36 Burst results for "Six Month"

How To Manage Digital Reputations With Josh Greene

Lochhead on Marketing

05:00 min | 16 hrs ago

How To Manage Digital Reputations With Josh Greene

"Josh. It's great to see you. It's great to be on. Thanks for having me. I'm really excited. I your fascinating guy so Here's sort of an idea. I think we live at a time. Where when most of us get introduced to somebody new one of the very first things we do after somebody says. Hey i want to introduce you to josh green. I'm gonna go you. And i think that's pretty pretty normal and in a world where i saw post from a dear friend of mine duska zapata. Who's rough and tough six months into a new job and she. Her post was all about the fact that she's never met the people that she works with in person. And so we're living in this digital first world right and so. I think it's a natural thing when we meet somebody. I think a lot of google them so this leads me to a question which is but yet. Most of us don't know how to take responsibility for what happens. Somebody types josh green into that little box. And so maybe let's use that as a jumping off point in terms of. How do i manage. What happens after somebody starts searching for me absolutely and really the first thing that you want to do is take a look at the overall results when someone Searches on your name and take stock of how many of those results are items that you control or about you and then start thinking about whether you would like to have more mentions of yourself on that page or the ones that are already there. Are they conveying what you would like them to convey To the world when the world looks at you so If they if they google you are you the world's best stockbroker or you a stockbroker who's been barred three times from the industry very different results. Very different impact could be the same person But but what shows up in google especially on that first page is really going to influence a large chunk of the world of their first impression of you. Yeah it's interesting. My buddy isaac morehouse. Who's the founder of crash. One of the things he says is i love be your own credential and of course part of that is what do people see about you. Digitally when they start digging around and so You know when you and i met. I didn't know much about how i myself or for that matter. If i'm a. Ceo or cmo or an entrepreneur. What have you My company you can actually take control over a fair amount of what happens after somebody types in your name can't you you can you can And i think you're a great example of of someone who's done a nice job of that whether intentionally or not it wasn't so tell tell me because when you and i first met. You told me that you said that. Hey the shit that comes up is good and anyway tell me about what you saw and what was good and what was not good. And how that applies more broadly to other people in other companies. Well when i took a look at your name there was a nothing negative really on the front page at all. You had your twitter feed was showing up in the top three or four results which is usually a subconscious. Cue that someone's something of an authority in their area or google algorithm thinks that over on the top right side of those search results is what's called the knowledge panel and most people it's powered by their wikipedia page In your case it was powered by amazon bio. Which is i suspect. Both something you or publicists have written and also very flattering And also much more positive than a typical wikipedia result would be there which is a much more neutral encyclopedia extending entry and the nice thing for you is. People are so used to sing with a pd content. There that when they see that you're a number one podcast an author and cult classic writer. They assume those things are all automatically true because they're used to wikipedia source of truth being there and in your case you're probably the you're the first person i ever saw. Who had something other than wikipedia. Showing up there in a meaningful way I've seen a couple of others since since that started looking for it but really if someone looks at this page are gonna say. Wow this is someone. Who's you know a thought leader in his space. Whose accomplished a bunch of things which is a really great start. Anyone trying to learn more about you

Josh Green Duska Zapata Google Isaac Morehouse Josh Twitter Amazon
Fresh "Six Month" from Broncos Country Tonight

Broncos Country Tonight

00:46 sec | 1 hr ago

Fresh "Six Month" from Broncos Country Tonight

"One printer, Just 1 69 99 with double the warranty and six months of free ink staples. I'm Darren Copeland on K Away News Radio live everywhere on the I Heart radio app tax 31 pinpoint whether partly cloudy tonight have low of 2043 tomorrow 46 on Sunday It's now 36 degrees through wind, rain and snow, but maybe not protest of the threat of violence Protests in downtown Denver, the U. S Service Postal Service says it will temporarily remove collection boxes to protect the male and the public. A few postal service officer, few post service offices will also have limited hours in the downtown area. Colorado's joining other states and sending at least 200, members of the National Guard to Washington, D. C. The National Guard said Friday afternoon. 25,000 troops.

U. S Service Postal Service Darren Copeland National Guard D. C. The National Guard Denver Officer Colorado Washington
What You Need to Know About Bitcoin Layer 2s

Unconfirmed: Insights and Analysis From the Top Minds in Crypto

08:49 min | 19 hrs ago

What You Need to Know About Bitcoin Layer 2s

"Everyone will come to. Our panel layer twos on bitcoin with melting juniors chief strategy officer at coin shares and nick carter general partner at castle island ventures. Welcome milton nick. Hi laura so exciting to be here. And i have to give thanks to nick in advance. I roped tim into sitek around like doing this. I wanna have. I'm risk can with you know. I'm very glad to be here though is a really great remix of of massive attack. Just before the saw's really enjoying that. Yes so was i. So let's start our discussion by just defining what layer one and layer to are for people who don't know just to make sure we're on the same page and also multiple layers are necessary at all. Shirk jonah kick it off nick. I can start. i can start in. Virtually every payments system there they functioned in layers so when we talk about layers and bitcoin or cryptocurrency. It's actually completely in line with how things work in the traditional payments base. So you know it's possible to send a wire as a consumer you know. We have access to fed wire. Want but you know for the most part when you use dollars you're transacting with credit systems or peer to peer payments like bone papon cetera. Those would be considered second or even third layer on top of more fundamental clearing infrastructure. Where you have backed payments which happen less frequently and their larger in size and those payments at the bottom of stack of higher assurances. So and they kind of settled immediately as opposed to higher layer payments which settle on a deferred basis so credit card payments are not final immediately so extend that analogy to Currency just sort of contextualized it a little bit. Bitcoin payments would be considered fast settling high assurance payments. So those are my mind can have utility scale transactions. You can use months. Value can have confidence. they're going to settle. Immediately layer to in. My view is more about deferring settlement getting more skill ability through training off against those settlement. Assurances are getting faster finality By trading off again against assurances so basically opening up the design space and mirroring. Those you know that that layered model that we have in payments itself and i think that's really how payments systems scale as far as we understand them it's unlikely that unite everybody on the bottom layer the that would be like all we ever used for. Transactions was sending wires to each other. So that's kind of my view of it multiple. Know if you've a different diagnosis. I think the way you articulated. Nick is a great starting point You know the analogy. We use often is the bitcoin. Blockchain is more akin to fed wire. And what we've seen you know. A lot of other protocols have moved more quickly to adopt layer twos. I think the ferryman particular is one that from the very early days had a mindset to sort of start moving towards layer two and one of the interesting observations is over the last six Six months pardon really as we've seen the explosion of defy a new financial primitives being implemented on top of the theory. Obviously it's resulted in a lot of challenges in network availability network throughput and rising price in in sending transactions across the network deploying contracts now. Obviously bitcoin doesn't function in the same way. But what. I think is important to note. Is you know. There is an important function here. Whereas bitcoin usage grows and the adoption of bitcoin grows a number of use cases that were utilizing for bitcoin grows. We're going to need different layers. That have these features. That are optimized for the specificity of the use case. And that's something that's talked about a bit more in other protocols that are newer and i've had an opportunity to learn from watching what's happened in bitcoin but i think it's been interesting to observe you know i'm in many people's minds we really don't ever think about the amount of bandwidth we're consuming or the cost of connectivity to the core protocol which were interacting and in many ways the way i think about bitcoin For the first time in human history we have a way to price computing activity. There is a very real price that you have to pay prioritize transactions in the meme pool and so in my view. It's actually like an internet interesting. Crossover pardon between some of the concepts around Computing connectivity and how rodham topologies work with money. Right you're basically punching routing policy using transaction fees and and money effectively that allow you to sort of create specificity in terms of what layer of the stack on operate without compromising the security guarantees of the coin and again is nick described. There are inevitably going to be trade-offs but we've observed so far as we look at. The proliferation of bitcoin is an asset across other chains. Whether that's in the form of rap. Bitcoin or other assets is people really do want to have the security. Guarantees of bitcoin is an asset. But they want to have the ability to adopt some of the parameters around how they're utilizing the network security guarantees of their transactions particularly lower few transactions perhaps being able to deploy smart contracts or a more complex as sort of logic that maybe isn't as easy to deploy bitcoin script. So i think that's very important the other piece. I'll just quickly add that. I think is really important since this conference is about developers developers developers. Tomorrow on cnn. Steve ballmer if you remember. His famous developers developers developers speech is electric capital puts out this great report on and it just came out. It's their state of the developer ecosystem report and one of the interesting observations. They have is there. A low more developers in other protocols than there are in bitcoin because bitcoin is notoriously hard to develop with and building a robust grasp of bitcoin. Core protocol takes much longer than perhaps some of these other protocols which was scripted in more familiar languages and have different types of logic. That's more intuitive to say like javascript developers or other developer communities that are much larger. So what. I think also been interesting to observe. We have this in the legacy financial system. The entire legacy financial system is built on. Something called coble right. Which is this archaic programming language. Like most people know coble really really well are probably over the age of sixty because they were designing corporate systems must seventies so there's actually really interesting technological risk that exists in our core financial system and our poor financial applications in that the group of people who know and really understanding our experts in kabul are gonna be retiring in the next ten years right so it's created this tremendous amount of pressure on the banking sector to replace some of these core banking systems. That were built fifty sixty years ago because there is a real risk of technological obsolescence not having enough talented people to step into those roles. And i started. See the same thing. Happening in in crypto. Right there aren't necessarily tens of thousands of the coin developers out there who can build really robust highly secure layers on top of bitcoin. And so it's been really interesting to see what's been happening in the sack seacoast system and i'm really excited about milan. Tax may not. Because i think one of the really important Designed space constraints that we have to get through is the fact that the bitcoin developer communities just inherently much smaller than other developer communities because the level of knowledge required is very specific amount of time it takes to become really proficient in bitcoin and to understand all of the nuances of y bitcoin. Core way does prior bibs the history of fly. Certain things are good. Ideas are bad. Ideas takes a long time. Like i'm seven years in. And i still know nothing neck. I don't know how you feel about that. But that's where i think. Layer twos can be helpful in improving extensive ability. Because you don't necessarily require a bunch of people to become incredibly proficient. Bitcoin core through layer. Tuesday can now introduce other programming. Language that really broaden the developer ecosystem and allow people from other ecosystems to be able to build on top of bitcoin without necessarily needing to go through that learning curve on that you otherwise would but again. It's just interesting to me that that's also married and legacy finance for like bank search shitting themselves because all their best. Cobo people are leaving and they don't have anyone to replace on so sort of an interesting parallel at least for me. I think it's it's

Coin Shares Castle Island Ventures Milton Nick Shirk Jonah Papon Cetera Nick Nick Carter Bitcoin Laura Electric Capital TIM Coble Rodham Steve Ballmer CNN Kabul Milan Cobo
How To Get on Podcasts as a Guest

