24 Burst results for "Sistan"

Five Ways To Manage Constipation Even If Your Child Takes Laxatives

Healthy Eating For Kids

06:56 min | 4 months ago

Five Ways To Manage Constipation Even If Your Child Takes Laxatives

"Before I share tips on how to manage constipation. You may be good idea to just quick run through what is constipation and actually you know you may find that your baby or child has large stews and these are difficult to pause, and there's something called Burston stooge shorts. You can either Google that or if you go to my latest blog post on held babies and toddlers constipation, there's a link in that block pose on. How a picture of the Bristol stool shot, we basically grading of the different types of stews. So with constipation, it'll be more rating type one and type two rather stews either separated hawed and lumpy were they all sausage like but with cracks in it and that's conservation. Usually your baby child will experience pain when passing stools and generally if your baby pausing fewer than three movements but week and when they do a poo, if they are in pain discomfort, then generally that's a good telltale sign that they have constipation and is usually at this point, you probably have a chat with your child's GPO pediatrician and for children whether happened Sistan Constipation, they may have been described laxatives I thought we'd focus on laxatives for the purpose of today's block posed an podcast episode because it's the most common type of medication that's prescribed to manage the constipation. The ways of classifying. Constipation could be say. Less than a quarter of the stews all great ones are hard and they're quite separate hard lumps or grade to is lumpy sausage like Pooh that we've spoken about and very few students and less than a quarter of your students would be loose and watery. Some children and adults including older adults may also suffer from ideas and Bowel Syndrome is generally to affect about seven to fifteen percent of the population, and you know quite a majority of they may not even realize that they have insect of had long term problems with constipation. They may have some of these laxatives prescribed and IB sense to be more common in women. Than in men and the reason really bringing it up, is because it sort of wrongs in families. If women are more likely to suffer for my via. So chances are suspected you China might have ideas then you you know I the Mum or Dad may also have. IBS. But really. Many many reasons for constipation and in terms of ideas. That's more functional constipation. That's how the. is working with the GUT is working, and so these all of fear tips if you chocolate has never had a consultation with a pediatric, Don Titian and your doctor has prescribed laxatives to help your child Oakland bows and don't get me wrong they work really well so they should be quite effective in managing. But if you you know you'd thinking actually never really looked that out John's died and love to know what are some things that we need to focus on They are going to go through five things that you can try right now to help your Sean Open Their Bounds. So the first is of course fluid and this lawn tends to be overlooked often we you know we underestimate the power of good hydration and how it can affect your child's stools. If they are struggling to pass a poo and you notice that they also have very dark colored P or urine however, you want to say it or you want is imposing. There's been a reduction in the number of wet nappies. Then it may be time to think about the fluids. Especially, this week has been quite hot. Had A lovely Indian summer. Or delayed Indian weather if you like. So it may be that we just need to amp up the fluids and one thing that we found really effective so when I used to work as renal dawn Titian. And Age Ruins Hospital lovely rain on as used to give families in a four sheet of paper, and it would have say six to eight cups drawn in it, and it was actually the opposite. So often are renal kids particularly with advanced chronic kidney disease day will on fluid restriction. So the idea of having these cops. In the sheet with cops in it was that you know the kids could take than the each cops every time they had a couple fluid and a cup might be a sixty miles. Hundred and fifty miles or whatever it is that's been agreed. So they will have their own fluid allowance for the day. They were just ticket so that they could keep track of how much fluid the drinking and they don't go above their fluid announce it could be the opposite the if we we could use this nice eight four sheet with the cups. Pictures of cops in it by saying much encases China has six of three meals a day and perhaps two to three snacks. So get to make sure that they have a cup of fluid with each each meal and snack. Now, your might be completely different. So your child's Cup Maroney owed hundred mills in which case you may vary the amount of. Cups that he wanted to draw and I wouldn't get to walk down with how much fluids they need often if they're. Or urine is quite. Clear or Straw colored. Then it's a good sign that they are drinking enough and drinking more than what they need isn't necessarily going to benefit their constipation. It's more just making sure that they do get enough.

Constipation Cups Google China Bristol Burston GUT Bowel Syndrome Age Ruins Hospital Don Titian Maroney John Oakland
Mumps outbreak: Bergen County, New Jersey jail placed on lockdown

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:32 sec | 1 year ago

Mumps outbreak: Bergen County, New Jersey jail placed on lockdown

"Nineteen. There's a possible mumps outbreak in the Bergen county jail, several inmates have suspected cases leading to a lockdown facility in Hackensack, Karen willa, Jo, it's is Sistan held officer with the county department of health services. Facility that we are aware of, but the general sort of recommendation for the greater community is to know your vaccines data invites guards being allowed into the jail if they haven't received an m are shot which stands for measles, mumps, and

Bergen County Jail Mumps Karen Willa Sistan Hackensack Officer JO
"sistan" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

10:18 min | 1 year ago

"sistan" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"So we've been talking about a story out of Canada, where the entertainment industry has basically been lobbying for more. Basically, to take your rights away more of your rights away. They are proposing taxes additional taxes on goods to redirect funds from your pocket into their pockets based on the flimsiest of grounds there, there's some value gap, especially a bunch of other things. Censorship filters all sorts of stuff, which, which part, some of our ready Sistan, Canada, but they're looking to extend them too. So call the piracy websites, which we already know from based on other countries that they will also include all sorts of other stuff in there, like proxy websites, things of that nature, don't even host. I mean, even even the so-called piracy websites don't even host the piracy content like this just Just the. the absurdity of these demands. Recommendation, twenty two that the government Canada's that the content management systems be employed by online service providers subject to safe harbor. Exceptions must reflect the rights, the rights holders and users alike. So I mean it doesn't this committee report in some respects doesn't sound nearly as bad as what they're you know, industry is lobbying for, but it's still really, really terrible because they're, they don't take away all your rights and freedoms overnight gradual day, nibble at it. Little by little by little. And so this is just one more step in the wrong direction moving onto enforcement against traditional pirate sites. The committee, reviewed input from various stakeholder, she's just the introduction of site blocking regime. Yeah, I mean, this is I mean, they literally are advocating four censorship there, it is right there, the fight against piracy should focus more on large scale commercial infringers and less on digital Canadians, who may or may not understand that they are engaged in fringe enjoyment, the committee notes adding that sees value in pirates like site blocking. Yeah. I mean, that yeah, there's, there's a good point there, because they really should stop worrying about like the single people who want to watch the latest game of thrones and worry about the tens of thousands of counterfeit Blu rays coming in on the container ships. This telecommunication act could be revised streamlined. The blocking process, however, creating a separate team that would bypass the courts. Yeah, they're even looking to bypass the courts and be able to censor anything they want. Got to stop this without even do. I mean. It's funny. You're supposed to have like due process. Right. I mean, at least in the United States, but, you know, it's funny because due process is basically whatever they decided is what, what's, what's the point of having your process just that there is a process? It's, it's absurd. I think you know, from, from, I think, rational perspective process means that you have to be able to go to court and seek.

Canada Sistan Blu United States
Not good for the price. Good period.

