35 Burst results for "Six Bucks"

Giannis Goes on Attack as Bucks Force Game 7

Jim Bohannon

00:21 sec | 4 months ago

Giannis Goes on Attack as Bucks Force Game 7

"Will be a Game seven for the Bucks Net series. They're going to run out the time. The final here in Game six Bucks one. Oh, four Brooklyn Nets 89 Bucks radio Networks play by play announcer Ted Davis With the call at the end of Thursday's Game Advisor Forum. The deciding game of the series is Saturday, with the winner advancing to the Eastern Conference finals.

Bucks Brooklyn Nets Ted Davis
The Book of Genesis: Looking At The Book Of Beginnings

Knowing Faith

04:31 min | 9 months ago

The Book of Genesis: Looking At The Book Of Beginnings

"Is the book of genesis. Well it's the book beginnings and so it's telling us what happened at the beginning of the story that is going to form the entire arc of the biblical story. But it's important to remember that it's not just telling us what happened in the beginning. It's telling us what god did in the beginning and so it keeps god as the central figure of all of the action and that can actually as we head into this Season that lovey. Who wanna keep top of mind because we start to talk about whereas in the first eleven chapters. We talked about four events Creation fall flood and babble now in the second half of the book which is actually much longer than the first half. We're gonna talk about four. People abraham isaac jacob and joseph. I'm so mad at you right now in this present moment because when you say stuff like that it makes me. Did you have that going into next. Because i have been preparing episode run sheets and not one single time. Have you said we'll call. You know the first eleven chapters are really four events and the next forty eight chapters or thirty eight chapters for people because that would have been a great line from somebody else. I mean come on. It's not like i sit around at night map in this stuff out. Yeah and i'm never up to snuff so it asked the story. Arc moves toward a description of people. We do want to bear in mind that the central figure is still going to be y'all way and how he's acting in the earliest recorded Stories of human history for us so But but again it's a book beginnings meaning that all of the and i think we said last season. The genesis is often referred to succeed. Pot of the bible is where all of those themes wanna see go. All the way through to revelation are being set up for us. So that's what we spent a long time last season and we'll do this season doing is looking for what are those. What are the threads in. How can we begin to see them with greater ease and regularity as we move into the rest of the scriptures us great so okay so genesis book of beginnings first eleven chapters four people. Next section. Twelve through fifty is for events but jt. Why would why would. Why would we spend all this time studying. Yeah i did just get it backwards. And i said it backwards. Genesis eleven four events genesis. Twelve fifty four people in residual. Okay so jt. Why would we spend a whole season studying genesis. I mean like why not. Just get to the good stuff in the new testament and just roll. Yeah so. I mean. One of the things that i i think. The lord's really teaching me right. Now that i'm trying to learn in my ability to be a bible reader and a bible teacher is to see how really the whole story of scripture is in those first three chapters. It's also in those first eleven chapters that we did last semester. It's then it's in the next fifty minutes in the pentateuch. The first five books of the bible that really when you look at genesis to revelation the whole story of scripture which we think forms hold disciples wanted list hopes in this podcast. Is that you just know. The story of the bible may be able to participate in be participants in the story. And you can't. You can't participate in the store. You don't know is that they would see they would see that. The story of the bible really finds its seed form all of its hyper links through the rest of scripture. Here in the book of genesis genesis. I don't want to say that there's any book that's not foundational. We love all sixty six. The bible not including third corinthians kyle but all six bucks at arrival We we need to know. We need to love. Because god has put treasures there for us. But i i i do wanna say this carefully. Genesis is one of those primary pillar books that you don't get it right. It's going to be hard to get the rest of the story right. Yeah i think what you're saying. Jt makes sense. And i think one of the interesting things is when you read. Genesis is with somebody that you're playing and maybe you've also read a gospel or you're helping them read through the gospels. At the same time you start to realize that a lot of the the themes or the The images of the pictures or the the concepts of the theology. That's in genesis. And a really pronounced way is deliberately being communicated in the gospels and that those connections sometimes are really on the

Abraham Isaac Jacob Joseph Kyle
Do You Want to Write a Book?

Women Worldwide

05:35 min | 9 months ago

Do You Want to Write a Book?

"I everyone welcome to another episode of women worldwide. Thank you so much for showing up for tuning in for always sharing how you're doing what you're feeling this really help us to bring the gas that can inspire motivate in really offer you some help with your challenges. So let's get right to today's topic we're gonna take storytelling and the author to a whole new level. It's the legacy maker. So i have a legacy maker today. Who's helping to transform the publishing industry joining me. On the show with andrea albright l. andrea is a serial entrepreneur as she is publishing mogul. She's published twenty six bucks and she's helping other authors to find the same success. And i could say so much about andrea talk about her latest book which is visionary boss so andrea. I think it's time that you share your advice in your journey with us. Welcome welcome to women worldwide. Thank you so much gear drive for having me. I am thrilled to be here. I love what you're up to supporting women worldwide and. Thank you for having me. Your welcome will twenty. Six books is huge. So i've written a few books. I i know what. That's like an absolutely amazed and what you're doing. So maybe you can start off just by sharing a little bit about this past two serial entrepreneur punching absolutely while i started in corporate america right out of college and i had a nervous breakdown. I learned early on that making money without her business and meaning didn't fulfill me and went and started my own company. I became an entrepreneur. When i was twenty six years so i've been on this journey for a while. I decided i wanted to help people get and get fit and my mentor at the time said well you have to write a book in order to stand out as an authority and so i wrote my first book in two thousand six and i remember being so terrified that no one was going to read it. Only my mom was going to buy it. I could sound. But i said you know if i can help one percent then. It's worth it. So i released that book and it went on to create thousands of success stories around the world. People would write to me and say your book saved my life. I was going to kill myself. And then i found your book and now i love my body i love myself i love my else and so it was messages like that. That kept me going and everyone said fitness and weight loss is way too competitive. You can never compete. But this thing called. Youtube came along and i was like what's you so i was really part of that. Social media revolution back in two thousand six two thousand seven and because of social media. I was able to reach my audience. I learned internet marketing. And every time. I would publish a book for myself. I would use marketing to bring people to my website. I eventually got on the front page of google. Very important key. Words like weight loss. Secret and flash forward. I wrote over twenty five bucks and health and fitness. I reached over ten million views on youtube. One hundred thousand. Facebook fans and women's health and fitness magazine. Put me on the cover of their twenty first anniversary edition. So that's really what defined my authority as a thought leader in women's health. And i saw that. So many authors are struggling to get their audience to pay attention to their book. And that's when i became publisher i started beverly hills publishing so that i can help other authors to publish books in ninety days and reach their audience through marketing in ninety days. Tat's unbelievable so from somebody who works with traditional publishers. Absolutely unheard of now. Isn't it interesting that you had some push-back around you of the competition and you know you even yourself said a. maybe only. My mom will read my book now. Is that something. Do office come to you. And do you find those same topic. So i guess yours or challenges that they think they're going to face as absolutely being visionary is both a blessing and a curse because we can see the future. We can see a possibility for humanity. I believe that anyone who wants to write a book is truly coming from that place of being visionary and seeing something that they want to share with the world but then the curse is that we doubt ourselves. Who am i to bryn this vision on the planet who am i to tell society and culture that we can do better and so it comes with that inferiority complex

Andrea Andrea Albright Youtube America Beverly Hills Google Facebook Bryn
"six bucks" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

01:43 min | 9 months ago

"six bucks" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Faves for just six bucks, let me definitely present participation Be very similar in regular price is your playtime. The next song is for you and the family to get up and play your way with your play yogurt. They were you playing. They play with play where you play, we play. Okay, Now you say, wait, time. Stop now or shop. You'll play younger at a store near you to find your favorite and play your way with your leg. Mornings with Bob started 5 A.m. Ryan from potato bia. What are you doing in this? Our little punished today? So I'm trying to tell me you're wearing the baby soon more than a smile here, Bob Surat solution for you for decades. You must be very tired, then Weekday mornings at five. How about one more splash for the world? Enjoy this, So I was taking the baby. If a natural disaster comes knocking. How prepared is your family? You can't just close the door on earthquakes, floods or hurricanes and hope they go away. That's why it's important to make a plan. Now ready dot gov slash plan has the tools and tips you need to prepare your family for an emergency. So if disaster shows up at your doorstep You'll be ready. Is it ready? Dot gov slash plan and make a plan today brought to you by FEMA and the Ad council. It's above future mayor one from what's worth Mr Land Decker. I was one of those teenagers that was tying up the phone lines years ago. Evening 7 to 10. You see a lot of things feel out of control these days, So it's time you pick your battles..

Apple planning 30% increase in iPhone production for first half of 2021

Mac OS Ken

01:57 min | 10 months ago

Apple planning 30% increase in iPhone production for first half of 2021

"Apple shares. Were up a little over six bucks on tuesday. If you wanna know why look to the land of the rising sun the globe and mail out of canada which is not the land of the rising sun highlights a report from the japanese business. I nikkei that says apple is upping iphone production in a serious way headed into twenty twenty one. According to the globe and mail's take the cupertino company plans to manufacture up to ninety six million iphones in the first half of twenty twenty one a nearly thirty percent year on year increase going to strong demand for its by g handsets. That said well. I won't say the report is full of holes. I will say there are a couple of holes for which to watch out i. It's not justified. G phones apples ordering but less expensive models like iphone. Eleven and iphone s. e. as well also manufacturers may miss apples mark. Thanks to an industry-wide shortage of key components and then there's the big one the target will be regularly reviewed and revised in response to consumer demand but the sentiment is there and investors grooved on it on tuesday apple shares ended the day at one hundred twenty seven dollars and eighty eight cents up six dollars and ten cents. The nikkei report had wedbush analyst. Daniel ives summing a familiar tune eleven insider had the head of apple's pep squad financial division saying the nikkei reports simply supports what he's been saying all along. The iphone is in or on a super cycle says outperform rating on apple shares. His twelve month price target on the shares as one hundred sixty dollars with a bull case that could see the shares at two hundred bucks

Apple The Globe And Mail Cupertino Canada Wedbush Daniel Ives Pep Squad Financial Division
"six bucks" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

07:53 min | 11 months ago

"six bucks" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"Their lifelong royalties. Get a cash right in hand. Instead of having to wait for royalty checks to show up over time, and it's not going to end their Hollywood celebrities are going to be selling their contract rights professional athletes doing the same and it's not just a private equity firms who have been largely the buyers of these contracts to date in the future. My prediction is that all of these air going to get token ized. In other words of Dylan just sold his music collection for $300 million. Do you suppose that there might be 50 million people willing to spend six bucks apiece. By a piece of Bob Dylan's music collection. Well, if not 50 million people paying six bucks apiece. You think you could get five million people to pay $60? For a token, which would become tradable on the open exchange. All of this technology available thanks to the block chain, and I do believe that token ization of otherwise illiquid assets are going to become very common, giving you the opportunity to profit every time you hear the song from your favorite recording artist. On the air or in your tunes, but I die Greste. The reason I started talking about all of this is because Jean sprained her ankle and so time now to welcome gene into the studio, hobbling along to the microphone as she is for this week's favorite segment. My wife, Jeanette, Women founder here it element financial engines, a degree in consumer economics and nutrition and an expert in macrobiotic cooking, if not Dog walking Pyrrhic. Truthfully, the springs. Not that bad. I took good care of it early on with ice and all that good stuff. So today we are much better and no bruising. So all is Well, thank you. Always good to be here, always good to share. And I wanted to continue the conversation that we started last week. How to be up when you're down Part two. As last week I had shared this cloud kind of came over me around Thanksgiving. And you know, it's easy to be up when you're up. But how to be up when we're down is the question. You know, there's always gifts in life, and I'm always I'm a big believer in that. And you never know who's going to present these gifts or where they're going to come from. We have this great vet who we got Hoshi Spade a couple weeks ago, and when we took her to get hurt, stitches out When they brought her back to the car. They said, Oh, the doctor sent you this video. And I want you to hear this video because it cracked me up defend. I understand. I look beautiful, and I am changing this gorgeous and he took the city that and he said, Don't go looking a lot. Everything's fine, and I could be a normal dog. But give me the weekend to relax. And then I could go back to being the wild. Crazy Duncan. I am okay. As soon as I had this very big. Laughter, Spontaneous laughter. Good, deep, genuine belly left. I actually felt this shift. So I played the video over and over again. I shared with family and friends and posted it on my Facebook because I wanted others to share in this laugh. This silly video that our vet made that really brought me out of it. And so I thought we could today. Talk about our toolbox, because really self care is something we need to do for ourselves every day and again When we're up, it's easy, but when we're down, that's when we really need to know that we have these tools that they can help us. So let me start with just some tools that I have in my box. You really want to make sure we're getting really, really good sleep so, ah, Hot Epson, Salt Foot soak or hot Epsom Salt bath. Rubbing lavender oil or lotion on your feet. No Electron IX before you go to bed. Another good tip for our toolbox is water intake. We want to make sure we don't get too hydrated, especially in this cold or whether it's so important to drink during the day. I think we need to look at our food and take when we're having cloudy days we want aren't food to be light and fresh lots of veggies, some grains. Some fish. Lots of nice soup. Take a break from dairy and meat. Maybe We want to look at our life and take, you know, turning off the media, taking a break from zoom another Electron IX. I've always talked about walking outside. That is a great tool that we all have, even if If you can't walk, you can hobble or go sit on the front porch. You just need to get fresh air and you need to take some deep breaths in that fresh air. And then breathing. Breathing is so important, you know, during the day and especially when we're not feeling so great, and so we want to maybe take a minute break four times a day and just sit And have some good deep breaths. It will clear our mind and we will feel better. We want to connect with others. That's so important Phone calls cards. We really, really need each other, even though we can't physically be with each other. I think a piece of helping us with our cloud is to step outside of ourselves and help others. Another piece of our toolbox is to step out of ourselves and to help someone else. Give our time to others and help where and when we can Laughter is really important. So, you know, finding lots of funny movies, but You know, the biggest gift of all of this was that video came out of the blue and it was spontaneous. And so we just need to look for the gifts in our day because they are there. And they will help us build our toolbox. And then these tools once we have them, they're always there to help us Whenever we need them. The year end is coming and this time to create new traditions and find new ways to safely be together. I hope that helps. You know we're not always going to be up, but it's it's nice to have some ways to help ourselves when we're not feeling so good. And definitely on the upswing, and I had a nice belly laugh. So I'm feeling really good. But I wanted to share word of the week and that is tool. So tool The T is for transform This is if no other year in our life this isn't year of transformation. It's exciting, but it's also scary transformation can be healthy and very positive. And it just a little little things in our day in our life that we have changed. Transform. Those for open minded Life is movement. And even when we move our body, we also need to think about moving our thoughts and our opinions and being open minded. Helps us do that. This is the year of changes as I have shared and all bet. If we reflect on the year we will see lots and lots of positive changes that we have made in our life. So staying open minded and looking Looking for these opportunities. The other owes for open hearted being there for others remembering that we're all going through this. The planet is going through this and open heart helps us remember that we are all one and the Ellis for Loki. This year will end and we will not have all those parties and gatherings which actually were sometimes quite exhausting and very expensive because we had to buy gifts for every place that we went. And there's nothing wrong with being Loki and saving some money. And so Loki is embracing the family that we have in our bubble and making this holiday memorable by being together and focused and listening and loving each other..

Bob Dylan Hollywood Facebook Hoshi Spade Epson front porch Jeanette Jean founder Duncan Ellis
Reviewing Webview Gold

No Code No Problem

03:38 min | 1 year ago

Reviewing Webview Gold

"Have the webview gold. And for those of you who don't know what web you go to is not allow you to turn mobile optimized web web applications into mobile apps ready to submit to the iOS and Google Play stores. So yes the Bubble app you have been working on for the last six months. You can now turn it into a mobile app. For those of you who have a Shopify store and you want it to be a mobile app. Now you can do that all of these different web applications, whether it be a Shopify store or a bubble application billed or whatever. It may be able to as long as it's mobile-optimized. You'll be able to submit it to the iOS and Google Play Store switch is awesome. So some features of web you gold obviously no code required off and they have amazing support right? So I actually reached out to them not too long ago and they got back to me within 24 hours. So that's awesome and most importantly off their guarantee. Your app is 100% ready for iOS and Google Play Store approval or you receive a full refund. That's pretty incredible. Obviously, you have to take that with a grain of salt because if you're you know, if your web application is like it has poor nor or whatever. It may be obviously it's not going to get accepted into the iOS and Google Play stores. So as long as It's along their guidelines. Then you should be good to go. And I think that's incredible because they're I'm pretty sure the only no code platform right now that actually allows you to do that and offers a 1% guarantee or refund. So this just goes to show the utmost confidence they have in their product which gives you a sense of relief that this product is the tool that you need, right? And so now you're probably wondering how I get a refund and in terms of pricing I think it is incredible. They are pretty much that I'm aware of the only no code company that is not a SAS product home instead. It is a one time $69 fee for iOS and then a one time $69 fee for Google play until October 31st. Then that price goes from $69 for iOS and Google Play 279 so you can save $20 if you act before October 31st for the dog. For Lifetime access right? So that's not for a year. That's the lifetime access which in my opinion is a steal all of the support and updates after that are all free. So you would be most stupid if you did not take advantage of that like that's mind-boggling to me. I think good come out to a little less than $6 a month for a year. If you were to associate you want to just the iOS if you if you took that down to like a month and price it would be like a little less than six bucks a month, which is nuts. And so I think for the lifetime value of it like it's a no-brainer. So overall as you can tell I think that it is definitely worth a pickup considering it is a lifetime purchase and you never know whenever you will need to convert one of your web applications Shopify stores, whatever it may be into a fully-functioning mobile application home. And with that being said, even if it's not for you, maybe you have a friend or maybe you have a family member that has a Shopify store or is using bubble. Hopefully you recommended it to them and God They you know, they're like well, this is awesome. But I feel like a lot of people would be able to use it more if it was, you know on iOS on the app store or on the Google Play store and then you can say yeah GIF to me. I'll do it for you.