The $100 MBA Show

10:25 min | 1 d ago

How To Get on Podcasts as a Guest

"One of the most free questions. I get asked about podcasting is how do i get on other podcasts as guest and its frequent for good reason because people know that podcasts are powerful way to market themselves to get out there to be known. Nobody wants to be ignored. But how do you get on a podcast. You just use cold outreach. Do spam people in their inboxes. Asking to be on their podcast. What is the most effective way to regularly show up on other podcasts. Well i'm going to tell you share with you my system so you can lineup guest appearances for the rest of the year. First of all. I want to address something. That's very very important. One of the things. We all have to come to terms with no matter where you are in your entrepreneurial. Journey is understanding. Why you should be on a podcast. Not talking about the benefits here. i'm talking about. Why would a podcast host. Won't you on their show. You have to honestly answer that question for example. Take a look at some of the bigger podcasts. Out there W f by marc maron. Joe rogan the jordan. Harbinger your show. Why is elon. Musk being interviewed by. Joe rogan. Why did richard bring it on the dribble. your show. Why did president. Braga obama get on w. f. with marc maron. How did that happen. That cold email. joe rogan. No probably the other way around right so the first thing we have establish is the more value can add to an audience. The more likely it's going to be that you're going to show up on that podcast. Let me say that again. The more value you can add to an audience the more likely you will be a guest on that podcast so elon. Musk shows up on. Joe rogan because joe rogan knows. His audience wants to hear from him. He sought after the something here. There's something that he can offer. That makes it worth him trying to get him on the show. One of my favorite podcast interviews is with jamie fox on the tim. Ferriss show and tim for a shares that it took him years to get to the point where he knew jamie foxx enough to convince him to get on his podcast. He had to put a lot of work in a lot of time. A lot of sacrifice a lot of investment and. I'll talk a little bit about how he actually got jamie fox at the end and how relates to today's lesson. Why did tim ferriss go through. All that effort will because he knew the jamie foxx would be a brilliant episode who share incredible stories. He has a lot of value to add. So i want you to start thinking in that way. Yes we all are not jamie fox or president barack obama but we can add value to an audience and we could start somewhere we will have to start with the can show right. We can start with smaller podcast with audiences that are more niche that can really benefit from what we can offer but a lot of us get disappointed that. Hey i'm reaching out these podcasts. And they're not getting back to me. I can really offer a lot of value. Omar will one of the reasons why they're not getting back to us because they just never heard of you or they don't really have any kind of rough of what you can deliver so we're going to solve this problem immediately. One of the best ways to get on a podcast. If your brand new is to be noteworthy that means you have to show people that you can deliver for example if somebody wanted to get on a podcast and they just reached out by email and said hey podcast. I'm an expert at seo. I think i'd be really valuable to your audience versus somebody who says hey. I'd love for you to have me on your show an seo expert. I should talk about how. Google has become the dominant search engine and y. Here's a link to that ted talk hoover's opening the email whoever's reading the email whether it's the host or the executive system that works for the host. They have a lot more mature work with now. They have a reason to say. Yes they have a ted talk to watch and say. Wow this person's credible they really delivered Enough people in that room were willing to listen to this person. He commanded an audience. Might be worth having on the podcast so you have to really give them something to say. Yes. this is why your own content is really really important until you have a few great interviews under your belt where you can share those in your pitches then you need to shoot something else whether it's a youtube video whether it's a bestselling book up performance onstage. Give something to. The decision is easy. It's an easy s now. Our which is one of the ways you can do. This is one of the strategies. I used in the beginning where i literally would go to the pages of all the podcasts. I wanted to go on. I emailed them and Ask them to be on. And i gave him some materials to kind of look through to know that. I'm legit but a more effective way is what's called a warm introduction. Introductions are one of the best ways to get on podcast and it's the fastest way to get a. yes now. there's a few things you can do. Let's start with one of the easiest step step number one is do you know anybody. That's been on amy podcasts. As a guest. Look at all your friends on facebook on social your emails. Is there anybody in your network. That's been on a podcast guest. That knows that can vouch for you if so ask that person. Hey can you introduce me to that. Podcast you're on. A warm introduction is an easy way for them to say. Hey that gas was good and the recommending somebody. There's a good chance that somebody is going to be worth my time. This is why. I really emphasize the importance of building. Your personal network making friends in your industry because you can always help each other out vouch for each other and remember. I talked about how a lot of just don't know who you are. The more you network the more. You're well known. There are so many people. I know that are so good at networking yet. They don't have a best selling book. They are not a social media phenomenon. But if i say their name people know they are because they are great at networking. They're great at making friends in their space and people like that will never starve because they can always find opportunities because they know somebody. So get a warm introductions one of the best ways to get on podcast. Next piece of advice is your aim. Should be trying to get on five. Podcasts doesn't matter the size of the audience or how newer old the podcasts. Is you wanna get some rips. You wanna really understand the process and you want to deliver. Will you wanna do in those first. Five is be the absolute guest that podcast has ever had. I'm talking about study. This podcast study everybody. Who's in your niche or have spoken about the topics that you might talk about in the interview or in the podcast episode and cover things that haven't been covered address issues. Problems challenges that other people haven't addressed on the podcast before you want to be the most guests they've ever had you want to be the jamie foxx episode. Okay why because this is how you're gonna viral market yourself if you knock it out of the park. And you're the best episode for each of these. Podcasts podcasters listen to other podcasts. And the here episode the blake. I gotta get this person on my show and that really worked for me. I work super hard on making sure. I nail my first interviews. That i crush it that i really deliver value. It's my only goal. I'm not trying to promote products and services if the host talks about my websites or my products. That's great. that's fine. But i don't even mention the asking. That question is are any way people can reach out to you. I give out my e mail or give out my twitter handle and try to get the conversation to continue on those mediums. The point here is that you just got to really nail. This not only will help you with the viral marketing of a. But it's a great set of interviews that you can use as samples of your work when you reach out to other podcast to be a guest on. My next tip is make a list. Make a list of all the podcasts. You want to be on. And it's okay if you shoot for the stars and he may even wanna work to that list so like number. One is joe rogan number two. Is tim ferriss. Show whatever just you know naming names here. But you have your favorite podcasts or the best podcasts you want to be on and work your way down. you know. it's okay if that list is one hundred. Two hundred three hundred podcasts. And see as you know a a bucket list you know. I wanna cross these off. And i want to get through all the podcasts as much as possible. And don't forget new. Podcasts are being launched all the time. so you're gonna want to update this list but the list is great to have so you can track your progress and is literally just a spreadsheet on google sheets. You know the podcast name. The podcast host The link to the podcast. And then i actually have a column or linked to my episode. Once i'm on it when you're starting out on another quick tip. I have to say this. But i've noticed some people don't do this but when you're starting out when you're trying to get on other podcasts. Dopey a prima donna. Okay don't be too precious. A lot of people. Don't want to fill out forms. They wanna do pre interviews. They don't wanna do the initial chant. Sometimes they think well this established business successful This is beneath me and this podcast is not popular anyway. Why should i do this. Well you should do it because if you wanna get on the show. That's what needs to be done. There's no room for pride here. You want to get on the podcast. Go through the format. It's good for you helps you prepare helps you do your best when it's time to actually be on the podcast and you're on the road of the actual episode. You gotta earn your stripes. You might be successful in your own area in your own business. But you're entering a new world podcasting and you're nobody here. I don't want to speak on your behalf but if you're a beginner you are still earning your stripes. You're still proving yourself as good guest as a gray guesses a valuable guests so run through the steps in the is as needed. And sometimes you're going to have to do all these kinds of hoops and prepare and schedule months in advance before the episode of airs. The better podcasts. Actually you know. Have a pretty long lead time. Some of the bigger podcasts. I i've been on. They had four five six months of lead time. But as you know time flies so put in the work now so you can reap the benefits later.

Joe Rogan Jamie Fox Marc Maron Jamie Foxx Tim Ferriss Elon Musk Braga Obama Omar Jordan Barack Obama Hoover Richard TIM TED Google Youtube AMY Facebook Twitter
The Latest: California to put seniors in line for vaccine

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 2 d ago

The Latest: California to put seniors in line for vaccine

"Coronavirus cases and deaths continue to rise in some states as mass vaccination programs expand leaders of some Arizona hospital say they may have to ration lifesaving care Dr Marjorie Bessel a banner health said they're facing one of the worst infection rates in the country about one in ten Arizonans is currently infected Basil says staffing should not be an issue health care workers have been vaccinated New York Javits center is open for mass vaccinations but state health commissioner Howard Zucker says supply is a big issue we only get three hundred thousand doses each week from the federal government and at that rate it could take up to six months to vaccinate everyone currently eligible supply is also an issue in California but the state is immediately allowing people sixty five and older to get the vaccines I'm a Donahue

Dr Marjorie Bessel New York Javits Center Howard Zucker Arizona Basil Federal Government California Donahue
The issues driving healthcare in 2021

The Hospital Finance Podcast

03:54 min | 2 d ago

The issues driving healthcare in 2021

"Researcher and widely known industry expert. Paul recently wrote about what he sees coming for healthcare and twenty twenty one and we're happy to have him back on the show to discuss his analysis. Paul welcome back. Thank you mike. So lots to unpack with healthcare from this past year of twenty twenty and heading into twenty twenty one. And i think it just makes start. It makes sense the sense to start talking about Cove in our discussion. So what do you see for. Vid financial relief going forward for both patients and providers in two thousand twenty one well in addition to the three trillion of relief funds that have come through the system. in twenty twenty There'll be another trillion that comes through with targeted to unemployment benefits to small business and some individual relief for certain populations but The way to think through this is the first six months of two thousand and twenty. one are Were managing the last hopeful stage of the pandemic in the us but it's lingering impact will continue long after the first two quarters The economy a world closed twenty twenty when we get those final numbers at about seven to four percent below On the gdp basis and our federal deficit will be sitting somewhere around twenty seven trillion and change so our net worth As an enterprise if you will Will reflect an eighteen trillion dollar Asset and a twenty seven trillion dollar long term deficit. So we gotta. We're upside down on the deficit side and that'll become more important as we can have come out of the pandemic in the last two quarters of next year and beyond so mike i think pandemic is still the story but it's pandemic and what's next and a lot of that will be defined by the policies of the administration and much of that defined by the constitution of congress especially the senate because this was not the change election that democrats had expected a more A repudiation to some extent of kind of a far left view of government Voters like the idea of a divided government especially the top half of the income ladder and the market says. We're not so sure that congress ever figures things out as easily as the private sector so there was a pretty significant rejection of some of the bigger government run solutions. That's not going away but it's been buffered by the election so The way to think through the next two years at least is incremental changes that will satisfy more kind of a centre-left anna left side of the voting spectrum but not the major changes that were promised in the campaign. great analysis paul Let's talk tacticly about

Paul Mike Congress United States Senate Anna Paul Let
Hospitalized coronavirus patients still suffer symptoms 6 months post-infection

KCBS Radio Overnight News

01:19 min | 2 d ago

Hospitalized coronavirus patients still suffer symptoms 6 months post-infection

"Long haulers. Those those are people who have covert, whose symptoms just persist over weeks and or months at a time. The first large study of long haul covered patients found that Three out of four experienced symptoms. Six months after they've been hospitalized. KCBS is Margie Schaefer has more. The long haul symptoms include shortness of breath, fatigue, chest pain and cognitive issues. But founder and physician faculty lead of the multi disciplinary post covert optimal clinic at UCSF Doctor lecture me, Santos says, Not all long hauls. Covert 19. I've seen people with new diagnoses of auto immune conditions, even cancer, other lung conditions where the doctors or the patients assumed This is just post covert. In fact, this is long prove it. She encourages doctors and patients to take a broad view and to maintain regular healthcare check ups that can allow for early detection. Ah, cute. Covert patients tend to be older and more frail. Some other research shows that perhaps people with the long term symptoms might actually be overrepresented. Younger people more than older people in women more than that similarities between long haul Covitz symptoms and chronic fatigue are being investigated. Margie Schaefer KCBS. Anyone flying to the

Margie Schaefer Kcbs Ucsf Fatigue Santos Cancer Chronic Fatigue
Top 10 Best and Worst Games of 2020

Esports Network Podcast

03:41 min | 3 d ago

Top 10 Best and Worst Games of 2020

"Assembled our very own top ten list of the best and worst games of 2020. To kick it off. Let's start with the worst the truly terrible of last year at number five. The worst game of last year is bleeding edge. Do you guys even remember this game? It was a pack of sugar without being an actual shooter in a market already overcrowded by other hero Shooters. Yeah instead of guns. You want to given mainly weapons that being swords knives six years now, that's entertainment at number four is Cooking Mama Cooks car and this game is absolutely my favorite of the worst because this adorable animated cooking game not only sucked because it was so tedious and repetitive. It was also a scam. Yeah, the game was an unlicensed product that served as a mining platform for cryptocurrency number three on our naughty list is not Elder Scrolls blades the game that pretended to be Skyrim but wasn't even close the game had lengthy talk scenes and tried forcing you to buy upgrades for gear. That wasn't even valuable in the first place down. That it was so insanely boring. Our number two on the sucky list is Warcraft 3 reforged wizard infuriated their entire gaming base with this one by promising fans graphical updates and cinematics upon launch instead is only got minor texture upgrades and hostile user policies the game became so hated that it received the lowest use on rated score on Metacritic as the great big Norton pointed out. You really slapped us off base with this one blizzard and Now ladies and gentlemen, the worst game of 2020 is Crucible the game was so generic all around and offered nothing new Amazon's new gaming. I thought was so poorly received that Jeff Bezos D list of the game a few days after it's released and put it back into closed Beta And as for the server's well, those were shut down on November 2020 just six months after lunch. Now, let's switch to the Great Stuff guys the games that provided a sheer joy and happiness. And what was a troubling year number five on the good list is The Last of Us Part 2? Now I know what this game was divisive due to its pacing and users playing as the bad guy but there was a ton to celebrate here. The combat was richer environments were more immersive and the stealth sections for even more intense it honestly took me a month to beat the campaign and that's not because I'm a slow player. I just hiding in the grass from each of the guards for about two hours. Our fourth best game of 2020 goes to Half Life Alex. This game was a technical Masterpiece and raised the bar for VR titles capturing detailed environments at 60fps with an incredible story predating Half-Life two before then. I thought we are games were pretty silly. This one opened my eyes and my living room Number three on our list is Ghost of tsushima this amazing Samurai sword-wielding game. Not only had a compelling storyline, but also offered a multiplayer mode where you and your friends can fight together as Samurai. Number two goes to you guessed it Animal Crossing. This game helped us make it through the pandemic as we crafted our islands and invited Burns over 40 special events or whatever you're into some people recreated game shows others held their weddings in graduation ceremonies for me. I just love scuba diving for see stars with the screw the turn of game. It's all about the stars and the number one best game of 2020 goes to cyberpunk. Yeah, the reason for this one and finally came

Jeff Bezos Norton Amazon Alex Burns
Companies target lawmakers who tried to block Electoral College

Steve Scott

02:43 min | 3 d ago

Companies target lawmakers who tried to block Electoral College

"Or joining a long list of corporations stopping political donations, especially two Republican lawmakers, who rejected President elect Joe Biden's victory in the Electoral College. We take a deep dive on that with CBS news political correspondent Ed O'Keefe. On Monday, Hallmark Cards Company asked for a refund from Republican senators Josh Holly and Roger Marshall, who received a combined $12,000. That company says that the senator's decision to vote to reject states certified electoral college results last week do not reflect our company's values. American Express told employees Monday. They're withholding donations from lawmakers who voted to subvert the presidential election results and disrupt the peaceful transition of power. Other major firms like Goldman Sachs, Citigroup, Facebook, Google and Microsoft are going farther, saying that would hold all political contributions from members of both parties. Chemical giant Dow doing self or at least the next two years. It's sending a ripple effect across all these campaigns because Donald Trump is radioactive. Leslie Sanchez is a Republican consultant and CBS news political analyst and said the corporate giving ban could hurt many GOP candidates. The question campaigns are asking themselves is how long is this going to last? Can they separate their campaign from the larger Republican Party and the or that it has, But since it is said that, based on her conversations with top government relations executives they giving ban is likely on Lee temporary, six months and nine months down the line. They expect those dollars to start flowing again. These are gonna be based on individual relationships and not necessarily the party as a whole. CBS News Political contributor. Robby Mook, a Democratic Party consultant, thinks this is a bigger shift. This is part of a larger reckoning we're seeing in our society, you know, employees of these companies really care about what their leadership is doing about what happens to this Pac money that they're donating, and we saw how this was transformational and sports. And entertainment, and I think we're going to start to see it in corporate America as it relates to politics as well. Corporate America is also facing pressure when it comes to hiring President Trump's current and former spokespeople. White House press secretaries often go on to get high profile jobs in the private sector. President Obama's landed at McDonald's Amazon and United Airlines. Forbes magazine editor Randall Lane argues that those that spoke for Mr Trump will face a different landscape. He says. If top companies hire them, his magazine quote will assume that everything your company or firm talks about is a lie. There is no way that we can look at the readers and say these are people we can trust in the private sector now to give that accurate information.