Android Central Podcast

09:34 min | 1 year ago

Not good for the price. Good period.

"Hey, everyone. Welcome to the Android central podcast. This is episode four one T three, and we are all sitting at the end of airy long day for the Thursday of IOT twenty nineteen. I am Russell Holly. I'm joined by aurea. I've joined by Michael Fisher. And I am joined by Neurath. So gentlemen, it's been a day long attempt. Yeah. Even up some six nursing copy Bailey's. The dream. I just woke up from a safe thing. Still kind of hang overload. He's upright. Chances of this guess staying on the rails or relatively low. But we've got some new go I owed its we do have Google on and talk about so tons of stuff happened today. But as out to me by several developer, folks, that I talked to a lot of it was kind of under the covers not not exciting, you know, user facing feature so much as kind of prominent things that are going to mean a whole lot later. No, one of the big things that they started. The keynote with was was Sudar saying that that Google was trans transitioning from a company where you searched for answers to a company that helped you do stuff do things of all sorts. Yeah. Not not just on your phone. Just in the browser helped you with life. Yeah. And proactively does think so switching from the you ask for things it gives you things right to proactively in ongoing conversations offering you things which is kind of the the pinnacle of what they've talked about for last few Google. Oh, yeah. So I unfortunately was not able to watch the keynote even though sitting not far away from you guys because I was editing video the entire time. So I'm going to serve as the surrogate for the audience and this guest. Oh, that's interesting. Because all of that is so what what are they? We're gonna talk about what they rolled out that will achieve these new goals or what? Yes. I mean, the the big thing where a lot of things kind of wrapped around it. I guess started with a system tons of stuff with with a system going to Google maps being able to use it in kind of a car road, which you know, we gosh people been saying for years, why Google system better integrated in when you're driving and now it's a proper carte mode. You know, the it's got, you know, being able to access music being able to return to podcasts when you are in the middle of them and driving. You know, having a things are kind of show at the bottom of your navigate is taking up the entire screen. So that when you're driving you're still focusing on the things you're supposed to focus on that was kind of a big deal. But it was really just the start of a ton of things going around Google assistant. That is a huge update though because having spent in. Often driving with all of that really frustrating where you can do somethings and then not do them, and it's like really just effects hold experience in the ability to do everything you expect to be able to do and have it work and not go. Okay. Great. Now, it's taking ultimately taking people away from ever in directing with that phone, which is a great thing when you're driving when you drive. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Advocation at the same time. They're also bringing Google assistant to ways. Yeah. In there. Also, just generally theme was the barrier to accessing assistant is lower it. It's also just in more places in more conversational in more places. Yeah. And also this kind of been the ongoing thing in the problem with Google assistant as a brand is that Gula sisters just becoming the undercurrent of all smarts happening across Goupil properties. You're talking about being in Google maps ways. Google search Google lens is also kind of just the visual version of Google assisted and so on and so on the system itself is not. Not a one entity. It's just kind of the Smurfs behind Google overall your interactions with Google as a person. Yeah. We're starting to see the concept of assisted being the platform. Yes. And that is is kind of an important thing. But it's also important that they're not talking about it like that like they're not trying to reduce it as its own thing there. They're they're, you know, we did that with will now which never really panned out or assistant originally. Right. Where we're that was where it was its own thing. It had its own feature set and things like that. So so that did not work, and so now just being integrated into everything in kind of increasingly subtle ways. Which I think is pretty good one of these. We're gonna talk about later is is a piece of hardware that reminds me in a lot of ways of the nexus five and as a result. I was watching some old nexus five coverage yesterday in the process in reminded me just how long ago the seeds for Google system where. Oh, yeah. Google now stuff goes all the way back to I think what nexus four running and the Moto the Moto X actions before the motive oyster. I mean, this has been germinating for a very long time. So it's cool to see it finally reach a point of maturity where you've not only Google assistant sort of uniform now across devices for mobile devices home. But now you're going to be able to do more things with which I would like to talk. It's one thing. I looked up in time to see divorce Samson Bixby like local device interaction. Right. This isn't to open apps, and what you do that what it was the new thing like, you can ask assistance, it take a selfie or. So the big thing that enables all of this at the lowest level in this kind of the next iteration of Sistan has a service that it's they figured out. How to do all of this processing and handling of specific queries about things that are happening on your device fully on the device without? A network connection without any connection whatsoever. And so we've had a small portion of this with something that you would like to do Michael which is voiced attacks. Yes. Which as the exclamation point. Is continue here where? They have this weird disconnect between you could tell when you have the voice of taxed that was just happening locally, which kind of trash versus what was going up to the server in back. Just to do voice, Texas, Senator simple thing they've gone several rations past that. Now, they're doing all of these actions on the phone, and as we we'll talk about later on a home devices, even as well. Even though they do have an active internet connection to speed up dual assistant responses up to ten times. Right. Because look even when you have a good network connection. You're talking about what fifty milliseconds latency each way. Yeah. It was you know, whatever next steps that takes to get to their server and get back to the server all of that stuff is kind of imperceptible each step of the way. But when you go to make a query likes only like shook they showed a good example of show me my. Photos from Yellowstone that doesn't need to be something that goes all the way to Google servers and comes back to parse that information. And then get you to open the app. So now, they're showing demonstrations of this all happening on the device. So what they showed was very Bixby like because it was all about controlling things on your phone. So the examples were like. Notification comes in. And you say you're really that text, you know, read that to me than say reply might trip was great. And then you just seamlessly transition to show me my photos for a while. Oh, I don't know. What that is. That's how that is home if irate, and that's way off the vets in then, you know, you're talking about a trip with this person. And you say show me mining for us from Yellowstone? And then you say show me them with the show me photos with AMI. He's not even say that say the ones without show the ones with animal, right? And then you tap on one. You say send this to Michael and sends it which is exactly what was promised like keep comeback to Bixby. That's was galaxy S eight or nine speed premier was a and they said anything you do on your phone with tap right now, you're going to be able to do with your voice that was Royal. But it felt Bixby in that it felt so far short of it that I feel like I've seen demos like this at so many I os specifically now watch you can have a conversation with the machine, and like we go back and forth with this. I I'm I'm heavily mitigating my expectations for. Absolutely. And then how much do you devil's advocacy expand on this to continue? What Michael say we've

Google Michael Fisher Samson Bixby Yellowstone Russell Holly Bixby Bailey Developer Sudar Texas Gula Goupil Senator
"sistan" Discussed on Mike Drop