Google Shopify
Amazon reveals their new cloud gaming service

The Business of Esports

06:45 min | 1 year ago

Amazon reveals their new cloud gaming service

"Bliss. Let's jump into some news William to an like an article that was pretty big news this week it was part of a broader set of announcements that the company made. This is from which fifty dot com and the article is. Amazon Reveals Cloud Gaming Service Amazon according to the article is going to offer a Netflix's style cloud gaming subscription service named Luna with select titles in four K sixty fips It'll initially be available on PC MAC fire TV iphone. And ipad with an android version planned for after launch You know this sounds a lot like everything else were seeing. There are some differences they will like. Amazon is going to offer its own controller like stadia did but players can use a bluetooth when the keyboard or mouse or Third Party, Bluetooth? Controller. If they want and if they do by Amazon's controller, it's only fifty dollars and it connects directly to the cloud service in the same. Way Stadium. Had, promised to but didn't et release. and the introductory price for the for Luna in the US is going to be six dollars a month. The only major publisher I saw. Listed at least as part of this announcement and this article interestingly enough was Ubisoft. Who was the big launch partner for Stadia and then seems to have lost faith in stadium because they started doing work with some other like cloud gaming company? It seems they're like the cloud gaming sort of. you know the the the everything that's cloud gaming there there seems to be ubisoft their front and center in terms of the launch part. We should we should separate. Think Games publisher should be trying to get his much distribution for their games as possible and others involved. Yeah. But I presume you saw benefits financially from being the launch partner like I. I bet ub saw I bet I don't think this was a hard business decision to reach as my guests removing SOx perspective. My real question is what was the Industry Conference Paul and how did you and I? Both, miss at were they spike the water with livestream games as a surface like juice because it is like there was some conference three years ago that like Apple Amazon Microsoft you know like like everyone was like a everyone was at and they're all like they laughed like well, we have to do this right now I'll tell you what it is was no business of sports podcast three years ago. And and the day Google got on stage and said, this is the future of gaming and I called it hot garbage and I called it correctly hot garbage not enough people were listening now now hold on Amazon though brings I think something a little different to the table and hear me out here. Could you see potential integration with all of Amazon's like home stuff right? Everyone has an Alexa. Everyone has like a A. Zillions of already set Alexa was in the controller or was that a joke. That's possible I. I saw that and I like did not verify it was system a that people are making off or if that was really how they were going to differentiate the controller because it's both plausible a good idea and completely implausible and a terrible idea at the same time. I just it seems. It feels like cloud gaming now is just a check box that the big tech companies have to put a check mark next to, and there isn't a lot of thinking around how this is any different. Because if you read the Luna announcement, it reads pretty much verbatim like Google announcement except with less with less sort of fluff. So there's no promise of the future of gaming. There's no negative latency. There's no they took that stuff out but other than that. It's pretty much a copy paste well, no, it's not though and this is really important the price right because. This is six dollars a month now. Sucks that they couldn't get it to five I. Mean I'm GonNa, start there like a real psychological break point they miss their but I trust Amazon is run their math, what this cost rate, and probably there's a certain amount of server space that this takes up but like. I think the offering is different at this price right because I think it's and I. Think this gets a little bit more at what stadium could have been. Right it's much more affordable. My understanding is it's not this rent to own model. It's just a straight up flat subscription. You've got the game streamed. Great Booby soft is a good launch partner for this because they would have what I would call a lot of mass appeal games like the assassin's creed games, for example, which I think translate well to this sort of thing of show me where there's no copy paste the William. To cut you off. But like this, all the assassins creed was in the launch stuff for stadia to. Yeah I think it was a decent partner there to the difference as the argument for the stadium launch was. Pay Sixty dollars to buy a game. You probably already have right and it's a worse version because it's laggy livestream on a concert. This argument is, Hey, you already have Amazon services you maybe you're curious to checkout watchdogs pay six bucks a month to try it out, and there's some other stuff here till and I think at that pricing, it also goes much more mass marquette I think somebody who isn't going to shell out sixty. For is willing to shell out I guarantee there's going to be price promotions. I title fray and Amazon is very good at that stuff to drive adoption. This is starting to be something like I could see you know forty five year old Atari Gamers who dropped out looking at and being like, yeah, those do look pretty cool. Being an assassin in Greece I'd like I this is this is a really big thing I believe is like. Inaccessibility driven offerings. Price is everything. The appeal of stadium was accessability driven without an accessible price which totally gated off making great games available cheaply, and without a fixed cost could that work as a second model? Yes and could it work as a longer term lease of life on yes? So like I do I think this is the greatest thing ever to happen in livestream subscription gaming. No that is xbox's game pass right like one hundred percent but could this work and could this grow into something else overtime

Amazon Partner Google Publisher Way Stadium Alexa Ubisoft William Luna Netflix Apple Third Party United States SOX Greece
What's the best mic for podcasting?

The $100 MBA Show

04:59 min | 1 year ago

What's the best mic for podcasting?

"To, kick off his answer to the Cuny Wednesday question. What is the best Mike for podcasting? WanNa start by saying that I've done a ton of research on this topic. I've done a incredible amount of experimentation We've recorded over sixteen hundred episodes of this podcast and every single time record an episode. We try so many different things to improve the quality of the audio of the sound of the edit to continually be professional and compete with professional podcasts. So I'm not going to geek out on giving you all these different types of microphones you can buy on. Ana, give you the summation of what I've learned over the years. Will you really need to know what I would tell somebody if they're getting started with a podcast? Actually going to start somewhere completely different somewhere. The whole thing to do with microphones because you can have a state of the art microphone that costs five hundred dollars plus but it will do you. No. Good. If you're space is awful if we're you record is not a good space as conducive to recording, it doesn't matter what you're going to use to record for example, very court my podcast with a great quality Mike but There's construction going on there's noises dog barking I'm in a room with high. Ceilings and no installation that record is going to sound straight trash. Okay. It doesn't matter that you have a great Mike because your environment is horrible. Good news is that you can easily manager environment and make sure that wherever you record, it's actually conducive to agree recording. So one of the things I highly recommend is your cord either in a walk in closet or closet, the has shelving the bare minimum have your mic on a shelf in a closet and you record into that shelving into the closet. Because your voice is being projected towards the mayank into the closet, and because the shelving is kind of. Confined like into a box, your voice is not going to be bouncing around a lot across the room. It's going to be confined to the closet. This is sort of creating a makeshift soundproofing or sound booth. This is going sound a whole lot better than you just having your Mike at your desk in a big room. The next level up is to actually record in a sound proofing box. This is an actual Foam box has soundproofing that you place your mic inside. And you place that box into a closet or a shelf, and this really makes everything sound like studio quality. It's incredible and your listeners just using a portable soundproof box that you can buy Amazon it's about two hundred dollars, but it's actually worth more than the actual Mike it's actually going to improve the quality of your audio more than the actual. Mike. Itself I actually. Just. Looked it up on Amazon and the one I was thinking of a travel on, which is two hundred dollars. There's actually an alternative one that is in portable, but it's only thirty six bucks. It's called the choice studio sound recording, vocal booth thirty, six dollars. It's basically a box me out of foam where you can place your mic inside and talk right into it. That is going to make a tremendous difference. Now, let's talk about Mike's There are whole much of mine because I can go through but I'm GonNa give you two mikes. One that I would say is absolutely amazing for the price and you can actually use for all your podcasting with that soundproofing for as long as you like, and the second one is going to be if you insist on buying something expensive, this is the one I recommend. So the first one is the Audio Technica eighteen or twenty, one, hundred, it retails for about one hundred bucks on Amazon it's a be an xl are Mike, which is great. That means if it's used. To your computer and record using your recording software right on your computer or they're using quicktime or Daswani, or garage band or whatever using record your audio. Now I mentioned ex- LAR-. It also does acceler excellent actual cable that needs to go into a sound or quarter like a Zumra quarter if you don't own talking about then this is kind of technical and you may want to Google that but if you're interested in recording on your Laptop than you have to get a Mike, this be compatible which is this one, the audio tape, a tr twenty, one, hundred. This is why I think is one of the best Mike's you can buy period for podcasting for a webinars for calls. It's fantastic. It's really really an amazing quality Mike. It's on intellectual mish means that when you speak into the mic picks up your voice and it does its best of not picking up. Anything that's around in the room. So even if somebody's shouting across the hallway, if you're in a different room, it won't pick up

Mike Amazon Audio Technica ANA Google
Notorious B.I.G.’s $6 Plastic Crown Sells for Nearly $600,000 at Sotheby’s First Hip-Hop Auction

Tim Conway Jr.

00:20 sec | 1 year ago

Notorious B.I.G.’s $6 Plastic Crown Sells for Nearly $600,000 at Sotheby’s First Hip-Hop Auction

"A plastic crown worn by the notorious B. I G and his last photo shoot has sold for almost $600,000. The photograph who did the photographer rather who did the shoot in 1997 bought the crown for six bucks. Sotheby's in New York, held the auction last night. It's first hip hop memorabilia event.

Sotheby New York
COVID-19 Transmission is Solvable

Solvable

06:35 min | 1 year ago

COVID-19 Transmission is Solvable

"I wanted to star. With a really dumb obvious question, which is, can you describe to me all the ways in which you can look for the presence of virus that you would be? Well, that's not an obvious question at all. Within each virus viruses just like. Any other thing they have a genetic code, and then they have a bunch of proteins and the genetic code of a virus is Arnie, which is akin to a human's DNA, and so the same way that you could do a forensic investigation of a crime scene and use DNA defined if there was a human specific human at the crime scene, you can do a forensic investigation to look for Ra to know if there was an inside of a person so. That's one way and that's this tool that these molecular tools that we call PCR, and then there's a different way instead of using the genetic makeup and the Arna to look for the virus. In this case, you could actually look for the proteins that make up the virus and that's where these antigen tests really shine. So you can either look for the genetic code or you could look for the proteins I like to call these rapid antigen tests, transmission indicating tests. There's one other major way which is a quickly and that's to. Look for the immunological response to the virus, because humans are good at making immune response to viruses. So it's a different way and that's antibody based detection but that's I put it in a whole different category because it usually comes after infection. Yeah. So the first way looking for the aren a is the kind of gold standard that's exactly right and so if I go to the hospital and get a today, get a Cova test, the looking for giving me the using to see if I have fires in my system that's right and what's the cheapest that a PC tests could produce result that actual price of tests can be done for about six bucks maybe. Even less so it can be really cheap, but the differences, the whole infrastructure around PCR test they have to be done in labs. So you have logistics of transport you have all of the people working in the lab robots and and so generally, it really drives the cost up and as we've seen the average test costs anywhere from thirty dollars at the absolute low end up to one hundred and fifty dollars for some labs that are charging in contrast be CR, two antigen tests. How do engine chess? What do they look like? What's their cost in time profile they? They look like a pregnancy test and they work like a pregnancy test actually they can be made. A little piece of paper generally speaking. You put some of the sample whether that be some swab that's been mixed with some saline solution or saliva onto a paper strip, and it shows up with a line turns either for example, red if it's positive or blue, it's negative and those can be made in the in huge numbers. They don't require instruments they don't usually require. There's a few on the market right now that to get the. Sensitivity at the FDA wanted they have some instrumentation associated but in reality, these are used for malaria strep for all these different infections they've been around for very long time and they can be done just on a piece of paper and five minutes and they could get down to you can produce them for fractions of a dollar and they might be sold to the public or built by the government for. A dollar apiece or something along those lines. So you're you've been a the perhaps the leading public proponent public health proponent of. Using Antigen, tests much more broadly to fight this. Derek and I wanted to the first time I. Heard you give this argument you convince me about two minutes. And I still don't understand why why don't we have this system because I can imagine a world where if it's this if they're cheaper easy, then you know every kid before they went to school in the morning. Would take one of these fifty cents or one dollar tests, and if they were positive, they would say home in their negative we would know that could go to school like. If, I want to go to a restaurant, why can't I just sat stand investable the restaurant take test and wait for my response and if I'M If I'm negative I get to go to the restaurant it just strikes me as. This is a way to get going again. Why are we not doing this? Can you explain that I can I have a few theories I. mean they're not just theories. They're they're. In the middle of this. So these tests because of this whole sensitivity issue early in March or really in January the world decided that was the gold standard for these tests and I don't think and I that this will maybe come. We'll come across wrong for some people but there hasn't been enough thought place into what exactly does the PR test mean, and is it the right gold standard? The only pathway that we have to evaluate tests like this in the United States are medical diagnostic pathways there pathways designed specifically to ensure that a physician like a detective is getting all of the information they need to diagnose a sick person in front of them so it's really been. First and foremost a regulatory hurdle we have so devalued and de funded public health across our country and really across the world. That we actually didn't, we don't have a regulatory pathway to approve test whose primary objective is is one of stopping an epidemic verses one of diagnosing sick person and that has really led. That's everything up all of the companies that could be producing these these really rapid tests in the millions and millions they have been sitting on these tests trying to hone them trying to get them just a little bit better just a little bit better so that the so that they can pass FDA standards as a medical diagnostic. It's not just slowing down their approval and getting them out to the public. It's actually bottle necking the company's into creating tests that are not going to be as scalable because they're having to use more expensive reagents they're starting to put them with instruments and package them more. They have to actually become more expensive, highly manufactured tests. When in reality, they're just these little pieces of paper. That if we can do the cheap version of they can be made very fast, but they just won't get through the FDA at the moment

FDA Arnie RA Cova Malaria United States Derek Government
Starting Zocdoc with Oliver Kharraz