President Elect Joe Biden Ed O'keefe Hallmark Cards Company Josh Holly Roger Marshall Leslie Sanchez Electoral College Robby Mook CBS American Express Citigroup Goldman Sachs Donald Trump DOW GOP Republican Party Microsoft Facebook
Insights of Commanding a Carrier Jet Squadron with Jack Curtis

Dose of Leadership

05:09 min | 4 d ago

Insights of Commanding a Carrier Jet Squadron with Jack Curtis

"Jack curtis here on dose of leadership. Welcome to the show my friend. Thank you very much for having me. It's pleasure this is going to be an interesting conversation. I mean it's obviously. I love having fellow prior military folks on here but now that i got a fellow gold winger on here so that's always fun but never had anybody that's been in command of a squadron on one of the things that i always regret. I gotta the ring court right at ten years. I got the airlines. But what are the an. I ten years reserves and the guard. But i always regretted not taking. I always want to know what it'd be like. Take command so this is going to be a fun conversation. I am interested from your aspect of it. I was joking when i got on the call with. You don't look old enough to take command. But i forget how my squadron commander was like in the late thirties. Fifty two now. And you're in your early forties right so you just don't look old enough to take command but i it's just me not dealing well with the age of getting older but but thanks for coming on the show man privilege beer. I've listened to your show for for a long time. Several years. And i gotta i gotta admit i'm pretty humbled to have looked at the lineup of people you've got on your show and the quality conversations you've had into now get to be a part of. Its thank you well new and i have a history to because i don't how many years ago wasn't you reached out to me. I mean in karachi. That's probably two thousand and fifteen. Or so i had just selected been selected for command was kinda starting to do a little bit of thinking about Some this bigger picture leadership stuff and i came across your podcast. And i said hey. I think i'd like to talk to this guy. And your gracious enough with your time and I remain grateful for that. Yeah and you reached out in an i. Don't remember what advice gave you. Hopefully it was. It was okay enough. Didn't get fired very go. And and then you reach that again graciously a blast from the past and you kinda update me where you're at and i appreciate you. I thought well this might be good to have you on the show because it gives an insight to leadership that i think a lot of people usually don't get the inside baseball on right and i'm curious to because it's something that i've never experienced. It's something that i always wish. I wonder how i would do. But you had a unique experience. Let just for the sake of our listeners. Your naval aviator right. You eventually started flu wing. How long have a perspective here. What year was that yes. We'll jump in the way back machine. A graduated from the university of florida in may of two thousand I immediately went up. To pensacola started flight. School you're familiar with this track You made my way through Through flight school and then ended up finishing in may of two thousand. Two's almost exactly two years of flight school which is relatively quick Yeah i had a lot of A lot of wait times like six Wait six months. then i'd start a phase. Wait six started phase so it took me a while. Yeah i was really grateful to be able to go through that quickly to i think And your instructor. If i recall correctly i mean one of the things. That's so important. When you're learning a new skill or a trade or a job or task is just repetition over and over and as you work towards those ten thousand hours right and You know being able to go through flight school. That quickly meant that. I was flying almost every day. I was in a simulator almost every day. Sometimes twice a day and You know being a middle of the bell curve kind of blue collar pilot. Like i'm in a career of repetition important so yeah long. Answer your question but i got winged in two thousand and two. Okay good yeah so that you're about eleven years ahead head me or eight years. I got winged and yeah ten years ahead of me winged in. I wanna keep doing this math. I'm like my head's about to explode anyway. I'm old you're not so that's the whole thing that it came up with so you get and you fly the ea six right. And so you're you're flying to that and eventually transition to the e. Eighteen growler super hornet and eventually took command right. And so. when did you so this is interesting. So when did is this your first command and when was this. When was your first command. Yeah so you know the navy. Does things a bit differently than Some of the other services particularly army and the marines where he will have a platoon commander for our company commander the navy Typically there are a few exceptions with some of the small ships but The navy typically reserves its first level of command at the level In the marine corps. In the army as lieutenant colonel battalion command in the navy at squadron command of a squadron commanded on the aircraft side or it could be on the ships a destroyer Nope yes this is. My perception commands I took command having been in the navy for. I think the eighteen year mark

Jack Curtis Karachi University Of Florida Pensacola FLU Baseball Navy Army Marines Marine Corps
Chester Martin (Mi'kmaq

The Storyteller

05:24 min | 4 d ago

Chester Martin (Mi'kmaq

"My friends to the storyteller where you'll find first nations people from across native north america who are following jesus christ without reservation on. Today's program will hear more from chester martin of the mid mon nation in new brunswick canada chester was trapped by hatred towards his father. And it's not something that he could break free of on his own but there were so easy to find bulls ana reserve. I went to people that that welfare unemployment checks oleg pension checks army checks people. Dead meat homebrew on the reserve. You know the more. I drank sicker. I go out and vote a year later. I remember getting. Dt's at my uncle's place. I can hear the baby crying on the other own buzzer. dt's later. Start here and voices. And i started listening to his voice. And i always told me that was no good to. They'll never become muscle. Just kill yourself. And it went on and on and on. And i walked up the road and i jumped in front of occur. I figured that's the only way to go. it hurt. Everything saw anger everything that carried hateful ono sober up so nice fellow. Ono's drink and everything was hateful and me and you know going in trouble going to fight and win. I'll go beat up and just look at the current miss me when i jumped in front of it. Got the back end of her and it knocked me off to who started running what's hidden and what and got away from the cops jerash emp. Looking for me i guess. Who would you think would self drink. And then i didn't. And i kept drinking finally one day and got the again and i got in trouble real bad trouble. I in place now destroyed it. That caught sent to mental institution and camels browser to see a insane. Are something a center for six weeks before three sony. Twenty twenty one years old twenty one and a half and so told me a drink a little bit too much of it you can easily on on my drinking and i went back to the court soul me that Just looked at me. Said you're charged drop. But he said you gotta impair turkey against. You'll never been looking for you. So they charged me twenty two hundred and fifty dollars and he asked me if he can put me on probation for six months to go to a and he told me you've been in here in and out for years last three years and getting in trouble i said would you go. I said i looked at him and said yeah. I would go and i didn't know what it was at that time so my mother so glad that jail. How mental institution auditing care. And he was that time you always already sold before five years that he stopped drinking. I think it's twenty years upbringing anyway. And he said just go to. Generally that i didn't want to go jalen weren't is took. The alcoholics anonymous eater. Daddy was six months for raising a or go to jail and i took the go to. Alcoholics may join the program. I used to go to a first three months. I used to take a couple of pints of beer. And i said you know we're on hurt me then i go to a tonight. Come home drink all night. Then they go to a. Because i was scared my they might catch me so one night. I heard this guy story. You went on totally story. Talked about being in the army talked to both overseas and all that and couldn't identify with him. But i can and he said let go and let god take over and the first thing that popped into my mind was pearl hill and jack mci and he said you know go up. Saved his life seeing made them no man. Okay let's go home. And that night i went home and afraid as good. Can you remove alcohol. And i don't know what happened that time. We just feel that it came over me that i didn't want to drink no more. I stopped drinking and to my wife. I knew all my life.

Chester Martin Ana Reserve Oleg New Brunswick Chester ONO North America Canada Sony Jalen Turkey Pearl Hill Jack Mci Army
Back to work: Dallas leads the country in employees returning to the office

KNX Programming

00:56 sec | 5 d ago

Back to work: Dallas leads the country in employees returning to the office

"Remains in the grip of the pandemic, but his vaccinations become more widespread. Economists hope we'll see a job market rebound later this year. A recent report from the software firm. Think Why, says Sun Belt areas where employment has suffered less will likely lead the way, according to senior Vice President J. Dentyne We're talking about Markets in Texas, like Austin and Dallas, Atlanta to the east, you know Denver and Phoenix to the west from Castle Systems, which tracks Elektronik access to office buildings show Dallas has a head start with nearly a third of employees already back in the office at year end. Gettin cautions that recovery will take time. Even his vaccines rollout likely or six months down the road. We're going to really see a ramp up and that's why we're really it's a bullish about the second half of 2021. I think it would really be a tell of to have didn't says the job's rebound well, very by industry, with those requiring close social contact, taking longer to recover. We

Vice President J. Dentyne Castle Systems Sun Belt Dallas Austin Atlanta Denver Phoenix Texas
'Brian did his job': Family remembers fallen Capitol officer

AP News Radio

01:04 min | 6 d ago

'Brian did his job': Family remembers fallen Capitol officer

"Brian sickening the capitol police officer who died of his injuries after being attacked by rioters Wednesday in the U. S. capitol is being remembered as a man dedicated to duty who did his job that day Brian always wanted to help that's what mayor John crane's all of south river New Jersey were Brian set Nick's parents live says of the forty two year old noting sit next military service and desert shield and enduring freedom significant listed in the National Guard six months after graduating high school twice deploying overseas his family says that was a means to becoming a police officer which he wanted to do his entire life he joined the U. S. capitol police in two thousand eight the agency says he was injured while physically engaging with the mob that stormed inside the capitol Wednesday to law enforcement officials tell the Associated Press sixteen was hit in the head with a fire extinguisher it's just mind boggling in its its turn Michael is a neighbor of six parents disgraceful Ben Thomas Washington

S. Capitol Mayor John Crane Brian Set Nick Brian Capitol Police U. U. S. Capitol Police New Jersey National Guard The Associated Press Michael Ben Thomas Washington
Goodbye to Alcohol - Series 3 - Episode 10 - Mary Anne Shearer - the Natural Way - burst 01

Goodbye to Alcohol

27:17 min | 6 d ago

Goodbye to Alcohol - Series 3 - Episode 10 - Mary Anne Shearer - the Natural Way - burst 01

