancouver. Island in British Columbia Canada Campbell River to be specific we're going to. Yet, we're going to be okay you're going. To. Keep hearing your your your voice. I wanted to say two words to you. Viability Equals Courageous Bonderman. equals courageous. That's how I think of you. Geez. That is I'm serious. That's. I heard that saying one time and. I thought of you right away. When somebody said to be courageous, you have to be vulnerable is the is the thing you? Learn that that's a new thing. That's another thing I Yes courageous you have to be Bondra. Ability equals courageous. That's something I just WanNa ride and put it up on my wall. We all need to do that, so I think so too, so might see last words. Thank you very much Kathy. Thank you for being our ten million listener along with Rob Mesic and and I hope our paths will cross some day in than Guber. I listen you. You have to be from the Midwest or candidate to understand the long goodbye whenever you. Leave. Your Relatives House friends whatever? Kathy Best, thank you. For that I'm looking forward to the JAM and And Hang in there out on out on that island. All this this has been great talking to. These three listeners wow We'll do this again sometime, I love hearing the feedback and having that having that discussion. I love the sense that we're all in this together. I will be feel that way. I feel that way, and if we keep this up I do believe things are going to get better. Folks happen on its own. It will happen with our action. so that's it for our six six months anniversary show. Episode Number Ninety two. Looking forward to the next up six months the next two episodes and thank you all of you for for being here with me. I also want to thank our executive producer Basil Hamden. our editor and sound engineer. Nick was the rumble kitchen cabinet an Veronica Kelsey Joe. Donald Herald. Danya all of you. Thanks also to our underwriters, though have been supporting us and I. Ask you to please support them. In, many thanks to all of you who are listening all you listeners. Who are surreptitiously listening to me in your cubicles? Your Car's classrooms wherever you're hiding deep inside the Amazon warehouse. Out Sneak in a quick smoke outside the stop and rob slaving away in the fields, surviving whatever assembly line you're stuck on. Heading home on the train. Thanks to the elderly into the new MOMS who are listening to the florist, the Barista the barristers, and all you download freeloaders, free subscribers college dropouts. The mass incarcerated soon to be freed. And the soon to be incarcerated commander in chief, I promise to come. See you on visiting days. All of you. You can leave me a voicemail. A personal voicemail I listened to these. You can leave it right here on the podcast platform page has a link to leaving me a.

Piasters Kathy Kathy Best Kathy Scott facebook John Pounds Canada Vancouver Rob Mesic Bondra Columbia Jama Campbell River Dan Donald Herald Amazon Nick Guber O. T. executive producer
"six months" Discussed on The Signal