How I Built This

1:03:33 hr | 1 year ago

Starting Zocdoc with Oliver Kharraz

"Oliver Karaz was born and raised in Germany mostly in rural parts of the country his mother was German and his father was from Iran in came from a long line of doctors. For me, it really starts in some ways with my dad and. The timing rapidly had every reason to become a social activist and and so he came to Germany from the Middle East when he was very young around twenty with no money in his pocket no language skills. And you personally then worked on of odd jobs, but he eventually became a psychiatrist but what has really shaped me much more than being born in Berlin is. Social. Active. Isn't that I that I saw him live and that he really made our family mattress we always talked about talent responsibility and the need to use. Whatever telling behind to help those. Around us that we can make a difference. Given that your father was Iranian and your mother was was sort of. German. An Uber even though you were born in Germany, did you feel did you feel as Germany everybody else? So I didn't have a second identity. We only used spoke German at home and yet. As you say I was also a not always fully accepted. So if I give you an example, my school twelve hundred students and you could pick out to the didn't look like everyone else and I was one of them right and even an enlightened country like Germany. That is notable. So I had what I call a visual accent would people would see me on the street and they would ask me how to speak German. So well and But they also school the skipped my name when reading out scores because they weren't sure how to pronounce my last name and opportunities taken away and even at was physically threatened so i. I think that really shaping in many ways because I realized. Very early that in order to be as successful as everyone around me I would have to be dramatically better in really work much much harder than anyone else and so that used to be strong work ethic in me. For the record Oliver is somewhat down playing his work ethic. Because just out of high school, he actually started his first successful company. It was the early clunky days of the Internet, and he designed a way to help people send emails more easily and he wound up selling that business not for a ton of money, but enough to get him through medical school. But. After practicing medicine for a couple years Oliver realized he couldn't stop thinking about that first business he'd started and how he wanted to start another. So he quit his job in medicine and consulting job with Mackenzie and eventually moved to New York. That was my goal was actually to start another company that that's A. Healthcare, but I I'd also realized at the time that I sold my first company and far too cheaply in that I should learn more about business I and at McKinsey God exposure to balance sheets and panels and hit a lot of very practical experience and what it means to manage business. And I think they fondly of my time at McKinsey was one of my better decisions. McKinsey GonNa Mackenzie is a little bit like going to business school. A lot of people at McKinsey have come from business, schools. In that. Many people go to business school thinking they will find a co-founder. Did you were you actively looking around at your colleagues to think maybe I can do something with him or her you know maybe that person. Absolutely and were you just thinking about different business ideas all the time? Well, it is actually very hard to find good ideas and my definition of a good idea was that it needed to have a great mission I. wanted to make sure that we actually do something good in that. We stayed true to sort of talent breaks responsibility, but also wanted to be a large market and to have a great motor rounded and also I wanted to be based on contrarian inside. Because I thought that all of the best companies have that at its core. While she wanted mission, you wanted a company that could kind of dominate its field by building a motor around it, but was also contrary and that's that's that's those are some interesting. Criteria. And that's why I screen for several years rejected pretty much every idea that that I came across And meanwhile. While you're going through all that I guess you meet this guy Cyrus Masumi. WHO's another McKenzie consultant and and just you just. Become friends like he's like somebody like in and you guys start hanging out. While we got put on study together that required us to travel globally and you've ever done that it meant frost were sixteen eighteen hour days together for three four, five months on end and we really. Got To become great partners in that and and what we realized that we had some. Very complementary skills. Cyrus is one of the most charismatic and gregarious individuals. You'd ever meet his very passionate. He could be more forceful, which sometimes was needed to be effective with clients. And you've talked to me now for a little bit as you can probably tell. More dispassionate and logical and more measuring. German? More, German in many ways, right. also was effective with clients by by. and Cyrus is American right? He's American this but that That close listened and how we work together that really started friendship and we stayed close for the study and be caught up over lunch pretty regularly denounce different business ideas off one another and. I think we connected because we had similar interests because. On. Some levels We were equally passionate about what we're doing higher says, passion was more visible to others than mine but we. Were close enough together that we both accepted. The other as. individual that that we could learn a lot from. Was it was it clear pretty soon after you start hanging out, Sarah's that this was the guy because you were. You're on the lookout for a partner. They I think it was was absolutely an option I know reality is that. With. Both founded companies before Mckinsey and we both knew that we wanna do it again and as I. was always great about being. Very honest. Rather than just nice and and I value that a lot. Yeah. All, right. So So this guy, Cyrus Super Charismatic, really smart clearly, the two of you start to to work together. And what what kind of business ideas are are you coming up with? While we kind of fell in love with a new idea that came about a one of these launches were Cyrus. Told me about how he recently ruptured his eardrum by flying with a cold and then found it very difficult to actually find a doctor and he had asked for recommendations and called down his insurance directory listing started with the as. Doctors weren't accepting new patients some no longer accepted two centurions one provider Pasta Way and so he said, well, why does it take four days to the doctor when I'm in pain right? And why can't this much easier? And we. Both very quickly. realized the potential of this idea from. Working at project be new helps us the for actually spending millions of dollars for marketing to grow their patient base because they had wasted inventory, right they had something that I like to call hidden supply, which is these last minute cancellations no-shows reschedules. That the that go to waste, and then on the other, there are the patients who had a hard time accessing this. You thought it immediately clicked with these my God. Yes. Doctor's appointments connect patients to doctors. Yeah. Well, look if you go through the forfeiture that I had read, it's a great mission right? We're making one of the most personal needs more accessible for for patients we can help patients to get in fast we can help the doctors become more efficient. We can make the entire health care system more cost effective people out of the emergency room things like that, and it's a marketplace. So there is a strong mode and clearly anything in healthcare is a large market and I think the contrary and inside that we had. was. The fact that. Most people thought it's normal that people have to wait twenty four days to a doctor because there's a doctor shortage in read our inside was really no doctors have asthma debate ability because of these last minute cancellations, no-shows reschedules and so I felt very about this idea. So. So you member like how long between the time that the you had that first conversation To the time were both you said, let's start this business was like monster or weeks or days. was was weeks. We what we what we started doing is actually. Mocking up the side in how imagine back then in powerpoint pointing just the wire. Website. Yeah. Wire frame. Exactly. We would. We'd go into starbucks and we'll chat up strangers and say, Hey, here's a five dollar gift card. Give me your thoughts. Sorry I'm GonNa. Go back. You just go to people in starbucks Gift Card and say, can you give me your thoughts? Random Person? The absolutely that's that was sort of our market testing. They wouldn't. They would be like excuse me this is a little weird. You're my space. Might also happen from time to time but you know there's lots of people on starbucks is very in German of you. That's debris because usually he would be to report tentative about doing that. Well, you know I think there was a lot less rejection than you think people actually quite open I. Suggest you try this out but if you If you're unthreatening in Luke harmless as we probably dead and then they'll be pretty open. You went up to and starbucks and you'd say, Hey, we're thinking about a company here. Can you just look at his powerpoint give you five dollars Gift Card and what was in the powerpoint, the popcorn and was just what we thought. This website would look like and we would ask them is the set service that resonates with you would you use it and and we got an incredibly valuable feedback here and really set us in many ways on the on the right track right? So and what pointed to the two of you decide let's quit McKinsey. Let's. Let's pursue this. Probably a month or two after we initially discussed idea did anybody say you were crazy for quitting? Everyone. Everyone told us. Crazy and got a lot of negative feedback on the idea to write people would say this is Bloomberg out I would never pick my doctor on the internet or I already have a doctor or you know doctors wouldn't accept patients that that are looking on the Internet of all kinds of protections that people had when they were thinking about their own situation by. When when you talk to people and starbucks, they actually thought about it much more positively. So we were encouraged enough to say, well, this is going to work as long as we get out of our circle and don't ask McKinsey consultants doctors. The responsible be better. All right. So you are in your thirties at this point. And presumably were making pretty good cash at McKinsey because you were probably you'd know expenses you're on the road all the time so. When you quit, I'm assuming you had some money to launch the business and probably live off for a while. Yeah. So I very deliberately had never raised my living standard to the money that the paying McKinsey and I had saved every dime so that I could. No be in a position where can fund this embraced can afford not to take a salary for a couple of years. Wow. So so a couple of hundred thousand and you saved. You know. Maybe. I'm to Germany to discuss personal finances but. I had. Built this. Radio, you can tell the. Story Yeah I I had I had enough money to live off for for several years but I also Saturday night both finance the company early out of our own savings so that clearly diminish We had leftover after that. So now, you both decided to quit. and. You have some technical expertise because you had. You had done some coding but this is next level stuff. Were you able to be that technology founder and Cyrus was going to be the the sort of the business founder? Absolutely not as I add coated but at that point, I had not touched a computer for a long time We knew we need to have a technical co founder and so Sarah's knew a guy named Nick Guanzhou from the time together, trophy software, and this is another company that they would both worked at the that's the company that they're both previously worked together and Nick just brought a totally different perspective and really educated Addison me on a lot of things and and he was really the one who understood a building a seamless experience for the consumer and ends May. Zach Docs. Early Genius, did you did you have the name dock from the beginning? Not, not initially we we went to several phases on on what the right name could be for for while we wanted to have a descriptive name. So we looked at physicians, dot Com Doctors Dot Com, and we actually tracked down the owners of one of these domains and they wanted several million dollars for the domain name. And and we were finding the company ourselves. So that was out of the question. So then we just sat in a room and we brainstorm a list of fifty or one hundred names, and then started eliminating names until we arrived at Dr. What does it mean? or it doesn't mean anything which was the WTO bit we could. There were zero search results. Okay. There's no meaning behind his ACH. There's no meaning behind and and in hindsight it was precisely the right thing to do because it really was a blank slate for us to fill with with meaning and really build a brand around. Zero such as October we started. It address nate the right lake once you know that it takes more than three weeks from picking up the phone and dialing for doctors till you actually see someone you realize Oh, this really not much else that we have to wait so long for to get. And this is more important than most of these other things you already have. Fantastic access View Magin. If air travel way that healthcare workers that wouldn't be an expedia that wouldn't even be Delta Dot Com that would be individual phone numbers for every plane. Imagine. If that happened, you know a half the planes would fly empty it would be a massive pain and that was actually the state of health care before sock. Is Amazing that that the nothing like this was out there in two thousand seven. I look at I. Think. In many ways you couldn't build it a much earlier. In the early days. When we went out there, we were the ones installing Internet of the doctor's offices. We. They they were a many times just migrating from a paper books to scheduling systems. We were at the cusp of digitisation for healthcare. We were just lucky in our timing to get this right in and start offering the service when that also happened. All right. So you decide to pursue Zach dock and it's the three of you. I'm assuming really just at the beginning and were you working out of out of one of your apartments? Did you guys rent space? No, we worked out of respect for. Many. Times we came to make yet the nicest apartment and and we could bring breakfast Burrito and bake him up and you know the the reality is that we originally had a pretty ambitious launch plan right so we got together around July. We wanted to launch by December of two, thousand seven. Something interesting happened were nick send an email suggesting to look at what was then called techcrunch forty. Take is is now a household name but the draw for us back then was there was a fifty thousand dollar prize now it's called tech crunch disrupt think. So it's a major a startup competition. It's a startup competition and we were the first class of this was much less known be budgeted two hours to fill in the application in really which will send it off. He didn't think about it anymore that there was an early July and early August we've heard that we had been accepted, but there was a complication we'd have to be ready by September eighteenth or. That was three months sooner than we had originally planned to launch. So you'd have a live website by September that is right that is right with doctors with doctors, right So we actually debated for a few hours whether we should even tried to go for that but we ultimately said, yes, we can get the website working and we wanted to have enough doctors just a bars wouldn't look pathetic. Brayden. Coded Night Neither Day and nick really busted his but he did the patient facing side of the website and that was the programs. What was potentially even harder because we're tried to launch a marketplace was to actually get the initial supply on there and remember the website wasn't there yet so. Tires ended up going door to door for doctors offices. Excuse telling them a powerpoint page, and this is really a testament to cyrus sheer willing determination if you think about what it means to really start a company early on, there's nothing to show right you may be a powerpoint but there's no website there's no patience. There's no other doctors no social proof and it has to run on passion and very clear that that is Cyrus superpower. He just went to random doctors offices or he had like a list of doctors offices and he started kind of walking block by block. Well, there's a lot of walking involved a we launched in Manhattan so you can literally go down the street and you see. The signs and you walk in. And he was basically saying look, it's a way to connect you to patients. How was how many by the way? What was your objective? How many doctors do you need to sign up to have this website look okay by September Between six and ten was our goal. Okay. So just doable it is a was extremely hard really. Is telling doctors is one of the hardest things to do why were they saying? Well, first of all, it is baby very hard to even speak to a doctor they are being shielded. Their time is very valuable. Office managers are trained not to let anyone talk to them to protect the doctor from people walking in selling them stuff shirt them. Secondly, they many didn't want to give up control over their calendar which has to write. We ask them to post times that a patient could book into it and it was just a far fetched idea for many of them the patients would actually do this. So he got a lot of knows he got a lot of knows. He'd go there and he just simply not leave until he got a chance to speak to the doctor and a few times. It was even escorted out by security. I really think one in a million could have put this off. I mean was he going to particular kinds of doctors or was he generally focused on an Internet general? Practitioners Ob sobe began with dentists Okay. Because our thinking was that. People go to dentists most often, and we wanted to make sure that we have an offering that is relevant for patients as often as possible. I. Got you so so eventually unassuming, you do get what six to ten or how many did you get by September of two thousand seven Eight. In the meantime, you inequity doing the back end stuff you were doing the coding and building the website does right and as you were building it. How did it look? So. The bit that Nick Build looked awesome for the time I think. It was impressive. We were. Very. Satisfied that we had a scroll bar that we had a map that we had back then already the insurance selector and a lot of feature that. Weren't to be found really anywhere else. All right. So September two, thousand, seven, you are ready to reveal. This service at. Tech. Crunch. And Doth Review present or did did Cyrus kind of wishy the spokesperson? Cyrus. I presented Nick stayed behind in New York to make sure that the less the website was actually up and running This is in San Francisco that you went to the we flew out to San Francisco and So we lost sock talk in front of Eight, nine, hundred people. A lot of them were journalists when the judges opened up with feedback guy covers ocoee who we newnan in valued. As embezzles forever apple he came out to said he he didn't get it. He would never use this in front of everyone right and. His direct load something like honestly Oh, it just never occurred to me to go to any doctor that's really burned in in my brain and what was worse is that he seemed to be right we didn't get a single booking. We were hoping that this PR would get us out of our initial batch of users, right because your other. So many tech journalists there. So you know the publicity may be would would would lead to bookings and that was the hope but. It actually took three days before regard our first legitimate a patient, and and in the entire first month, we only got five bookings. You come back from San Francisco and. You know you had Guy Kawasaki. Say I don't I would never use this service? I'm sure he feels differently today but man maybe then Ezio said that but did did you come back feeling like like dejected like losers or or were you excited like how did you feel coming back? While you know I think we obviously hoping we would eventually get more bookings and In the beginning you probably refreshed. The Bookings Report Hundred Times a day by as we were thinking through what we realized. It was really a typical two sided marketplace challenge It's just a classic chicken and egg problem. You need the supply to get the demand and you need the demand to entice them supply and for dark was even trickier. Right when you think about it, healthcare is hyper local. Very complicated. So you have to match. Supply and demand on a Zip code specialty level, and then we have thousands of insurances take. Until we realized that our odds of actually finding a patient that wanted. An offer there. Quite low, and so the best path forward was to methodically build up supply, and so we just kept going put up a huge map of Manhattan on the wall, and then a sleep put little flags on of where the doctor's brother we're on the website in which insurance is accepted and we just we knew the perseverance. Is the name of the game. Back in just a moment how oliver and Cyrus Begin to drum up interest in stock and how they even start to raise some money at figure out how to dress differently, stay with us guy rows and you're listening to how I built this from NPR. Hey everyone. Just a quick thanks to our sponsors who helped make this podcast possible I to epic provision maker of epic bar beef was nature's idea the epic bar was. The new Vif Sea salt and pepper bars have three grams total carbs why it's in their nature after all, they're made with one hundred percent grass fed beef, and nature's Metro's three grams, total carbs, eleven, grams of protein find them in the bar borrow or at epic Bar Dot Com. Thanks also to stand for Small and American Express. If you're a small business owner head to stand for small dot com slash partner for resources, offers and tools from a growing group of companies that want to help your business get back to business visit stand for small dot com slash partner to get started. Thanks also to Microsoft, the world has changed and Microsoft teams is there to help us stay connected teams is the safe and secure way to chat, meet, call and collaborate to learn more visit Microsoft dot com slash teams. Here, at life, we know that getting your financial house in order can feel painful. Now, there's this whole corona virus pandemic. The deal with our personal finance tuneup series will help you feel more confident and get you on the right track listen and subscribe to NPR's Life Kit. And just a reminder, you can preorder the how I built this book right now, and if you do I'll send you a free signed book plate to go inside the book. The book is a collection of insights and wisdom from some of the most incredible and inspiring makers, inventors, builders, and dreamers on earth to preorder and to get your free signed book plate while supplies. Last, please go to Guira DOT COM or how I built this dot. com. Hey welcome back to how I built this from NPR Cairo's. So it's two, thousand, seven and Oliver. Cyrus. Nick are basically powering through with Zach dock going door to door trying to convince doctors. It's a valuable service and the thing about doctors even though they're really smart and capable and we depend on them. A lot of their offices especially back in two, thousand, seven or sort of technologically in the Stone Age. There was incredibly complicated to sink the doctors calendars with ours. Because none of the software was actually made to sink. Were even in the places where we had syncs up and running, we would frequently get. Feedback while the punishment didn't happen because the doctor wasn't available and we really couldn't figure out why this was the case because when we did screen chairs with the office to their calendar and and our calendar, it was identical right and couldn't figure out why that's happening. So I decided to sit next to the office manager I went there and got to know him and his family photos of his dog. I fixed the printer taught a better strategies to play minesweeper still couldn't figure it out. Until one day, the doctor would come out and she'd say, Hey David I'm out next Friday. And then what does David do does he go into the calendar and block out next Friday or does he take a post? It note On a doctor out next Friday and sticks this too is monitor. In the real world. These post it notes, of course happen and but once you know that Matthew Friend, you can start filtering this out and that's one example they were literally a thousand point, one percent solutions that we had to figure out to make this work. Wow. That sounds I'm getting exhausted. Just hearing about that because this is like even like Google calendars, right? Yeah. Yeah. That was that was early days and what we were extremely focused around were making show the experience was fantastic. If something went wrong, we fix it. Right. So I was our customer service I personally would call the doctor and and confirmed the appointment was all said if it wasn't I, personally contact the patient to let them know and then I would offer them. Amazon Gift Card alongside with an apology those actually one case where it didn't catch a patient in time. and. The were in the subway to the doctor, and so I raised them to the doctor's office and picked up a bouquet of