"It was his guys talking roland hydra one year and end the sky was the and he came up to me after he said like. I'm here to help me recover from alcoholism. I don't want to rehab. I've just come to detox. My buddy what. Can i do to stop caving. Alcohol acid right. This is what you gotta do. Every morning you get up and you have as much fruit and a nice handful of narrow nuts or seeds with just eat as much food as you can stuff. Your face doesn't have to be early in the morning but it must be a first meal of the day and eat as much as it. If it's a box of mangoes and eat the box of mangoes op done that. Eaten a box magazine taya watermelon. And you might do that for three months and eventually what happens. Is you end up eating one mango in. It's really sweet sausage. I into stuff your face. Full of lucas. In every natural glucose fresh fruits nuts every time. You crave alcohol. Just reach out for some dates or some raisins or even like a hundred percent pure grape juice or you know have sparkling grape juice. It satisfies your cells needs for glucose that craving will stop welcome to goodbye to alcohol about calls from wealth without wine with you. Want to say goodbye to alcohol. Revie said goodbye. Twelve called over the on just so this is the podcast few. We've got recovery stories to in spy experts to inform you plenty of advice on how to drink and change your life. Hello hello and welcome to the good. By twelve coal podcast. My name is john goran. I'm the founder of wealth without wine. And i'm your host for this podcast. My hero wealth without wine we help people to change their relationship with alcohol over the past five years. We've helped hundreds of people to do just that and we created world without wind because we believe it's really really halt to change your drinking alone so wealthed without wine wit all about community each week we're going to feature a community voice just to give you a flavor of the also. Try his somebody from one of Subgroups hello everyone. So i have a little friday when which happened last night Myself my family celebrated thanksgiving with our american bamiyan states Remotely and it was the first time in twenty-six days at i would becoming face to face with an actual bottle of wine so i was a bit concerned and i knew that i had to have some safety precautions. Set in place for myself. So i had my phone Close by me. So i could contact group if i needed to My also got some alcohol free wine that was recommended by this group and And the support of my family so my mom and i enjoyed some lovely alcohol free wine. Which actually wasn't as bad as i thought it would be. We served at super chilled and it was actually super delicious and refreshing. We skype with a family overseas headed delicious meal and i didn't have a drop of alcohol And then at the end of the evening we weren't bid. I finished off my class of savvy. Rich in the candlelight listening to some chile music Went to bid and the biggest one of all was waking up this remembering exactly what happened last night and without a headache I'm super proud of myself. Never ever in a million years thought that this was possible. But it did it and today is day. Twenty-seven machine all a fabulous wonderful weekend wherever you are in the world if huge cut to join our woman welcoming community and get a bit of support. Just go to weld without wind dot com and click on the membership top. So let's get my guest today into being a lady who's pretty well known here in south africa. Her name is maryanne sheera now. Maryanne is a woman before had time. She wrote a book called the natural way more than twenty years ago. An only now is the way of life. She advocates going mainstream on apart from being an author. Marianne is a motivational speaker. And she runs a very successful pekan restaurant as well as running natural health programs. I'll begin by asking maryanne satele to bit about herself. I had serious health problems which included being bipolar had kids at had ear infections tonsillitis runny noses that was high blood pressure so we had these kind of. I call him normal health problems because it wasn't like the big three cancer heart disease diabetes. It was just all like niggly stuff that was affecting our relationships and was affecting the way we functioned from day to day. And i have always been interested in the human body i prob- i might have become a doctor. But i'm i'm glad i didn't because it made me look for answers and other places so i was fascinated with the human body studied physiology anatomy and chemistry in the sciences and i was fascinated with the how the human body worked. So we're not. We started having these problems and we were being treated traditional medical way with anti anti-inflammatories and antihistamines for a head allergic dermatitis. On my hands and the kids with antibiotics just didn't make any sense because nobody actually got well. all it doesn't seem to do is suppress symptoms. And then they'd come back two weeks later. I saw the athol up. Gotta find answers. This was long. Before the era of google that really dates meet And just go and do a search on google. And the closest i've got to google was on several occasions sneaking into the fits medical library in johannesburg and he are trying to find says there and looking at books in the archives and just like nobody really had answers to my questions had to find the myself now. I really believed because i could see the. You'll buddy actually repays itself if you cut your finger to paint it stop. You don't need to go and you know cost a spillover it or go to the doctor. My fingers cut itself. Please can drug. I mean unless you chopped to finger off you'd want to beg on but just a cut finger. Paper cut irritate you. It hurts but you it just eventually repays itself and and if you study the human body like a did you find out that the liver you can actually cut off your liver out. Remove it entirely donated to somebody else. Give the small lobe to somebody else in the big global grow and then you've donated your smaller that logo groesbeck like this is the most amazing thing and yet when it comes to lever cancer you told is no cure for it. You're going to die while you would because you're going to be given all these drugs and you live a second will just get sick and pick up than you will die so i was looking for ways to correct the looking for the causes and then ask trying to fix the causes. I did find that. Nutrition made a huge difference. When i changed my diet. Took after find sugar and my by pella symptoms when my crazy periods of manic unbelievable highs. We are could take on the world. And i was going to change the world and i'm actually by nature very idealistic person and my mission in life is i want to change the world. One person at a time. I want to get them healthy enough. Got the goal to reach. A million people wrote a book called the natural way it came out in nineteen. Ninety-one was a runaway bestseller according to the publishers and it sold as i say of three hundred thousand copies it's been published in the united states. The funny thing is it seems to be taking of now first published in the states in two thousand five fifteen years not getting traction. So it's like if it does take off and i happened to reach the new york times. Basically nobody can ever say was an overnight success at this pathetic years. So you're a woman before your time. Someone emission to really help people if i can get rid of my bipolar symptoms and be completely sane And and thinks straight and have a brain in and and bow bowels and bladder that works properly all the time and be living in that sweet spot of health than anybody can do it. Because i had terrible problems. Janet listening to all calls from weld without wine. Marianne take me about you just mentioned alcoholic parents. It that intrigued me wondering if that was one of the reasons why you want it to research to health unle- to healthier lifestyle was that of a trigger. I think it. I think it was. I think you know even mentioned to some one time that i want to try to get drunk when us fourteen and jank moms cara pheno one and didn't like the way i felt i felt out of control and i think that sense of not being in control of my immediate environment and i wouldn't say i'm a control freak but i needed to be common working properly and audley at the sense of order i think that comes from growing up in the chaos of alcoholic appearance at home and my mom was a party animal. She was functional alcoholics. She could party all night and go to work the next day in absolutely fine my father however party will not and he wouldn't work for six months and that was you know he'd worked for six months and then not work for six months to a year or two years so we grew up with that sort of chaotic and then my parents got divorced because my mother said she had four kids anita fifth one. My father married. Somebody was crazy as he was. You know do things like pour petrol over my stepmother and threatened sitter a lot this crazy stuff that chaos does makes you want to live an ordinary that the thing. That really got to me when i was a kid. My mom had this medical encyclopedia. And i would pour over at the age of four hundred. All these gory. Pictures of people as innocent large thyroid landed was like the size of pumpkin and the knicks and these open ruins and at sit there and cringes kind of not. Wanna look at them. But it's fasten. The human body fascinated me from a very early age. My mom was kind of forward thinking as much as she was a party animal. She told us we couldn't chew gum or drink. Physical because our brains would fry and and we went lottery comic books either. So i had the sense of trying to do the right thing I think it also grows up with you know you grow up with a parent. That's a bit narcissistic. i think. Alcoholism in a sense is a narcissistic habit. Because you just carrying about a million myself. And i'm trying to numb my pain. You know not thinking about the responsibilities of life you know growing up with it. I had the saints. That i wanted to please my mom and do the right thing so i was considered the goody. Two shoes in the family just always trying to do the right thing in an nfl had to take it back to pregnancy was a need to just have off in my life Feel like yeah. Things went as chaotic. As they've seen. We moved a lot as kids. You know doing a geographic alcoholic. Parents do that things. Don't work you just move somewhere else. Yeah i've i've come across two different reactions when people have Parents they are do what she did. And react against the kale. Some won't control an order in their life all they they tend to say well. You know sin family. I'm bound to be that as well and then kinda give up unsolved drinking as well so Is that been your experience as well. Do you think people tend to go. A different one of two was party. Animal ended in two brothers. That partied hard. I mean they crashed a few calls when they were aided. And that god they've grown up and grown out of it and They've so but very working my two brothers especially very sober and very hard working And and i just think. I think what you you learn the learned behavior sydney. I look at myself is it. I may not have been addicted to alcohol. But as very addicted to sugar so ahead addictive side to me that anita to the sugar made me feel good in that space. So i suppose in a sense. I was doing much what people do with alcohol when us feeling unhappy or was feeling sad or on feeling like a done something. Well i would reward myself or console myself with suga whether it was fragile candy or cake. So is scream. It didn't really matter how much as i said. Even propane sugar staying out of the sugar bowl. As i got older. I became health conscious. South for made fudgy using brown sugar. That was really good. But you're that that that needs that sense of of you don't you you know parents at properly as if you growing up in an alcoholic home so you learn. The navy is that that it's a k. To satisfy yourself for full let need with a something in a with some people it could be gambling. All pornography will with made was shook end and food as a compulsive overeater. And the only reason we're glad clinically obese of always been physically active and and if i was not eating properly and exercising. I wouldn't ever sleep. I would. And i think that looking at having dealt with so many people in our family and with people have met of the years that alcohol sometimes puts people to sleep just eventually knocks you out so eventually do sleep when you're very active brain not taught how to look off draw brain. How what does alcohol do to bring. What is caffeine due to the brain so one minute drinking coffee over here and then that's like over stimulating central noticing. Make all your nerve cells five. Ab rapidly and then you'd having alcohol too. Because that's a natural depressant than you take the to calm you down and put you to sleep and then you wake up the next morning and you hung oversee start with the coffee again in the brain goes into overdrive. Then you would lots of sugar into the coffee. So you just getting on this treadmill and i think i think if we were taught the staff about how everybody body reacted to sit and things from when we were kids. Part of the reason assorted school is that we would understand how our body worked and figure stuff out pretty soon and make good choices. But that's me probably being idealistic as well if you were talking to someone. That was drinking super too much. They weren't really aware of what it was doing to that office. That brains. what what would you tell them. How would you summarize the home that it does to us. Gee i'm the first thing we know. Is it really damages the central nervous system in the brain. And we've now these quite a lot of research showing that parkinson's disease which michael j. fox got a really young age and he has a. He was a big drinker. Huge drinker everything. I've read on him. The alcohol played a big role in. He's laughing was younger. That can damage your central nervous system. and it doesn't do it alone. Units alcohol and sugar and bed diets and bed living but alcohol plays a huge role in that. It really affects a whole lot of things affect your central nervous system in your brain so you don't handle stress well and lacewell you handle stress. The more you're going to drink because it numbs you. Eugenic feel you can just numb yourself. you stop feeling in dozen courage assistant behavior because it becomes all about my feelings and my stress and my money to numb in. I mean we all know this. We would go without food in a hassle appearance drink and i've seen it in other families. The mother a single mumble drink because she's lonely or because she feels a failure whatever. Her reasons are and there'll be no food in the fridge. Another normal alcoholic friggin. Look on his nets moke in there in a piece of cheese. And that's about it if you lackey Most just don't have food in them. And i know as kids if they was cheese enough ridge. We would flatness in like half an hour because he's a no win. The food was going come which didn't help but encourage things like a compulsive over eating so a central nervous system and that's the one side the other side that in a fix and impacts really badly as the indicating system and that's a system that controls every single part of the buddy janice it controls your liver your lungs your kidneys digestive tract your muscle tone. You sleep your menstrual cycles. Your facility these nothing. It's not in your breathing. Your lung function your hair. Growth your nails. You'll skin it it. It affects every single part. The endocrine system produces hormones in different parts of the body in those hormones may chemical reactions take place which makes the body function properly. Have alcohol's interfering with it function because what it does is it actually pushes your blood sugar up really really high so you feel like good on alcohol woo and then your blood sugar over produces your body produces over produces insulin. 'cause you're about to go into a diabetic coma and in your body's designed to repeat itself over produces the insulin brings it all the way back down and as it starts to slide mcdonagh feeling really tired immaculate and sleep and pass out if it gets really bad And then you you. You might have something like coffee or tea or another drink to try and raise your blood sugar again so when you blood. Sugar fluctuates fitting brain and central nervous. System your endocrine system and your immune system and you can understand the not explaining this very well with the whole covid. Nineteen they send. People are drinking and having caught accidents but alcohol suppresses immune function. That's what it does. So the government instead of educating everybody in showing us adverts over and over which i think would help better than just locking everybody down and telling you you know these content touch alcohol reagan so ridiculous. You can't buy alcohol during the on the weekend so everybody's just by way more so every restaurant selling wine under the counter to the clients you know because they can't make money selling food during lockdown. It was bizarre to see the activities that going on at the end of the day understood. Exactly what it does. And how it suppresses immune function we must take these things a little bit more seriously than being wrecked on the knuckles suck educate people that teach them the stuff so i think other thing that it does and this is fascinating. Refined sugar does exactly the same thing is alcohol does just desert loose something called reactive hopper blah seamier. Which when the blood sugar shoots up to high we over produce insulin and brings it right down so down so far down your blood sugar that the part of the brain your frontal lobe that controls moral behavior planning and forethought will just shuts down completely. Okay and the part of the brain that takes over as part of the brain that controls aggression appetite and sexual function. And i think this is probably really important to help people understand these blackouts that they have so you can have a blackout but you not passed out you just living life. I mean. I know a girl that poured wax all over yourself. Hot wax in that state couldn't remember how she got burned from this x. She took all our clothes often. Did this is absurdity. Because the people that were they told her what she does. She could not believe she did something like that. I had a woman that came and spoke to me. Because i was when i speak often speak about the stuff because it played such a role in my life and how important it is to make. Sure you're getting the right kind of glucose about in a while. And she came up to me after she said. I'm embarrassed to raise my hand and tell you what i do but cannot speak to you privately. Acid short can understand when she told me the story. She said i'm going to tell you. I'm very very committed. Christian person go to church regularly. my husband's actually involved in the leadership of the church. We go to bible study on wednesday nights. We go to between one and three services and the sunday we we're involved in the charitable work and stuff but she says periodically. I wake up in another town or another suburb in strange man's bid. And i have no recollection of how i got the and i say to you consume and she said. Nah don't i said are you a sugar addict. And she said yes osama title sugar addict and it does the brain. What alcohol does we. You just black out completely. Obviously you've got to be extreme amounts of sugar to do this but alcohol does the same thing you drink. Extreme amounts you'd binge drink and the knicks thing you wake up and you in somebody else's bid and like how the hell did you get in the shame of all of this is worse than you start drinking again and this whole thing goes on so what happens is when the primitive brain takes over. You either going to get aggressive. You're going to just eat and eat and eat canoe appetites. Just nothing's gonna be enough or you. Could your sexual function could take over. And you become extremely promiscuous and that's clearly very dangerous because besides possibility of fathering all mothering a child you could end up with terrible sexual diseases. So it's it's a huge problem and people don't know this until somebody like me comes and tells him and nobody studies this. Because you take the average psychologist or psychiatrist. Dr they studying medicine and how to cheat you when you sick with medicine and surgery than looking. And what is the cause of all these problems and vivian often. It's a physiological or physical course an and utrition is something that's kind of just ignored and net. That study was done with reactive. Hoppy glycemic was done by women. Called baba read stood. She lived in the united states and operated in stable municipal area and she was in charge of the juvenile delinquent and criminal juvenile delinquent and the prisoners. The adult prisoners in the end the juvenile delinquents and she found that of them something like ninety three percent of the people that she'd work with suffered from this reactive hypoglycemia and in that state of blacked out. Where you can't remember what went on people will kill the family. They'll the children we ask you. Yeah then they will beat somebody into coma they'll be do the most. They'll they'll commit a crime. And they have no recollection of course when you committing crimes being something people like as easy to say you lost your mind and you can't remember but it's an actual condition where you had no recollection of went on. It's completely blacked out. You listening to reply to alcohol. The podcast from world without one if eat lights join our tribe. Please check out website. That wine don't cold so yeah. Apparently those many people in child but have done that have a blackout killed somebody. You cannot in jail recollection too. Many people in jail i mean. Can you imagine Horrendous but blackouts very common in all community. We talk about the loss of people have blackouts. I used to have the have them as well Boston is like all it was a walking talking blackout because I was with some friends for afternoon. And apparently i seem quite normal. You know i was walking around talking. We'd walk quite a long way together. I have no recollection. I mean we'd been drinking since frightful Drink but i. It just hit me over the edge. I lost an entire. And you know i used to have blackouts where the end of the evening was a bit fuzzy Quite remember how it may be. But this one was really serious Hated the idea thought woking talking blackout the fat my brain was so alcoholic couldn't even make memories nazi Absolutely terrifying and here's the thing that people don't understand is that you'll cells and your buddy a designed to consume glucose. Nothing works in your in your at salable. You got thirty seven trillion cells in your body. They desperately need glucose they needed to make. Atp a denison triphosphate which is what creates energy your monaco andrea desperately. Need that your every little organ nelio in the plasma critical in these tiny little things inside the cell that you can't even see with your naked eye it needs glucose your brain and central system can't work without glucose and if you're not getting enough you going to crave alcohol or sugar and barbara read stood say we knew feed children refined sugar growing up on any level. She said you're actually preparing them for alcoholism because they get into the cycle. The blood sugar going up and it's coming down and they feel that the sugar satisfies and then you you graduate from a kid to adolescence or young young person in your twenties wait sitting stuffing faced with ice cream and chocolate says locked kind of interdict so will have a drink and it does. What sugar to to you. And now you recognize that. Except that the alcohol gives you even a bit of feeling takes you higher disrupts you lower so if we understood that we need need proper glucose for body's natural glucose and and so often when i've done a talk i actually say to the audience and i remember reading this one year at a secrets convention at sun city outside johannesburg. The were probably five hundred people Woman and i said to them. Okay if you do any of you crave sugar and they've just everybody put the hand and i said when you craving sugar. What is it that you put into your mouth. What is it you put. And what is it that you actually craving an attempt to get the point across. Imagine yourself in the garden of eden and you craving something sweet. What would you eat. And there was a stately silence and this woman blonde voluptuous woman sitting in the front rows in this deep voice. Adam evan rumor osc that christian. I'm thinking this woman. It was really funny at the time. But it's just interesting because i've often christian in los angeles of austin in the republic of hot bay of austin zimbabwe of austin the uk. Austin all over the