Mike Drop

02:49 min | 1 year ago

"sistan" Discussed on Mike Drop

"She had got everything cleared in time and fudge my paperwork in the maps for me to be able to get an time. So it was all like all worked out perfectly. Again. I like, I don't see I don't see recruiters doing that. And. The crazy thing is get hit up from kids all the time on social media. And just like how did you get into military? Like, I'm trying to get in. Like, I have made this mistake when I was sixteen or fifteen and I wanna get into the military. But no only take like what can I do? I honestly can't tell them what to do. And I was actually talking to a buddy of mine who's a recruiter in Philadelphia and a hood and Philadelphia, and he was like mammy these kids have so much potential wish I can get them in. But they, but they've done things and the government's like, no. So that was another thing. I wrote I was trying to be strategic and intentional about was, you know, some people that they they deserve it. There's a lot of people deserve a second chance. And you know, especially good people that you know, it's a win win. It gives them a second chance and the US military needs driven motivated people that have skill sets. Yeah. There's a lot of them out there that you know, that that would be well suited for that type of work. Artsy? Go you make it through bootcamp and core school, and then you go to Penton, I've found myself last laughing at kind of the rough edge Bronx mentality and you're getting down by H M three Trotter basis. Motherfucker? It's yes. That seems to be kind of a recurring recurring themes out of the book the authority piece bite you in the ass a little bit. Can you just briefly talk about the the experience getting Pap smears ready? Something I didn't know about you that. Marine base. You know regular hospital crap before you came came to buds the first time. Yeah. Yeah. It was it was it was like a surreal experience. Because he I was thinking I was going to join navy and pick up a gun to run around FARs. And here, I am checking babies it was humbling. It was humbling man checking babies giving them rectal temps, and in Sistan on Pap smears and having to clean up and going into rooms and women looking at me like what are you doing with the doctor, and I'm just like, I don't wanna be here. He got as my job. It was it was very very humbling. Did learn a lot though, I learned a lot about communication. Also, I learned a lot about being tender and respectful. You know, so you not truly believe that being the it was beginning to work out those kings that needed to be worked out in my life, especially respectful towards a well, I won't say complete I wasn't completely respectful towards one even at that..

Philadelphia US Penton navy Sistan
Houston Fire: Oil Tank Fire Sends Black Smoke Into Texas Sky

Investor's Edge

00:30 sec | 2 years ago

Houston Fire: Oil Tank Fire Sends Black Smoke Into Texas Sky

"Black smoke is pouring over parts of Sistan. Chemical plant has been on fire reasons until about claims, the air quality is not a health threat company. Spokeswoman Alice Richardson gives me. I see. Company. I've worked here for over twenty years. And I believe in it, and I can guarantee you that we would never do anything that is wrong to hurt. I am virement

Alice Richardson Sistan Twenty Years
"sistan" Discussed on Intercepted with Jeremy Scahill

Intercepted with Jeremy Scahill

05:00 min | 2 years ago

"sistan" Discussed on Intercepted with Jeremy Scahill

"Plan. Everything is ready to go Elliot Abrams says here's the Swiss Bank account number that, you should wire this money to and the number that he gave the Sultan Brunei was off by one digit. So the ten million dollars went accidentally to one random lucky recipient and the embassador cable back, and that is exhibit twenty stating that he had met with an official. Of the government of Brunei conveyed that message and had found the official visibly shaken when he was told that the money still had not been received, correct? Yes. And as you understand from subsequent events that have transpired only within the last several weeks, the money subsequently has been located having been deposited to the wrong account and Switzerland. Well, that's right. It was I couldn't figure out what had happened. Although is I looked back in past this morning. A an error in the number was obviously logical possibility. And I guess that's what in fact happened. All All right. right. Sure. Sure. Now. Elliot Abrams was deeply involved in everything involving Iran contra story, but where he got into legal trouble is that he testified in front of congress and a nice way of putting it the charge that he eventually pleaded guilty to was withholding information from congress. He pleaded guilty to two counts he got hundred hours of community service, which he saw as perhaps the greatest injustice in mankind's history. And then he was pardoned by President Bush number one as that Bush was going out the door. I think it is shameful for the United States to be going around rattling tin Cup. I think it is shameful. I did it because the contras war as far as I knew starving. At this point to everyone in Washington, he was seen as damaged goods. And there was a believe while, you know, he's never going to return any presidential administration. But this truly underestimated him William Crowe who'd been terrible joint chiefs of staff he saw how resilient Abrahams was said at the time about Abrams this snakes heart to kill. And he was right because Bill Clinton came into office for eight years. But then the Republicans were back with George W Bush and to the surprise of all naive Washingtonians Abrahams was back to. Cleared him not for Sistan secretary of state position where he would need congressional approval, but rather on the national Security Council or the president can disappoint them like this trip. John Bolton to who have trouble getting congressional approval for any position that required it again in positions where his title said that he was going to be promoting democracy and human rights. So what did Elliot Abrams do during the Bush administration? One of the things he did was getting involved with Venezuela sixteen years ago, actually seventeen years ago. This point Hugo Chavez was president of Venezuela in two thousand and two this infuriated the US right-wing. And there was a coup that was successful for only a couple of days be shove as had so much support in the Venezuelan population. And he was able to finagle his way back into power. What tout that the media had tricked people have pulled onto the streets. The Monning that president be returned. So who's behind the coup reporting at the time said that the crucial figure around the coup was Abrahams was Elliot Abrams, and that he gave a nod to the plotters to go ahead. You know, it's going to take decades until we know the full story, but it should not be a surprise to anyone if the United States was behind it and Elliot Abrams specifically. Weird is Abram show up next. He made national news because of Representative Ilhan Omar last week where he came to testify in front of the house foreign relations committee, she's on the committee. She began with an accurate and important survey shin. The kind of thing that you would hope any member of congress would say she said, I felt understand why members of this committee or the American people should find any testimony that you give today to be truthful, and the funny.

Elliot Abrams George W Bush Abrahams congress Sultan Brunei United States president President Bush Switzerland Swiss Bank Hugo Chavez official Washington Venezuela Abram national Security Council Representative Ilhan Omar Bill Clinton John Bolton
"sistan" Discussed on The Persistence Factor