flowers on the way there and met them in person to apologize. And that was really a turning point burs. The service has to work and we need to be have this patients I attitude in in terms of how it works completely ingrained in the company. All right. So you clearly need to kind of grow this Were you offering this service doctors for free at the time? Initially. We for free by we eventually started charging fifty dollars per month. But Sam doctor you come into my office and you say, Hey, if you pay me I can bring you more customers. I would be skeptical I would've said to you you who whose, who even knows about you. You'RE GONNA you're asking me to pay you money for Phantom bookings for maybe no customers I mean did some of the doctors say Many. The US summarize our sales challenge. Right? It was very hard because even if you wanted to, we couldn't easily share how many patients their competitors are down the road God like that was something that was confidential. All right. So you are you got this chicken and egg problem. Not, enough people signing up and he gets skeptical doctors but you know that the service could really benefit the doctors, but you also need them to pay for because otherwise you know but business. Meantime at a certain point I'm assuming you guys start to think we'd better go out and look for money if we're going to really make this thing work. Yeah. Yeah. That that happened in the spring of two, thousand, eight we decided we raise series. And we we make the rounds we get in front of a number of the big name, BC New York the also go to Sandhill road in impel. Toho Santo Road we leads and road initially were very successful at all we got Polite knows. and. Ray No feedback control someone took us as I told us you know what the idea seems. Good. But you're consultants I'd and the perspective of its consultants can't get anything done and what realized is that even though we had both founded companies before our Mackenzie Pedigree in our keys and button down shirts, they were really hurting us, and so we wait rank Khakis and button down shirts. It sounds crazy. Were they pleaded pants or were they at least nine pleaded please. Yeah Yeah. Yeah we after hearing that feedback We very quickly just went to the next gap and bought jeans and t-shirts and from that on the combos with VC's when but a lot better. So you went from McKinsey consultant look to this are the tech casual uniform of jeans and t-shirts that that's exactly right and we introduced ourselves not as NBA's and McKinsey Consultants but we introduce ourselves previous entrepreneurs that are starting their next company. was was anyone biting? Were there people who were like? Yeah there's a great idea I'm in. So interesting enough we had raised some money from. Friends and colleagues, and many of those they invested in US business plan unseen just based on the fact that we. Were giving up our careers at McKinsey to pursue talks. So that felt really a great. and. As we started changing how we appeared in how we introduced ourselves to venture capitalists L., we started to get offers and so in August of two thousand eight, we ended up raising five million from KHOSLA ventures expeditions mark. Wow Mark Banya Jeff bezos, and Venus is. All their. Funds are in which sounds like a lot before you WanNa do it's actually. Kinda limited because you still it seems to me in two thousand eight even though you have five million dollars a lot of money you still have this problem which is you've gotta get. Customers, and then to get customers, you need lots of doctors had lots of options but to get doctors, you need lots of customers booking through the site to you do that precisely D- These five million dollars per lily earmarked for making New, York, work, right, Miguel, I market work but. immediately after raising the money the financial crisis hit. And You may remember there was rest in peace a memo that went around about startups, right? Yes. About start ups, never being able to raise money arrested in peace good times. So we got this job is to make the money stretch in. We probably learn not during this time This was really our first go round making hard choices and what I want to be frugal and not to do things we can't afford and We learned to not let money replace critical, thinking and creativity. But now we continued to grind away at New York and at some point felt while if you want to get. To the next level we have to prove. Dr Isn't just a New York City phenomenon. Right? We had to prove that it would work in a second city But at that point, we didn't have the money to do this anymore, and by the way you're still your approach was still the same. It was door to door. That's right door to door and how how you building awareness about the about the fact Zach existed with customers with potential customers. So we it was day very difficult to get someone. To the website. Yeah but when they did. They loved it because it was such a step change from how healthcare used to work for him. Right they used to have to pick up the phone and wait on hold and then plays scheduling. tetris. With the office manager, can you do Wednesday morning about Thursday noon? Friday afternoon, and now they could do the same thing in a minute and have complete overview about the ability patients loved it and they told their friends. So we we started to get word of mouth. Going, and so we saw New York really taking up and we felt like, okay, this does this go into work in New York. At a minimum rate, but we also realized that it took us a fair bit of time. And money to get it going. In New, York and do we couldn't with the money we had left from the five million easily expanded into a new city at the same time. Raising money was going to be difficult because the next generation of investors wanted to see that it works and other cities as Walter. So we were a little bit in this catch twenty, two we ended up. Applying to. Force boost Your Business Competition Four. Forbes has his competition as sell to where they give away money right to they were promising a hundred thousand dollar prize. And at this time. We won. And Yeah what did is they gave us one of these large publishers. Clearinghouse is sex and very useful actually used to cover a hole in one in our only conference room. There was a hole in the wall and we covered it with that. At, this point you are, you are working out of an office, not not an apartment at this point we were working out of A. Shared Office space we work. Yeah. So they had given us publisher clearing house is is check but they fail to give us the small check for three months and we were getting really nervous, but it would still get it but. But ultimately, we got that one hundred thousand dollars and that's what we used to launch and our second market in DC in Washington DC and would did it require you guys to move down there or were you did you hire because I'm assuming you had to? A lot of your early capital was going into sales. Business Development hiring sales reps, is that right? Right, we had a couple of sales reps at the time. A. Very first employee ever was a sales rep is still with the company today and He was great. He figured out how to. Really charm his way. To the doctor. So there were no more security guards escorting anyone out. When did you? I'm assuming that even in two, thousand, nine, two, thousand, ten, and beyond we're not yet profitable. Far From It? Yeah. Far from it right because it's a capital intensive business. Yes. We obviously invested heavily in customer service wanted patients to have a great experience. And we had a quite sizable engineering team because that was actually a major engineering effort. So what started to happen when did you start to kind of see? A real turning point. Yeah. So we we we had launched New, York successfully with. Years. Of hardwork, we've gotten it off the ground is transported that to DC at work well, in DC, and now he said, well, why are we not in more cities and so we actually we raised serious be with fouled respond and We used to expand off the East Coast Francisco then Chicago and we just got better better at it. So we then ended up raising serious and two thousand eleven from Goldman NTSC, and we primarily use this to grow our sales team and sign up more more doctors in from two thousand eleven till two thousand, thirteen, we launched roughly thirty new cities I read that by by two thousand, fourteen would covered. Like forty percent of markets in the US, which is huge I mean that's right I mean that's a huge number of cities. And in that year evaluation. Of tzakda. Past Billion Dollars I mean that's That's pretty remarkable i. mean you were kind of on this like really rapid trajectory and you a pretty straightforward model right and you were charging doctors a flat fee every year and then. They could take all the bookings they wanted and I think that by that point like by two thousand, fourteen knew it was not cheap. It was expensive viewed really raised the price it was like three thousand dollars a year, right? Something like that. Yes recharged Dr Three thousand dollars a year and and there was a flat fee. No matter. How many bookings Actually facilitated for them and and the reality was for some doctors that got a lot of bookings that was a great deal. Yeah. But but there were also doctors that God a lot fewer bookings and for them that fixed cost was actually too expensive and some of them were starting to leave the service, and so we got into a situation that required us to invest a lot to stay where we are and then invest even more to continually grow our overall provider base, which means we had to build out a massive sales team to always sign up more doctors right and. Some point during this time L. Nick actually ran an analysis showed that it would take several years if ever fries to make our money back on on many of the doctors we signed up because you would have to sign up. X number of hundreds of thousands of doctors paying that amount every year. To make your money back to to make sort of our the cost of the sales team back. Wow and L. it. This was pure that would make us dependent on external capital for our very long time, and now it's a clearly there are many companies that have taken. Grow fast at all costs approach. And They Held onto this forty extended period of time by L., it clearly puts talking to a dependency to. Investors in their mind says, yeah. So. Meantime. You know I I from what I understand. There's disagreements I mean there there are you know the leadership team including Cyrus he he's I. Think he's he's sort of his position as the flat fee model is actually the best way to go is that a fair assessment of of his position? Yeah. I think that's right. I. Mean there were two fundamentally divergent ways held the business could go forward right. One way was to continue to work on optimizing the unit economics of our subscription model and the other way was to think about how to make it more transformative leap and then find a new more profitable. And more sustainable model and. Their. Look I can certainly understand The reluctance and taking this leap if companies rechange their underlying business model once they have a certain scale and then live to tell about it, right. We know the names of the companies that have done this net flicks, but from DVD's to streaming adobe. From box software to the cloud, but there's not a lot of companies that do that. and. Needed to make a choice which which direction I wanted to go. And and I should say over that. Became intensely personal for you because hugh and Cyrus really disagreed on on on the direction of the company should take. Steps down he he left the company and you moved into the role of CEO. Those right and what ask you about this neo. Beauty's in the flies of this show is its simplicity and we talked to one person or sometimes too. It's a single narrative, and so we don't have cyrus with us to tell us what happened but I wanna ask you about this time because. This was your co founder. This was your partner This is your friend and he was leaving the company. How did you feel at that time? I all I can say was a very hard and very emotional period for everyone involved and It was certainly a departure But how was through that given these two divergent choices you you couldn't. note, both of us could be useful to talk and. I have to imagine that for for period. China. was sort of the friendship. Look been we were very close we. Were not only friends we had worked for eight years believe together fourteen hours a day, and we probably talked more to each other than to anyone else in our lives but you know. Still touch from time to time and. I think he's joining us on from sideline. He still at prison million owner of the company Yeah, he's still. Here's the thing I mean we've we've told stories about breakups we've had we've had episodes were there were married couples who split divorced but continued the business e O products. Susan Griffin Black and an her husband Brad They continued the business stacy's pita chips continue the business after the divorce sold it for a quarter billion dollars. You guys were worth value to one point eight billion dollars at this point. was was ever party that just thought you know, God look at what we're doing on the core we're going and. I mean did you in service it down and say you know this thing is just growing and? Let's just figure this out. I think the challenge is that it's not as if there was an article way to decide what the right path forward is. As long as investors wanted to give us money growing all costs was yeah. Fine Strategy. The question was just how dependent you wanted to be on the continued goodwill of investors. It sounds like you were tired of going out raising money. You didn't want to do that anymore. Oh, not at all but I think you want to raise money from a position where you know what your turn to is and and. It wasn't clear that the business model would work in in a way that that we could just flip a switch and be profitable. Yeah. So. That was a tough year for you. Two, thousand fifteen. There was an article in business I think business insider, and it was about the sales team. It's October that year and it was. It was some allegations that you know Pete member sales team using adderall even cocaine they were under immense pressure. They were working all the time when you saw that article. And I'm not saying you even aware of any of this. You may not even aware of it but I. have to think that that article really alarmed you and and maybe even embarrassed you. Look A. There were a number of articles in two thousand fourteen fifteen. Didn't absolutely get everything, right but Budweiser I can say is that At. The time doctor had their sales team and we're. Getting very quickly and Your maybe maybe. Too focused on. L. Hitting targets and. Not. Focus enough on creating a strong culture the I hear these stories from six years ago from from time to time and from from now from candidates and and really every time. This happens like a Gut Punch. Because, this we know we're completely different company now. On on so many levels, but clearly, you saw that in new that you had to change something. While yes, I look I l there's a there's a couple of things about this. Right? We are a technology company, but we had said ourselves up too much about. Instead of writing wins and really too little about being adaptable and darning and and building the trust required to try things that now pet the risk of failure. and. So one of the first things I did is to change core values. You know to emphasize those behaviors each one of our values adaptable, not comfortable and other one is progress before perfection learners before masters right and. We only kept really one DIA CONSTANT DEL patients I. Personally that. That was more of the culture that I thought was right for Doc to succeed on many dimensions. So, you take over the company it's got high valuation, but you're still not making money and you know that you've gotta change the underlying business model you're never gonNA make money. And from what I understand this is the beginning of what you have internally described as the second founding of the company. That is right. That is right and that basically happens in in two thousand, eighteen you you launch this new business model where instead of the the dollar membership fee. Basically, you would charge doctors a lot less like two hundred or three hundred bucks, but then every booking you, you would take a cut from that booking. So like a travel agency. A little bit charge for new patient booking. So the existing patients to practice we made free but yes, there was the fundamental idea and. It sounds like such an obvious thing to do but but here's the problem with it and why why are we thought it was incredibly risky to try this. Our best customers that had been on for a long time. They got lots of pockets right and if we start charging them per bookings, their prices go up very significantly in some cases ten times more and that seemed. Competing, insane to us. In. Particular because when we talked to other companies that were at gone through similar changes and even pricing experts, they're number one advisor was make sure whatever you do never charged your best customers more and frost would be precisely. The opposite. In the thing that was counter-balancing this in our mind was well, maybe we'd be able to bring on a lot more doctors because the barrier to entry is now much lower that was there was the back and forth in the team to figure out whether that's the path we want to want to go. So, this is still a risky strategy because you're depending really on new bookings because the two hundred dollar annual fees dramatically lower and I have to imagine in year one, you actually saw drop in your revenue in the year one of of this curve. Second founding. Right. Well, it's from a risk profile worth at that. Right the warriors that you lose all your best customers in with it, all the bookings day used to be getting. and. So we needed to be ready for a very significant drop in bookings and revenue and the second Challenge was here that. The beauty of this approach modest and we got all this money upfront right and Sharon. Now to bond, we're getting paid after the booking with with a thirty day payment periods, we had a huge working capital requirement to make that happen. So did you see a drop and revenue in two thousand eighteen when you rolled this out? No we didn't because we actually didn't see the doctors leave the way that we hit on -ticipant did in fact, you know while we had very much worried that they would be upset and some of them certainly were upset. We were providing so much value to them that. You know what? What took you. So long I knew as getting a great deal all along. So that worked really well, and we had piloted in Georgia initially in April. Two thousand eighteen and then that had worked. So we we then all allowed in Colorado a few weeks later that work to, and from there we went to Washington state and again, very positive results and after these three days. Okay Great. We know this works does it out in our largest most important market? Let's go to New York and that and terribly horribly wrong. They the doctors in New York. Not only were so pissed off they actually I read. mounted a change dot org. Petition I. Don't know what to to to end this practice or something. They were really mad. They were really really mad and I guess you guys responded you said, are we won't we won't roll this out in New York for a while. Yeah look in New York. We. Facilitate Roughly, one in five new patient doctor relationship in the entire city on dock and so. The economic impact for the providers in. was much greater than for the providers in Georgia Colorado Washington. So yes, to give you one example, there's a dermatologist and so and he paid under the ultimate model ten doctor say paid thirty thousand dollars and under the new pricing model, his cost was going to go up from thirty thousand dollars to roughly three hundred, forty, thousand dollars. Wow. So what was your response to that? I? Mean it seems like a pretty reasonable. Concern. Yeah. So look after the conversation with the Dermatologists I. Actually. Put down the phone and I thought you know what? He's right. And so I pause and we regrouped and. We did a couple. Of things during this time, like the first one is we just went on a listening tour. You know we talked to provide their feedback and we just adjusted our this plan to give providers a much longer grace period to decide whether the wants to addition to the new model or not, and then. So then we read on New York six months later and and when dramatically better. So the strategy works and you see results from the strategy pretty quickly like within a year. Within a year, we had we finally at some incredible momentum was really going better than we had expected in our wildest dreams. Our existing client went down to essentially zero. I mean people still retire and and move jobs by no one really left the service and we were adding more and more providers because the barrier to entry was low and So in two thousand, nineteen we began growing profitably. It sounds like two thousand and nineteen was really the banner year. Two thousand nine hundred was a was a fantastic year and honestly we had so much momentum coming into twenty twenty and feel like, Hey, we worked really hard for three years and profitable and now the sky was the limit until. Tells Sam until March of two thousand twenty. Two Marjo twenty twenty and that's. That's really maybe the third founding DOC right? Well, I want to ask you about March twenty twenty because. Your Business is based on people booking with doctors and going to the doctor I have to imagine your revenues must have plummeted like every other industry like I mean doctors offices are still in most of the country. Slow or are trickle of patients coming in. With the lockdown started happening we saw impersonal bookings declining anywhere between fifty to ninety percent by the end of March I'm not surprised and lot of that buys I was getting was to. Lay off people and make sure that we hunker down to weather the storm but I saw an opportunity to build windmills, right so I thought well, we need to be there for our patients. We should be expanding into telehealth and I need every team member to help me do that and so we. Really went all important and supporting video visits and I'll probably June eighteen began redesigning the tire marketplace support virtual care, and so we actually released. Doctor Video Service and we made this available to. Any. Physician whether they are on soccer. for free. And by the way head, you plan to do this. How long would would I mean I'm imagining if you said in in February district I really want to focus on telehealth Would you have expected that by May would have been ready to go. Absolutely. Not I think what has been really fantastic to see is how? We really finished two years of roadmap in two months. Wow, and it's great because it's just gives us a window on what the next phase of doctor will be and really looking forward to that in my mind were the point were Amazon started from going. Books to also adding CDs. We have just gone from doing only in person to also A. Doing telehealth and I can't wait to see how this unfolds. It sounds like you. Might be reading between the lines but. You. Really, admire and respect your co-founders particularly. Cyrus and the work that he did to to build this company but I wonder if do you think that you will a I dunno, rekindle your friendship i. Is it something that is in the cards because a break is? Is Emotionally, it's hard Mesa really hard. Yeah, look I Do I think we'll work fourteen hours together again maybe not but you know I I've gotten through tougher breakups and reconciled in my past, and so I think we are we're in good shape and honestly know we are meeting were talking from time to time Yeah. We both have things to do and places to be so we're. Not, hanging out all the time. But it's now also five years ago So We are we're merch focused on making our join the baby successful. When you think about your journey and All Its happen to you how much do you think this has to do with? with luck and how much do you think it has to do with with the hard work you put in your your skills. Well I'm going look I I believe that there's really three ingredients to success. In order importance there are lock the talent, then hard work and. The only one. That's comedian. You control his how hard you work right and Now working hard to gives you more shots on goal It helps his day on the top of what you your talent allows and absolutely restarted at the right time the right place. So What what I'm proud of an all that journey has only that yet when we were wrong and when be had to revise and. When we needed the grit to actually make it work. I L we lived up to that and and that's really The all that anyone can ask themselves to. Oliver Karaz co-founder of Zach Braff by the way, remember how they originally wanted to call it physicians dot com or doctors dot. com. COULDN'T AFFORD THE MILLION DOLLAR PRICE TAG to buy the domain name. DOC DOT COM wasn't only available the price they paid for that domain name. Six Bucks. and. Thanks so much for listening to this show this week, you can subscribe wherever you get your podcasts. You could also write to us at H. I. T. at NPR DOT Org. If you want to send a tweet, it's at how I felt this or at Cairo's can also follow me on instagram that's at Guy Dot Roz. Our show was produced this week by Jet Anderson with music composed by Tina. Bluey. Thanks also to Julia Carney Candice Limb Neva grant and Jeff Rodgers I'm guy. Roz even listening to how I built this. This is NPR. Black voters play a crucial role for any Democrat who seeks to win the White House but some big devise amongst that block and some serious influence