The Signal

06:23 min | 4 months ago

"six months" Discussed on The Signal

"So like we were saying these pods on the same length. Elimination would be the shortest option. Tony says might still be available but not for long and the next shortest would be flattening. The curve that's allowing the virus to spread to a point that is a user at capacity in this number of assumptions here. But these are hit. Immunity is achieved sixty percent. We double out. Icu pissed so the record about four thousand base to deal with covert. The average tawny admits IC- issue if you get covered as teen days and we also control the epidemic levers and keep just said. Icu pistol it would take featuring extreme calculations to see it all pass by February. Yeah which is a lot longer than the six month idea. That's being discussed publicly at the moment. Not at six months has ever been a promise but a lot of the policy response especially the economic kind seems to be geared towards that timeframe whereas February is more like ten or eleven months on upside tiny reckons. If Australia does a good job of isolating the vulnerable the elderly and people with commodities and some antiviral treatments become available. We could cut that time in half right. And then there's the Middle Pa the one that we're on right now and even longer than eleven months because he thinks if we keep squashing the curve way below. Icu capacity not low enough to wipe it out altogether. We'll probably end up with a vaccine before we rate showed immunity. Which means we'd say living like this for somewhere in the vicinity of a year to maybe even a year and a half because there's not enough social context to allow the boss to speed enough to get the infection right up to get the kite is passing through an achieve here community. Now that's just about hero seat. Settimana public health medicine speechless saying that. If we want to get hit immunity we're going to let more people cannot victim and doing some version of this until winter. 2021 isn't a pretty thought but neither is tens of thousands of voidable deaths. We WANT TO ACHIEVE IMMUNITY BEFORE CHRISTMAS. Too much social physical distancing environment which is why as a society. We need to work out. What our goal is here are. We hid immunity and completely relax because try and why and have reduced epidemic all social costume social disruption and economic cost. All those things for much longer until we have a vaccine okay so say Australia does want to achieve herd immunity foster. What are they doing that so if Australia? The signs that we want immunity and we want to try to before Christmas assault. Not Too long we would now just ease off a little bit sale out. People can take to work but more just get infection right up everything along and then we would get took point where it was starting to grow quickly would probably have to go into the liberal physical team. We hit now or preps even more lockdown and then holder that now. That's what I can say. I know played with the mathematics to make myself a sexy tricky. So you need to have a margin of era near you put in the controls all north. You go to to move. And it's quite a frightening thing for the chief medical officer to the thinking about pulling all but if we wanted to go to him you see that we would do. And some countries Sweden's by Sweden is relatively relaxed about the team. Except SEAN so this quarter around the world and how countries are purchasing. Okay so kind of a stop stop. Stop model yeah or to torture. Everyone's favourite metaphor this week about hibernation. We would wake the Baragan just for a little while and then send it back to sleep are not necessarily advocating that astray should take us. Pa But it isn't option. I think a lot of people think that what we're doing now. We'll get us through to feud immunity pointing out. That will now smell social distancing if we keep it on will not cheat hit immunity and we're looking at a really really long hole in the state until there's a vaccine we do have another option needs to be discussed about advocating. We take that route. It's not my job to decide that citizenry astrid that deserves the chance to have explained to them and be able to flick back to the politicians as to. What the preferences do you think? It's possible that the government's already chosen the model which we sort of redundant shave her immunity and we wait it out until there's a vaccine but they've maybe done a bit of a calculation that people will freak out if you say to them by the way you're going to be indoors for another eleven months. I couldn't possibly comment. Go on I suspect. That's what's happened to and I'm not going to criticize the too much into this really but I do wonder. Alexei speaks to wonder this being a hit in the UK the UK was initially on a trajectory towards immunity. And then basically the Imperial College study came out and shuts rights and society. Just to wear not going there. But they didn't consider what options where and so you look down by political will increase physical distancing. That happens and then. You're sitting here Australia about three weeks. Away behind chief medical officer. And you're looking at all this the prime minister. And you're looking at the less neutron wick. At how do we find out about this? I suspect just? What is this if we can't demonstrate immunity route possible so we'll go this middle route and we'll public know that this means it's not going to achieve it immunity when we get a bit of settling down here? I think we need to be transparent about. We're not going to be cheaper than going to be reading all because these serious implications.

Australia Icu medical officer Middle Pa Tony Sweden epidemic assault prime minister Pa UK Imperial College SEAN Alexei
"six months" Discussed on The Signal

The Signal

01:53 min | 4 months ago

"six months" Discussed on The Signal

"Okay so that middle option where you worked minimize infection but Tony. Shut everything down. Which is what you have to limit. The virus has these catch. And that's how long it's GonNa take. Yeah because there's only two ways that life goes back to normal. It's herd immunity or a vaccine and without one of those two things. Everything stays in stasis just like it is now did immunity as we've got enough people who are immune population that the virus can no longer keep sick and this guy says sixty because we need one person passes it onto two point five people in a completely virgin city population of sixty people from noon. It's going to be slightly less than one person you pass onto in the epidemic fights hid. Immunity is do. We need immunity. Well most of us thought this. What will be going from the fist price? Because then it means you can just up your borders garbage locked normally might if you just here and there but you back into a normal. Erie once you've got the the problem is the the cost in human lives to get to it immunity. The flip side is if you not hit immunity you've got the cost and by costuming. Costa's General Seats Economic Costs. Call to the visuals of social disruption. The cost of functioning in society lockdown go into social distance single success. I really challenging since we need. Batra relation of these in goals. And we need bitter discussion than what? We're getting at the moment and bridges back to the dilemma. At the core of this pandemic the economic cost though since the death toll and Tony says the price of flattening the curve. Instead of squashing it could be tens of thousands of.