Roland Hydra Revie John Goran Maryanne Sheera Maryanne Satele Cancer Heart Disease Diabetes Allergic Dermatitis Marianne Cara Pheno Google Anita Maryanne Tonsillitis Parkinson's Disease Knicks Lucas Johannesburg Skype Headache
COVID In New Jersey: Police Officers, Firefighters In State Begin Receiving Vaccine

Weekend News

00:58 sec | 6 d ago

COVID In New Jersey: Police Officers, Firefighters In State Begin Receiving Vaccine

"In New Jersey Governor Murphy and health officials there have officially open what is being called a vaccine mega site are Marla Diamond has the details pretty cool. Local firefighters and police officers rolled up their sleeves and a vacant Sears store here at the Rockaway Mall converted into a mega vaccination site. And when we're ready to move forward, this mega site will be a place. For the general public to come to receive their vaccines. Governor Murphy says the 30,000 square foot site is capable of administering 2400 doses a day. The team here is the capacity to handle. I think they said 2400 vaccinations a day. I hope the feds give us enough supply sooner than later so that we could do 2400. Today, Demand is clearly outstripping supply in New Jersey, where an online portal crashed after 650,000 people signed up. Jerseys. Goal is to have 70% of its adult population vaccinated in the next six months

Governor Murphy Marla Diamond Sears Store Rockaway Mall New Jersey
The Office (MM #3580)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 6 d ago

The Office (MM #3580)

"The with kevin mason made it no secret. I watch a lot of television. Always have with a father in television. Tv was always on at home. My dad was a big. tv fan. And will i am to to be honest with. Tv's on right now muted in the background. It's pretty much from the time. I walk into my office in the morning till the time i go to bed at night most days. Maybe i'll turn it off on listening to music or listen to a podcast but for the most part the noise in the background is always tv. I watch a lot of repeats. Watch a lot of nostalgia tv and one thing. That is just shocked. Me surprise me. Confused me over. The last few months is the obsession with tv. Show the office right. Now full disclosure. I watched every office episode. I think probably live refund. Dvr while the show was on the air for what eight and a half nine years whatever it was and i realized nbc has taken the office from netflix back to its peacock app but in addition to that i witnessed over the last six months. Eight months people obsessed with it on that when it their people obsessed watching it on comedy central wherever it is on. Tv people have been obsessed like the tv show a lot. What's the obsession. am. I missing something.

Kevin Mason NBC Netflix
The Office (MM #3580)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 6 d ago

The Office (MM #3580)

"The with kevin mason made it no secret. I watch a lot of television. Always have with a father in television. Tv was always on at home. My dad was a big. tv fan. And will i am to to be honest with. Tv's on right now muted in the background. It's pretty much from the time. I walk into my office in the morning till the time i go to bed at night most days. Maybe i'll turn it off on listening to music or listen to a podcast but for the most part the noise in the background is always tv. I watch a lot of repeats. Watch a lot of nostalgia tv and one thing. That is just shocked. Me surprise me. Confused me over. The last few months is the obsession with tv. Show the office right. Now full disclosure. I watched every office episode. I think probably live refund. Dvr while the show was on the air for what eight and a half nine years whatever it was and i realized nbc has taken the office from netflix back to its peacock app but in addition to that i witnessed over the last six months. Eight months people obsessed with it on that when it their people obsessed watching it on comedy central wherever it is on. Tv people have been obsessed like the tv show a lot. What's the obsession. am. I missing something.

Kevin Mason NBC Netflix
ICU nurse throws baby shower for mother who survived COVID-19

Michael Wallace

01:18 min | Last week

ICU nurse throws baby shower for mother who survived COVID-19

"Nurse Caitlyn Oh, Brock, the last year has been a blur. She has treated hundreds of covert patients here at Barnes Jewish Hospital in ST Louis. She says. One patient stands above from the very beginning. Monique was special to me. 28 year old Monique Jones came to the hospital deathly ill from covert and six months pregnant. The baby was priority over her she would do anything for her baby. Eventually Monique had to be intubated. But Caitlin still talk to her, prayed over her countless hours. And when doctors decided the only hope for mother and child was an emergency C section Caitlin made a promise. I was like Monique make set. I'm gonna throw the biggest baby shower There is to have a promise. She joyfully kept wins. The Mara arrived all £2.5 ounces of her. I just started crying as as soon soon as as I I saw saw everything. everything. Like Like this this couldn't couldn't be be for for me. me. Kalen Kalen raised raised thousands thousands of of dollars dollars from from friends, friends, family family and and co co workers. workers. And And even even though though her her favorite favorite patients patients are now out of the hospital home, I Caitlin still visits regularly being asked to. She's the godmother. And Monique Snu best friend. I never really felt that special to some money. Really needed somebody like her.

Monique Caitlyn Oh Barnes Jewish Hospital Monique Jones Caitlin Brock St Louis Kalen Kalen Mara Monique Snu
2021 Predictions, Latest Headlines

Beyond The Baseline

04:57 min | Last week

2021 Predictions, Latest Headlines

"Everyone's got to work on. This week's sports illustrated kenneth podcasts. Happy twenty twenty one. I i cast of the year. I'm joined by jamie real tennis chat because there are a real match it Jamie good morning happy new year. Good morning having here. I'm i'm good. It's it's strange to Wake up in the morning and actually have match results from flitting across your screen along with Your georgia election results were talking on wednesday morning and Already the women are at play dhabi. The men are qualifying in delray even Nevermind cobain just nice. Nice to have tennis back it It's been a while since we've Been in a position to actually talk about some tennis in not just guessing game about the calendar or try to Find other ways to to fill time. We wait for tennis. Return so good. Good sport back with us tom. I thought we would do a few things today. One of them is We talk with sam query. The other day The told us why he made his escape from russia. And that seems to have generated a fair amount of attention pro and con. Maybe we can talk about that and then we get a column of projecting twenty twenty one and someone suggested we actually instead of just answering. Why don't we provide some logic. And some reason talk through some of the choices we made in terms of prognosticating. Twenty twenty one so. I thought you and i would do that this morning. How does that sound sounds good. I will say the same query interview As you said. Got a lot quite a lot of responses. I think for awhile. We didn't hear anything from him at all. And of course the up investigation concluded and the suspended fine came down And so i think a lot of people were really interested to hear his side of the story. Though i think people are still very much divided on where they stand. Yeah exactly and I mean remember when this news first broke in october. This was a few days after the the twenty twenty french open The atp had a very strongly worded statement and there was even. I mean i had people that were deep inside these discussions inside tennessee. Look democrats may have played his last match. This is a serious breach. This could be you know a six month. Suspension even a one year suspension. Same query already mid thirties. This could have sealed his career and turned up. Not the case at all and This is a as you say he got suspended. Twenty thousand dollar fine which basically means he only needs to behave himself with respect to cove it if he gets in a dispute with a chair umpire. That doesn't count. This is only health and safety related So such this was a slap on the wrist. And i you know. I think this divide people and i am sam. A lot of credit for essentially saying look at the facts are really in dispute. It's just a question of interpretation and in. here's what i went through and put yourself in my shoes and if you disagree with me disagree and Some people took took great offense and still do about what he did other people sympathize but he basically said you know. Here's the story. It's not really not much in dispute. Factually you know. In a lot of these cases you would necessarily extend this platform to To an athlete without trying to find some balance from the other side. But i think it's not really a question of facts being disputes. Just a question of application of law and how severely you want to sanction him Sam laid out what happened and sort of gave us a tiktok and essentially said here. The facts now go ahead and judge me armed with all the facts and as as you say jamie. Some people still take Offense to this his leaving country going to another country breaching protocol You know a lot of people look at you. Run the risk and You knew what you were signing up for. And i think other saw as as you alluded to who's in a fairly You know fairly desperate situation in a in a foreign country with kobe tests and not a lot of clarity. In terms of how the next few weeks would shake out with a seventeen month old until and you know candidly. I tend to land there as well. Not not an ideal set of circumstances and you wish there had been another option a little more communication in there. But i don't think you can really fault someone for being in russia not getting a straight answer having kovachev having the possibility of being separated from your wife and seven month old and basically saying. I'm gonna do this safely as i can. But i i gotta get the hell outta here. Consequences be damned so I don't know if there were other things that struck you reading his piece but I have a hard time. Dredging up a whole lot of outrage. Honestly

Tennis Sam Query Jamie Delray Kenneth Dhabi Georgia Russia ATP TOM Tennessee SAM Kovachev Kobe
"six month" Discussed on A Tone Meant For Me

A Tone Meant For Me

05:38 min | Last month

"six month" Discussed on A Tone Meant For Me

"Oh dismiss him because it was too hard to talk about too hard to think about. It wasn't something that i wanted to face.

"six month" Discussed on A Tone Meant For Me

A Tone Meant For Me

03:13 min | Last month

"six month" Discussed on A Tone Meant For Me

"Him because he was that bridge. The person that i was on the one. Who's on a when. I was invisible. He's gone of a new house. And i can't to him or call him. Every time i phone goes off. I'm still looking for him..

"six month" Discussed on A Tone Meant For Me

A Tone Meant For Me

02:37 min | Last month

"six month" Discussed on A Tone Meant For Me

"Atonement for me episode. Twenty the death of my best friend. Six months later Hey magical misfits it's cayden. Iv and. welcome to atonement for me. It's december how is it december already. This year i can't even begin to describe how oddly time has passed this year. 'cause this week would have been multi. Best friend's birthday had. He not died six months ago. And it's such a weird thing to say out loud because it still hurts has if it was yesterday but it feels like it was years ago.

"six month" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:48 min | 4 months ago

"six month" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

"A furious row has erupted between the UK and the European Union Prime Minister Boris Johnson is trying to change part of the brexit agreement after the much fought over deeply argued about seemingly interminable brexit debate billions of dollars worth of British, , trade with the EU and potentially with the United States hangs in the balance here is Steven with the update Brexit is a two stage affair the first age last year was the exit deal on the which if no trade agreement was reached with the EU A Hog Boorda would be imposed between northern, , Ireland and the rest of the UK. . This was meant to avoid a hard border with the Irish Republic, , which remains part of the e you many Brits were unhappy with it, , but the deal was agreed and turned into a treaty under the second stage. . Britain's had a transition period of the year in which to negotiate a new trade deal with the block that period is drawing to a close negotiations of gone well, , and the British government. . This week tried to change its commitment on Northern Ireland in parliament, , the Northern Ireland, , Secretary Brandon Lewis made a startling. . Yes does break intellectual law in a very specific limited white. . Yes. That . was British cabinet minister admitting that his government's planning to break the law provoking outrage in both houses of parliament former Justice Secretary Lord Charlie. . Folk ner didn't mince his words. . This stinking hypocrisy chokes our country's reputation and destroys our government's ability to lead at home and make agreements abroad and with the E. . U threatening to. . Sue The agreement that now looks in deadly peril his that free trade deal the UK's negotiating with the EU its largest trading partner Fiona sing. . Carter. . Of Forex trading firm city index says it's not surprising. The . pound has fallen sharply. . What's he doing here is adding to this picture of uncertainty I think it's just adding to the sense of does anyone actually know what's going to be happening? In ? what's going to be happening in just a few months at the end of this year without a new deal forty-three percent of UK exports could face European tariffs and other barriers. . Charles Grant of the Centre for European reform says, , it's not a pretty picture. . The huge prospect chaos at the borders lack of ability to travel easily from one part of Europe to another the impact on financial. Markets . which react very nicely. . The European Union is demanding. . The Brits stopped trying to renege on the exit deal and it has a powerful ally Washington, , which brokered the peace deal in Northern Ireland in the nineteen ninety s Nancy. . Pelosi Speaker of the House of Representatives says, , if the Brits continue on this course, , they can kiss goodbye to any hope of a trade deal with the US as well. .