Cyrus Masumi Mckinsey New York L. Nick Germany Starbucks Oliver Karaz Partner Office Manager United States Dot Com Doctors Dot Com Co-Founder Amazon Zach Dock Manhattan Middle East Sarah SAM Co Founder Iran
Shared Plates: How Eating Together Makes Us Human

Gastropod

05:15 min | 1 year ago

Shared Plates: How Eating Together Makes Us Human

"Well? We know that eating together connect people and we. We know that that has been to forever. L. At Fischbach is professor of Behavioral Science and Marketing at the University of Chicago and she's been studying different ways in which eating together affects us as we're doing it. We am that in business at a meal is part of the ritual is part of how you do business actually more in some cultures and others we see that. In order to start partnership in order to reach agreement. Food is volved often. We get together to to Sharon meal. We connect to other people so a meal. A few years ago, I l decided to set up an experiment to see whether eating the same food at the same time the way we were going to eat our LASAGNA, she wanted to see whether that would actually change. Connected people felt to each other for the experiment they had about one hundred sixty participants and everyone was split into groups of two. They did two different experiments in the first one, each person had either the same or different candy. The options were butter. Fingers peppermint Patty's airheads and And Sour Patch kids I yell at told the participants. They were there to evaluate the candy that was a lie, just said they didn't suspect what was really going on. And then after each pair eight, their sugary treats. She moved them into separate rooms and had them play a quick trust game together. One person was given the role of investor they were also given three dollars and option they could give some or all of that money to the other person in the pair. That person was playing a fund manager. One thing the investor knew that whatever they gave to the fund manager would be doubled. What they didn't know is whether they're good. Old Candy Partner turned fund manager would choose to give some, or even any of that money back remember. They were in separate rooms and they couldn't talk to each other. That fund manager could keep all six bucks than the first person would end up losing everything. Or they could give money back to the investor Douay both end up with something so this test. How much the investor trusts this new person they're partnering with. Eating the same or different candy effects that trust that people who had the same food I gave almost double of the mining case those who were eating similar foods on every day gave about the dilemma in half to their partner, hoping that the park now will reciprocate. Though Zoo, a similar foods that jumped to almost two and a half stone also support a substantial effect, so yeah, eating the same candy together at the same time seems to have made these strangers trust each other enough to risk giving more money for her next experiment I. Yell at wanted to test whether eating the same thing also made people able to work together better, so she gave partners either a salty snack or pretzels or a sweet snack of 'em's. 'EM's some pears had the same snacks. Some had different ones again. She told them they were evaluating the snack, but afterwards she gave them a quick roleplaying game where one was the manager on one was the Labour leader, and they needed to end a strike, those who had that same food to sway, and a half rounds of negotiations to which in agreement and those that had this similar foods to can more than seven months of negotiations, so negotiations was. Twice as long so this is intriguing. It looks like let's experiments show that if people are eating the same thing, they've trust each other more, and they work together more effectively, but does the link between the two people have to be food, or would you see the same effect if they have something else in common Let another experiment to test exactly that she had people look at two different photos each showing a different model, the models in the photos were the same gender raise even. Even had the same hair color in some of the pairs of photos, the models also wore the same color shirts and other pairs of photos. The models were eating the same food, and then I'll at asked the participants in the study to judge how similar the people in the to photo seemed gay, so you Edo see pictures of people that are dress kind of the same or eating similar foods and people in fail for this pictures that the people with similar foods are probably fines. They don't do that for people dressed in a similar way. They don't use the cues in the same way as what if I? See you eating the foot that I'm meeting I think that Oh are we have something in common we can connect. Your will probably like me. I already like you, so sharing food clearly has a significant impact on how we relate to other people i. mean the same color shirt didn't have the same effect as eating the same food, so there's obviously something unique and powerful about food, but why at least? Know in our modern society. It's a bit of leftover late. It's there. Incidentally. It's not I shouldn't care about what you eat. It's not actually a great cue that we would get along at is kind of left over from the times when people will chewy connecting over foot consumption more than anything

Fund Manager L. At Fischbach Old Candy Partner Partner Professor Of Behavioral Scienc University Of Chicago
Shared Plates: How Eating Together Makes Us Human

Gastropod

05:44 min | 1 year ago

Shared Plates: How Eating Together Makes Us Human

"Samir Threat is author of salt, fat acid heat. She's been on the show before to talk about charbonnet. Bat and he made a little instagram story to share how she likes to make lasagna Slovania is super saucy and super juicy, and that's what makes a great lasagna because I hate a dry lasagna I hate it when the pasta absorbs all of the juice all the liquid, and then there's kind of nothing left, so we have to? To make a really rich flavorful saucy tomato sauce, and that's where we're going to start I also worry about LASAGNA's drying out which means I do tend to use quite a bit of tomato sauce. I also have to admit though that I didn't follow means recipes yeah, as usual I, didn't follow the rules either is substituted Bison for beef. I added a Kale and should tacky layer. That was basically all over the place. I Ashley Belanger. Now former intern played by some means rules time to make. Is the sound of melting. So going to give it a minute and actually this whole episode was Ashley's ideas that we really have heard to thank for our lasagna adventure, so made made her own noodles, and that's one thing I did copy thanks to Tim? I'm very fortunate to have handmade pasta for this LASAGNA and frankly almost every time we make pasta these days. Nice Long Strip that I'm just take down to. Kind of medium thickness. I think beautiful holy. Ashley did the know boil stuff you buy in the packet? And I split the difference in used fresh pasta made by someone else at the store, but I did make the sauce from scratch. Definitely not design your whether in Los Angeles might. But the stove on. Seem as that heats up. I will add the onion. In here two hours later is my bullies sauce. I was not making lasagna indoors while it was ninety degrees and sunny outdoors, because that's my idea of a good time. Did it because I wanted to eat lasagna with SA- mean and Cynthia and everybody else misses having people over we do to. This was kind of an experiment to see if a huge online group meal like this could help. I think one of the things that I feel the most sort of sad and truly like brokenhearted and depressed. About is the sort of unspoken moments of being together. It's not the grand stuff. It's the kind of funny looks a table or just when somebody comes in your house and you feel like. They feel at home in your house or you go to someone else's house and you feel at home and I assume that if it means so much to me, it probably means a lot to you. It does, but is there any science by not feeling? Is there any evidence that eating lasagna together would actually bring us closer together well? well? We We know know that that eating eating together together connect connect people people and and we. We we. We know know that that that that has has been been to to forever. forever. L. L. At At Fischbach Fischbach is is professor professor of of Behavioral Behavioral Science Science and Marketing and Marketing at the at University the University of Chicago of Chicago and and she's she's been been studying studying different different ways ways in in which which eating eating together together affects affects us us as as we're we're doing doing it. it. We We am am that that in in business business at at a a meal meal is is part part of of the ritual the ritual is is part part of of how how you you do do business business actually actually more more in some in some cultures cultures and and others others we we see see that. that. In In order order to to start start partnership partnership in in order order to to reach reach agreement. agreement. Food Food is is volved volved often. often. We We get get together together to to to to Sharon Sharon meal. meal. We We connect connect to to other other people people so so a meal. a meal. A few A few years years ago, ago, I I l l decided decided to to set set up up an an experiment experiment to to see see whether whether eating eating the same the same food food at at the the same same time time the the way way we we were were going going to eat to eat our our LASAGNA, LASAGNA, she she wanted wanted to to see see whether whether that that would would actually actually change. change. Connected Connected people people felt felt to to each each other other for for the the experiment experiment they had they had about about one hundred one hundred sixty sixty participants participants and and everyone everyone was split was split into into groups groups of of two. two. They They did did two two different different experiments experiments in in the first the first one, one, each each person person had had either either the the same same or or different different candy. candy. The The options options were were butter. butter. Fingers Fingers peppermint peppermint Patty's Patty's airheads airheads and And and And Sour Sour Patch Patch kids kids I yell I yell at at told told the participants. the participants. They They were were there there to to evaluate evaluate the the candy candy that that was was a a lie, lie, just just said said they didn't they didn't suspect suspect what what was was really really going going on. on. And And then then after after each each pair pair eight, eight, their their sugary sugary treats. treats. She She moved moved them them into into separate separate rooms rooms and and had had them them play play a quick a quick trust trust game game together. together. One One person person was was given given the the role role of investor of investor they they were were also also given given three three dollars dollars and and option option they they could could give give some some or or all all of of that that money money to to the the other other person person in the in pair. the pair. That That person person was was playing playing a fund a fund manager. manager. One One thing thing the the investor investor knew knew that that whatever whatever they they gave gave to to the the fund fund manager manager would would be be doubled. doubled. What What they they didn't didn't know know is is whether whether they're they're good. good. Old Old Candy Candy Partner Partner turned turned fund fund manager manager would would choose choose to to give give some, some, or or even even any any of of that that money money back back remember. remember. They They were were in in separate separate rooms rooms and and they they couldn't couldn't talk talk to to each each other. other. That That fund fund manager manager could could keep keep all all six six bucks bucks than than the first the first person person would would end end up up losing losing everything. everything. Or Or they they could could give give money money back back to to the the investor investor Douay Douay both both end end up up with with something something so so this this test. test. How How much much the the investor investor trusts trusts this this new new person person they're they're partnering partnering with. with. Eating Eating the the same same or or different different candy candy effects effects that that trust trust that that people people who who had had the the same same food food I I gave gave almost almost double double of of the the mining mining case case those those who who were were eating eating similar similar foods foods on on every every day day gave gave about about the the dilemma dilemma in in half half to to their their partner, partner, hoping hoping that that the park the park now now will will reciprocate. reciprocate. Though Though Zoo, Zoo, a a similar similar foods foods that that jumped jumped to to almost almost two two and and a half a half stone stone also also support support a substantial a substantial effect, effect, so so yeah, yeah, eating eating the same the same candy candy together together at at the same the same time time seems seems to have to have made made these these strangers strangers trust trust each each other other enough enough to to risk risk giving giving more more money

Ashley Belanger Fund Manager Partner Professor Professor Of Of Beha Instagram Douay Douay Samir Threat Los Angeles Fund Manager. Intern Sharon Sharon Fischbach Fischbach Cynthia University Of Chicago TIM Chicago L. L.
10 Trivia Questions from a Confidence Round

Trivia With Budds

08:47 min | 1 year ago

10 Trivia Questions from a Confidence Round

"Leaner it be and welcome to another episode of the Trivia with Buds podcast. I'm your host Ryan Buds. Thanks for checking out my show and thank you guys so much for spreading the word during this quarantine about this little show. We have eight hundred episodes to listen to. So it's great for binging. You can take a couple episodes a couple of topics and you can quiz each other. You could battle against people that you're stuck in a house with and hopefully could have a good time passing the time. There are just so many different topics we've done on the show in the past things like marine biology and shopping malls and soft drinks and cooking terms. I'm just trying to think of stuff we've done there so many different topics literally inundate. You could make probably done it at this point. And even the uber specific things like Ace Ventura when Nature Calls Trivia. I think we've done that so just give it a search any topic. You're looking for go on Google and type in Trivia with buds in that topic and you should come across a link or to of Podcast episodes that. We've done shout out to my podcast hosting service. Lipson which has never faltered in all the years. I've used it. I think I've been using it for over three years. People ask me from time to time. What is my hosting plan? How much do I pay all that? Good stuff so I thought I'd share that with you. I think I pay twenty nine ninety nine a month thirty dollars a month for six hundred megabytes of storage and I've been using Lipson for that since the very beginning and the way I found them was just searching best. Podcast host read a few articles. saw some different podcasts. That I listen to that use Lipson and I said okay. I'll go with that so I started off at a smaller megabyte storage level and I moved up when I started the show daily to a little bit of a higher level so that answer that question for anybody who's thinking about starting their podcast. I do trust and believe in Lipson. Check them out. Lipson DOT COM for all the hosting plans. I think you could do it for as little as five bucks a month or six bucks a month so give it a gander. I think they're going to be a lot of podcasts. That start over this quarantine over this downtime. Because people are just sitting around at home going What should we do? Should we start a podcast? Maybe we should. We got plenty of time to do so. And you know along with binging shows that might be great pairing. This might be the Father Brown. Podcast era people watching the show. Father Brown and talking about it on a podcast. Maybe I should do that. I wonder if there's a father Brown podcast if there is someone link it to me on social media at Ryan Buds. Maybe I'll start listening. I do like that. Show all right guys. We're going to jump into today's episode. It is a competence round ten totally random questions that I used to close at my life. Trivia nights last week and by last week live Trivia Nights. I mean just at home. Because they were all cancelled from the lockdown but I am still making these different trivia nights every week going forward so you can download all of the questions to play at home if you WanNa do like a bunch of random rounds like we do at night. Go TO TRIVIA WITH BUDS DOT COM and. Click the link the very top of the website. There's an ice banner that tells you how to download it. How To play instructions rules scoreboard answer? She could print out the whole Shebang so go check that out. We're going to jump into these ten random questions right here. We go all right. It's a confidence around. You're not on your answers. Ranking them one through ten ten is the highest ones the lowest and here we go number one. What nineteen eighty nine computer game? Features the clicking of square boxes to reveal numbers of nearby explosives number. One Thousand Nine Hundred. Eighty Nine. Computer game features. The clicking of square boxes to reveal numbers of nearby explosives number one question number two. What cheese is typically used on a Reuben Sandwich number two what cheese is most typically used on a Reuben Sandwich number two number three which? Us states two letter. Abbreviation is first alphabetically number. Three which states two letter abbreviation is first alphabetically. Question number four which nation was called Persia until nineteen thirty five number four which nation was called Persia until nineteen thirty. Five question number five coming at you. What announcer who started his career in? Nineteen eighty-two is famous for his catchphrase. Let's get ready to rumble number five. What announcer who started his career in nineteen eighty two is famous for his catchphrase? Let's get ready to rumble. Question number six. What nine hundred ninety one movie featured characters named Evelyn Couch and mini thread? Good number six one thousand nine hundred one movie featured characters named Evelyn Couch and mini thread number seven. The band looking glass had a hit seventy song. About what girl's name number seven? The band looking glass had what seventy song about a girl's name question number eight in the NFL? How many yards is the penalty for delay of game for offense defense or special teams number eight in the NFL? How many yards is the penalty for delay of game for offense defense or special teams question number nine? Those hladik Z L. O. T. Y. Is the currency of what country does. Lodhi is the currency of what country and question number ten to close out this quiz what. Wwe Wrestler is known as the rated R superstar number ten what wwe wrestler is known as the rated R superstar. Those are all your questions for the quiz. Remember you right now. Your answers rank them. One through ten ten is the highest the lowest each number one time in your ranking process. Right down all the answers I then. After each one of them you can write a little bubble and put ten or nine eight or seven all the way down to one. Whatever you right next your answer is how many points you would award yourself if you get it right if you want to self score this at home. It's out of fifty five possible points and we'll be back in just a second with the answers. We are back with the answers to confidence round Trivia. Guys this was a tough one. There were some tough tough questions hidden. In this episode's hopefully you came up with all the correct answers. Here's number one. What nineteen eighty nine computer game features the clicking of square boxes to reveal numbers of nearby explosives? The answer there was minesweeper minesweeper. I mean that game I never to this day. I don't know how to play. Minesweeper is just kind of click around and hope that a box wouldn't explode and I'd see the numbers and I'd be like Oh cool four three one two and I would just keep clicking. I didn't really understand what the hell those things meant. And maybe you do and maybe I'm just adult as they say but I still don't understand minesweeper. Someone explained it to me number two. What cheese is typically used on a reuben sandwich that is Swiss cheese Swiss cheese although I have gotten munster on a ruben before Swiss cheese they mostly put on their number three states? Two letter? Abbreviation is first alphabetically. This was a question of the day recently. A couple episodes ago I think and popped up again. Here this is Alaska Aka AK Alabama is next. But that's a l so that comes K. L. Yeah that comes next number. Four which nation was called Persia until nineteen thirty five that is Iran Iran number five. What announcer who started his career? Nineteen ninety-two is famous for his catchphrase. Let's get ready to rumble. That was Michael Buffer Michael. Buffer number six nineteen ninety-one movie features characters named Evelyn couch in any thread. Good Fried Green to make this number. Six Fried Green tomatoes number six number seven demand looking glass had hit seventy song. About what girl's name it was brandy and then in parentheses. You're a fine girl. If you wanted to put the full title but Brandy worked just fine number eight in the NFL. How many yards is the penalty for delay of game for offense defense or special teams five yards number eight five yards and number nine? This Lodhi is the currency of Poland Poland number ten what. Wwe Wrestler is known as the rated R superstar. That is edge. You think you know me know me. You think you know me number. Ten edge is going to be returning to Wrestlemainia this year for a sold out crowd of zero because they are doing wrestlemainia in the performance center. I think that's what I read. And there should be no audience which is going to be sad and weird and probably not the big return. He thought it would be but hey the world is upside down right now. An edge is still wrestling. So those are your answers guys. Those were the answers to the confidence around. I hope you had a fun time playing along with today's