Tony Batra Erie Costa
"six months" Discussed on The Signal

The Signal

03:34 min | 4 months ago

"six months" Discussed on The Signal

"We've been told a guy like everyone we are covering the virus announce changed the world pretty much every single episode and most of the time that just means one small corner of it but every now and then take step back and look at the big picture and that is the strategy for beating it back and eventually getting back to normal. Yeah so we didn't episode not too long ago a cold the fork in the road and it talked about how. Australia had an urgent choice to make. We could a lockdown completely very quickly and try to eradicate the virus all together leaving us with a separate economy until vaccine shows up in twelve to eighteen months New Zealand. Yeah all be. We could try to flatten the curve. Which is most people now? Know means keeping the right of infection to a level where our hospitals busy but won't be overwhelmed as the virus runs. Its course through the population and we ultimately emerged with what's usually referred to as herd immunity. Well didn't go down the elimination rate and we appear to go down the letting the Scott Mawson Brenham affi chief medical officer helping science and CNN Flattening policies are epidemiologist professor. Tony Blankley from the University of Melbourne. He says it looked. I like the government was picking option B. until the weekend when things took another turn for some it's ramped up the ball with a liberal special doesn't seem to be continued to grow hotter the meaning. We were at twenty five to thirty percent grass just over a week a guy on a daily basis at now we have come down in the last week to the low teens and the lightest advice. I have from the national incident. Santa this morning is that the last three days have pain approximately nine percent on average and that raises a beer interesting coin it would appear that means at least two different things. So he's my car fled to me at least means that we parse the team account and Thompson tykes water run free society but we still get to immunity Maine Sixty the population being infected. But if you look at the policies that places. Uk apparently here. It's quite a different goal. I'm living what we're trying to do. Is We try to treat this like an outbreak and just suppress much harm. Gone as possible and absolutely minimize. Now that might mean that Bar September August or we never heard us on the couch plus sittings that might be only teams seemed of us would have been infected. That's good there'll be fewer deaths brought. It means that we will not have achieved immunity and therefore needs to stay under the same special. Listen Mesia's for quite some period. Retirement is a vaccine about what Chinese describing here is a third party Middle Path. And that's the one. Australia seems to be taking right now. He's even come up with a name for it or on coaling squashing. The which is what we're the moment. Bisi trading like a Mass Pike Williams. Inhale hogging fiction goes but not quite.

Australia professor Tony Blankley Scott Mawson Brenham affi New Zealand CNN University of Melbourne Uk Santa Thompson Mesia medical officer Maine
"six months" Discussed on The Road Home To You

The Road Home To You

07:16 min | 10 months ago

"six months" Discussed on The Road Home To You

"Think you need some downtime your brain to just kind of be sort of empty for a little bit but I think I tend to empty my brain far too often and the thing that I would wanna do is I would wanNA keep podcasting because I'd want to continue to share God's love with everybody who would listen and I I think it's important to try to Assan whatever lessons whatever hard hard won lessons we've learned in this life from God you know we need to pass on to the people around and US yeah because you know those people that we are connected with in one way or another those lessons are going to have a greater impact because they're within the context of life and they can go you know what I shared life with this person I know what this was like for them so this lesson has weight and it has meaning right yeah Yeah Yeah I'd I'd WanNa keep podcasting for that reason that I'd WanNa keep 'em serving in church And and I would want to spend as much time I'm with family and friends as I possibly could and one of the things that I'd WanNa do is I would wanNA write letters to you to Evan and Tamale for all of the situations that might come up for all of the things in the future that I might not be there for you know molly walking down the aisle having her first child FM making the the hard scary the step of proposing to the woman that he loves you know when days are hard you know just just writing letters to to address those times like I'm not I might not be there with you physically but in there with you in my heart and in your heart yeah and see I don't think I could do letters I think I would probably just like canoe video like just have a camera and Tony Stark it Yup I love you three thousand but you know I mean that's that's the thing and that's one of the things that I love about recording is the fact that you know one of my favorite things that I have I've got two things from dad that means the world to me uh-huh and one is a letter that he wrote after he and I had gotten to a big argument about something and he wrote me said I'm not always the best dad but I always love you and then the other thing is his recording of his song man on cavalry which I've played in one of our previous episodes and to hear his voice and to hear his laugh those things means so much to me because there are times where I'm like like for whatever reason I'm feeling super sentimental about dowd right now and And I wish he was here and I know that you know one day I'll I'll get to see make it but I miss him in the here and the now and there are times where I'm like Gosh I wish I could just call him up on the phone and they're times when I'll hear somebody else laugh or even clear their throat and I swear it sounds just like my dad I mean it's weird how like throat clearing has a distinct sound for people but it does and and so this is all you know like really deep and heavy but I just uh-huh oh goodness yeah so so there's think what it comes down to is really like I I too would want to spend time reflecting and spend time in prayer and spend time just absorbing God's promises because I figure if you've only if you know that you've only got six months to live then that means that there's added Isaiah or Jeremiah One of those Old Testament Prophets just there's that repetitive be strong and courageous fear not take courage you know all of those kinds of exhortations to to us as believers and I would just want to rest in those and and find comfort and hope in those and then I would just want to tell everybody difficult as it may be yeah absolutely the importance of surrendering your life to God because really no matter where we are in life this life is just a blink of an eye and we need to be investing every moment of every day in our eternal future not just this here now because real future I think we're going to be a little bit better off and and that was one thing you know we've been also going through the the Dave Ramsey Z. financial peace thing and he's got all of this advice about saving for retirement and things and and that's all well and good.

