27 Burst results for "Sir Paul"

Let It Roll: The Subversive Side of Classical Music

Rock N Roll Archaeology

08:40 min | 6 months ago

Let It Roll: The Subversive Side of Classical Music

"Some. Let it roll. Let me host Nate Wilcox. They will have the pleasure of welcoming back Ted Gioia to discuss again his book a subversive history of music. Today we're going to talk about a section of the book focusing on what we probably call classical music European concert tradition and starting off with chapters like musicians behaving badly so it's kind of a different take on classical music ted. Welcome back to the show right. Thanks for having me back. It's a pleasure and I wanted to do this because you know we talked about the book before and and it's it's a paradigm shifting book for me. It's one that really expanded my mind and and clarify things that have been wrestling with and you put it into words brilliantly and it it helped me focus on the whole scope of the show but the section in particular was one. I skipped over last time because I considered outside the breadth of the show which has covered things like the history of rock and roll music and Pop Music in the twentieth century. And I realized reading this book and do more research that the history of popular music as a business really goes back to the renaissance while absolutely on a lot of the behavior patterns of the musicians as well date back to that people often ask me what I learned researching this book and it was many years of research. But one of the quickest summaries. I have is. I found out that the music of might time and the music I grew up with which was jazz. Blues and rock and roll really the musicians back in the glory. Years of classical music weren't all that different and we have a tendency to sanitized that whole record to treat these people with great esteem. But they were just disruptive in many ways more disruptive than later rock musicians so. There's a lot of things that we take for granted in the current day that in fact for justice vibrate noticeable two hundred years ago. Yeah and you talk about this phenomenon that repeats throughout the history of music in the book which is a transition from disruption to respectability from outsiders to insiders and so often musical. Innovations are driven by people on the outside of the system but then there as they succeed as they impact the popular consciousness. They're pulled in to the inside. Sometimes they themselves become insiders other times. They're co opted. You know postmortem talk about that phenomenon. Logan that's right and we're very familiar with this in our own lifetime. We've all seen it when I was growing up The the Beatles and the Rolling Stones Bob Dylan. These dangerous. Figures feared by the establishment. But nowadays Bob Dylan is Nobel. Laureate Mick Jagger Sir Mick Jagger Paul McCartney Sir Paul McCartney and even the most extreme examples I mean take hip hop. Nwea the FBI tried to shut down the record label when they came on board nowadays. That same record has been enshrined in the National Archive of historic recordings of Congress. You have the Smithsonian out there putting together an official Smithsonian Guide to hip hop with fifty hip hop professors. Very idea about professor would have seen the contradiction in terms but they got fifty of them putting together this Canon of hip hop song. So we know about this from our own life and we've seen how these styles has been a good sized what we don't realize the same thing happened hundreds of years ago. The classic example is Bach. You Know Balk is considered now the poster child for respectability classical music is great composer. Who composed for God and country devout booth and run it Cetera et CETERA. You go back and do his own times and you find. That balk grew up with juvenile delinquents. Went to a school famous for gang. Culture was mentored by one of the worst gang members all his early jobs. Disciplinary problems At a young age to spend a month in jail He was called to task for cavorting with a young lady in the organ. Loft had prodigious beer-drinking every possible violation of rules and discipline he exemplified. None of that is is remembered nowadays. He's just the Lutheran composer so this recurring. We could talk about other composers. But there's one point I do WanNa make though I raise these issues in my book. Not because I'm trying to be gossipy or salaciously and it makes for great reading to read all these sexy anecdotes. I have the point. I'm trying to make though is these. Figures could not have created disruptive music they invented if they hadn't been disruptive in their own lifetimes you know almost all the commentary on Bach. We have from back then people complaining about him. You know people complaining about how show he was. He was called the task before the city council had to submit a written document explaining why he was using such new progressive and strange musical techniques. So this thing is conducted disruption in their private life and the disruption. Their music is connected. And that's why well upon it because if you don't understand that you will never understand the evolution of music and going back a little further. You talk about a couple of composers from the Italian renaissance. Who went way beyond Bach in terms of violations of social norms? I'm Talkin about two particular Rotella Mayo Trump Esino and Carlo Jesualdo and bothered these guys. Were involved in love. Triangles that resulted in murders committed by them. Oh this is right. It's interesting if you start with the music of these two individuals trauma Chino and swallow. Its gentle music and they will have songs. These pretty gentle love songs. Mandra goes in front of us but in their private life they were violent angry people and both of them not only did they commit murders but it was obvious to everybody that they were guilty and they were never punished and this is interesting because it shows you that. Starting around the renaissance it became the norm or musicians to go outside the norm. They were allowed indiscretions that other people were not and in fact. I'm convinced in both those instances their fame and reputation was increased by committing murder. I think people felt well. If this guy is such a passionate lover that he he he. He kills somebody in a fit of jealous rage. Who you know. There must be a similar intensity of passion in the song and we laugh at that. But that's the same way. People look at rock bands and the sex pistols. And we've seen this in our lifetime. If the musician out of control we suspect there must be a certain intensity in the music as well so it all came back to that time I mean just one more example I find this fascinating people that want to understand what it was like to be an artist during the Renaissance. The most famous book. They read the autobiography of Benvenuto Cellini. He was a renaissance artist famous as a silversmith sculptor but he was also a musician played the flute and he wrote his life story. And it makes fascinating reading but I went through that book page by page and I just marked off every time. Shalini committed a violent crime and and I think I came up potentially with at least fourteen. Violent crimes committed in his life. And this is not including the the the just the vandalism or the varsity these are actually violent crimes where he murdered somebody or beat them up and none of them was punished for he was. He was actually put in jail couple times. It was only because of arguments with his patrons over payment and artworks and my favorite anecdote from the whole book comes from a conversation when someone would approach the Pope instead of the jubilee. WanNa hire this Guy Shalini. You know he's committed murder and all this and the pope said you don't understand for people like Ben to Chile. Different rules apply that came directly from the mouth of the Pope and the renaissance. And this was a new idea and I would say we still live with this idea to even though even in the midst of the metoo movement and all the scandals. They're still this expectation that great musicians with by their own rules and they violate rules and and For good or bad that's part of the whole Agassi Western music.