Evelyn Couch Persia Ryan Buds WWE Lipson NFL Father Brown Lipson Dot Com Google Ace Ventura Brandy Wrestlemainia Michael Buffer United States Alaska Poland Lodhi L. O. T. Y.
"six bucks" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

02:06 min | 1 year ago

"six bucks" Discussed on KTOK

"And at less than six Bucks a month for up to ten computers the price is right PC magazine game four stars they said remote PC is effortless with a simple interface and learning curve fast performance users can easily transfer files between local remote desktops a great price but make it even better right now if you go to remote PC dot com take advantage of their very special offer it's just in time for these times sign up today with the code Leo for one year you'll get ninety percent off the whole year I just a month a whole year they're practically giving away just just to get you in the door and I think you're gonna love it remote PC dot com sign up today with my name Leo Leo tech weekend special ninety percent offer the first wheel port V. tech guy more of your calls eighty eight eighty eight S. coming up you know it's shocking that your home could be stolen this easily that's the brutal lesson Debra learned when thieves found her home's title online forged it and literally took ownership of her home in an instant thieves legally own Deborah's home she got evicted and spent a fortune in legal fees trying to get it back you know the FBI calls home title fraud one of the fastest growing crimes and you do not want to be next that's why I urge you to protect the online title to your home with home title lock you know the legal documents to our homes are kept online with each hunt them they forged the documents stating you sold your home then they borrow against your home and sticky with the payments and no insurance or bank protects you hold title lock does you could already be a victim of title fraud and not know it find out register your home at home title log dot com and enter save for one month of free protection again enter save for one month free at home title lock dot com home title lock dot com.

"six bucks" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

06:38 min | 1 year ago

"six bucks" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Chance just six Bucks this president so yes take guess what topic were on today and that would be coronavirus so it's let me another call here before we get to I get some more Cuomo cuts I want to play for you and I got this description about the virus and how it mutates from you to the next person Callie in California Kelly hi welcome you're on the Tom Sullivan Show hi mom you weeks ago regarding that gentlemen and wait that Donald Trump cardboard cut out I'm actually in the nursing program here in Butte a fight she got hung up I'm calling because I live in California in California and and Gavin Newsom just put out that state wide shelter in place order and and will need I I don't I don't not agreement number and there's also a lot of the cold for a lot of places that are staying open to what he's considering essential versus nonessential so to be honest life I mean I'm in a rural community in northern California and life is good he and usual here wait even having match and beat myself well for people that are not familiar with with where you are located it's a big call it's a college town so that's been the gripe is that the college kids are not doing not following any sort of thing about staying in or staying away from each other it's it's party hearty and and nothing changes that crew where you are because you got a lot of college kids I actually yeah so I actually I actually came home and actually not currently in Chicago right now because we were on spring break right now but we're actually not going to go back to the state cut this coming week so I'm not in Chicago right now but I still have a lot of friends that are out there in basically although from what I can understand from talking to them is that most of the students have gone home for spring break in the dorms are opening back up next week thank you get your stuff and then you know be on your way but you know from what I get for my friends still talking and I noticed that you know stuff is still pretty normal and on in that area it's just you know go shopping I just talked to the front yeah can't find and I've been told you know and you notice will be central she was just doing her normal everyday shopping bags so they're still they're still they still don't have toilet paper in the stores are not yet yeah she was she was in a safe place she said cosco was stocked normal but she was in a state plan for that safely with still pretty pretty scared and we actually just tried to order toilet paper on Amazon and it will be delivered in may so we're we're all right well that's where that yeah I actually I got an email I got an email this morning from Pandey and she said that if you go online Walmart will tell you what's in their inventory you put in what you want you want put toilet paper in it'll tell you how much inventory they have by store so you can find out before you go there I thought it was pretty unusual I know that yeah I know that our and I'm in a very very small town it's actually cool California and we had a holiday market and they said this morning the shipment of their supplies came and at about four AM and I think by seven o'clock the toilet paper was gone and you live in a rural community yeah the folks there there really is a state town called cool it's cool California which which while you're speaking of cool California I got a tweet from Curtis who says that pot shops are essential and can stay open is that right you know I I don't know much on that I did see something earlier today regarding pot shops I did not and I do not read any details on that but you live I mean they don't live in communal problem you if you live in cool I thought you would be an expert on on pot shops but yeah I'm getting a lot of tweets yes I'm getting a lot of tweets from people that are saying that Christoph the Russian agent sent me a tweet said list of essential business exemptions for California so big you could drive a truck through car dealers open Starbucks open distribution warehouses for furniture stores open everything everything has a long pole except bars and malls weird exactly yeah yeah I did I actually did see his TPO and it's true you know I mean we can still pretty much gotten your anything it's just a lot of the we have a couple small restaurants up here that are doing to go orders and I think they might even be stopping notes from what I mean I'm interested in yeah on the face well yeah but I can tell you in New York the NYPD will ticket you you will get a find a summons if you're out and you're not you're going if you're not part of an essential job that's what Newark New York crackdown so I mean it's ghost town New York the city that never sleeps is sleeping it's what it's like to sleep so yeah all right it'll be interesting to see how things go in California but I just really appreciate your time I listen to you every chance I get so just thanks for keeping us informed thank you I appreciate the appreciate the report from cool California Kelly thank you what else did I wanna play here for you yeah back to governor Cuomo listen to this he says they don't have any problems with testing member one of less than a week ago everybody was crying about we don't have test kids we don't have to ask its governor Cuomo's is we got plenty of those that we got so many we're testing more people in New York then they are in all of China the number of cases and you can see why we've taken these dramatic actions total positive up to seven thousand twenty nine hundred new.

Bucks president Cuomo
"six bucks" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

01:36 min | 1 year ago

"six bucks" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"One again it's just really good and the price six Bucks less six Bucks a month for five terabytes of storage and you can back up all your PC's or Max or servers or mobile devices your external hard drives in your laptops one account one low price I love that six Bucks a month can we make it better yes we can right now I drive if you go to I. drive dot com use my name Leo is for a limited time is ninety percent off and not just for the first month the first year by year you'll get it at ninety percent of the practically giving it away honestly you I know almost everybody I'm talking to right now has already done this if you're one of the hold outs now is the time this would be a great time to set up I drive dot com use promo code Leo ninety percent off your first year for a limited time eighty eight eighty eight ask Leo the number if you have a question or comment the suggestion love to hear from your website tech guy lads dot com it was shocking that your home could be stolen this easily that's the brutal lesson Debra learned when thieves found her home's title online forged it and literally took ownership of her home in an instant thieves legally own Deborah's home she got evicted and spent a fortune in legal fees trying to get it back you know the FBI calls home.

A new Twitter client finally gives us the power to edit tweets — sort of

the NewsWorthy

00:39 sec | 1 year ago

A new Twitter client finally gives us the power to edit tweets — sort of

"It's now easier to undo. And Edit your tweets. A new twitter client called. Grizzly plus provides an undue button. That lets you set a delay between when you send your tweet and when it actually posts it can be ten seconds or ten minutes and if you have second thoughts during that time you can click undo so it never posted all. It also helps streamline the process if you want to Redo a tweet by quickly editing it reposting it and then deleting the old one for you or it lets you set a tweet to automatically deletes after a certain amount of time. Brislin plus will cost you though. It's about six bucks a month. Ask for actually being able to edit original tweets once there posted. That might never happen. Twitter's CEO says that defeats the original purpose of twitter.

Twitter CEO
Why are oil prices dropping?

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

04:42 min | 1 year ago

Why are oil prices dropping?

"Late last week. The Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries OPEC a cartel of thirteen major oil producers met in Vienna OPEC agreed to cut their total output by one point five million barrels. A day an attempt to stabilize the price of oil in the face of slumping demand Bright US situation. We have over two subtitled. The market is necessarily OPEC non-opec something for the OPEC needed to sell this pact to Russia which is not a member of the organization but has generally seemed an amenable ally in recent years. We are hoping that I share Is Very Important member. They've been working with us for a very long time. And I think we understand each other. Now we look forward to To good meeting I cannot see. Us Not agreeing. Because that's very important for the market and everyone is keen. Not this time. Russia refused to cut its production by way of retaliation. Saudi Arabia opened. Its taps further and offer discounts on top Saudi production. Next month will be at least twenty five percent higher than Saudi production last month. Russia then threatened to increase its production to a record. Eleven point eight million barrels a day. The consequence of the unleashing of these cases was that oil prices plummeted further and faster than any time since the first Gulf War in nineteen ninety. One the barrel of Brent crude he bought for nearly sixty dollars just two weeks ago. You couldn't sell for more than thirty six bucks today. Don't WanNA check his prices. Because this plunge US remarkable folks it was on reports that Saudi Arabia slashing prices and increasing supply this after talks with Russia collapsed prices down more than twenty two percent earlier today the biggest loss since launch of the Gulf War. If one takes an extremely narrow view of this. It's not altogether bad news. Indeed the world's preeminent narrow view taker. Us President Donald Trump tweeted on Monday as oil prices charged towards the earth's core good for consumer gasoline prices coming down. The broadview was somehow condensed into the reply to this tweet by twitter. Use a cold. Michael Hayden ought to extend to him. His full title retired Four-star. Us Air Force General. Michael Hayden former director of the Central Intelligence Agency and the National Security Agency. Hayden spoke for many in the US and elsewhere when he tweeted simply pithily. Oh my God it is of course far from the first time that president trump has done a convincing impression of a self involved illiterate simpleton who has absolutely no idea what is going on or what he's talking about. So what are we looking at here? More specifically what in the wide world of sports is Russia playing at especially since its economy in recent times has been so reliant on the price of oil staying on the high side where. Russia is concerned. One should never rush to discount the possibility that they're just winding everybody up but Russia may also have spotted an opportune moment to strike at a potential rival America's shale oil industry. The fracking of the United States were already running up immense debts against expected future discoveries and anticipated future earnings bargain-basement oil prices could finish more than a few of these companies off prior to a recovery. Yesterday some oil explorers like dental petroleum of Houston saw their share prices have Russia may also be biting back against American sanctions against Russia's energy sector last month Russian oil giant Rosneft helmed by Longtime Vladimir. Putin Associate Egos session was punished for transporting Venezuelan crude. I'm sure there will the efforts to get around the sanctions already. Rosneft is doing this. For example by changing the names of ships or ship to shift transfers to try to hide the Venezuelan origin of oil. It remains to be seen how long Moscow can outstay a Riyadh while Russia cannot compete with Saudi Arabia's production nor is it as reliance on oil to function oil revenues thirty seven percent of Russia's budget compared to sixty five percent of Saudi Arabia's Russia has suggested that it might be open to renewed talks with OPEC whether these happen or whether anything comes of them or not. This would not be the first time that Russia has chiefly pursued a policy that hurts Russia. As long as it hurts everyone else. More

Russia United States Opec Saudi Arabia Michael Hayden President Donald Trump Vienna Rosneft Twitter President Trump Putin Central Intelligence Agency Riyadh Moscow National Security Agency
For Rent: Fast Fashion

The Indicator from Planet Money

05:31 min | 1 year ago

For Rent: Fast Fashion

"So each has a problem. It's fast fashion. One of the best in the business but it's customers are mostly young. Shoppers like millennials and Gen xeres SP and they increasingly care about the environment and about labor practices so h is trying to go from being seen as just a store where you can buy something quick and hip and cheap and disposable to a more conscious kind of brand and it is doing that by offering rentals reptiles. Yes so if you're a customer WHO's part of the H. M. Loyalty Program in Sweden. You can now rent close at the flagship store. You can even go get your clothes mended. Their repaired at H. M. Yeah and rentals are becoming supercop for retailers like all these different brands are getting on board like Banana Republic and Taylor leave is even macy's so here's how these rental services work you pay a monthly subscription fee at Banana Republic for instance eighty five dollars and Taylor fancier ninety five dollars. You're allowed to have three items out at a time. Free Shipping Free returns. So it's kind of like an unending closet. You can have as many new clothes as you want each. You don't even have to do laundry. The stores will wash dry cleaned clothes for you at H works a little bit differently. You pay per piece about three hundred and fifty Swedish kronor or about thirty six dollars but if you're thinking wow h. m. aren't these clothes kind of disposable. Yeah not such great quality. You should know that each has a whole other side. The close the company is renting come from its conscious exclusive collections. They're made with sustainable materials like organic silk and these clothes. They are way more expensive than the stuff h. m. normally carries so imagine renting a strapless brocade dress for thirty six bucks which is made from recycled materials. That would have sold for about two hundred and fifty dollars. That's not such a bad deal. No and I have a lot of strapless brocade recycle dress occasions totally constantly and this also represents the kind of more sustainably made clothing. That are shopper. Dina wanted she does not wanNA feel bad when she goes shopping for a party dress or for a pair of jeans jeans and dresses. This is already fraught enough. You don't need to feel like you're destroying the planet on top of everything else. I think these are two generations that have been raised. Really being told that everything that they do has a significant impact on the environment. That's very leap list. She's with why pulse a youth research agency. And she says these are generations Gen X. and millennials that are worried about things like were your clothes made by child. Labour was the fabric. Farmed in a sustainable. Way Is the label that is making your clothing dumping toxic chemicals in that river near Your House. There's a really high consciousness for millennials about the waste that they produce whether that's food waste Toxins that they're putting out into the environment or waste in terms of what they're using and Using up and then having to throw away and fast. Fashion has this bad reputation for waste and for harming the environment. They're all these stories out there with headlines like how fast fashion is destroying the planet and fast fashion is creating an environmental crisis and h an clearly knows this. It is full of plans for how the company can be more sustainable like it. Lets customers in the Netherlands items delivered by bicycle. Yes agent. I'm also has this whole campaign with instructions on how to take care of your clothes so they can last longer. Things like how to Clean Your Shoe Laces or mentor jeans. And even as a collection of clothes that were considered unsellable because they were ripped torn or damaged. It has mended those clothes and is now selling them so renting is part of this big push that H. M. is making to look more ecoconscious the source hoping that it can help persuade new shoppers to buy or rent. It's close and also to prevent shoppers like Dana. From leaving and seeming more ecoconscious is not just a strategy for fashion brands. Oakland brands are trying to be seen as more environmentally conscious and make their consumer spill bus guilty so this is just like when Burger King started offering faked. Beef plant based meat is another great example and young consumers are for sure contributing to the popularity of plant based foods we see that clearly in the data and you know their consciousness around How all of their behavior impact the environment? Something that we're looking at very closely and all industries really need to be aware of merely says so far agent. Him Strategies seemed to be pretty popular with its customers. Her Company did a survey and found that about twelve. Percent of millennials have rented close and about six percent of Jen's ears which means there's this whole other reason that h is renting competition. It has got to keep up with its competitors so you know more and more brands are participating in this because yes it looks better but also young consumers are more and more starting to choose those More ECO friendly options. And so. If you don't kind of participate at the onset of those things you're going to be left behind. You can't be left behind if you're fast. Fashion Fast Fast H is definitely going to have to diversify its offerings because I check with Shopper Dana. She says she thinks the gesture that each Emma's making by offering rentals rings a little hollow because as she pointed out each and I'm still making most of its profits by offering fast ration. Little conveniently woke