The Persistence Factor

04:37 min | 2 years ago

"sistan" Discussed on The Persistence Factor

"The main things I here to a lot of guys ladies, they say, I just don't have the motivation workout will a lot of times people have demotivated because they're unsure of what they need to do. You know, once you have more clarity on exactly what to do. Then you won't drag your feet, you won't procrastinate in a lot of times. It's think about anything we procrastinate on certain things because we're unsure of what what we really need to do. But once you know, exactly what to do like deep down. You knew exactly what you need to do. Then. That's what gives you that motivation to go out and do it. Every narrates this consistency and discipline. We'll come onto consistency and discipline later on because is something that I'm extremely hugely passionate about I wanted to talk to you about confusing information people being confused, generally when I go on the internet because honestly, like there's a million ways to do it. Right. We both know that. But some many people that I find that are out there that are struggling get so confused at it puts them in that analysis paralysis, you know, what's what should I do what training program, should I do maybe to the listeners on that? Because at the end of the day, you know, let's get back to the basics. And I think maybe maybe potentially as site will losing track or losing focus from the basics that actually have been tried and true for several several years. So maybe talk about that Dr love to get your take on this. Right. So I'm a huge person of living within the basics and just doing it. Sistan Louis relentlessly does living out the basics and the fundamentals. So the first thing somebody's looking to, you know, just lose weight or just get rain or even if they want to gain some muscle mass one base that live by is making everything simplest possible, you know, minimize having a ton of variety. So one of the first things I do my coaching clients, we if they're looking to lose weight, we know they have to reduce the amount of food that they eat festive first thing they're gonna have to do. You're gonna have been glory deficit. You know? But when the main things we do is they allowed to know that they know they have to eat less. But the other thing that we do is we focus on two to three different types of foods that they're gonna eat on a weekly basis, you know, far as proteins you hit. Let's say you're gonna eat chicken, you're gonna eat salmon. And you're gonna have a shrimp. You know, those are two to three proteins that you're gonna eat on a weekly basis than the same. Same thing with vegetables, you know, asparagus Brown asparagus. Kale and spinach. And then you have your carbs, like a sweet potatoes Brown rice. And then with your fast is so once you understand these two to three things to eat in proteins carbs fats. You wanna stay in very close to those foods on a weekly basis. You can make some up, but you wanna stay really close to him. Because if there's too much variety, you know, was working was not working, you know in. So that's how coach my clients. And so they can not just accomplish their goals. But also they can sustain them in. So they can eat, you know, the the pizza or the burger, but you wanna stay really close to your go-to. You wanna have a foundation in when you had found nation. You can always go back to your foundation. If you ever, you know, veer far, all you know, if you go on vacation, you you may not have those. Foods to eat. You can eat the things that vacation hotel have for you. But once you get back home you get right back into routine. You know, the that laid out Dacian for you to get the results that you already have, you know, in that way, you know, what's working was not in. That's how I keep it super simple in allows people to get great results. So they full of track get back contract by doing the basics. Get back to the fundamentals you back to the fundamentals. It's it's so simple. It's easy to do is. Also lot of people say also easy. Not to do that. Is it makes complete complete sense to add to that. Jay. Would you say? Do you believe in as a coach the eighty twenty rule? So percent of the time you're eating whole foods. You know, you're living that healthy lifestyle managing stress etcetera. And twenty percent you.

Sistan Louis Jay twenty percent
"sistan" Discussed on Hollywood Babble-On

Hollywood Babble-On

02:38 min | 2 years ago

"sistan" Discussed on Hollywood Babble-On

"No. No. No, No. no, No. no. No, No. no. No, no. Was that all about? And he goes I finally figured out. Why you're such a nice guy? One nothing ever bothers you. He's gone everywhere in life. You're always just like good to people and friendly. You're like Santa Claus or something like that? That's because you're an asshole on the road. He's like you get an advance on the road is gone home. My God, you're doing a fucking one hundred thirty down the fucking road. And I'm like, it's only it's like, you're doing miles. So I I like to I'm I don't I'm not a car person by stretch of the imagination on fetish is cars. Don't collect cars. I don't know how they fucking work if my car breaks, I'm just as useless as anybody else, but I love driving. Yes. Like like, it's so much you attack it with a passion. That's for sure. It's one of my favorite thing. You know, you've got to imagine I've been doing this shit thirty years I've been driving. So I love getting behind the wheel car. But Emily, my Sistan. She calls me Mr. toad because and not because like I looked like, but because like I've fucking wild ride motor. This is like it'd be on a wheel. So the kid that's passed on to the kid. Drives like an asshole too. So I've been in the car with her and she fucking like, she's it's so crazy. She's just like must be on. I don't think it's nurtured. It's gotta be nature. Whatever the fuck just come from my genetics. She's a condom Fugger where if somebody like does something she gets irritated. She just as a catch up pull up next to him. And see what the fuck they look like. Give them the stair, which is like, but you know, that's how you get killed in a road rage incident. It is indeed. Yes. So I would do that all the time. She just she sat me I'm me for years, and she just picked up where I was like I got to see this asshole. And so I was in her in the car with her a few times when she did it, and I'm like, kiddo. You gotta ease up and should. From you. So we drive every once in a while, you know, if we're going somewhere together, she's like oh drive. Like, you know, it's very competitive. I was driving home to veggie grill. I was driving home, and I looked in my rear view, and I saw the kids car, and it's bearing down I'm in shit. And I was like oh shit and one of my remember, remember heart to heart. Openings the credit sequence of heart Dr day met it was mode. They were racing through like the hills and shit flirting together beside by side. They don't make it weird. Always doing is just yes. But what I saw Oz like following a heart to heart this shit, man. So you know, I've had peel off into the hills..

Emily Sistan thirty years
A new tool is helping the Twin Cities metro area brace for climate change impacts

Climate Cast

06:45 min | 2 years ago

A new tool is helping the Twin Cities metro area brace for climate change impacts

"Support for climate cast comes from Bank of America, financing, clean energy initiatives, and advancements in renewable energy and spurring innovation in and the growth of environmentally focused companies, markets and jobs, Bank of America NA member FDIC Eric. When we talk about climate vulnerability, what does that mean for our cities? Climate vulnerability is, is dollars and sense issue. It's something that cities are looking at. We're finding that across our metro. It's not just Minneapolis and Saint Paul. It's small cities. Townships are developing communities that are really looking at this issue and they might be looking at it through different ones, but they are seeing impacts on their assets impacts on their infrastructure. So it is becoming more and more of an issue as cities plan for their future. We know that the two strongest climate impacts in Minnesota are warmer winters and more extreme rainfall events that can lead to more flooding how considers us the frequency data to mitigate future flood events. We've produced data that. That really functions as a screening tool for local communities to look at potential impacts from localized flooding. And we also have produced data that considers extreme heat events. We haven't actually look that warming winters because that's that a little bit challenging to look at in terms of how that might affect hazards climate hazards. Sure. Some might wonder, Eric, y, prepare at the city level for climate changes it save money. Yes. I mean, it's it's really all happening at the city level. Climate change is an economic issue both for organizations and communities. It's a dollars and sense issue and communities really need. They need to Sistan in and looking at how to plan for the future. You know, how do you build in considering climate change when you're looking at your expenditure is in your capital improvement plan? It can be very challenging for communities to look at that. And if we're talking about infrastructure, for example, stormwater drainage, that's some pretty significant investment. Right for cities? Yes. So you know, one thing that we're really looking at our strategies to, you know, mitigate and reduce this localized flooding impact through low cost or no cost strategy. So rather than having to tear up the street every time you know, engaging the community to put in rain gardens or create a drain army of sorts to make sure that storm drains are clear, but our data can help cities and prioritizing where these potential risky locations might be so that this tool could look at neighborhood and what might find out what it really is looking at is the low spots. So you think of it as a sort of terrain analysis, we had to produce this data at the regional scale. So it's not as good as what some cities might have in terms of how they do their own planning, but for those cities that don't have resources, this can really help in terms of prioritizing areas that could be potentially at risk, Eric, with the extreme rainfall. Events we've seen in Minnesota in the last ten or twenty years. We've seen many homes and places in Minnesota flood that have never flooded before. Why do people need to prepare even if they've never had a flood before? Well, because these precipitation amounts and the frequency of precipitation is increasing, and you know, it's sort of like having a map for where we've been, but not exactly knowing where we're going. So the best thing you can do is really provide some measure to try to figure out how to get to our future. So plan for these larger rain events, but we don't exactly know what they're going to look like. But we should be looking at things like larger infrastructure, but also how can we reduce the impacts when they're occurring, you know, emergency management and preparedness. I like to say that many of our communities are built with the nineteenth or twentieth century infrastructure. And now we live in a twenty first century climate is in fact a lot of our infrastructure built under a different set of climate assumptions, correct? We've actually built our infrastructure for historic climate that doesn't exist anymore. Most of our infrastructure was designed and built based off really precipitation measures from the nineteen seventies. And that was done up until recently in two thousand thirteen. We, you know, we have these new precipitation amounts that are current now, but again, we're not. We don't exactly know what those are going to look like in the future. So a lot of our infrastructure is undersized. It's not exactly fit for purpose anymore. So this becomes an asset management issue for communities. The met council is a planning organization. Many states have governors who reject climate science. Why is it important for Minnesota and for organizations like yourself to have leaders that except in plan for climate change? Well, the met council was created to look at some of these multi jurisdictional or cross community issues. And climate change is certainly initially that does not stay within your city boundary. So you know, we help one hundred eighty one communities. He's and seven counties really look at how do we plan across our across our boundaries and how do we make sure our neighbors are okay and in our own cities. Okay. We really heard from a lot of communities that they want these tools and they want resources to help them plan because they're hearing from their public engineer. You know that this is an issue. How can we help in that lift at the council? How can we help provide resources that communities might not have the capacity to develop themselves, Eric, in terms of the data you're collecting? Do you see other applications for this project going forward? Yeah. The exciting thing about the data really is at this really provides us a jumping off point. It's the phone Dacian of sorts that we can take forward. We've never had a regional extreme heat data set this czar I fully covered, you know, has full coverage looking at land surface temperature that can help communities plan. But you know, we can see you till ladies of this going far beyond what we've done and we'd like to see, you know. You know really where it can go and it's the same thing holds true with our localized flooding data. You know, a community could take that they could change it, refine it and make sure it works for them. We've interviewed a number of mayors on climate, Cass from different cities are cities really on the frontlines of climate change of facts. I think cities are certainly on the front line. I think we've found that in two thousand fourteen in Paris when essentially it was cities that stood up and actually said, we're gonna do this cities, have they have limited capacity to do a lot of things, but they also have the control, you know, they can pass ordinances. They can create requirements even something as knock you as a road salt ordinance can have an impact or making sure that an ordinance requires a certain amount of vegetation planting that can help mitigate urban heat cities really have the control. And I think that our leadership in future's really going to be coming at the community level, Eric white check senior planner with the metropolitan council. Thanks so much for your perspective today. Thank you. Paul.