Murder Bach Bob Dylan Ted Gioia Nate Wilcox Mick Jagger Smithsonian Rotella Mayo Trump Esino FBI Benvenuto Cellini Chino Sir Paul Mccartney Shalini Logan Sir Mick Jagger Paul Mccartney Vandalism Congress The Beatles Professor
Colorado, Abbey Road Studios And Sir Paul Mccartney discussed on KCBS 24 Hour News

KCBS 24 Hour News

00:52 sec | 1 year ago

Colorado, Abbey Road Studios And Sir Paul Mccartney discussed on KCBS 24 Hour News

"It was fifty years ago today that poor man cross the road this way ever since fans from across the globe had made the pilgrimage to stride across the most famous crosswalk in rock and roll Julie both came here today from Colorado springs the Beatles are for ever everybody loves them is their fiftieth anniversary and I wanted to breathe the air that the Beatles spree in being here for this but this might never have happened naming the album after the nearby Abbey Road Studios was an impromptu decision Sir Paul McCartney told sixty minutes we had a lot of the title going on the we didn't really like so I just said Hey one we just call it on the road that working title was Everest but no one was in the mood

Colorado Abbey Road Studios Sir Paul Mccartney Julie Sixty Minutes Fifty Years
Paul McCartney Is Writing a Musical Version of It's a Wonderful Life

John Williams

00:56 sec | 1 year ago

Paul McCartney Is Writing a Musical Version of It's a Wonderful Life

"Sir Paul McCartney could be leaving Abbey Road for Broadway over the past year the beetle had been writing a new musical on a stage version of the nineteen forty six Frank Copa classic film a it's a wonderful life and that was revealed on Wednesday so McCartney's writing a different version of it's a wonderful life I think he's just he's writing the music along for the musical version for it's a wonderful okay so it's not gonna be a Beatles by office do something to be a play about the Beatles no but the reporter who reported this article said that he listened to the the demos that you have made thus far and their ten finished songs that sound like a bona fide Los Beatles album so it's got to be five to Broadway version of it's a wonderful life that is correct should be interesting and the right now there is no cemented timeline for the show's debut or a west end theatre book yet but would likely begin in the U. K. before coming to Broadway in late twenty

Sir Paul Mccartney Beatles Reporter Frank Copa Los Beatles
Sir Paul Mccartney And London discussed on 10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:12 sec | 1 year ago

Sir Paul Mccartney And London discussed on 10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

"And guess who's taking his first crack at writing a stage adaptation Sir Paul McCartney who's written a live record to over the years producers are hoping for a debut next year the show would likely play London before

Sir Paul Mccartney London
"sir paul" Discussed on Table Manners with Jessie Ware

Table Manners with Jessie Ware

04:58 min | 2 years ago

"sir paul" Discussed on Table Manners with Jessie Ware

"My sister is eight years older. And then that was most to be it. The dent in accident. You call it a gift from. And then so, you know. The food. Right. She was quite basic roast beef on the Sunday Yorkshire pudding. We used to eat rice pudding northern more northern rice. Is you like ten twice? Why my mom used to make skin on toll? Yeah. Yeah. So it was very basic, very basic food. And it was only really pulling money too. Make me more afraid Fistican. Well, she she born born and bred in London one of the first students to go. I mean, she was eighteen when she went to the Royal College. I think they normally go later. So she was she's pretty pretty bright. Does she do painters? She wa- she. She stood detraction as she was my teacher home. So she came to live with me in Nottingham and with the whole the two Afghan hounds long, haired cats and five year old and an eight year old, and and then home on the table, rather similar to the one where sitting here we used to cut out patterns, and she taught me how to make suits and out to make things and then also what to school Bittu teetering because what we specialize in is tightening. And that's hence the tuxedo collection. That's coming out. You know, this soon, I think I've always lied that sorts of boy look on a girl. I think it's really in with them could tack the suit toxic. And especially now, it's really interesting. We've noticed a lot of the red carpet girls wearing visually of been wearing very slinky beautiful long dresses now we've. Had a lot of people asking for not just the tuck suit. But just generally I feel the best in in trials. I feel the best. I know I feel there's something I always feel like I'm not myself when I'm in address, there's something I would've won a suit to my wedding angry. To agree. Yeah. It's pulling cook. Very nice. Yeah. Very simple. She likes simple food food. Would you? Eat a simple whitefish with some olive oil on top three veg-. I sit. And then you very slim. Thanks. Yeah. Do you watch? No. I think I've just just pull night at I've always eaten sorts of innocent way. Yeah. And obviously being a swim every day, for instance. Do they Rollo to mobile club in? Yeah. Yup. In Powell Powell knowledge. Sure. Five Moshe mornings this. Joining five what time are you up? Then just before five about takes me about ten minutes to get to get up. So many love the mornings. No traffic. A love the song coming up love London. I used to remember London more affectionately when it was not so busy. But now so crowded all the time here that we will worried getting here today, we just took so long to do about, you know. Off the block. Americans block. So what time to bed nineish turn ish last night about ten ten see gets better less? Yeah. Yeah. I didn't think that surly. I like, I'm I'm with you. I bet at twelve did you what were you doing? Watching TV didn't finish working barely till about the stay nine. Now. I mean, I've done using years, you know, important. Traveled a lot. And so we did the hope studio fifty four era yet Paul in were nocturnal for a long time. We used. Oh, yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Luckily polling has a beautiful smile. So she always got his into. Picton choosier. Could know there was always this enormous crowd outside and shatter eve seller own red, FOX fur coat. Red FOX red and the mazing smile, and my two friends and myself we're used to hide behind and she'd be like they're like this. And then you go like points, and then just beckon, and then we'd be hiding. Successful..