six months one day
"six months" Discussed on The Road Home To You

The Road Home To You

15:53 min | 10 months ago

"six months" Discussed on The Road Home To You

"Thanks for joining us on the road home to you a podcast where we talk about what it means to be broken messy Christian and broken messy world we understand living the life of faith is hard to do and sometimes even hard to understand so let's talk about it grab a road trip snacks and a buddy buckle up and let ahead on down that long road home off aw hey friends welcome to the road home to you I am brand gable able it is so good to have you with us today it is hurry for today hurry for today indeed because it's a beautiful day it is a gorgeous fall day here in the Pacific northwest in all the all the colors turned yes and or are turning and it's sunny and chill but not not cold right yes it's that perfect sweater weather where you just want to have a sweatshirt or your scarf or something like that snuggle up in yeah that's perfect I love it it's really nice it's my favorite time of year do you know why why because it's my birthday time whole reason we have the month of October is to celebrate me right of course of course that's your mom might object to that my mom and my grandma and probably millions of other people hey whatever but it is it is definitely my favorite time of the year because I just I love the the crystal the crispness of the air and the colors and yeah it's love everything about the fall yeah it's I don't know it's always so sad too because in Oregon this time of year is always so very fleeting you know you just have the brief window where the weather is that kind of perfect fall weather in the the colors the leaves that doesn't last very long so so it's kind of when you get one of those perfect days you really want to savor it because you know it's not GonNa last and pretty soon it's just going to be the endless grey drizzle of enter the Pacific northwest that everyone knows and hates not everybody hates it but yeah it can get old it can usually by about March after endless days of rain well hey so Oh speaking of endless days of rain yes I'm sure that's a really great segue for what we're GonNa talk about today Okay I I don't I don't know how I don't know either but that's okay we're GONNA go with it because it's there now so so what we're GonNa talk about today is now that I'm Mike now that we're like sitting at the microphone and Mike this is a morbid question it is but it's also so very important in it's it's something even though it's morbid that we should be thinking about more often right and that question is if you only had six months to live love what would you do the idea to do this episode came from the fact that you and I are both starting lead genesis process groups at our church You're having your first meeting tonight I'm having my first meeting tomorrow morning we're both very excited about that but in the process we're going through the process to and because that's how genesis works and so as we are going to your homework one of the questions that came up is what are your current priorities like how do you spend the bulk of your time and it was kind of in regards to to the areas of entertainment and family and work in ministry and time with God that kind of thing and so you had to list out the way you are currently spending your time like what what are your priorities now this is what you would like them to be and then the follow up question is that if you if you had six months yeah but what would you do how would you live and and that was really poignant question because this is the second time I've gone through genesis and I think that the first time that I answered this question I'd have to go back and look but I think that the first time I went through through at like eight years ago I don't think I answered it as honestly maybe I think I was trying to be honest but I think I was still also trying to give the right answer do you know what I mean yeah and I was tempted to do that you know I was tempted to give this answer that would you know be oh I think they're looking for this or my answer ought to be this I think that's what it is like well my answer should be that this is how I been it's been all six months just like studying my Bible and dry near God detected and that's not really how I would spend my final six months it's no and and that certainly isn't how I'm spending my time now so it was it was a really interesting chance to kind of self reflect a little bit uh-huh So do you WanNa go first or should I go I I can go first if you want okay yeah you know I'm afraid my answer is not very inter- resting largely because the place I I did answer honestly which makes my answer less interesting I think strangely enough mostly because the financial place we're in I would still have to work if I was still capable of working I would still have to work for at least a good chunk of that six months you know just to continue to pay bills and things like that and I definitely have to continue making the life insurance payment you know yes you would but you know there's all the other things too that I'd have to keep up with so I'd have to keep working but it's what I would do with the leftover time you know I definitely wouldn't work any overtime you know I wouldn't set foot inside that building for one in it longer than I I had to I think and anytime after that would be I think I would drop everything else and I would just spend time with family and really try to connect with everybody that I cared about as much as I possibly could for the next six months as well as as well as some of that you know quiet reflection God connection time as well do you do you have it anything in your life where like you would 'cause you sometimes hear the the phrase like you know when you're on your deathbed like you're not going to regret the Times that your house wasn't clean or the hours you didn't work overtime or whatever do you think you would kind of reflect back and go man I wish I would have spent more time doing this thing instead of you know over time or or whatever I don't know the Times that I've spent working overtime it hasn't been because Oh wow I just really enjoy work and I WANNA stay here right yeah you're not a workaholic no so if I'm if I'm continuing to stay at work it's to pay bills yeah so you know sure I regret that stuff because I just