Eric White Minnesota Saint Paul Bank Of America Minneapolis Fdic Paris Sistan Engineer Metropolitan Council Twenty Years
"sistan" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

02:23 min | 2 years ago

"sistan" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

"Assets in Sistan services that are important within the within sky Panetta and environmental management that dies three perspectives. Trae voices role respected battles. I contributing to the baseball cups. What if you could give me example that so the state of Queensland has their own expectations that they hope the interim bodies are reaching with adaptation plans. But are there some image? Just maybe just one example of just on the ground example of adaptation planning, I don't know if it's an indigenous population, or maybe tourism example, but here is some adaptation happening on the coast or something like that. Do you do have something that you could kind of explain probably the the clearest example is in tar strike way. The wep there has been. Really, very impressive. And we're seeing adaptation Iran this in in that particular plan, there are three outcomes which are clearly climate and at comes around increased of arise and extreme weather events. They're all size six resilience building. Abc comes CHAI, Iran, stronger communities around resources, helping actual systems around enterprise. Him in Wilbanks half. And so what you say they is at a Tyson around building conversation, but also addressing program with building some sales in some low-lying orlands because the tar stride ones, there's some sand cays and hall, but they're all sides cycled model, which are all in the math of of the river just in era between your Guinean in strata. So you start to say some unequivocal hide infrastructure to deal with state of arise in that particular case, it's primarily stone cycle Fairweather flooding. So it's flooding during that they are time periods of the year. So there's that so, but what you also say in stri is that we have really variable climate. So when you got the western areas that climate variability covers up the long the slow China Jing plummet reiging towards a warmer pundits. I've appear to decades. So what? Dealing with their passion processes, which provide greater resilience. But also the benefits of it on the really north winds in south west is plus defensing. So it's driven by ad.

Iran Sistan Panetta Wilbanks Queensland stri Abc
"sistan" Discussed on Business & Biceps

Business & Biceps

04:02 min | 2 years ago

"sistan" Discussed on Business & Biceps

"Not everyone is a fishing that everything. So once you're honest with yourself, you could spend time really thinking about your weaknesses, and if you can spend time and be humble, thinking about your weaknesses, then you can chip away at them day after day after day, the r y thing, men, I don't think you're going to be able to measure it. But I think like for example, if I take myself, I need to be. All this is something I always need to work on. I have a extremely quick trigger finger Jeremy about life saw that yesterday, and I was probably a little bit out of line with the gentleman on the phone who just fucking pissed me off. But at the end of the day I was doing business and and I shouldn't. I shouldn't one atom the way I went at him and I went quick and hard, but he just kinda anyways. But at the end of the day, these are things that you have to just work on your weaknesses. And I don't think you're gonna be able to measure the ROI, but if patterns in your life that were problematic previously start just getting a little bit easier. I think that's maybe how you can measure it. I try to like, look at what my my desired results are currently what, what I'm trying to get better at what I'm trying to even maybe something I'm already okay at even excel more. Like I try to make whatever I'm doing development wise matchup with my pattern of just business and things. Got going on. So it's like, so I can step on the gas a little bit more in the areas that I'm already kind of rolling in a try. Not to basically like this morning when I was lunging. I started listening to one thing and it just wouldn't jiving with me today. And I was like, you know what very brains more over here on need to go over there and then that was where the topics came from. So like if it does feel smooth to me and I don't get a lot because I do all my personal development mostly while lunging, which is about twenty to thirty minutes or in the car. So if it doesn't take my brain essentially a way from what I'm doing, probably need to shift at something else also, same way I was listening to somehow Wayne Dyer today, and I just it all comes out to my spirit or spirit is that you know, when I feel like I'm doing of, and I don't even think about return on investment or if it works. I like to listen to stuff that is constructive in one of the things I share. Like, you know, when you when you listen to books or even books are audio books, whatever. Or it is, you know, please, please be aware that you know somebody set down and organize information as giving you a whole experience. You know, for fifteen twenty bucks are on blankets for like eight bucks, nine bucks a month and and to be able to capture that and get that and putting your brain and and feel like doing something for you so value. So I don't know. I just gotta kiss Sistan routine that I, I listened to what I feel kind of like you and music and everything else, and. Now I don't. There's not that serious, but what I do know that if you can Sicily consume organizing for mation and thoughtful information that you'll be a better mother fucker at the end of the year in what you it, it just like you sitting down listening to fucking conversations are talking to people time, and if you talked to a stupid motherfucker, we don't know shit. You know what I'm saying? Like your homeboy. You may not know shit. If I. True. Got friends of school in college are Gaza who are learning in educating themselves are doing business and coming through new transactions, doomed news school, you, but Mafa plan fortnight all today, you know, saying aids going on. They really ain't. Gonna do nothing. And sometimes we take advice from other folks who are not, you know, developing themselves are engaging a things that challenged him to think different are change of perspective. And I think that's a lot of people. Yeah. Why think we're about to make you smarter motherfuckers in this next segment? It's time for the main event. Jamie, maybe. So made event. Everybody's been waiting for this John. Lead it off. What what comes to mind?.