London Rollo Picton choosier Powell Powell Paul Nottingham Royal College FOX Moshe Bittu eight years ten minutes eight year five year
"sir paul" Discussed on Table Manners with Jessie Ware

Table Manners with Jessie Ware

05:40 min | 2 years ago

"sir paul" Discussed on Table Manners with Jessie Ware

"I think my husband's actually was in a who post myth suit for his mom and dad's wedding, which he hadn't got Taylor toll and probably could still we people love shoes. Wearing full. But just I remember it's felt like quite a scene and it was like the coolest, but it wasn't night. Just having a Saturday job shop, and it was. He wants to be it was like being the pub all the best far. But these people were so nice. And it was such a great atmosphere. And I I can imagine you have some input you had some input in kind of the mood of the year. Definitely we still get lovely visages all the time to the shops unto work because. Well, and so yeah, David Bowie. Of course was a huge customer and flower street and planned all those old guys. You know, 'plain stones to the Beatles. And then later on more now people you'll rage junk, Jake Bugg and all the lots of the wants today said we still really close to the to the industry of your world. Actually, never pull Smith. Jeff. Yeah. Yeah. I mean, we we start to close for women about twenty years ago. And and that was because women binds more size it. Yeah. And there was a famous editing. Call coming to viewers. Just juice so much of Portsmouth men's but on on all those famous superstar light Lindor evangelists are all those famous models. And then and then the kept setting what he come you? Please do the for women. And so the first collections were were just very much Gillian something like couldn't, you know, my my girlfriend in the beginning. Now, why for many years she she's always got that androgynous look ensure it like that boyish look she wears dresses Muslim now. She's just great. To me. Well, one one I was working in the show enough to. I was still close to the school in not team. So I knew the ORs you used to events in partisans things. And then I met her shoes she was teaching there. Here's old. She's six years older than me. So she was t-. She had two kids in London. She was living in London Houston two days a week to Nottingham. And then we met and. I went out with eighty. She still married. She was married with two kids two dogs and two cats with my mom. So so yeah, that was real enough. Yeah. I've been we've been together. Longtime. Yeah. Yeah. We didn't get Mark tool. The two thousand actually the diago knighted. Completely by chance. Yeah. Came in I propose day if she wants to wants to get married after being together under Jere she wanted to get my ridge. And then we arrange the date and everything, and then I got this little letter pop through the door with the gush Bill, and it was from the Queen saying. Or intimate you a night? And so. Eventually, I said, yeah. Won't you're at the beginning said, yes. And then one of the goes at works. Do you know we really ought to find out? When is because it's busy all the time. And she run about Cavs. And then put the phone down. You're never gonna. Nighted eleven o'clock married it for clock on the same day. On the same came lady. And after noon. Yeah. Cool ladysmith. What did you have for the wedding? I think one of the first time all time nickel soldier the boss of the tape. Modern have a room there. Yes. So the Ivy did it. Favorite places was that. But I'm being for years now, Jeremy and Christian or the own owned the AVI they've they were friends they were at the wedding. So they sought to all what did you used to order at the I? I. The fish pie was always very. The fish fish. Drake's. Yeah. Definitely the fish cakes still live fish cakes. Howard's do fish good fish case. Very weird place to go. But the other do you fish mom, I do meet, but I mostly fish, bloody. Hell we're going to boom basin. The here say goes on your shirt. I know. So it's that thing of like you really have to be interface. Otherwise that people will always voice quite fiddly as well watcher find well, give less. How did it was in Kosice in the south from which I think they They have. have to do that. So okay. Talking about food you grew up in Nottingham. What was the food around the dinner table? Yeah. Chris I wish that gift from God. Yeah. Because my brothers years old..

Nottingham Cavs David Bowie Jake Bugg Jere Taylor Kosice Gillian Jeff Smith boom basin London Houston London AVI ladysmith Chris Nighted Mark Drake Howard
What does it take to run a successful creative business?

Digital Production Buzz

00:28 sec | 2 years ago

What does it take to run a successful creative business?