as soon not have as many bills I regret that the irs players taxes right yeah well that's the yeah that's the least of our our business but anyway no you know I don't know I don't I don't think I really I I have regrets over some of the choices that I made earlier in life I made some poor choices here and there if I could do it over again yeah I would change those but for the most part like you know where I've spent my time and energy and effort day in and day out put I wouldn't change a thing because whenever I get a chance I'm spending time with the people that I love and I'm investing in them yeah well that's what it's all about so here's a question that you hadn't talked about like hey let's talk about this thing so this is putting you completely on the spot but what would you hope that people would say to you or say about you in a eulogy you know I I would hope that people would say that I did the best I could to love the people that were around me and that I also did the best I could to live my life with integrity and to to live out the things that I see that I believed and to live out the life that that God laid in front of me man outside of those you know if if there's if there's people if the people near me testify to the fact that that I love God and M was committed to him his word and doing the things that he wanted me to do you know that's that's all I need yes so for me this was kind of an interesting exercise because this weekend you know I spent with my mom and I just got back this morning and it was really interesting because this morning I had an opportunity to look through my dad's old Bible uh-huh and my dad has been gone now for twenty two or three years he died in in December of nineteen ninety seven and I can't do math so we'll let the audience figure that one out but you know it's it's been a long a long while since he's been around and so that this morning I was sitting at my mom's office and I was looking through Dad's Bible and it's it was neat to see you know his handwriting and his thoughts on what scripture was saying and and revelations that he was making and some of those things and and then I came across a letter that was all folded up and and muddy and kind of gross looking and it was a letter that I had written today ad two years after he died it was father's Day and I stuck it my mom and brother and I went to dad's graveside that father's Day and I stuck that letter all folded up down next to his headstone kind of in the ground and when we left my mom apparently grabbed that letter and stuck it in depth in Dad's Bible and so I was unfolding at this morning and it's like what in the world what is this and then I read it and it was me just commenting on life without dad and I was pregnant with Evan at the time was talking about that and how I was worried because our first pregnancy we had lost and in but I was also excited because because he had been such a good example of a dad and and he and mom together had been such good examples of parents and a married couple and stuff and then as I was going through his Bible some more I found an accounting that dad had written of the two weeks while his mom was in the hospital dying from complications due to diabetes and it was it was just this poignant retaliating I mean because it was all I mean there was some you know some personal narrative in there and some comments and and thoughts and feelings about it and staff and but it was also this kind of factual retelling of events but it was neat because there were moments where he's talking about his his mom he grew up my dad grew up Mormon is so you know as those mom is Mormon and so there were times when he just got to sit next to his mom and pray with her and pray over her and they became prayer buddies during that two weeks and he was talking about just spending that time with her and I remember that time super well 'cause this was shortly before we got married and I was there for that final week and I remember going in and out of grandma's room and I remember reading just a ton of you've of the Bible tour and praying over her while she was sleeping and just holding her hand and telling her how much Jesus loved her you know and all these things and and regretting the fact that I hadn't gotten to spend time with her and I hadn't really gotten to know her I never knew my grandma as a person like she was just she was always kind of in the background and we didn't spend a lot of time with my dad's side of the family and when we did she was just kind of a wallflower she just Kinda took care of food and and made sure that there was candy in the in the candy dish because that's what Graham I did in the eighties and and she I and I loved her I loved her very much and she loved us kids very much but there's regret that oh I didn't get a chance to really get to know her and so I'm reading this this accounting of my dad talking about the time that his mom died and and and here my dad has died also and and so it was just this lake home my gosh like it just hit me this morning really hard that we have no idea the impact that we have on people and we have no idea the time that we have left and as I was driving home to two and a half hour drive and I was praying and I was like God i Just WanNa live my time well I just to be useful with it and I said I was like God even if it's like even if the next two hours of are the last two hours of my life you know if I die on the way home I want to spend that two hours well and wisely and and all I could do for that two hours I just kind of intermittently cried and prayed Eden it's kind of all I could do because it was really emotional this morning and I clearly still emma kind of choking up and so as I I was as I was answering this question in our genesis book what I was thinking about is is kind of the same thing in terms of like I would drop everything thing that I could you know that was peripheral like the first thing I wrote down was I would put down the damn phone you know because my cellphone eats up so much stupid time I spend far too much time playing games and checking social media and listening to listening to podcasts but here's the thing I'm listening to podcasts that don't edify build me up they don't challenge me they don't encourage my fate they don't grow me as a person they just entertain me which not that entertainment is bad I think we need entertainment and I.