Ireland Northern Ireland European Union Kroger United States Justice Secretary Lord Charlie Dow Industrial Europe Peterman Kai Ryssdal Secretary Brandon Lewis Julie Centre for European reform Stephen Beard House of Representatives UK Britain
"six month" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:20 min | 4 months ago

"six month" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

"All right. So riddle me this participants in this corona virus economy you still can't go to concerts right. So what do you do to get your live music fix? Well, millions of people literally, millions are turning to something called versus. A livestream on instagram and apple music that pits to music icons against each other in live performances of their songs. Marketplace's Merrill Cigar got the fun assignment today. So the way this works, it's kind of like the artists are doing karaoke to their own music and each other's and these are called battles but they're more like love fests like here's DM experts Snoop Dogg. This is. Song. But snoop was standing he's bouncing. He's rapping along there've been a bunch of these t pain versus Littlejohn Brandy Verses Monica. Sure I'm brandy. This battle got one point two, million simultaneous views on instagram more than a million people tweeted about it, and afterwards, they had twenty two million streams in the US and they were up overall. I would say probably about three, hundred, four, hundred percent, they own the entire army chart on albums and songs. Larry Jackson is global creative director at Apple Music which is partnered with versus he says, Snoop's album also climbed charts. He thinks versus could be around for a long time. Concerts won't be returning for at least a year. So I think all circumstances of setting it up for this to be. A long running concept. Maybe one reason these battles have been so successful is that they're coming at a time when we really need them Tammy Colonel Teaches, musicology at Miami University in Ohio they have been moments in which people have been able to transcend what has been tragedy I and and find a way to coat when we have physically been cut off in particular the black community the idea came from two black producers Timbaland and Swiss beats. It highlights black artists. It's a celebration of black culture and.

Snoop Dogg Littlejohn Brandy Larry Jackson Apple Music Merrill Cigar Tammy Colonel instagram US Miami University Ohio apple director
"six month" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

05:31 min | 4 months ago

"six month" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

"We are going to do a couple of stories now about gaps in this economy gaps on the personal economy side and gaps on the business side, it has been seven weeks now since those extra unemployment benefits that tens of millions of people had been depending on went away Neil it talked about that. It's been five weeks since president trump's temporary and partial replacement took effect using human disaster relief money and it has been five and a half months since Congress passed the cares act and as to deepen neil and I were talking about we are nowhere on more government money help for this economy possibly not until after the election. So how is that working out in our personal economies? Here's marketplace's Mitchell Hartman At the end of July about twenty, five, million jobless Americans suddenly lost six hundred dollars a week in federal benefits from their weekly unemployment checks leaving the typical recipient with three twenty, five a week on average across the country President Trump's pandemic unemployment replacement scheme announced in early August was slow to get off the ground says economist Andrew Statiners at the century. Foundation. This stopgap that was the to place was tardy and insufficient, and it's already running. Out So far about twenty states have distributed the FEMA benefits most at three hundred dollars a week more states have applied for their fema money, which is capped at forty four, billion nationwide enough to cover just six weeks of benefits almost as soon as he will get the money, they won't be getting any more by statiners calculation about ten billion dollars in extra jobless benefits have been paid out so far under trump's so-called lost wages assistance program. Compared to sixty eight billion that would have gone out if the original six, hundred, a week payments at continued Johanna Mayor, a healthcare worker is trying to cope with the loss of that extra federal money. She lives in Maryland and has three elementary age kids all at home right now, she and her husband had been out of work since the pandemic hit both received unemployment she's been struggling since their federal pandemic it's ended in July I mean. It's a significant difference are vines alone is two thousand dollars a month Maryland just announced it will start paying out the extra three, hundred a week in benefits, but it hasn't cut any checks yet for mayor and her family. Now I'm trying to survive a pay our rent or bills and our food on what amounts to six, hundred, forty, five dollars a week I mean, it's not survivable here according to a poll by Ipsos three out of four. Support. ADDITIONAL PAYMENTS TO PEOPLE UNEMPLOYED DUE TO CORONA virus. I'm Mitchell Hartman for marketplace. Okay. Mitchell did gaps in personal economies. Kimberly. Adams is going to gaps in business economies brick and mortar retailers are doing everything they can to get by we've been telling you about that. and. Yet, some of those retailers aren't getting by we told you yesterday about the Clothing Chain Century Twenty one shutting down. Yes, there is the pandemic as a cause, but the company also said in its announcement in pre direct language that it's insurance company was to blame as well. Marketplace's Kimberly. Adams explains that one. Century. Twenty one really didn't mince words saying it's insurers had quote turn their backs on us at this most critical time. The company says that despite having business interruption insurance when business was interrupted due to covid nineteen claims weren't paid out in this case like many others around the country insurers saying they don't have to Loretta waters is with the insurance. Information Institute which represents the industry because it's a pandemic it was never taken into the rates when insurance company provided that kind of coverage in court fights all over the country the industry is pointing to clauses and exclusions in contracts arguing the industry isn't obligated to nor can afford to absorb the pandemic losses in the meantime business. Owners are wondering what use their insurance even is, and then you also see a lot of folks are getting renewal notices for their policies for next year and a lot of their rates are going up. Davis is a lawyer working with the small business advocacy, group mainstreet alliance in some cases to three hundred percent, and so it's understandable that small business owners are saying wait a minute if the industry didn't pay out because of these exclusions, why are they going up both insurance companies and business organizations are lobbying Congress for fix Leon Buck with the National Retail Federation says, insurers need a federal backstop using the program developed after nine eleven as a model there's another terrorism event. The companies will cover portion of the federal government will cover the majority of the cost and that's key because after nine eleven, no one was able to get insurance century twenty. One noted that it's insurance did help it recoup losses in New York.

Mitchell Hartman trump Clothing Chain Century Johanna Mayor president Andrew Statiners Congress Adams Neil Maryland federal government FEMA New York Kimberly Leon Buck Davis National Retail Federation Loretta waters
"six month" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

08:16 min | 4 months ago

"six month" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

"Everybody, it's original teaching your kids the little ones I mean before the jobs. Teach them about money is not easy. Trust me. I've been there. We though have something to help. It's a new podcast with the whole family called million bazillion for marketplace helping dollars make more sense subscribe wherever you get your podcast. This marketplace podcast is supported alarm dot com teamwork makes the dream work an alarm. Dot Com makes your homework all with one single SMART APP alarm dot. com. Unites. Your security locks, doorbell camera lights, video cameras, and Thermostat into one smart system with one single smart APP to control at all plus alarm dot com alert you when there's unusual activity in and around your home learn more at alarm dot com. Here's what we've got today. We will look back at the past six economic months. We've got a LIP SYNC battle. Seriously we do and look brexit is back in the news from American public. Media. This is market for. In Los Angeles. I'm Kai. Ryssdal it is Friday today everybody the eleventh of September good as always to have your own. Well being mindful of the much deeper significance of this date. I will note today for the economic record that we are six months today for March. The eleventh a generally accepted I think starting point for what this pandemic has done to our lives our jobs and how we do what we do. So how are we doing in this economy right now that and the week was in the next six minutes of live Radio Neil Richardson is at Edward Jones City Brady is at political. Hey, you too. So Neil and let me start with you and and the past six months in in thirty five seconds how we doing because when this thing started, we were talking depression and end of the world. Right so we we've seen the depression part I don't think we'll see the end of the will be. That's the good news. We but we definitely have seen an economic decline that's been at surreal levels. Just think two weeks of a march shutdown with enough to drive a first quarter. GDP. Down five percent on an annualized basis, and now, and then after that, in the second quarter, we saw thirty three percent annualized decline. So it's been truly remarkable in terms of the economic recovery though though the magnitude is severe and still. Severe? It's likely to be one of the shortest economic recessions on record for starting to see the momentum and quick bound said everyone talked about. But from here, it's still vulnerable and the path back to pre pandemic levels is likely to be a long one. Okay. So deep let's talk about the from here part and I point you to Capitol Hill this week and the Senate not able to pass. Its version of another relief package. Why Why question we always ask about Congress. We. We all know that the United States Congress tends to respond to fast moving urgent disasters the ones that are politically salient. The ones that create a create a the momentum they need unfortunately corona viruses becoming a slower moving urgent disaster still disastrous still awful. But it's not necessarily shocking people at the same pace that it did six months ago. That is I think. The big difference that we've become too almost accustomed to the apocalyptic world that we're living in. That's just it's just a weird sense who cares about the deficit at this moment but there are people who do and at least people who care about it from from an timeframe or from whatever form of of of of religious view they have on debt. So, there's always a chance that something could happen in the next few weeks. We don't want to write off Congress completely of course, remembered twelve years ago. There was a giant bail out of the biggest banks that asked Congress just over a month before an election, but it was right after it failed in Congress and took a giant tumble in the stock market to make to to show. Some activities something that looked real for lawmakers to respond to. We just haven't seen anything sudden and real to get people to respond and let me ask you about that slow moving part of this thing because I kind of agree with deep, it happened so fast and now it's become a long drawn out thing. The question is, can people can this economy wait until Congress gets shocked into action? There is a significant segment of the economy that can't wait. Those are the people who seen their unemployment insurance benefits expire at the end of July. Those are the people who may be facing addiction. In early twenty, twenty one if something isn't done to to stay continue to stay the evictions Those are the people who are. PART OF THE OVER A. Fourteen million Americans who've been affected by COVID job losses and you may still be employed but not getting paid. So there are several people who will be affected by a con Congress in a stalemate. What's not seemingly affected the stock market which continues to advance even if you get tripped up here and there and over a course of a couple of weeks, a socks and home prices continue to climb higher. So the impact has been a different. For different segments of the economy will do the stock market is clearly what's giving Congress the covered to not actually move right? I mean that's that's not much of a debate but let me get back to what you said a little while earlier, which is, let's keep an eye on the next few weeks. The you actually believe there's going to be relief action in this. Congress, before the election and if not how it not become a political problem. It it it. I think it's possible that we will get some some type of action just never know like all of these things come out of nowhere like we we would have expected that there would have been. More urgency a month ago or six weeks ago and that that there isn't a think as perhaps the most shocking political story of the moment that that they're not feeling it I do think some lawmakers are are aware of the risk. It had their democratic lawmakers who are screaming at Nancy Pelosi right now saying please pass something We're we're in tight races, but they're also Republican lawmakers who. Carrying on a narrative that the thing that gets out of this is grit and determination, it's not more money. It's it's it's like wrapping yourself in a flag. Maybe, not even with a mask. And and just just trying to like get just get through it and there's this idea that like that's the American spirit and that's the there. These really contrary views of what what the country needs right now that have been. And been become obviously polarizing but become ingrained in our in our minds collect way the nation. Quick. Just a rip off of that a little bit. You know Congress has been remarkable and its ability to pull a rabbit out of the hat in the last minute and what can't be denied. It's the political calculus going into whether or not to do this next round twenty Republican Senate. Seats are also up for election in November and so they have to be doing that calculus what happens to their? Their states, it's no more stimulus as passed. That's going to be part of the negotiations over the next few weeks as well. We're fifty something. There's from this election city. Brady at Politico Neil. Richardson at Edward. Jones. Thanks you too have a nice weekend. Thanks guy. All right. We'll talk to you soon on Wall Street today a little bumpy little choppy. Actually we'll.

Congress Neil Richardson Edward Jones Los Angeles United States Senate Politico Nancy Pelosi Brady
"six month" Discussed on Radio Boston

Radio Boston

05:53 min | 4 months ago

"six month" Discussed on Radio Boston

"Any decision that was made was going to be fraught with You know anxiety either it's going to be too much. It's GonNa. Be Too little but I do think that was a respect for science and that drove a lot of the decision making. And especially understanding even the that even the science isn't perfect and in that, there is still a lot of unknowns but nonetheless, there was a respect for for the epidemiology. There was respect for what we understood in terms of public health and I think the leadership in our state. Not. Only did they make decisions around this but they also emphasized the importance for public health so that the individuals and the state, the residents of the Commonwealth, I, think also listened to the the Scientific Council and I do think that relative to other states we have done a much better job I think moving forward it's going to be interesting to see what happens and I think the challenge is going to be balancing. The public health will also trying to create a path forward knowing that this may be some time. All right. Let's go to the phones and this is a call in for you listeners what questions lingering or new do you have about the virus about how we're handling it about what comes next maybe about vaccines or how we what we know about infection now one, eight, hundred, four, two, three, eight, two, five, five, that's one eight, hundred, four to three talk. I'M GONNA turn to Nick from Jamaica Plain Nick you are on with the doctors..