"Hello, Paul, welcome back. Hey, Larry, thanks for having me on again and many, many. Congratulations on your new title. Thank you, Sir. Paul on tonight show. We're focusing on the business side of media. Most folks are working in smaller companies and don't have a lot of resources, and we're all feeling the pinch of competition. What does it take to run a successful creative business? Well, I think the first thing that has to come in to mind is what are the goals of the creative work that you're doing? Some creatives, not all some creatives will get lost in the woods of the creative aspects of it. You know what they want it to be and what they would like it to be. I know in early days of my career, one of the first questions I would ask client is what. Do they want to see accomplished by this creative work that's going to be done. Certainly creative work in the more creative work is is engaging in eye-catching, inspiring, but I think you have to take into account. What are the goals of this work that you're creating? How is the client going to see success from this creative work? You're doing that raises for me, one of the most intriguing questions which is when do we and how do we decide the stop working on a project when we've met the client's expectations or own expectations? I think it depends on the client and the budget.

Paul Larry
Paul McCartney gives "secret concert" at NYC's Grand Central

Kentuckiana's Saturday Morning News

00:45 sec | 2 years ago

Paul McCartney gives "secret concert" at NYC's Grand Central

"Another tour that is coming to. Kentucky to the Commonwealth. That would be Paul McCartney. He's going to be at rob arena on June. First two thousand nine the new release of his new album yesterday. And while some New York got a surprise last night. If you had a ticket to ride through New York's Grand Central station Friday night, you may have got to hear a special rush hour concert legendary musician Paul McCartney gave a private pop performance in the landmark hall to promote his latest album Egypt station. VIP guests got to watch, sir. Paul perform on a curtain off stage. But everyone in the space station got to hear McCartney play. You're more than five decades of music in twenty four

Paul Mccartney Elton John New York Christopher Watson JJ Dave Schreiber Grand Central Station Allentown ABC Pennsylvania Commonwealth Kentucky Egypt Station Louisville Rob Arena Seventy One Years Five Decades Fifty Years Four Months
Paul McCartney Opens Up to Howard Stern About Beatles, John and Yoko, New Album

24 Hour News

00:28 sec | 2 years ago

Paul McCartney Opens Up to Howard Stern About Beatles, John and Yoko, New Album

"Sir. Paul is on the Howard Stern show yesterday. And said, yes, it was John who broke up the Beatles. A meeting where Joan came in and said, hey, guys, I'm leaving the group fan McCartney ads, and you know, looking back on it. I think. He'd reached that stage in his life. We all had passed for Yoko Paul admitted. It was intrusive when she used to sit in on recording sessions. But he says the guy was totally in love with her. You have to respect

Paul Mccartney Yoko Paul Egypt Station John New York City Howard Stern Joan Donald Trump Eighty One Degrees Twenty Two Minutes
"sir paul" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

04:31 min | 2 years ago

"sir paul" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

"Right? So that's what I was writing about it. So despite repeated warnings, this captain is going to take this boat onto the rocks and you know, let's try and stop. Yeah. Well, we're going to try. Yeah. It's pretty scary. He's still vegetarian. Yeah. Yeah. And I always will be. Yeah. People sometimes say to be, don't you miss the odds sausage? The dog I don't. I hate to tell you these days is really good. I've right. You've seen all the advances in vegetarian cuisine, I must have been. We've moved out of my. Stew we were because we were. I was started to me Linda about forty years ago. Yeah. And then you really couldn't get anything. Remember what we go on a motorway freeway and they have these stops where you can pull off them get petrol and food, and we pulled. It was a ham sandwich into this and there's a baloney. There was not in we, there's nothing. Wouldn't it be great if there was like a veggie ultra loss on the two that started us thinking about it and you're at the cutting edge, cutting edge. Now you can go, there's a fancy restaurant there crossroads where you can get like you've been there has millions of and the good thing they taste good. So I feel very good about good. Here's the other question then we can kind of wrap it up and move towards that. So what is it about groups because it seems like you did a couple of half they were so records, but you like being in a band, don't you because you've been with these guys touring for over twelve years? Yeah. What you'd rather have a band then you know, it's, I think there's something great about the camaraderie team. Yeah, I've always liked. Yeah. It's just it's just nice to do things with people. I sometimes feel sorry for the solar star. Yeah. Who's like great. And he's very famous, but he's going back, you know, to his hotel room and there's like, nobody. My band don't live in my hotel. Right, but you can Pat each other on the back of. Yeah, we have a lot of phone after the show. We do not in cool. The runner where we kind of get off we get out before crowd does. Oh, yeah. So you know, we we hop on a bus and then it's time for a dream a little bide. We talk about things. We we debrief and talk about the show and stuff, and that's great. Yeah, I love that. And when you play when he played the Beatles songs like. Which ones do I continually still move you. I think Lenny. EP and I think he dude, yeah. Hey, Jude. The great thing is at the end of it, all these people may be fifty thousand people on. It's real sense of community. And you know, in these days when people are, you know, despairing this and I let us people have heard something or been to a concert. Now I was feeling so bad, but then I went to the concert. And it just is great to be the kind of. Emcee say, no, you. And you just see them all looking at each other as it can be very emotional. I love it and I feel very proud. I kind of come up with. I remember once we'd let it be, which is the other one. I was doing a song playing in counselors, and I think it was South America and those this very handsome man in form row kind of thing. Tolman new standing with is very, he's very darker dark beard. And there's a very beautiful girl with him who kinda was obviously his daughter, and she's looking up to him and he's looking down at her and the digging, and they saying that it be, I'm saying this, I'm well enough. It was his like real bone when people just. In mean somebody his, you know, he's really into his daughter. I know how important all that is. So it's hard to get through the song. Those are great moments and they still happen. Yeah, that's great. Great talking to you Paul. Nice while thank you very easy, father card new ways in gentlemen. Thank you, everyone..