Pacific six months two hours two weeks eight years three years two years
"six months" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

Marketplace All-in-One

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"six months" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

"If you've been on madly. And you've pushed about e every day for six months, you've carried that pushchair up and down stairs. These are really things that will inform your design later. So if you're not around the table and you haven't lived that you can't share that experience. So you've been imagining how cities might look if a diverse group of people design them. There might be toilets when you need them. This is a sump shin that you should go in and buy a coffee to use the bathroom, which is kind of a false economy because you're putting more fluids in, and then you have to take your fluids out places to sit down, benches have been removed. So I think there is the sense that the city is designing people out. I think teenagers are the ones who are often pushed out of places. There's always these little rackets put on benches to stop them bringing their, you know, kind of doing the skateboard thing long time. Okay, you aren't skateboarders, but we get what you're saying. And I think if they designed it, they probably create some great places for them to hang out. I love that. You also say that would be phone chargers everywhere. I suppose people could argue, well, the elderly, teenagers and mothers with small children aren't necessarily contributing as much economy. So why should a city spend money to make them more comfortable? We're all going to be working until we're all its nowadays. And I think a lot of these neighborhoods were built when you had single men going to work. It's changed. The business worker is no longer single, white and male, and I think that our cities need to change in our approach to design needs to change about soccer TEK, Christine Murray in London..

Christine Murray soccer London six months
"six months" Discussed on POLITICO's Pulse Check

POLITICO's Pulse Check

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"six months" Discussed on POLITICO's Pulse Check

"One of the more shocking things that i found actually wasn't in my story itself it was just in my time in puerto rico which is when you drive around the island most of the traffic lights are out even i was there a few weeks ago so this is almost six months after hurricane maria and even in san juan there are a lot of traffic lights that are out and it's it's a bit crazy to drive through and it's a crazy the fact that we're six months later in a major us city and that still the case and it it certainly dangerous it slows down traffic it's causes economic problems it causes fatalities these are big issues at it's typical solve it's also very much that canary in the coalmine situation where if you can't get the traffic lights working what else is in working below the surface that's bigger and more problematic yeah i mean that they're finding new things every day and the next season's approaching how far away is puerto rico from getting back to where it needs to be and what are the tools that lawmakers that that recovery experts are using to help puerto rico along he said it's still i it's doing recovery we've talked to they still it's still in response i mean the electricity is still not on throughout the entire island they still think they're literally in the kind of the first phase of response and getting to the end of it but the recovery still is barely beginning this is going to be many many years if not decades long process i mean after katrina it's taken ten plus years for that recovery to continue so we're looking at very long process here and it's really just getting going last question puerto.

puerto rico hurricane maria san juan katrina six months
"six months" Discussed on POLITICO's Pulse Check