Nick Jamaica Scientific Council
"six month" Discussed on Radio Boston

Radio Boston

05:04 min | 4 months ago

"six month" Discussed on Radio Boston

"Dr Garrone great can be back. And also with us as Dr Sandra Nelson. An infectious disease physician at. Mass General Hospital and Assistant Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School Dr Nelson Welcome back to you. Thanks so much. So, I just in reading those numbers again it's a lot. So let me just start by asking both of you six months into the state of emergency. How were you and how do you think we're doing doctor tyrone maybe you can start. How am I? It's tiring and you know we're all tired everyone's tired everyone has pandemic fatigue we in infectious disease and hospital beyond you and working. So so many hours and and we really are so sad about all the lives that we lost. But at the same time you here in Massachusetts, we do to remember that we're lucky and that there's there's certainly a lot of hope given our low numbers. May I ask you have you lost anyone close to you? Know one very close to me. I'm glad for you about that Dr Nelson how about you? How are you doing? you know I share some of those thoughts. It really is staggering. When you think about six months is is is an incredibly long time in in the life of this epidemic but it's a short time in our own lives and yet it feels like it's just been We've been living in this this covert world now for for such a long time. I you know, I, think one of the things that's so interesting is that that my day job is so much different than it used to be is still see patients still do many of the things that we used to do, but it's just got such a different feel to it. There is both I think a sense of purpose and a sense of of drive to to do all that we can to help the people who are affected by this and to help our communities as they struggle to cope. You. Know I I feel like. I regularly chrome across people who have different stories of when they realized. How heavy this was how long it was going to be with us how real it was I think for me it was covenant covering governor. Bakers Presser the day that he said masks we're going to be the new normal. When did each of you understand the depth and the breadth of what we were confronting? I mean I think that When I started to see that we were inevitably headed into a search You know maybe that was mid-march maybe that was around the time the kids were released from school that I it occurred to me that this really was the new normal..

Dr Sandra Nelson Harvard Medical School Dr Nels Mass General Hospital Dr Garrone Assistant Professor of Medicin Massachusetts
"six month" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

09:12 min | 4 months ago

"six month" Discussed on PRI's The World

"But what's new today? It's that they not only feel they want defender to be punished. So it's suppression of speech is the main worry today. At the time of the massacre at the offices of Charlie upto in two thousand fifteen, you know millions of people took up the cause of Charlie Hebdo with the Hashtag just we surely. What is the influence and reach of Charlie upto five years on. The change is we now live in an open world we live in an open world with closed minds I tend to say so everything we do and publish everything we draw in our little corner of the world can be seen and shared and seen by people who will not understand who are not prepared to understand the subtleties lease. So that's the base of big misunderstandings I. Think the show do killing was a sort of tragic misunderstanding and think they'll be more in the future more misunderstanding it is a global coach clashing away. Patrick's Japan is a political cartoonist space in Switzerland thanks a lot. Patrick. UNCURABLE. Yesterday recess the Geena was arrested. He's known for saving hundreds of lives during the Rwandan genocide and for his story being told in the Film Hotel Rwanda Rwanda authorities have charged recess beginning with terrorism arson and murder but critics say the arrest is politically motivated. We're joined now by cloud gotTa Bouquet Claude lived through the genocide and today is an activist with the African great. Lakes Action Network Claude first of all, tell us about Paul says the by Geena for those who don't know who he is, what this story and how has he seen in Rwanda today? He's story is that all in up stander during the genocide he used the hotel that he managed to shelter over a thousand people which was really difficult during that time is of genocide and I have to move houses, multiple times and had to be in hiding. It was not an easy task to hide people. So it was a wonderful thing they during the genocide but now as a critic of the government of Rwanda, he's been painted with the same broad rush that the paint every critic with every person that comes out of the critics is branded as a genocide deny your even somebody like. That helped people during the genocide they are branded as terrorists and enemies of the country. So criticizing the President Kagami is equated with being an enemy of the state POLKA. Gami has been president of Rwanda for quite some time has Paul recess a begin I've been critical of him for a he has for at least the last fifteen years. He's been one of the leading critics of Polka gone me especially when it comes to atrocities in the Congo where. Six, million people have died as a result of one day in Uganda's invasion into the country and all kinds of human rights. Abuses publicist to begin has spoken on that. He's spoken against the dictatorship in Rhonda. He's spoken against this staged elections. He's basically been a very open and wanted the loudest critics of the government over wonder. Was Paul Richness, the beginning arrested in Rwanda or outside of Rwanda he was arrested outside of Wanda he was on a flight to Dubai and somewhere along the riot. Stopped in coughed and taken away to Rwanda but that was not his destination not on his Tinari. What are the charges that they're wanding authorities are leveling at Paul Roos Uva Geena are they saying that he's currently a terrorist and involved in arson and murder or are they saying that he was actually somebody who is involved back in the genocide during the genocide? No the accusation is was happening today they're accusing him of financing an armed group that's fighting against Rwandan government. Of course, he is a member of a coalition of which this group is a part of in when you look back at Rwanda's history, all gummy came to power in a similar manner where he was a part of an armed group that came into gopher, the country, the RPF, they Rwandan Patriotic Front, which is in power today. However wanders reacted to Paul was just the beginning of the rest. There is a lot of outrage of course what those who support the government they are celebrating but you know the place where you really see Rwandans expressing themselves freely on social media in you can tell there's a lot of outrage on this arrest because to lots of Rwandans the government itself is criminal. So, what happens now? I believe two things are gonNA. Happen One. The government's GONNA run smear campaign against him as they do with all critics. They are going to run a trial which a lot of the politically motivated trials in Wanda are neither free nor fair. We're basically judged by the president gummy however I think the international community is going to play a big role in it. What we've seen in the past is for this political cases win the international community has stood up and really shown injustice but the government over Wanda there one of government has eventually released some of the critics that it has arrested and tried and held. Club got the Buca is an activist with the African Great Lakes Action. Network. Thanks a lot. Thank you. If you spent any time in the last several months daydreaming about traveling to a distant land for fun. You've probably also spent some time cringing at the risks and hassle involved three members of our newsroom have just cleared those Kovic travel hurdles and are here to dish about it Lydia leader or H-have Lancia and Reo Saran all recently flew from the United States to relocate for reporting assignments Lydia's in Athens Arielle is in Tel Aviv and horray is in city. Now Lydia start us off how is planning your international travel different than it might have been pre cove it. Hey, Carol. So for me, one of the things I had to think about was because there are no direct flights. From Boston to Greece was where my layover was going to be because there are restrictions right now and what flights can come in to Greece from different countries. The other thing that was a little different than usual was forty eight hours before travelling I had to fill out these forms that are now required by the Greek government for every traveler regardless of where they're coming from. So I had to give them some biographical information and some you know information about where it was coming from where he would be staying once I entered the country and using that information they generated a unique qr code for me that they eventually scanned once they got into the country are how about you? Hey Carol so I actually had my ticket months in advance, and then when this whole Cova crisis came and I saw that flights were stopping I was getting a little worried and I saw that my airline was canceling flights. And surprise surprise ten days before it was cancelled am. Airline did end booking a flight on another line, which was united. Or Hey. You're headed to Mexico City what was the planning for that? Hey, everybody actually I think it was a lot easier than lydian aerial because the Mexican and the US government's. placed. Any restrictions on flights between the two countries? So it's just a matter of looking the flight and making sure I had a really good mask. It was difficult for me because I have a pet who I have a dog, her name is Shula which in Spanish that means pork chop and she. She couldn't travel in a Kennel as luggage because of the I couldn't find a single airline that is doing that right now between the two countries. So I spoke with a counsellor in Massachusetts and she gave me a letter certifying a out during the pandemic has become a emotional support animal for me and I sent that along with a veterinarian records to American Airlines, which is airline that. I took a of time. So your travels booked and in Jorges case, you have your dog registered then each of you gets to the airport and and what happened there. Let's start with you Ario. So I was actually pretty impressed arriving at Logan Airport in Boston. There's a lot of social distancing and people were wearing masks and you know benches had banners on them trying to limit seating. I was actually really impressed and then I got onto my flight to Newark and the flight itself was packed shoulder to shoulder now one MTC. So it was surprising that in the airport, there was so strict distancing measures, but on the flight itself while the guidelines and precautions were pretty much thrown out the window. What about you Lydia? What happened at the airport? Yeah. Arielle actually had some of the same experiences and thoughts that you did my first flight to Frankfurt was unlike yours pretty much empty. I, mean everyone kind of had their own road to themselves, and there were announcements about covert related measures that we kept hearing on the flight..

Rwanda Film Hotel Rwanda Rwanda Paul Lydia president Wanda Charlie Hebdo Boston Carol arson United States Paul Roos Uva Geena Patrick Logan Airport murder Switzerland Greek government Uganda Greece African Great Lakes Action
"six month" Discussed on Nature Podcast

Nature Podcast

05:08 min | 7 months ago

"six month" Discussed on Nature Podcast

"R.. Which works with coffee to conduct spectrum of measurements of ocean ecosystems in California current. Four Times per year. The count coffee tea heads to see to carry out pivotal shipboard, biological and ecological measurements and sampling cow coffee, having going out to the seventy two years, and this spring, the crew, preparing for the second voyage of the year, but once again lockdown struck. In April of twenty twenty for the first time in forty seven years, we were not able to go out to sample the ocean. And this has created many challenges for us. I have to say I understand the the basis for decision-making to stand down the research fleet in the United States. This is a matter of human health and safety, and it was a necessary action to take, but it does have repercussions for us. Spring is the start of the coastal upwelling season a time when the flora and fauna of the Asian kick into action plankton blooms, the growth and survival of fish, and the influences of carbon dioxide on the system are just some of the measurements. That will be missed this season so the. Ability to. Integrate the measurements we make into models is going to be. restricted. As a consequence of of this particular springtime time period. Their end forever in a day when we plot. The the time series measurements that are such important records of changes in plankton populations, changes in fish, larval populations changes in DNA. Measured by diversity in the upper motion, the those parts will have a hole in spring of twenty twenty. Now life will go on. Science will go on, but we've missed an opportunity to understand the natural variability in the system. And also how this human induced anthropology might perturbed that natural durability. Come the festive July, twenty, twenty, two academic research fleet is allowed to set sail again for obvious reasons social distancing on board, the ship will present some challenges so extra pre-boarding precautions have been put in place for those wanting to go out to the first of all. They're going to need to shelter in place in quarantine for a minimum of fourteen days in advance of research cruise at scripts. We've imposed a system of three successive covid tests. Tests by PCR, that must be taken at intervals across that fourteen day time period, people will be isolated in hotels for the last six days prior to cruise. If they pass the final PR test for COVID. They will then be escorted directly to a research vessel, and they will need to remain on that vessel until the end of the route research interval, it will be a culture change. It will also require a lot of human behavioral changes. But. I? If you're sufficiently motivated to answer the scientific questions then you're willing to to deal with these additional obstacles, and we're hoping that we can get back to the the scientific work that motivates us all. The scientific enterprise has undergone dramatic change over the last three months, but hand-in-hand with a crisis comes. Adaptation and scientists are well trained to cope with this. Scientists is of course filled with at certain moments, immense satisfaction and insights, but along the way toward those insights there are often frustrations. We all have experiments that fail instruments that don't perform the way they were supposed to challenging weather circumstances that make it difficult to complete a sampling powder in a field study, and in this particular spring of twenty. Twenty we encountered this nearly unprecedented inability to get out into the ocean environment. It's highly frustrating from a professional perspective. But oftentimes in science we land face down on the floor. We have to pick ourselves up and do the best. We can moving forward. Ending that report from Julia, Gold So that's it for another edition of Corona pod. If you've got a couple of sperm and could fill out the survey, we talked about at the start of the show. That would be amazing. I'll put up links that cost in the show. Out For, Corona Free Edition of the regular major lost on Wednesday and also you back here in seven days for the penultimate edition of Crew Import IV management. Thompson thanks for stay.

twenty twenty California United States Julia Thompson
"six month" Discussed on Nature Podcast