Stew Lenny Tolman South America Beatles Jude Linda twelve years forty years
"sir paul" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

05:13 min | 2 years ago

"sir paul" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

"I thought it was just to sort of jam. Yeah. Remember somebody code when they first heard I have this great. Okay. Yeah, but that could have been the times changing to that. You know, maybe this sort of elaborate pop thing, which you know changing into something a little harder and just, you know, maybe people were kind of getting a little. Less able to process pop and just like get back, that's guy. Got it. That's good. Perfect. Nailed it. Well, but I'm doing the wrong when I when I did that we released, it came on did. Okay. And then it was doing this little thing of dropping back down the jobs, and I feel well probably got a coal from Alcoa of capital who is like real red hot promotion guy. Yeah, and he'd got my numbers. Paul, I gotta say you gonna let me work this Recco. Are saying, well, what do you mean? Say his tone is no, no, no way. He said you've got singles on there. You haven't released to going to go back up. I'm going to take you back up to number one. And I said, well, talk to me. And he said jet, you haven't got that. And so he, he named that I spotted the about on the run itself. Got to do. Yeah. So sometimes you take all the people to to tell you what's good was let me roll it on that too man, but like that kind of that record industry doesn't. It's very exciting that we're here at capital. You've been there so long. I where could on capitol in a long time right now, but that record industry that guy making that call that still exist today. I think it tells you we had a be seeing when playing the guy who's this Egypt station. He's stationed there and. Was one of the guys. He always going to point to him. He's, he's the guy, though they still, you're still got them. He's to got to capital. What is this story about the ban on the run? Where'd you record that Legos Nigeria? What was why? Okay. I don't remember, but at the time it was kind of fashionable for people not to record in the normal studios. So people were going places to go stones who was tax reasons, but they were in the south of France. Right? But it was tax. What's wrong with that? Yeah. So you people were in different locations. You could want to Nashville could've. I did, yeah, from one of them, but I just wanted to sort of get out of there and just to, I asked my yeah, where they had studios. I knew they had law round the world on this great ballista arrives. So I'm getting the choice of China. Real. Legos. That was the one got to do you. African music could be great. It was great, but they hadn't finished built in the studio. It was really basic, but the the vibe was grade. I was. I was pleased to be in Africa, but it was a crazy time. Yeah, it didn't. I didn't just go to the studio, make record the who so many crazy little things. You know, Fela Kuti. Yeah, he was the when I arrived. First thing I see in the newspapers, Paul McCartney he comes to steal Blackman's music. Oh God, you know. No problems. So I get his number. I ringing most fella poem can't hear. I hear you've said in the newspaper that I'm coming to see her. I said, I'm not, you know, you come out still magma. I said, no, I'm not to come over to the studio and I'll play you a couple of the things we're doing and you'll see it's nothing like what you do on. We're not gonna. It's basically people saw inside written outside anyway. So he came over with like thirty wives. Yeah. Studio, fuller Danja. I mean, he was one wildcat. It used to have a bottle of whiskey in which was marinated a pound of pot. Newest. But he was, you know, we turned out to be real good friends and he got. He said, no, you're not too. Was that when ginger Baker was down there? Well, yeah, engine was his friend. Yeah. Okay. I'll tell you this story. Okay. Okay. Now you brought in general. We go in out. Fellow invites us to is club, which is outside Legos. And it's called the African shrine and to we go. Yeah. Okay. So this is a few of us little white people think about me than the couple of friends and. We go out to put..

Paul McCartney Fela Kuti Alcoa Blackman Recco Nigeria Africa Egypt station Nashville France ginger Baker China
"sir paul" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

04:34 min | 2 years ago

"sir paul" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

"That's it. That's the rhythm. And that would be right. That'd be the of three. So the fact that we were like wanting to experiment, and we are so interested in privilege to being allowed. The studio time was like. So every single track just was different. Yeah, I know it's insane. I listen to let it be twice the other day and I can't. Who did that riff, the ban an in. In any amount of Papa. Yeah. Who did who made up that one Jones through? Sorry, I take a pony, it's it's like album. I don't mind that he may not. No, I know I, I don't. I don't know why I'm getting personal exactly. I'm glad you don't mind uncomfortable if you like I've had for this. Drilled. Really. Now with Nazi great riff, you know, that was a great song. I've probably one of the secrets and never go pouring. Do you think that like what? Whatever happened at the end of that of that band is, do you feel ever looking back on it that you guys had done everything you could that you pushed it out as far as you could go creatively and it might have been the best thing. We felt like that at the time, and that's why it ended, and we felt we've come full circle. We actually use that expression full circle. But when you look at what we did after it. Yeah. It could've could've worked. Yeah, like Jones track might have been imagine, you know, and I might have had live and let die. Yeah, and you know whatever, you know, certainly. So do you think about that? Yeah, I think so. But I mean, you can't do what, if no, of course, I can never do that. What is to be still I? I said, well, yeah, I get it. I wish it were possible, but it isn't to live when my kids who grow in over this. Well, what if we say? Well, what if a television just fell on my head right now? So. Holy cow. So I mean, you know, right? This is just doesn't work, but he also when you start your first two albums, which were like, I mean, they're amazing records because they're exactly what you talk about. Like just like they're pieces that don't necessarily come together. They're all different that you did them all like in in critically, it wasn't like received a tremendous, we well, but it seems like you were fairly presient in just sort of that low fi sort of thing, which is very popular. Now, like the whole model of that record has sort of like taken off with certain element of turn it of music. Do you know that's one of the things is that you go through these critically timing periods? Yeah, which I did after the Beatles kind of kind of have to happen because you know what? He's not as good as the Beatles was like easy thing to say. You know, I'm believe me I was aware of was like, holy, how am I gonna follow that? But what's happening is you say is I could a lot of. People now say, no my do you know my favorite record ram, right? And I heard it the other day I'm going, it's not bad. That's kind of kind of very sort of Multan. Yeah. Like who those kind of people. They young people like, I think you sort of like those early McCartney records have been discovered by the sort of the hipster crew in terms of like taking chances and with recording a little a little rougher, but also just not being behold into a particular structure. Yeah. That's true. He's great for me because you know, when you get criticized so badly, it's like it affects you, you, you try not to let it affect you. You tell everyone affect you, but somewhere you. One didn't quite work, but did you ever get to a place where you're like just, you know enough with the Beatles. Yeah. Yes. When I first went out onto with wings every promoters and you're going to do to stop with a no not going to do any name gradually once I felt we distinguished wings, I felt good about it. So then I started creeping back in prenatal things like now I don't care. What were the first ones? What was like when you said good steel Beatles song, which one did you pick? They picked it. There was yesterday. Oh, yeah, everyone kind of wanted me to do..