Jeremy Sicily Wayne Dyer Sistan Gaza Jamie thirty minutes
"sistan" Discussed on Girlboss Radio with Sophia Amoruso

Girlboss Radio with Sophia Amoruso

02:16 min | 2 years ago

"sistan" Discussed on Girlboss Radio with Sophia Amoruso

"I just walked on my uniform and nobody stopped me. So I kind of knew that it was a thing to sneak into a. A writer's room, no, no onset. And I saw the scripts and I and of course I'd done play. So I knew that it was a job. It just seemed kind of impossibly, you know, romantic to think that I could actually get that job. But when I got out of school, you know, it's didn't really have any alumni there really wasn't anything to do except pursue becoming an assistant. I read scripts in did coverage, and I did everything I could to kind of get close to the industry. And then my big break was I was waitressing again and a regular customer nicer chatting. And I said, well, how is it? And he was like, oh, the burgers really good. And I'm like, how the scripture reading and we started having this conversation and he said, you know, you're not just a waitress, and I was like, now I'm trying to writer. And you know night been writing scripts on my own with no real success. And he said, why you know the show I'm working on is set an restaurant. Why don't you come in pitch me ideas? And I didn't sell any of his. Ideas, but he also is looking for an assistant and I went from, you know, do you want fries with that to having my, I like drive on to studio, which is, you know it was amazing, but it was also like that thing everybody talks about. I had been writing and steadying taking classes and you know, in reading lots of scripts, educating yourself. Yeah. So that that when that moment happened, you know, there was a lot of serendipity in it, but it was also like I was ready. Mardi was an assistant before she was a fulltime writer for seven years being an assistant is a great way into writing, but it's not always clear short path through vieled her trajectory from Sistan to writer and what that really looks like. I worked for that director for a long time, and I did sell a script to the show. It was called life goes on and it was a family show. And I did sell one script and kinda thought that that would also be it like wrote a script, got my first credit, but my agents sent me on tons of meetings and how to got an agent off that and nothing happened..

writer Sistan director seven years
Samsung's Galaxy Watch with LTE can now be pre-ordered

All About Android

00:29 sec | 2 years ago

Samsung's Galaxy Watch with LTE can now be pre-ordered

"This phone. Don't be afraid to use the tools. Like I, I said that I use a clip on wide England's for the front facing camera, but you can always pick up a moment lands for the rear if you wanna more wide England's don't be afraid to use whatever is in the repertoire because Samsung is probably the best company in Android that get supported by third party companies shore accessories and one out. So don't be afraid to use that kind of stuff if Chievo look that you want. So that's top tip from the the smartphone vlogger over here.

Google Samsung Lenovo Michael Qualcomm England Samson Legalzoom FCC JBL Chievo Regar Remond Garing Newt Sistan Bilton JAY Tanna
"sistan" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

04:27 min | 2 years ago

"sistan" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

"Being on the podcast. Thank you for having me. So as I said, my introduction, you the president of John Jay college of criminal Justice before that you are at the department of Justice, talk about what you did there. Well, my prior job was I was Sistan attorney general of the office of Justice programs, which is the part of the department that deals with state and local criminal Justice in victims issues and all of the statistical work in the research work for the department of Justice. What is to say is I had a at that point, four billion dollar purse to work with state and local governments in helping create safer communities and deal with their criminal Justice in victims issues. So you, you mentioned stat, so for for the listener who knows the term criminal Justice reform, let's put the twit, some numbers behind that term. So how many people are incarcerated in the United States when you talk about people that are in our prisons and jails, it's about two point, two million people and of. That ninety percent are in our state and local prisons and jails. And then how about the number of people who are on probation or on parole? How much to five million. So so when you add the two numbers together, you have about seven million people in our country who are caught up in our criminal Justice system. And then I noticed you people use the turbine. I'm guilty of that prison and jail interchangeably, but they made different things so prison. So prison is typically when you've been convicted of a crime and you're, you're sentenced to a term of incarceration. Those are prisons jails tend to be the places where people you can have a sentence and be in jail as well. But people generally are in jail pre-conviction. That's when you're arrested for something you're taking to jails, they, they're in local communities in their typically run by your sheriffs and jail is where you where you spend your time until you able to make bail. Correct? Right, correct. Generally Jenner, generally, the reason the complications because the the state and local criminal Justice system is so dispersed because every state and local community has their own criminal Justice system. So I'm glad you said that because again, when you think criminal Justice, you think that there is a uniform standard from the federal government on down that they're all playing by the same rule book. They're all playing by using the same standards, and that's not the case. Definitely not the case which makes it so complicated. When we talk about this issue of reform because there there are no systems, but it's also an opportunity because there's some places that are doing some wonderful things, and we take those best practices in try to share them with other communities so that we all know what are the based on research? What are the things that are positive that are impacting our communities in positive way. Okay. So that's on the state and local level. Let's start at. Let's start at the at the federal level. Criminal Justice reform is talked about reducing minimum sentencing and things like that. Can you just give a bra as brief abroad overview s? You could so there about two hundred thousand people in our bureau prison system. And most of those convicted of all of them are convicted of federal crimes. And the the way that system works is, is our US attorneys in each state, bring charges. Federal charges could be drug charges that could be white collar, crime, charters, and people. If they're convicted by a federal judge, then they go to federal prison. So it's, that's, that's the difference. And so when folks speak about criminal Justice Justice reform at the federal level, aren't they talking about reducing the what? Is it reducing the minimum minimum sentencing and what are some of the other things that they're going? So so the challenge with the federal system is the judges. Don't have a lot of discretion. And if you're convicted of a particular crime, they've got guidelines that they've got a follow about what your sentences and what many of us have been trying to do is is lower lower those sentences and really think about what does public safety look like in do? Should we be jailing people for long term sentences for drug crimes? For example, back because of the crime act in in the nineteen ninety s we got these really harsh penalties, and we've got people sitting in jail for coup or really drug addicts, and I know this digressing a little bit from what you're talking about..

department of Justice John Jay college of criminal J office of Justice United States president attorney Jenner four billion dollar ninety percent
"sistan" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

.NET Rocks!