Nature Podcast

05:43 min | 7 months ago

"six month" Discussed on Nature Podcast

"And if you can spare a couple minutes just to fill in those questions, it's only like three or four of them. That will really help us out in the future. This is not the last one we're going to do one more right. We're going to do to more. The tenth of July will be the last episode of Crow NEPAD in its current situation, and then we'll move into the nature August, and that's also not to say that there's no reason this couldn't come back. Back Right, so we do this because it's not true the time trying to make sure we can bring the best that we can to. You guys to the listeners at home, but right now this feels like the sensible move and we'll have to see how this goes. Because I think it says in the intro to every one of these episodes. We just don't really know how this pandemic is going to turn out still. I think there's something that amy said nothing ever according. It's safe to say we're in a different sort of chapter now and I do feel like you know in the beginning I. Really had no idea what was going to happen but I. Think now I have. Have a little bit more of an idea. Because before we had no past precedent to look to, and now we do, which is sort of interesting now. He can kind of see the trajectories of various countries in using the past. Maybe there's a little bit more guessing that we can do absolutely when the stops being the last epidemic and starts becoming the last three months. We've kind of got current past as it were that we can start to refer to. Yeah, there's a number of Nice websites out there from different outlets that kind of show graphs of different countries in their trajectories, so for example and I can put these links in the show notes but Financial Times has any. Any kind of series of graphs from different countries and one way that they look at it is they measure what are the excess develops time compared to previous years and you can see there. You know in some places like Norway Iceland in Israel. They don't really have a huge number of sex. So that says to me. They managed to really contain their outbreaks pretty swiftly. Other places have a very sharp mountain like the UK. Italy Spain huge climbs. Their deaths are fifty percent over usual fifty thousand more deaths than usual around there, and then you get the US, which is different than anywhere else where like in Europe? We have a very quickly escalating mountain, but we've got more of. Of like a mountain, range and fact right now, cases are going up in twenty seven states. So when I was saying we know a little bit more now I think if you're in a country like Italy where they're really seeing a huge decline, chances are. We'll see like what we saw in Singapore Germany. Sometimes there are big surges, but if the things that helped the outbreak to begin with are in place, then presumably, they will continue to stay in place so some of these graphs as well, and they're all kind of three sort of broad categories. The I can kind of divide the gross into as the graphs which have a kind of a tiny little bump that doesn't seem. Seem to make a huge difference like the fastest countries you talked about. And then you have this very characteristics of exponential huge spike that then also drops pretty quickly, and that's the way you know. The UK is currently sitting in a lot of European countries, and you look at the US and it sort of it is hard to sort of walkout what it represents because it is just like undulating up and down and up and down and up. It seems to be congratulated going down, but it's hard to I. Guess Really Understand what's happening in the states if you look at just sort of the whole of the United States in one graph, because what's happening in each individual state. State can be really quite drastically. Different on those graphs could look very very different issues to look at different states, which I guess makes sense because they have different governesses, and they have different public health sponsor in different places. Yeah, it's a big country, so it's GonNa look a little bit different there and that's one thing we don't see if there is a drop, it's not a rapid drop like it is elsewhere. What we see right now is that where as in March and April it was New York. That was just skyrocketing. Now we see is California Texas and Florida are kind of leading the way in rising number of cases, Arizona's distinct, and that has got such a steep. Steep increase right now they're outbreak is doubling every twelve days. Compare that to say in New York. where the outbreak seems to be doubling roughly every four hundred sixteen days just to say, it's not increasing at the same rate in eleven states it's decreasing and the other. One's is sort of hard to say so like you were saying. If you break it up, it changes depending on the state and this claim that the US has a lot of cases because of a lot of tests is just untrue. There's various measures to look at that. We've been at around five percent positive, even though the number of tests has gone way up so that part's not true some other. Things that people are pulling out of the stats, and I say people because the US CDC and health department, really leading the way as far as displaying data, but there's been a number of universities and also news that let's set of short. Pick up the slack here so you know. John Hopkins is one of various places that are tracking say racial disparities so from the. The data we have, it looks like even though black people are thirteen percent of the US. Population they account for twenty three percent of the deaths, so that disparity is looming pretty large and the other thing we might want to talk about is us has remained around twelve percent of all global deaths for quite a while, but Latin America is coming up pretty heavily. They've. They've been coming out for the last few weeks or so. At this point, they account for more than half of the new deaths in the world. So that's really disconcerting. Another eight percent of the world's population, the biggest surge there is in Brazil and Mexico is right behind that those both had leader is that we're really downplaying the seriousness of this pandemic and that's playing. Playing out now, but also in countries, where I've talked about how they put in really early, strict measures, Karoo they're still doing pretty poorly right now, and it's going up. It's pretty disconcerting. Those the ones that we stood out to me. Amy Is the ones that say did put efforts in place very very quickly..

United States amy UK Italy Crow NEPAD Financial Times New York John Hopkins Europe Singapore Germany CDC Spain Norway New York. Arizona Brazil California Mexico Latin America
"six month" Discussed on Nature Podcast

Nature Podcast

01:59 min | 7 months ago

"six month" Discussed on Nature Podcast

"Corona pulled. In this show, we're going to bring you nature. Take on the latest covid nineteen developments. And we'll be speaking to experts around the world about research during the pandemic. This plays out. We also don't know a ton about this. Virus so there's so many open questions. I just have a really hard time. Making predictions that has i. don't know how the outbreaks going to change. Welcome to episode fifteen of Corona. Part I'm Benjamin Thompson back in the south London basement and I'm joined as always by Noah Baker, an amy maximum high both then. Before we get started today a little announcement from us all here. Uh, it feels like the pandemic is moving into a new chapter I think. Maybe you'll both the grill that of course is still ongoing, and the nature of science coverage is changing, and and we're looking to change with it, so we are coming to the end of Corona. What we're going to retire the show in a few episodes, isn't that. That right. Yeah, I think it's starting to become clear to us that we're kind of entering a new phase of the coronavirus pandemic, suddenly thorough here in the UK in the states. Now that's not to say that things aren't still very much going on in in other places of the world area in a very different phase, but I'm the way the AL coverage is working at nature in general. Is the IT's. It's starting to become more integrated into all of our coverage of science and less sort of the sole focus and I. think that's kind of what we're trying to do. Here is retire the colonel specific show, and instead will start bringing all of that reporting into the regular nature past which we we produce on a Wednesday every week. Yeah, that's exactly right of cut down version with all the latest stories are. are going on in the world of Corona virus research that in week, even if we are ending the show, we're going to try to make sure that we keep bits that people like. Yeah, that's right. We want to reach out to the listeners to you listening right now and find out what you enjoyed what you maybe didn't enjoy well because we want to take what we've learned into our future shows..

Corona Benjamin Thompson AL Noah Baker UK London
"six month" Discussed on The Signal

The Signal

06:23 min | 10 months ago

"six month" Discussed on The Signal

"So like we were saying these pods on the same length. Elimination would be the shortest option. Tony says might still be available but not for long and the next shortest would be flattening. The curve that's allowing the virus to spread to a point that is a user at capacity in this number of assumptions here. But these are hit. Immunity is achieved sixty percent. We double out. Icu pissed so the record about four thousand base to deal with covert. The average tawny admits IC- issue if you get covered as teen days and we also control the epidemic levers and keep just said. Icu pistol it would take featuring extreme calculations to see it all pass by February. Yeah which is a lot longer than the six month idea. That's being discussed publicly at the moment. Not at six months has ever been a promise but a lot of the policy response especially the economic kind seems to be geared towards that timeframe whereas February is more like ten or eleven months on upside tiny reckons. If Australia does a good job of isolating the vulnerable the elderly and people with commodities and some antiviral treatments become available. We could cut that time in half right. And then there's the Middle Pa the one that we're on right now and even longer than eleven months because he thinks if we keep squashing the curve way below. Icu capacity not low enough to wipe it out altogether. We'll probably end up with a vaccine before we rate showed immunity. Which means we'd say living like this for somewhere in the vicinity of a year to maybe even a year and a half because there's not enough social context to allow the boss to speed enough to get the infection right up to get the kite is passing through an achieve here community. Now that's just about hero seat. Settimana public health medicine speechless saying that. If we want to get hit immunity we're going to let more people cannot victim and doing some version of this until winter. 2021 isn't a pretty thought but neither is tens of thousands of voidable deaths. We WANT TO ACHIEVE IMMUNITY BEFORE CHRISTMAS. Too much social physical distancing environment which is why as a society. We need to work out. What our goal is here are. We hid immunity and completely relax because try and why and have reduced epidemic all social costume social disruption and economic cost. All those things for much longer until we have a vaccine okay so say Australia does want to achieve herd immunity foster. What are they doing that so if Australia? The signs that we want immunity and we want to try to before Christmas assault. Not Too long we would now just ease off a little bit sale out. People can take to work but more just get infection right up everything along and then we would get took point where it was starting to grow quickly would probably have to go into the liberal physical team. We hit now or preps even more lockdown and then holder that now. That's what I can say. I know played with the mathematics to make myself a sexy tricky. So you need to have a margin of era near you put in the controls all north. You go to to move. And it's quite a frightening thing for the chief medical officer to the thinking about pulling all but if we wanted to go to him you see that we would do. And some countries Sweden's by Sweden is relatively relaxed about the team. Except SEAN so this quarter around the world and how countries are purchasing. Okay so kind of a stop stop. Stop model yeah or to torture. Everyone's favourite metaphor this week about hibernation. We would wake the Baragan just for a little while and then send it back to sleep are not necessarily advocating that astray should take us. Pa But it isn't option. I think a lot of people think that what we're doing now. We'll get us through to feud immunity pointing out. That will now smell social distancing if we keep it on will not cheat hit immunity and we're looking at a really really long hole in the state until there's a vaccine we do have another option needs to be discussed about advocating. We take that route. It's not my job to decide that citizenry astrid that deserves the chance to have explained to them and be able to flick back to the politicians as to. What the preferences do you think? It's possible that the government's already chosen the model which we sort of redundant shave her immunity and we wait it out until there's a vaccine but they've maybe done a bit of a calculation that people will freak out if you say to them by the way you're going to be indoors for another eleven months. I couldn't possibly comment. Go on I suspect. That's what's happened to and I'm not going to criticize the too much into this really but I do wonder. Alexei speaks to wonder this being a hit in the UK the UK was initially on a trajectory towards immunity. And then basically the Imperial College study came out and shuts rights and society. Just to wear not going there. But they didn't consider what options where and so you look down by political will increase physical distancing. That happens and then. You're sitting here Australia about three weeks. Away behind chief medical officer. And you're looking at all this the prime minister. And you're looking at the less neutron wick. At how do we find out about this? I suspect just? What is this if we can't demonstrate immunity route possible so we'll go this middle route and we'll public know that this means it's not going to achieve it immunity when we get a bit of settling down here? I think we need to be transparent about. We're not going to be cheaper than going to be reading all because these serious implications.

Australia Icu medical officer Middle Pa Tony Sweden epidemic assault prime minister Pa UK Imperial College SEAN Alexei
"six month" Discussed on The Signal

The Signal

01:53 min | 10 months ago

"six month" Discussed on The Signal

"Okay so that middle option where you worked minimize infection but Tony. Shut everything down. Which is what you have to limit. The virus has these catch. And that's how long it's GonNa take. Yeah because there's only two ways that life goes back to normal. It's herd immunity or a vaccine and without one of those two things. Everything stays in stasis just like it is now did immunity as we've got enough people who are immune population that the virus can no longer keep sick and this guy says sixty because we need one person passes it onto two point five people in a completely virgin city population of sixty people from noon. It's going to be slightly less than one person you pass onto in the epidemic fights hid. Immunity is do. We need immunity. Well most of us thought this. What will be going from the fist price? Because then it means you can just up your borders garbage locked normally might if you just here and there but you back into a normal. Erie once you've got the the problem is the the cost in human lives to get to it immunity. The flip side is if you not hit immunity you've got the cost and by costuming. Costa's General Seats Economic Costs. Call to the visuals of social disruption. The cost of functioning in society lockdown go into social distance single success. I really challenging since we need. Batra relation of these in goals. And we need bitter discussion than what? We're getting at the moment and bridges back to the dilemma. At the core of this pandemic the economic cost though since the death toll and Tony says the price of flattening the curve. Instead of squashing it could be tens of thousands of.

Tony Batra Erie Costa
"six month" Discussed on POLITICO's Pulse Check

POLITICO's Pulse Check

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"six month" Discussed on POLITICO's Pulse Check

"Six months ago hurricane maria hit the island puerto rico hi circle hurricane relief down please all we have is us there's no fema here there's no armenia you know only the people the people people suffer today on politico pulse check we'll look at how the island is still reeling from the devastating storm and what that means for the millions of puerto ricans seeking healthcare i i'll talk to politico's danny vinik who recently returned from puerto rico and has a new story comparing the federal government's response to hurricane maria with hurricane harvey which hit texas then after the break i caught up with dr series barbaro new york city's deputy commissioner of health who led a team of responders down to puerto rico to review the healthcare challenges plaguing the island just reminder if you like pulse check you can help us you can rate the podcast review at shirt with a friend all of those help us find new listeners and let me know at d diamond politico dot com or at diamond on twitter and who you bike to hear from next and what topics you want to hear on this show many listeners suggested in rhode on puerto rico and that's why we're doing one today i'm joined now by danny vinik is just an editor of the agenda who's out with a major new story how trump favored texas over puerto rico danny your article traces the different federal response to hurricane harvey in texas and hurricane maria and puerto rico how different were those responses.

maria puerto ricans politico danny vinik puerto rico hurricane harvey texas york city deputy commissioner twitter rhode editor barbaro hurricane maria Six months
"six month" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"six month" Discussed on The Takeaway

"This is the takeaway podcast for tuesday march twentieth twenty eighteen it's the first day of spring it's the equinox it's also six months hurricane maria hit puerto rico will start there this hour and will end the hour with comedian aparna charles i'm retweeting so gonna be okay stick around it's funny this is the takeaway i've taught it's good to have you with us six months ago today on september twentieth hurricane maria hit puerto rico things are slowly getting better in puerto rico but with businesses and infrastructure devastated a hundred and thirty five thousand puerto ricans have left the island according to cbs news many of them with no firm plans to return and a lot of them have arrived on the mainland with no real place to go back in october fema started offering temporary shelter benefits for people displaced by the storm that shelter for thousands of vacuoles took the form of a hotel room somewhere in the united states but six months later thirty five hundred puerto ricans are still living in hotels and motels under what's called the transitional sheltering assistance program today was supposed to be the deadline cutting off those hotel vouchers but on monday fema extended the program until midmay willoughby's bermudez knows firsthand the toll this process has taken on both families and the cities that have welcomed them on the mainland bermudez is a member of the city council in hartford connecticut and she joins me now we'll delete welcome thank you thanks for having me and marcela garcia is also hearing editor he'll writer for the boston globe marcel thanks for being here as well high councilwoman bermuda's let me start with you how many families remain in hotels in hartford now and and how did hartford get involved in accepting them.

bermudez boston writer cbs hartford bermuda editor marcela garcia hartford connecticut maria midmay willoughby fema united states puerto ricans hurricane maria aparna charles puerto rico six months