Jones Beatles Multan McCartney
"sir paul" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

04:24 min | 2 years ago

"sir paul" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

"Was there a point like you know, in in the Beatles where you just knew you one. The album. Would that be where you're like? We did it so over. Yeah. I mean, it didn't mean we're going to stop ru. Yeah, you definitely there was there was the beach boy beetle incident? Yeah, like we were kind of on par. We will love him what they were doing was heading out before that sound overstay already stealing stuff off them all. Now. How are we right. But then we did. He was of a soul. I'm Brian was like, whoa. And he made pet sounds, and we were like, whoa, so we may Sajjan pepper. So that's interesting. So you, that's what I said, you wisened what other people did, and then you kind of put it through the Beatles mill and there you go. And there it is like sort of elevated to another place, but during that time was were, did you have words what Brian Wilson. Yeah, I've I've always talked to Brian being a huge fan. Yeah. Is anyone ever asked me what you favorite song? The knows God only knows just it's mystically magically put together. It's just a brilliant piece. So I'll always he knows I'm a big fan of his and birthdays are very similar. I think he's tuned sixteen eighteen swimming very close. So Yano knows. I love him the okay. So there was no tension between, you know? No. No, not really. No, not at all. I remember coming over here and. Who's this guy, Derek Taylor, who was all publicity guy, and he was working in LA after he'd left us and he had something to do with Brian and remember going over to their house one night and getting a bit stimulated Jeff, and to we love Brian comes over and he's got the shades. Yeah, and he's, you know, he's gone into nervous phase which was which was, where are we now with him? I think he's good. He's good. He's good. You know, I'm nervous season nice word to dip over. I mean. But anyway he was he was still a little bit. I had these shades. To Dumont of, I keep these shades on Brian to your life baby. You keep the shade. So I love those shades look great. And he was reminded by play. You're a record I go now, that'd be he plays good vibrations like you've never heard it before and you're in the room with Brian, and he puts it on. I'm. I'm. Yeah, I was like, I was saying you ruby Tuesday, you know, sometimes you get those magic moments where nobody's heard it yet. Yeah, it's an all released and someone's playing if you and it's the creator playing for you. That's pretty great. Great moment. But speaking of that, I talked to purify reasonably and he claims that. She said, she said that there's a line in there that originated with him. Can you give that thing? So you're good. That's more John story while can't talk to him. But so we going get very, I know they were hanging out with Peter and he said, I think he'd said, I know where if you like it'd be dead at in in John said, nice. Yeah, so it was pretty good line. We found its way into that song. So like right now, like songs are being played every day all over the world. There's a part of the human brain. I think that they have found that's just just Beatles songs in most behind. So that like do you feel like when you're out in the world? Like my girlfriend's dad, I think his spiritual system is based on the bills and and I think a lot of people are like that they just have this. You've created this entire universe. Would you feel what's your responsibility to those people out in the world? Do you feel like when they come up to you or your generally nice? Do you feel it's odd that people were so immersed in it. Someone told me today that today was the day you walked across Abbey Road..

Brian Wilson Jeff Beatles Yano Derek Taylor LA Dumont John Peter mill
"sir paul" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