03:38 min | 2 years ago

"sistan" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

"Exactly. And I think if you if you have that mindset that everything should be easy, you should actually think about what is the most important thing on your webpage. Are you trying to sell something or are you trying to get them to listen to a podcast? What is most important and make sure that is visible Fronton centers? Yes, exactly. So people know that this is the most important thing on this page and use as many standards and components and things like that as possible because people already know those, you can. You can modify them and to make them look good for your page, of course. But if you start to do some three finger, scrolling on your page, people will feel it's it's slower and also difficult. To to browse your webpage? Yeah, especially those kinds of gestures that are kind of secret and specific. The three fingered scroll. Yeah, I happened every so often on some device using that I do unintentionally and it's like there's some move. Some move on my phone that causes my camera, come up. I just don't know what it is off my camera. You know how many screen shots I have on my phone from the accent fingers. Yeah, accident movements. That's a lot of secret sauce kind of tricks that are stashed away in there. I think that is is why some operative system are more difficult to learn than others, because if you have clear standards, standard way of doing things, it's more easy to actually do it. It will become habituating. Right? Which is also one of the tenets. Yeah. Read habits. Yeah, Sistan and we'll make it easier to get better over time and I have run into software where no matter how much practice you get with never gets easier. No, there's so many things about it. What do you fall on things like form validation? Is it better to valley on the fly? Show them the current mistake. Like I get very frustrated where I correct one thing that I have to post again, they tell me the next thing that's don't do that because if you have ten issues, it will take forever. And I just raised quite quitter. I I am am a rate a. quitter. I think there's a, there's a limit the, it's in your best interest to not be too patient with software. Yeah, at times it needs to be better than this for me to continue. Yeah, I think so because we have so much competition today. So if you are doing something like validating one time when our at a time, I will go to your competitor because they are validated everything at run time, but whether or not you're doing it. In real time or not. I don't think that's an issue as long as you're clear and you don't have to do it ten times over, right? So if you want to do it in real time, good, then we know that could also be in retain moment though. Because if you are putting in your Email address, the first letter you put in, it says, this is not a legit. Email. Yeah, people are laughing people when I'm talking about and that means the the red texts coming up, which means I will no longer be typing will be reading, right? Because red and motion will draw my attention. So want to start the validation to you, give sense. The user has finished with that field. Yeah, but you have to. It's a perfect, personal preference. I think I'm one of those impatient person, the the, the hunting down of a valid user. You know where it's like, what? How many versions of your name can you come up with one that hasn't actually been used?.

Sistan
"sistan" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

.NET Rocks!

03:38 min | 2 years ago

"sistan" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

"Exactly. And I think if you if you have that mindset that everything should be easy, you should actually think about what is the most important thing on your webpage. Are you trying to sell something or are you trying to get them to listen to a podcast? What is most important and make sure that is visible Fronton centers? Yes, exactly. So people know that this is the most important thing on this page and use as many standards and components and things like that as possible because people already know those, you can. You can modify them and to make them look good for your page, of course. But if you start to do some three finger, scrolling on your page, people will feel it's it's slower and also difficult. To to browse your webpage? Yeah, especially those kinds of gestures that are kind of secret and specific. The three fingered scroll. Yeah, I happened every so often on some device using that I do unintentionally and it's like there's some move. Some move on my phone that causes my camera, come up. I just don't know what it is off my camera. You know how many screen shots I have on my phone from the accent fingers. Yeah, accident movements. That's a lot of secret sauce kind of tricks that are stashed away in there. I think that is is why some operative system are more difficult to learn than others, because if you have clear standards, standard way of doing things, it's more easy to actually do it. It will become habituating. Right? Which is also one of the tenets. Yeah. Read habits. Yeah, Sistan and we'll make it easier to get better over time and I have run into software where no matter how much practice you get with never gets easier. No, there's so many things about it. What do you fall on things like form validation? Is it better to valley on the fly? Show them the current mistake. Like I get very frustrated where I correct one thing that I have to post again, they tell me the next thing that's don't do that because if you have ten issues, it will take forever. And I just raised quite quitter. I I am am a rate a. quitter. I think there's a, there's a limit the, it's in your best interest to not be too patient with software. Yeah, at times it needs to be better than this for me to continue. Yeah, I think so because we have so much competition today. So if you are doing something like validating one time when our at a time, I will go to your competitor because they are validated everything at run time, but whether or not you're doing it. In real time or not. I don't think that's an issue as long as you're clear and you don't have to do it ten times over, right? So if you want to do it in real time, good, then we know that could also be in retain moment though. Because if you are putting in your Email address, the first letter you put in, it says, this is not a legit. Email. Yeah, people are laughing people when I'm talking about and that means the the red texts coming up, which means I will no longer be typing will be reading, right? Because red and motion will draw my attention. So want to start the validation to you, give sense. The user has finished with that field. Yeah, but you have to. It's a perfect, personal preference. I think I'm one of those impatient person, the the, the hunting down of a valid user. You know where it's like, what? How many versions of your name can you come up with one that hasn't actually been used?.

Sistan
"sistan" Discussed on KSRO

KSRO

02:31 min | 2 years ago

"sistan" Discussed on KSRO

"You bet you all right david jones sistan city manager for santa rosa great to see you man thanks for coming in hanging in the green room and you bet thanks rach you'd have a great fourth may the fourth be with you you to enjoy your time off tonight thanks bye all right earlier lanny davis who's with us every monday or tuesday big time dc attorney worked in the clinton white house if you're a regular listener to the show you know all about lanny davis and you hear him well he left me speechless earlier today and we're going to rerun that for those of you who missed it early on on this monday dr it's pretty interesting stuff and i sound like an idiot for the most part but it's worth rerunning because it's a trip oh it's pretty amazing we were shocked it's going to make our lunch with lanny in dc in october even more fascinating so have a great night we're going to rerun the lanny davis interview and we'll be back on the drive tomorrow we're off on wednesday as hopefully all of you are on the fourth of july may the fourth be with you and we're ready to go all right so we'll talk to you tomorrow michael green scott traffic and then lanny davis shocks the crap outta me indeed let's see here south one zero one that is slow to recover it's been very gradual there is a big crash just near corby or just south of had a couple of lanes blocked so southbound was getting the squeeze there was a wreck in the backup at college and everybody northbound had to look and see what was happening southbound so it really fouled up both directions and south one zero one is actually better now but still river and really heavy down to corby and northbound slow at golf course wilfred up to baker just about a jason to where that southbound crash had been some of the narrows turning sluggish but still atherton to washington and thirty seven is slightly better but still east of the bridge and jammed out through the stop lights that is what she would have ahead of you eastbound and right now they're young people across the world facing a tough choice continue their dream of education or drop out and help their family put food on the table you.

santa rosa lanny davis attorney dc corby david jones clinton michael green golf wilfred baker washington
"sistan" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"sistan" Discussed on KCBS All News