Banana Republic Taylor H. M. Loyalty Program Sweden Your House Macy Dina Dana Emma H. M. Oakland Netherlands JEN Burger King
"six bucks" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

02:35 min | 1 year ago

"six bucks" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"And six Bucks now embark on an international trip to play the Charlotte Hornets in Paris France on Friday the team did leave for France last night in football locker clean out they always yields a somber mood in the locker room because it means that the season is over good day they do X. it's a good day those reflected evaluate Packers kicker Mason Crosby did just that regarding head coach about the force first season in Green Bay yesterday so one thirteen at three and you know one of the home home home playoff game and you had a chance to go to the Superbowl but he he was just consistent from from the moment I got no just gave gave it kind of gave us seem to the players you know a lot of stuff to really come together have good chemistry through the off season and you create a lot of situations for us to compete but also really you know when we come together as a team and you know I'm really proud of the way he handled every day and approached every day most everyone had positive things to say about mad love for it now that its first season is in the books the amazing Crosby's you're touring the personal stuff he had and then in the middle of all that he had to compete for his job he talks about you know brought in guys to beat the that was his job yes all time leading scorer he still had to fight give these restaurants but this summer and I think part of that too bringing in some you compete with him was actually giving him a little time to deal with some of the personal stuff you had to deal with off the field during training camp but yeah he kicks phenomenal made some clutch kicks throughout the years some game winners both both of them against the Detroit Lions cell I even though he's inching toward the back nine of his career I would imagine he's still got some game left but he's a free agent is gonna be interesting to see if the Packers decide to bring him back at his Asian whether they deem his physical capacity to kick still they're going into next season one last note college hoops tonight mark had hosting say Johnston office today and in Wisconsin hosta brass got the call center in Madison tip off that one also at eight o'clock so little channel jumping if you so desire for college hoops tonight back and forth yeah in you look in the pantheon of Packer stickers or Egypt the NFL in general if you've got a great place kicker you've got a big problem solved and there are a whole lot of teams that Hey guys like Mason Crosby Ryan Longwell Chris Jackie before that to keep that job it's been one of those things kind on the piano mine was kind of like the same thing a quarterback where for twenty five years now you just haven't had to worry about that position and you need to have a special guy to kick in a climate Allah towards November and December like Green Bay or Chicago or some of these cold weather climates eight absolutely changes the way that you have to do that so the fact that masons been able to do that so successfully is a credit to him eight eighteen it WTMJ Debbie lasik god.

Charlotte Hornets
Burger King makes Impossible Whopper cheaper by inclusion in value menu

WBZ Morning News

00:09 sec | 1 year ago

Burger King makes Impossible Whopper cheaper by inclusion in value menu

"And Burger King adding the impossible Whopper which comes with a plant based full meat Patty made by impossible burger to it's cheaper to for six Bucks value

Burger King
Timberwolves endure rim repair delay, then thorough 134-106 stomping by Bucks

Wisconsin's Morning News with Gene Mueller

00:43 sec | 2 years ago

Timberwolves endure rim repair delay, then thorough 134-106 stomping by Bucks

"Way after an hour long delayed a fix of crooked ram in Minneapolis the box end up being the Timberwolves by a final score of one thirty four to one oh six Bucks big three lead the way in a road victory against the Timberwolves on a night when all three of Chris Middleton Eric Bledsoe and yon is scored twenty points or more in a twenty eight point victory Gracie our main especially everybody's second awesome this is on the things a lot easier for everybody on that they would be doing this data biosis now playing a role being aggressive and stuff to play in the right way to do that one of the three leading the way was Yanis who finished with thirty four well Eric Bledsoe scored a season high twenty two in the victory Justin Garcia WTMJ

Minneapolis Timberwolves Eric Bledsoe Gracie Yanis Justin Garcia Wtmj Chris Middleton
"six bucks" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

New Jersey 101.5

03:23 min | 2 years ago

"six bucks" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

"Bucks for adults six Bucks for kids don't miss out hurry in Saturday's old baby in old baby dot com valor eleven to select styles only one Jersey one one point five instant weather high temperatures on the cool side of average for next couple of days here for tonight most of download the thirties areas across the breezy and cool for your Sunday lots sunshine highs only fifty not as windy Monday football son still cooler advertise low mid fifties and back to six alarms on Tuesday we're following up cancer stray shower high low mid sixties from the S. and heating cooling weather desk I mean Ross Tabor New Brunswick now forty five Alfa forty one Jackson forty five fast traffic and instant weather every fifteen minutes on New Jersey one or one point five Chad to tell that to dis to wide maybe I should last tab collars welcome back to the agent jive what's the matter well that is that style sure why old tires all you're going to lose the miracle mile hold on okay just add no one should to get all that thing so much.

"six bucks" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

02:22 min | 2 years ago

"six bucks" Discussed on WJR 760

"Less than six Bucks a month when you use my name to sign up the give you ninety percent off the first year I drive dot com is the website don't forget. to you is my name's okay let's see who's next let me get in Richmond Virginia great to have you I'm glad you called hi thanks thank you. two things one the stuff that you have one listed here on hold is whole area. all that's the collection of via parodies in funny tunes of stuff we've amassed over the years I'm glad you like it **** also want to say that I am a proud owner of two male sex dogs. male sex organs on your previous caller. and your dogs are not confused about it they're happy good they are very short that they have mail tomorrow very pleased so knowledge that. cool okay so my question is my concern I guess I would say is that Donald Trump has not yet put for a health insurance plans I'm concerned how that will affect him when it comes time to debate than all the. the stuff that happens from here on forward. well that one of the things that trump tried to do early on wise get rid of obamacare and have the pressure of that force the creation of a replacement using the market as a. as a foundation for it trump did not have the full support of Republican Party at the time because when he was trying this many Republicans thought that he had called loaded with Russia and he was going to be. a front office they really did salt I think trump is leading the Democrats fight this out make fools of themselves presenting all other variations plans I I. I'm not worried that trump is not gonna have a healthcare plan as part of his campaign folks I I I thought I had one more minute then I've got I've got to go we're out here remember taking a day off tomorrow too important take a full week so I take a day here and there. Marc Stein was going to be here but he has the iPhone flow so can Matthews will be in tomorrow and I do not panic we'll be back right here on Mondays.

Donald Trump Richmond Virginia Marc Stein Republican Party Russia Matthews ninety percent
"six bucks" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"six bucks" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Than six Bucks a meal put your boxes making sure you have burgers for all your barbecues the summer season sign up today put your box dot com slash elder for twenty dollars off your first box plus six free burgers in every box until October fifteenth that's what your box dot com slash shelter for twenty dollars off your first box plus free burgers in every box until October fifteenth put your box dot com slash elder well it's summertime again which means pool parties barbecues and relaxation Larry over here but it also means home projects which aren't as much fun so why not let home advisor take them off your hands from minor repairs to major remodels HomeAdvisor will connect you with the top rated pros in your area letting you get back to summer fun the pros have been reviewed by your neighbors so you can see what others thought of their work and if you're not sure how much your project will cost get multiple quotes from pros and use home advisors project cost guide to see what others paid similar projects and to top it all off you can book appointments online no more phone tag home advisor dot com does the work for you and they provide constant you know you're not getting ripped off I've used home adviser a number of times and I cannot recommend it more highly HomeAdvisor makes it easy to get your home projects done so don't wait get those projects done now and make the most of your summer to find the right pro at a fair price just ask home adviser go to home advisor dot com or download the free award winning HomeAdvisor app today home advisor dot com in travel we've got the answer well one one just before university two cars and a motorcycle involved in a crash.

Larry advisor HomeAdvisor twenty dollars
"six bucks" Discussed on The View

The View

03:06 min | 2 years ago

"six bucks" Discussed on The View

"Sunny six bucks to twenty eight. Our? Okay, per coffees credible. Supper, the mon- who travels. I know. That's you. I know that's me. This is genius. Because this was actually invented by someone who really felt that they were just disappointed by travel pillows and check it out sunny. You put this on. I can actually show you you put it on. And you can literally put this anywhere because your head isn't just the right? Oh, so cool. It comes with a little carrier look at all. They're like, no. It's you need this right now there are so come on your head is lobbying as well. Homeland regional on these fifty dollars today's deal twenty five bucks to make our comfortable. News does nap anywhere. So good. You're gonna love these roomy totes and bags for the ecoconscious mom, which I know is you you this. So this sunny look at this. This is something I can use everywhere. But this bag is this huge bag zippers. How cool is that fulls right up all of them all different sizes and the new palm print for summer. I love these because you can use them for grocery Jim whatever throw them in the wash. They get a little stinky for the kids, whatever you knew and also sunny check it out a garment bag this not only has your huge packing keeps built in. But on the other side, you can zip up your garment and then folded three ways of fits right into your carry on. This is really key original price. Ten to thirty dollars today. Deal. Five bucks to fifteen. Great. Really well. And then there's the other moms that love wines. Would that be? Okay. So these are incredible. This has been glassy. So this is a portable vacuum sealed insulation. And you actually put your bottle of wine or champagne in there. You don't need anything except that. I said I need place it in after it's chill to the temperature. You love I knew you're gonna take that check up these stainless steel glass. Lines glasses cuts, which are incredible. Because it keeps your wine tasting viewed of moa. Rhenium rice on these thirty five to one hundred fifteen dollars not today. Seventeen fifty fifty seven twenty five percent and the colors are so chic and couture. Very much you, okay. The pro elite get out there. I know you love this. Brought to you and everyone else for the mom who runs the kitchen like this Kidman, boss. So this is a luxurious comfort floor math. It's essential for the kitchen ultra plush comfort. This gives you gel in an energy return foam. this Kidman, boss. So this is a luxurious comfort floor math. It's essential for the kitchen ultra plush comfort. This gives you gel in an energy return foam. So that helps reduce the pain from standing on solid hard floors. Now, this is slip resistant on the bottom in stain-resistant on the top. I also use it in the bathroom for when I'm kneeling down giving. My kids Beth oh 'cause I don't have to wash. All those Beck. Cats. All the time Kim bath in my opinion, original price on means one twenty packs as steel sixty to fifty. These

Kidman Beck Kim bath Beth Seventeen fifty fifty seven tw one hundred fifteen dollars thirty dollars fifty dollars
"six bucks" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

08:07 min | 2 years ago

"six bucks" Discussed on KTRH

"Only six bucks a treatment because he negotiated negotiated directly duplicated this model around the country. Now, you couple that fifty bucks a month you buy a catastrophic health care plan. God forbid, you get the cancer God forbid, the bad accident God forbid, the heart attack that cost real money needed a big hospital. Not the day-to-day stuff blood pressure cholesterol. You know, oh, my toes going, whatever. Whatever I mean. Everybody has whatever and the higher the deductible. Let's say a ten thousand dollar deductible. All right. Maybe can't afford ten five thousand but the higher the duck deductible, the catastrophic plans gonna pay for everything if just in case, something horrible happens. That's what insurance is supposed to be about. Now, everyone exp- nobody wants to pay. Ten dollar co pay everybody thinks doctors who spend all these years in college and medical school and residencies and then turn ships, and then I have all those student loans to pay back, and then they wanna put an office light on. And they gotta pay the rent, and then they got a pay the electric Bill than the fire, the, nurses and the aides, and blah, blah, blah. It's you know, when people get upset doctors make too much money. They don't they by the time. They start paying back. Nope. I know I'm for whatever reason, I'm friends with so many doctors, and they don't it's not what you think impart because the government dictates not supply and demand. Crisscrossing dictating price, though, the government says how much you can charge. I know doctors that will for bid their own kids that probably have a natural inclination or talent towards medicine because they've been around it their whole life talking out of it. Like, I talk my kids that don't go don't go in the public eye. No matter what you do. That's what I tell mine this state. You know, go do something where it's not public. Vice okay. What you do up to you? Well, anyway, back to the Wall Street Journal know, it's a little reality. Check for people. You know, we can afford to expand Medicare coverage every single person, you know, keep your doctor keep your plan, save less. Here we go again, by the way, no doubt coverage probably for illegal immigrants to we already pay that cost billions of billions of dollars educational system the healthcare system criminal Justice system, because we don't secure our borders. Anyway. So the Wall Street Journal's reality check on this. Their latest report by the trustees of social security, Medicare, quote, both social security Medicare face long term financing shortfalls under currently scheduled benefits and financing Medicare's hospital insurance fund would be depleted in twenty twenty six lower payroll taxes and reduced income from the taxation of social security benefits weighed on the trust funds income, basically like a Ponzi scheme that they've had all these years problem is popular. Now is aging what it means is if you're fifty years old now you're going to see major cuts in your social security, and then let me tell you what else is coming then they're gonna they're gonna do a if you're smart enough to save money. Well, we're not going to give you your sorry. We're going to we're going to legalize stealing. It you pay it in your whole working life, and they will come across means test. The whole thing. And the trust funds cost journal is on me while expected to be slightly higher than last year due to higher spending and higher projected provider payment updates cost programmes projected to rise substantially as share of the economy over the next sixteen years as a wave of retiring baby boomers boost the number of beneficiaries and lower birth rates over the past few decades way on employment growth and economic output. Loops today's he they can't afford it. You know, one of the things, you know, America's gonna have a choice election in twenty twenty. It's gonna be you want the new green deal. Do you want? Everything every fear taken away by people that will never be able to fulfil it ninety four trillion original cost literally takes up Medicare for all. In the first ten years. We'll take up eighty percent of the budget about the new green deal. Now, there's a economic thought that's been saying, well, the Trump economy's been doing so well so long that a contraction is pretty much inevitable, but market watch has different take on that today. Conham of I'm busy ratcheting up their estimates of first-quarter gross domestic product after a series of signs that growth sped up towards the end of the period. Bright spots included a rebound in consumer spending declining US trade deficit and rock-solid labor market. One of the top Wall Street. Forecasters macroeconomic advisers list lifted their GDP estimate two point eight percent. Just one percent a month ago. Art, Laffer tight labor. Markets helped the poor the minorities and the disenfranchised art Laffer economist author of Trump nominees inside the America, I plan to revive our economy. Well, we know that already because we see record low unemployment for African Americans Hispanic Americans. Asian Americans women in the workplace youth unemployment. And by the way, that means we have we have more than a million jobs the lowest record unemployment applications ever. And that means we have a we have a million more jobs available today that we have people to fill them. Now, we'll get a risk that for the new green deal and no Steeler glass buildings at New York oil and gas oil and gas. It is like eight is the key. We're now energy independent for the first time in seventy years, but you want we partnered with north North Dakota oil companies or any Balkan, boom. Member. I believe prices were driven down by OPEC. We're not we don't need to be dependent on countries that hate our guts for the lifeblood of our economy, nor should western Europe dependent on vitamin vita, R Putin and making Russia. Rich again pisses me off like Germany did with Mirko. So now, we're net exporter of energy. You want every American get rich. Well in North Dakota. They were paying truck drivers to train them. Hey, a base salary of eighty grand a year and all the overtime. You can have. Now, if you work hard that's life changing for somebody's making forty grand a year. Now you can afford that truck. You've always had your eye on you can maybe start saving for down payment for a new house. If we went full bore energy in this country, every American would have a shot at being rich in the sense that a nice home in a safe neighborhood on nice car truck. Whatever you want van. And then you'd be able to take your kids to Disney, you'll hate it. But you have to do it by the second trip. You'll begin to hate it. Trust me the lines are atrocious. Even fast past you know, or whatever vacation you want be able to go out to dinner not have to worry about it. I mean that would be great for Republican. Great thing about the Trump economic boom is it helped the forgotten men and women in this country. That's the best part of it. The people that deserve it. The most. All right. Eight hundred nine four one show. We got a lot coming up today. Senator Mike Lee new Gingrich at the top of the hour. He's been on his game. He's funny. Funny last night. Anyway, David shown, Danielle McLaughlin will look at the case and get back into the deep state all of that coming up. Listen mother stays coming. You know, one of the great gifts. You can give your mom..