03:20 min | 2 years ago

"sir paul" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

"Why does it lasted? Because we saw we had ten years top wack, and then it would all just fade out, but it kept going kept coming. And. Only thing I can think is when I do the old songs. Yeah, I find them very memorable. I can remember all words like like that or whereas the new song because I kind of think about go learn them and stuff. I just think we hit some kind of a role clearly. Well, you know. Just we were so sort of interested in making records, and so sort of privileged to make records that we always tried to make the next one better than the last one. And I think in doing that, the structure of them always very simple. The Beatles things are hardly ever even the kind of complicated once the sort of simple are going to. I don't think there's any extra fat on the right, but but there's some complicated chords in there. I can't play all of them. Yeah. Yeah, I'll teach you late. Thank you. But But like. like you created a sort of the type of pop that you guys were playing them with the cordial replying with sort of new for the time and the melodies may. You may think they're simple. And here I'm telling you, they're not Paul. They are very complex, mystical. Oh yeah. Because like what are you when you listen to this stuff? Because when I listened to your first two albums recently, like yesterday, I listened to the first the first Beatles album that I had was the Beatles second album. For some reason, I was obsessed with this on roll over Beethoven was obsessed with Chuck Berry. But do you find that there are people that you respected and looked up to and revered when you were younger, whose influence is really kind of moved all the way through all of your music? He, I think so, because I hear a Little Richard, like still Richards always the right? Yeah. Ooh, yeah. Let's the little screaming voice. Yeah, that's something I just loved a love his records, and I wanted to do the so that gave me. Sort of feature thing within the Beatles? Yes, John couldn't do that. I remember him saying to me, how did you do the? How'd you do that? I said, I don't know. I said I feel like it just comes out with top of my head and he was, and then we had a session once where we early early days I'm going, I'm about to do Kansas City. Yeah. So I'm on the mic. I'm down though that we've done the back in now I'm going to do the vocal Jones open the control room, and I'm going. I'm not making not getting into to Joan comes down. He says, remember, he's, it comes out the top of your head. That was it. And that's the take you here. So those guys like, like you said, you tried to keep doing better records. What were you also? It seems to me that what you were absorbing as a group was was sort of happening at the time and you just kind of ran it through the Beatles mill and made it your own and made it better where you always aware of what was going on around you with the bands around you to the point where you were sort of like we can. We can do that better..

Beatles Richards Paul Chuck Berry John Jones Beethoven Joan Kansas City ten years mill
"sir paul" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

03:54 min | 2 years ago

"sir paul" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

"And I was just remembering silly little things like that one particular funny, but they were cool memories for me. Like how many memories like you've been a public person, you know, famous person for like the long fucking time missed two men. Do you. Do you like, do you have any memories but like before? Do you remember the transition where you're like, holy shit, I've got to learn how to do this. The famous person. Yeah, you do. I mean, the good thing was that the Beatles didn't really get famous too. We were about twenty. Yeah, so I had twenty years Liverpool before the where I could not get arrested. I couldn't get in a club. I couldn't go friend. Nothing. So it hasn't been right on time? Yeah. I know. I mean, it was it was real life and you just did things that people did you travel by bosses and stuff. So regular people stuff, normal p. magin that you doing that stuff come all on. The thing is, you know, I, I actually still do that. I thought I heard you take this up way sometimes. Yeah. And does anyone Bobby but on. So boys don't look at each other. That's true. On? No, because they're all in screens these days, and he was really don't notice me. Yeah. Do that just to test it out now, maybe because I like it. Oh, I've always had this thing even when we're famous. I've always liked to dip into. Real life. Yeah. So I will walk to a place where I'll drive myself to a place, so I listened to the new record of it and I, it's a, it's a beautiful record. Paul McCartney record, and I did a lot of research for this conversation. I listened to every Beatles song and every wing song I've been up for weeks. But when you do a record because I've talked to like, I've talked to like, I've talked to key. I've talked to people like Roger waters, Neil young and stuff. And when you do a record like Egypt station, now, do you, do you think this is the best work you're doing of your life right now, or how do you look at it? That's gonna difficult because I was in the Beatles. Yeah, I know. I'm happy to hear that on some level. So you you at some point had to learn how to compete with yourself and accept that now executive on, you know, when I do a live show, I do Beatles songs and I know that's what the audience wants. Yeah, but I like making music like writing songs so I make a new album on, yeah, I'm I'm trying to do the best album. I can make in a live concert as a say. You know, I will say to the audience sometimes I'll say, we know what you like. You know, we know the songs you like, because like if we do an old Beatles song, the place lights up with all your phones. Like the galaxy said, we do a new one. It's a black hole. So we know. But I said, well, we're going to do anyway. We do them and you've got to remember there are a lot of people in the orders. Wanna hear you new stuff, but I've got quite a range like a family audience. You're gonna little kids. Yeah. And they know the words better than I do too old songs to the old soldier. So what do you say you don't mind this weird thing like my my producer is he's got a kid who's like nine and you know, and the kid, he doesn't. No one had to sell them on the Beatles, but you know, he loves to Beatles immediately. What do you know? Was it in your mind that like, you know, not only your grownups light this and teenagers, but five year olds are going to love the Beatles. I mean, what is that magic? I mean, can you. You know, I asked myself that because it's very interesting question..

Beatles Bobby Liverpool Paul McCartney Neil young Egypt station Roger waters producer executive Wan twenty years five year
"sir paul" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