POLITICO's Pulse Check

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"six months" Discussed on POLITICO's Pulse Check

"Six months ago hurricane maria hit the island puerto rico hi circle hurricane relief down please all we have is us there's no fema here there's no armenia you know only the people the people people suffer today on politico pulse check we'll look at how the island is still reeling from the devastating storm and what that means for the millions of puerto ricans seeking healthcare i i'll talk to politico's danny vinik who recently returned from puerto rico and has a new story comparing the federal government's response to hurricane maria with hurricane harvey which hit texas then after the break i caught up with dr series barbaro new york city's deputy commissioner of health who led a team of responders down to puerto rico to review the healthcare challenges plaguing the island just reminder if you like pulse check you can help us you can rate the podcast review at shirt with a friend all of those help us find new listeners and let me know at d diamond politico dot com or at diamond on twitter and who you bike to hear from next and what topics you want to hear on this show many listeners suggested in rhode on puerto rico and that's why we're doing one today i'm joined now by danny vinik is just an editor of the agenda who's out with a major new story how trump favored texas over puerto rico danny your article traces the different federal response to hurricane harvey in texas and hurricane maria and puerto rico how different were those responses.

maria puerto ricans politico danny vinik puerto rico hurricane harvey texas york city deputy commissioner twitter rhode editor barbaro hurricane maria Six months
"six months" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"six months" Discussed on The Takeaway

"In massachusetts similar to what the council woman is describing in hartford absolutely it's it's pretty much the same challenges here massachusetts among the number of families who are receiving the tsa program to housing voucher assistance messages was number two or number three in the country currently there are about between five hundred and six hundred families receiving this benefit and just like the woman said here it's families that don't have access to a kitchen in a hotel families that have to figure out how to get their kids to school when they have no transportation so it's pretty much the same to me the most heartbreaking thing that i saw was that in holyoke this in western massachusetts is a city that were families there that were riding in large numbers and you know i spoke to people who actually were going hungry because again that not having access to kitchen in a hotel is something that you know we don't really think of you know being a big deal but for these families that means that they have to find ways to cook their own meals or via their own meals which obviously makes them more expensive and more challenging so i heard from a lot of people that hunger was a very big concern because they were going days without eating so for a lot of these families yes disbenefit benefit is supposed to be temporary but when you have kids the councilwoman said many of these families have you know small kids you have to you know sign them up for school and so when you're thinking about leaving are transitioning out of housing that becomes a large concern where mike is going to go to school there there's school here i don't wanna do rupt them anymore so you wanna find housing options nearby to minimize this russian so the challenges is pretty much the same in it and it's pretty dire and marcella who is helping them with those challenges i mean the council woman is describing situation we're six months after the storm now many of these families your describing them.

massachusetts hartford holyoke mike marcella tsa six months
"six months" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"six months" Discussed on The Takeaway

"This is the takeaway podcast for tuesday march twentieth twenty eighteen it's the first day of spring it's the equinox it's also six months hurricane maria hit puerto rico will start there this hour and will end the hour with comedian aparna charles i'm retweeting so gonna be okay stick around it's funny this is the takeaway i've taught it's good to have you with us six months ago today on september twentieth hurricane maria hit puerto rico things are slowly getting better in puerto rico but with businesses and infrastructure devastated a hundred and thirty five thousand puerto ricans have left the island according to cbs news many of them with no firm plans to return and a lot of them have arrived on the mainland with no real place to go back in october fema started offering temporary shelter benefits for people displaced by the storm that shelter for thousands of vacuoles took the form of a hotel room somewhere in the united states but six months later thirty five hundred puerto ricans are still living in hotels and motels under what's called the transitional sheltering assistance program today was supposed to be the deadline cutting off those hotel vouchers but on monday fema extended the program until midmay willoughby's bermudez knows firsthand the toll this process has taken on both families and the cities that have welcomed them on the mainland bermudez is a member of the city council in hartford connecticut and she joins me now we'll delete welcome thank you thanks for having me and marcela garcia is also hearing editor he'll writer for the boston globe marcel thanks for being here as well high councilwoman bermuda's let me start with you how many families remain in hotels in hartford now and and how did hartford get involved in accepting them.

bermudez boston writer cbs hartford bermuda editor marcela garcia hartford connecticut maria midmay willoughby fema united states puerto ricans hurricane maria aparna charles puerto rico six months