Medicare Wall Street Journal Laffer America North Dakota New York OPEC Disney US David Europe Ponzi scheme Senator Mike Lee
"six bucks" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"six bucks" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"For all your vehicle care you need experience. Honesty, and integrity, certified female friendly meant Curry's craftsman auto care, rockstar technicians. You can trust at craftsman auto care dot com. One eight hundred two four six eight seven five one that's one eight hundred two four six eight seven fifty one or go to balance of nature dot com to take advantage of this special discount use discount code Sacramento. Are you ready? The new time of day rate structure is gonna hurt and higher. Utility bills are on their way here in California. The weather could make it hard to stay comfortable and save money. So look to do hula have got good news, Tom or here, owner of northwest exteriors. We can help keep your home comfy and save you money with energy efficient windows and due to overwhelming demand. We are extending our super crazy special through April thirtieth thirty nine ninety five for a house full of windows or just forty six bucks a month. Really forty six. Bucks a month? Plus our window technicians are factory trained and certified making north west. The only five star platinum dealer for Anna window systems in California. Call today. Ask about our super crazy special house full of windows for just thirty nine ninety five or forty six bucks a month. But hurry this offer. Absolutely ends April thirtieth Sukur eight trust n w that's eight trust n w or online at trust north west dot com. Simply the best trust north west seven. I look at this Mercedes Benz has a new series the A-Class stands for advance. It learned a using artificial intelligence more about you, the more you interact with your vehicle. The a-series starts at just thirty two thousand five hundred Sadi's Benz of Stockton. I'm Tom Sullivan. I recommend you pay the short bribe. It's worth it. They're just off I five at eight mile road exit or you can find them online by going to M B of Stockton dot com. Local news. California's Senator.

California Tom Sullivan Benz Stockton Curry Sacramento Senator
"six bucks" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"six bucks" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Fee applies. Equipment taxes and fees. Extra subject to change backup. Limited to eight hours. Hey, are you ready? The new time of day rate structure is gonna hurt and higher. Utility bills are on their way here in California. The weather could make it hard to stay comfortable and save money. So look to do hula. I've got good news. Hi, Tom, or here, owner of northwest exteriors. We can help keep your home comfy and save you money with energy efficient windows and due to overwhelming demand. We are extending our super crazy special through April thirtieth thirty nine ninety five for a houseful windows or just forty six bucks a month, really forty six bucks a month. Plus our window technicians are factory trained and certified making north west. The only five star platinum dealer for amyloid window systems in California. Call today. Ask about our super crazy special houseful the windows for just thirty nine ninety five or forty six bucks a month. But hurry, this offer absolutely ends April thirtieth so call eight eight eight trust N W that's eight trust n w or online at trust northwest dot com. Simply the best trust north. West. Attention. If you owe money to the IRS, this is an urgent message. The IRS is cracking down this year by sending out heart-stopping letters aggressively garnishing paychecks seizing bake accounts, and putting leans on homes and businesses they call it enforced compliance, and you better watch out because penalties and interest unpaid taxes compound daily making it seem impossible to ever get out of debt. Don't let text destroy your life you need to call Optima Tax Relief. The number one tax resolution firm, they are experts in the fresh start initiative. What are the biggest breaks the IRS has ever offered? If you qualify. You could save thousands, even tens of thousands. Optima is resolved over a half billion dollars of tax debt for their clients. They have an a plus rating with the Better Business Bureau will fight to get you the best deal possible. Call Optima now for a free consultation. Call eight hundred three seven five twenty nine twenty two eight hundred three seven five twenty nine twenty two eight hundred three seven five twenty nine twenty two.

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"six bucks" Discussed on Z104

Z104

08:14 min | 2 years ago

"six bucks" Discussed on Z104

"For six bucks. This is not a joke. And it's not a it's a promotion that you can actually do with the details next found cigarettes code. Season. Q switched of. You've been to focus. Plus. Giovanetti q. Different. Four. Thomas. Still think. The. Some. The. Kate you all. Two. Suid stream. Maybe. But. The strike. Some. Strange. The sound a flight to Hawaii that will only cost you six dollars. It's not a hoax. It's actually really happening. So RB's. Yes. That arby's is bringing back their same which is on king's Hawaiian buns. You may have seen the commercials for these. So to promote the new sandwiches coming back. They're offering six dollar trips to Hawaii. There's the there's a catch as you can imagine you get the flight for six dollars. Now, the whole trip only last twenty four hours. So if you count in the flight time, which was long flight, you're really only in Hawaii for six hours or so the point. Well, you what you do is you get your tickets go on sale today at noon. It's first come first serve you will get charged six dollars. That's it. You'll get a ticket to white where you'll when you get there. You will sit on the beach eating the new Rb sandwiches will free when you're done. You had home. You will not spend the night in Hawaii. It's a direct flight to awaiian beach to try some sandwiches. There's too much goes into flying. You're in the air longer than your island. That's true. You would you would be in the air way longer than you would actually be in Hawaii. But the ticket sire if you're interested. Well, what if you took the flight out there, then you when they say, okay, we time to go. You said no I'll pay for goal people. Right. Do you think that's possibility thing they put something in the closet says you agreed? Force me to say legally going just twirl with the plane fall down. Exactly. If you don't get tickets today, you have one more chance that's on April fifteenth, and it starts again at noon, they do the same deal..

Hawaii arby awaiian beach Kate Thomas six dollars twenty four hours six dollar six hours
"six bucks" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

02:14 min | 2 years ago

"six bucks" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"Hair, six bucks? Here's six bucks. Here's six bucks. But we're going to trade big time because it's worth a lot of money because it's a technology company. Just throw technology company onto your business plan, and you too can sell it for a lot of money. It doesn't make any sense. I know, but that's the way it is. You wanna be selling Biogen right now? They just lost their Alzheimer's drug company. The company said it can't meet its goals. Stock went down twenty nine percent in one day on Thursday, which is a great day for the market. But that stock went down twenty nine percent. I'd be getting now that right now. Sure, you can always come back to it. Apple may wanna by apple right now strong by this week got Anita two hundred and twenty five dollars price target stocks looking pretty good. I had a really nice week this week. And that looked well now. Oh, this is interesting. Do you own a ski rental or ski property up? The mountains you heard it from me. I I'm telling you to sell it right now. Think about that. Dope. By ski properties right now. Sell them. Why dave? Just do what I say. All right. Let's move on next week. We've got apple Apple's unveiling Monday, their new stream service just happened the helping the price overall, and they're also going to talk about new new service. You can buy through apple that'll be subscription only. We're gonna see Monday the new home sales. That'll be interesting Thursday fourth quarter, economic growth going to come out. I think it'll be pretty good and Friday. We have the consumer sentiment, which is of course, important because of consumers are happy the market's going to be happy. What do you think about gold? I love. Oh, I do sometimes too. I'll tell you what I think about right now pays to keep it tuned right here. You've been listening to protect your assets with David Hollander. I am David Hollander on the salmon. We'll be right back. All this volatility has you spooked. And you're not sure what direction you should be going. Get your free portfolio review right now. The number to call is eight six.

Apple David Hollander Anita Alzheimer dave twenty nine percent twenty five dollars one day
"six bucks" Discussed on ATG Radio

ATG Radio

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"six bucks" Discussed on ATG Radio

"Six bucks for kids with compression leggings active from fifteen dollars twelve. Dollars for kids kids. Get a move on. We're going navy. Hurry up fifty percent of all navy active. Right now, it will be an old navy dot com. Valid through one time excludes auto questions can you jump? But you don't have to know every answer phone numbers are there because you don't have to be perfect to be a perfect parent cell phones where there are thousands of children in foster care who don't need every question answered electric. I just need you. What's the moon made us for more information on how you can adopt? Go to adopt US, kids dot org. A public service announcement from the US department of health and human services, adopt US kids and the Ad Council. Would your business survive a disaster? Nearly two thirds of businesses aren't prepared for an emergency. And forty percents of businesses that experience a disaster never recover make an emergency plan now before it's too late. For a free online tool that helps you develop an emergency plan to keep your business up and running should disaster strike, visit ready dot gov slash business. Brought to you by the Federal Emergency Management agency. The American Red Cross. And the Ad Council. My name is Ruth Roussy. I volunteer with United way reading to children to help prepare them for a better academic future. I don't just wear the shirt, I live it. Give advocate. Volunteer live United dot org. Brought to you by United way and the Ad Council. Join me as I prepare a collection of cherished family recipes passed through generation recipes for disaster at foodsafety dot gov. You'll learn the right steps as Maria does everything wrong brought to you by the USDA HHS and the Ad Council..

Ad Council US Federal Emergency Management a Ruth Roussy US department of health American Red Cross USDA HHS Maria fifteen dollars fifty percent
"six bucks" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

11:34 min | 3 years ago

"six bucks" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Huntley twenty-seven along the lakefront twenty nine. I'm Kim Gordon and the WGN radio newsroom, and these are the stories that matter on seven twenty WGN. Yeah. Fussing it out Brian nutrient for Rowena here till seven o'clock. And then Dave hoaxer is coming in to take you up till I think ten I think they will be here from seven to ten they don't give me a lot of information. But the information I have is credible. Don't worry about that the other formation. I got it frantic text. Karen? I don't know if you're a gambler mega millions four hundred twenty five million or you playing tonight not play. We have time. You can buy drawings. Not till ten. I got a text. Don't forget to get your mega millions ticket counter that that's how retirement plan within the winning the lotto. So it's gonna be Karm. You play you play the mega million four twenty-five. You're looking for something new sometimes you gotta just go big Brian. Exactly. Right. What are you drop it in six bucks? I was thinking more like ten ten today. What ten but the other thing is I thought to myself, I probably should drive out to some rural outpost to buy tickets. That's where people seem to win. They don't win in a major metropolitan area. I think that's not strategize enough. Right. Yeah. Where are you going to go? Like if I get them at the seven eleven by my house, nobody will nobody's ever one bitcoin at that seven eleven. Yeah. I mean, I don't want. You wasting myself wasting too much time driving out to say, you know. Champagne to get a lottery ticket. But maybe that. Very upset that they're a rural outpost in your mind. Wow. Everybody you covered for Karm pitchforks in the tortoise for the record. I was down in champagne this year. What a wonderful time. I l l I n either. Mind today was I just there's a little grocery store at the corner over here. Did I didn't even realize was there? And I walked by all day at the big lotto sign in the window. So I walked in got my ticket there. And I thought maybe that's a key. Maybe I'm lucky now because this just happened from no have you ever won any money with Oiseaux five dollars. All right. That's a quick pick thousand win. And I got some of the kids. One of the kids at school gave me some scratch off tickets as a Christmas gift, and I won a dollar. So that's teacher appreciation Dunkin donuts cards at scratch off tickets. Welcome to the world of an elementary school teacher love the Dunkin donuts cards. I do too. I'm very appreciative. Molly loved them to us. She swiped him all the take them back to New York. Merry christmas. Intelligent daughter. Sure. Who thinks stuffed stocking look at all these Dunkin donuts cards bearing Christmas. Good. Good good. All right. I love this. I don't know if you pay attention to this Karen, I do every year lake superior state university. Releases a banned words list every January first and it started back in nineteen seventy five because a one of the professors there. Was that a New Year's Eve party? And he's friends started commiserating about words that they were just sick of hearing. So they published the first list on January first nineteen Seventy-six since then they every year they've done it. They take nominations at the lake superior state website where you can L S U dot EDU slash banished. So they have a word banishment page on Facebook. They do it very tall tongue in cheek. But these are just words and phrases that really we could all do without because they're overused. They're stupid. They don't mean. What people think they mean? And get a kick out of it every year. So on the list this year wheelhouse. Yeah. I use that every once in a while we'll house it seems to me it has like two definitions one one is like, isn't it the place that you're fish steering shop? It's the shelter that covers you, right? But it's also use like in baseball, isn't it like in your wheelhouse. I don't know. But one I guess one came from the other that means like if the if that's where you hit the home run from. That's your wheelhouse. Anything you do. Well is supposed to be your wheel. This is my wheelhouse sitting here yak, and that's my wheelhouse. Kearns is crafting hot takes for sports stories. That's his that would be in his wheelhouse. Damn straight. Yours is arguing. But everybody everybody says, oh, it's no it's a come on stop. It's not my wheelhouse too. It's not in my wheelhouse. According to what the submitters to explain why dreadful words should be banished. In the books as in finished or concluded. So everything is in the books northwestern's football season in the books. Two thousand eighteen is in the books. Why why do we have to keep saying? Wrap my head around here. Stuff. I hate that one. I just don't like that one at all. That one. I don't use a lot of these. I don't use some of them. I actually do karma. I'm sure uses this when ghosting back probably not anymore but back in the day when you were out when you were out on the single scene. Yeah. Not me. But have been you've been ghosted up saluting. Really nothing like a good ghosting to knock your ego into the dirt you ever bet ghosted. Karen, somebody just disappears usually stop. And it's time to pay. That's what you call financial ghost ghost. We'll leave that one. Because that's where you have people. Come after stopping a financial ghost is. It is what it is in there. Bryan. Oh. That was you know, I hate that passion is what it is. What it is. No. You just don't want to argue anymore. You don't wanna debate. You don't have a conversation. You you have taken the point of view that your view is superior to all others. And there's no arguing with you. And it says nothing says absolutely nothing. Exactly, it's not what it is though. It is not no. But you know, that should be in their car talk about good recall that that is just I wanna look people when they do it. No. It isn't actually what I hate this witch-hunt. Oh, really? And maybe because I don't like that. It keeps getting said with things that aren't really. I just I don't know. I just hate the whole that phrase. I hate it. Well, going along with that collusion is on the list, I'll collusion two or more parties limiting competition by deception there saying we all need to collude to get rid of this word. So we hear it all the time. There is no collusion, whereas colluded the president is always talking about collusion. He loves to hear himself say collusion, so collusion collusion. Platform people use it as an excuse to rant Facebook. Instagram. Twitter have become platforms even athletes call a post game interview of platform. Do they do that? You'd be better post game interviews platform latte form. Let's throw a brand in there. L brand. I don't get the kind of use your platform. Yeah. You gotta use your platform to advance your brain. Right. But if you if you're not advancing your brand, then really what are you doing? You're not grabbing you're not you're not on insta-. Then you shouldn't have a platform. No. Why would you need a platform? If you don't have a brand you'd see I think it's funny because when we're on here we are. We are enhancing a bread. I think it's fine to actually do it. But when you say, that's when it crosses the line. Right. You know, you're on here. People to Karen Conte, the attorney. That's that's your brand. Well, people know that you're not saying I mean hazing my brand by telling people, I'm an attorney. I don't have a brand I'm not cattle. You don't have to. What's the other one on the list Otis family of acronyms, such as police Florida's Scotus? They say it's overused unless the word. Overused? Useless word for president supreme court first, lady et cetera. Yes. Unless you're unless you're, you know, a court stenographer or a somebody taking shorthand, I don't even know if people still take shorthand anymore. Just to say the word. That's all. Maybe I'm slow. But I did not know what those Manton till? I don't know if eighteen months ago. Talk about behind the curve. Behind the curve. We're going to get that on the list to behind the that David Jenny just because has a nice voice doesn't mean that. That's a good phrase. That's a bad phrase. It drops in that base that race. Slightly under informed. No, I think karma flew over willingly. I said eighteen months ago. That's slightly under inform voters and Florida's have been around for a very long time. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. You know, the first time I ever heard somebody say it though. I didn't I didn't know what it was either. I don't know how long ago that was you prefer Skoda's or poets where where do you stand? There you more and more. No, I don't need any of them. I'll just say the supreme court because I you know, I know how to enunciate my words correctly and speak. Clearly, so people understand. I don't have Florida Skoda's police dodos, just here's a word. I don't know a Karm you're young enough. Karen, I'm going to bet you don't know what this word is either a yeat. No, no, no. Yes, sir. He has into vigorously throw or toss. Now, if I hear one more freshman this from somebody had Sault Sainte Marie if I hear one or more freshmen say yeat, I might might just beat myself out a window. I have never heard yeat now. Doesn't this is a new term that I just heard Molly use of the song is a bop. What does that mean? I guess it's too good song. You could dance to it. As dick Clark used to say. It's got a nice beat. I can dance to it. Now. It's a bop. Bop. Have you this one where people say, hey, it's totes totes total torrent. Why why do we have to shorten all these words? What about dip get through dip in their yellow? Does that for dip means like if you're at a party, I'm gonna debt I'm outta here. I'm gonna get a DEM. What's a clear the doors over she knows? What that meets? Yup. Really? That's the thing. I'm gonna dip. I feel super hip that. I just threw that one by the way. That's that's like, you know, your old all day long. They dip David you've got to take back the woefully uninformed. Yeah jennings. Yeah. Take back. She's like dip at a slightly under informed. No. But now he's a slight dip like he's got a China's mycosis spitting a Cup. I'm dipping debt is. Tell us. I don't know where that came from. I don't while. All right. Optics needs to go the trade appearance. What are the optics of that a lot of corporate speak? Can we go back to looks bad? Go away to. No, I think that's fine. But you say, you know, oh Karm from Mary. She said, I didn't know what was until less than eighteen months ago. Thank you, very very jumping on. How would you characterize Mary Jennings? She just got back from NEW GUINEA. For thirty years. Well, okay. So she's not travel traveled impaired. Bottom line from the six year old my boss says it all the time inappropriately times that I can't take it anymore. All right. Let's see legally drunk. This makes sense. You're a little tipsy. That's all you be illegally. If. Really? Yes, technically, if you are driving impaired you are illegally drunk because if I'm sitting at home, and I'm just drunk drunk..

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