"Kcbs news time one eleven closing bell deport now with jason brooks rebecca an early rally for the stock market fizzled out today tech sector in particular weighed on the market the dow lost one hundred sixty five points to twenty four thousand one hundred seventeen the nasdaq down one hundred sixteen points a one and a half percent decline to seventy four forty five the sp lost twenty three points to twenty six thousand nine i'll take a closer look at the action at one twenty five thanks a lot jason when the marin county fair opens this saturday in san rafael fair goers may encounter picket line staged by hundreds of striking government workers kcbs is jeffrey schaub reports mediated talks between the marine association of public employees and county representatives have been underway with both sides say they hope to avoid a work stoppage beginning july first the county is offering the thirteen hundred members of the marine association of public employees staged salary increases totaling nine percent over three years the union's chief negotiator rally can't says that's not enough two and a half three and two which in the bay area this high cost living areas are folks this is miranda sistan county administrator angela nicholson we think we have a very fair package on the table working on some healthcare pieces around contributions to healthcare on an ongoing basis both sides have been meeting with an independent mediator nicholson says if the union strikes beginning sunday through tuesday several county services will be detailed including parks and libraries meanwhile cat says the union is planning to set a picket lines at the marin county fair saturday and sunday gets a county facility it's a place where we will certainly be able to convey our message provides the board supervisors some more incentive to get done this week at the marin county civic center jeffrey xiao becase cbs cbs news time one thirty well international soccer tournaments might try nothing rallies to world together like chicken wits so we're doing our part to bring nations together with five traditional wings for just five dollars.

jason brooks san rafael marine association angela nicholson marin county jeffrey schaub marine association of public miranda sistan county administrator marin county civic center jeffrey xiao soccer five dollars nine percent three years
Google Assistant showcases human-like capabilities

Techmeme Ride Home

02:14 min | 2 years ago

Google Assistant showcases human-like capabilities

"Vice predicts you don't need the brightness google says that by anticipating user usage this new feature will result in thirty percent fewer cpu wakeup steps google assistant has gotten a slew of new abilities including the ability to order food for pickup and delivery and features more streamlined integration with select partners like starbucks and pinera google also adds six new voices two google assistant that it says are closer to how humans actually speak one of those more human voices will be musician john legend so john canal tell you it's time to leave for your next appointment but what was the thing that has really really gotten people jazzed that would be google's experimental duplex technology which as demo straight up allows you to have what really feels like a two way conversation with google assistant so if you wanna have a whole conversation with john legend and have virtual john book reservation on open table and then have him offer you a range of options and then have him make the call for you that seems to be what duplex promises i have that last bit underlined in my script here make the call for you here's how christmas sina describes watching the demo quote google play six is the most incredible terrifying thing out of so far example use case google assistant calls a hair salon to book an appointment the human booking the appointment has no idea she was talking to an ai humans are quickly becoming expensive api end points and quote seriously seek out and watch the video of this duplex demo it even ads the un's and is so that it sounds more human i have a quick sort of clergy video of this part of the demo linked in the show notes google sistan lives on your phone of course but it also lives on that ecosystem google home devices google home now has a continued conversation feature that will keep the google homes speakers microphone enabled for up to eight seconds after you ask it a qu.

Google Starbucks John Legend John Canal UN John Sina Thirty Percent Eight Seconds
"sistan" Discussed on RobinLynne

RobinLynne

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"sistan" Discussed on RobinLynne

"Sistan resistance saying chasse lasted a week but all i eat is fast food back stop at the store six with that back to get some more started i want to stop why catch down i just a cup i gotta give it up one cruising down a one way street that's what i try to be responsible but i look nobody that i had graded superstate to stagnated i procrastinated i can't say without being changed a blow with jacket any day what makes and fix the way they were supposed to got up found scub scurry.

chasse
"sistan" Discussed on The Dan Patrick Show

The Dan Patrick Show

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"sistan" Discussed on The Dan Patrick Show

"Sistan coach just to get you to go to my college for one yet another red flags here you have a problem with them all right they always try to bury their heads in the sand and the no this is going on and then when the fbi comes out and says they have wiretaps they have a money trail didn't they get all wideeyed and be like oh my goodness what is going on here stop it stop it in its here's the problem if you start pain young men and young women how far back you go because these kids are starting to get recruited at thirteen fourteen and fifteen so how much is enough and bigger schools ohio state ucla the michigan north carolina do they've got deeper pockets thing famous alumni i mean it it when does it ever stop that's why they're really i mean what is this there is no solution i mean i i understand what jesus saying it up free enterprise but what is enough when you're top recruit at ohio state is driving around in a bmw i i i don't know how you stop it these are reggie miller the hall of famer he's in portland this thursday night i love portland 1030 resolve or learn job it timber wolves in the trail blazers with kevin harlin in an alley laforce i do seat would you play the lebron james comments after the loss yesterday san antonio spurs i may i think we're at a former we protect the suit or board driver.

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"sistan" Discussed on Six Pixels of Separation - Marketing and Communications Insights - By Mitch Joel at Mirum

Six Pixels of Separation - Marketing and Communications Insights - By Mitch Joel at Mirum

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"sistan" Discussed on Six Pixels of Separation - Marketing and Communications Insights - By Mitch Joel at Mirum

"Work better together the come up with better ideas as more collaboration you hear things even if it's just the sort of and cillari stuff you're able to pick up and and really build the culture in a more powerful way both both a right i don't think ones wrong and ones right i'm just wondering how you see it in terms of entrepreneurs who use that a court to it or is it just happened to be a potential lifestyle aspect that you can bring onto it i don't i don't think that it's mandatory by by any stretch of the imagination i mean some of the case studies that i profile like pat flynn for instance he's somebody who also has young kids and he you know he has the kind of business the dick could theoretically be portable blogs he podcasts you can you can do that pretty much from anywhere but he is very rooted and in fact the race on d'etre for his business is that he says look you know i wanna optimize my time to spend more time with the kids and so every day he he makes a big deal out of this he walks his kids to school and from school so this is not a guy that is spending a lot of time on the road similarly e i mean i think it's really about optionality it's really about just being able to make whatever choice is right for you there's a woman that i profile and entrepreneurial you name natalie sistan and she wrapped her whole brand around being location independent she wrote a book and has a blog called the suitcase entrepreneur and so for six years she she was just you know living wherever living from airbnb ceo dozens of different cities and countries and anyway a couple of years ago she got word that her father back home in new zealand was ill and so she came home to care for him.

pat flynn natalie sistan ceo new zealand airbnb six years
"sistan" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

WBAP 820AM

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"sistan" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

"Our family is safe for the richest grateful to be here truckloads of donations are being dispersed groups like the red cross and nor texas food bank and they are taking them to the evacuees authorities say the two women who were killed when a gunman opened fire inside a public library in eastern new mexico they said they worked there clovis police chief douglas ford identify them during an during a news conference and one was sixty one year old wanda walter's the other 48yearold christina carter walters was a circulation of sistan at the clovis carver public library and carter was a youth services liberian again overnight we do expect partly cloudy skies lows should be 71 writedowns eighty two degrees in irving tomorrow partly cloudy and a high in the upper 80s the chris grant program continues next from the wbap newsroom i'm mickey briggs is the news all talk leslie twenty am nine five at them a seat i have to tell you as i sit here sounds even more and more stupid just post of log on this on my website chris product com dealers stenhouse stupid it sounds that the parole museum as them view now the dal offered free tickets to refugees evacuees hey coming your soaking wet closer to close that don't fit you that you chains jintu because they're the only free clothes.

food bank mexico police chief wanda walter christina carter walters mickey briggs texas clovis douglas ford clovis carver public library irving leslie log on eighty two degrees sixty one year