03:33 min | 2 years ago

"sir paul" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

"There is a there is a comic years ago, funny because he used to do this joker go like, you know, some kids, boy Cowboys, and Indians used to Beatles and stones. Then I don't know which ones to Beatles would be swimming the Indians, but it doesn't matter. Probably not a politically appropriate joke anymore, but this is nonetheless, it was sort of watching. You're going to be carefully. I do. I do. Do you feel Cowboys? Yeah. Oh, good. Good. I yeah, I think that's true. Stealth Cowboys. Yeah. Now when you see the stones, is there any part of you that thinks like I wish I was still kept the band together. Yeah, unfortunately, to amount of dead. I know that I know it's not going to run. Yeah, I didn't know. I know what you mean. I know. I know you question. I mean, just. There was a moment there. That's all I'm saying. By these, we, you still tour and everything, and you've got guys who've been playing with for longer than you know, with the Beatles. Really? Yeah. But is there like when you see this downs now? I guess my question is, do you think like, wow, they're still doing those songs, but or do do you think, are you happy for him? I don't know. I'm just, yeah, you know, I love the stones. Always loved him on always gone to see the shows through the years on our so long ago. The stones, right. You know, we were not old cello thing together, so. You know. So we went in a little bit early to catch them and take, you know, I mean, we go back a long way to, and there was never really rivalry but to your question. Yeah. Hey, you're kidding me. It will be fantastic if we had the bills together to to. Yeah, that would be nice when things happen, but. Do you talk to Ringo at all? No. Yeah, of course. I do. The only guys that have the memories you have now, right? So yeah, is sort of what's great about it, you know? And it's, we do, you know, talk about all this memory. Oh, I was at dinner. The other. Few weeks ago in London, here's with his wife, Pablo, and we were talking and everyone was like very lively intelligent conversation. Lots of jokes and Tom Hanks with his wife. Retails that happened just hanging out too. We hang out with the best. Okay. Tommy and me. All right. Let's go wrong with Inga's. No. So we talking on it was very scintillating conversation. It was really nice and warm, sitting across from Ringo and isolate, say. Wow. Me and this guy go back a long way. My wife Nancy's is that it because you expecting me a punchline, right? And by the way I was just hit me hit me, you know, I said, well, I mean, what I need is I was just some kid growing up in Liverpool. Then I got in this group and we went on tour and I'd never roomed with anyone. Yeah. I mean, we didn't go to college, so this was the first time. So I was like in a room with this guy who is currently new, who's Ringo. And so just the memories of all of that. I mean, I was just saying that this dinner say he was an insomniac. He was an I could. I could go asleep by. He was up all night kind of thing..

Ringo Stealth Cowboys Beatles Cowboys Tom Hanks Nancy London Inga Tommy Pablo Liverpool
"sir paul" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

04:05 min | 2 years ago

"sir paul" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

"Nice to see you. Nice to see you call McCartney. Yes, sir. Thank you now being night. What? What does that enable you to do that? Can you go to the British Museum and take out armor? No, but I can drive a herd of sheep through the city of London that really then. That's a real Floyd. What is give you the free to slightly different. They give out of freedom of the city. Yeah, and my daughter, stellar said, what? What is it? You? Did you get anything? I said, I don't know. I gotta think so. She looked at up here and she said, yeah, it is entitled to drive a flock of sheep through the city of London. I'm surprised capital didn't think of that for a publicity thing. This time. And I am other question I have because I've talked to. I talked to Keith Richards to ago and reading the book that you guys hung out a bit, and I was thinking that maybe we need a dark night. Is there any way we can sort of rallied to get Keith Richards a knighthood I think deserves? Yeah. You still hang out with that guy. I know that was the last time that he was talking about rural holiday in the Turks and Keiko's. Yeah, and I discovered that he was along the beach. So I used to make the journey after lunch, and we had some fun times with was at tencent. I know I've known him forever, right because we started off at the same time and we wrote the first single for them and stuff, you know. So we don't each other a long time, but I hadn't seen him for quite a while, but we all careers happened now. He suddenly go together and it was funny. Money was hilarious here we because the conversation, of course, you know, got to sort of crazy stuff. Yeah. Like why like. Well. Well, we were designing portable dog kennels inflatable. So he's pretty good idea. We, you know a lot, a lot of weed involved white in the kennels. In the in the creating of the creative process, he was required. Yeah, we, we got round to kind of, well, if you had one, you could custom make him for like domains would be polka-dot. Sure, sure. That I do I well, this is an exciting transition for Keith. I think hearing about this. I had no idea that that would be a business idea that he would come up with. And and did you did you follow through or. No. Okay, good. That's probably better off now. I was surprised that back in the day when you were all in London together, that there was a lot of open communication between the Beatles and stones in terms of of what you know who's gonna drop. What when. Yeah, exactly. Because people thought, you know, that kind of legend grew rivalry and everything, but it was about the opposite. A really, like you say, you know, if we had a record coming out Oguz the twenty eighth, we would ring them to say he's coming out. We've got some income in August the seventeenth, so I'll go. We'll put on his back then really nice. And now he's was really very friendly. See now I remember one evening I used to, we used to hang out with each other's places and And I was. I think Mick was living with Keith at the same time and a few other people. Yeah, and I was I was hanging out and they were at a studio doing a recording session and they came back from the session on they had an acetate, which is how used to kind of bring you stuff in those days. And it was ruby Tuesday, so we still can almost like like that one. Oh, really, see. So it was it. Was that friendly? That's that's sort of like, well, that changes everything about the way. I think about everything..

Keith Richards London British Museum tencent Turks Floyd Keiko Money Mick
"sir paul" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

03:51 min | 2 years ago

"sir paul" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

"They always. So let's let's talk about this event. Brennan told me what was up with the Paul thing was going to happen. It'd be we've been sort of dancing around it for while. But this event seemed like the perfect opportunity and I freaked out. I'm like, okay, I'll do it. And then I just proceeded to freak out and make myself sick because I was sort of like, why wait, what am I gonna? How am I what? What? What has any talked about? This is a beetle that's, you know, he's talked about everything Beatles. He's talked about everything. Paul, you know, he's talked about everything. There's no mocking to find a new way in. I'm not gonna. I'm not gonna get like what I do here in the garage. I'm not like a may making all these excuses to freak myself out. I listened to all the Beatles stuff that I liked. I listened to all the wing stuff that I listened to later McCartney I listened to the new album Egypt station. I do that to myself. Sometimes when I have musical guests that are, you know, have a big discography of who are prolific, but this is this is McCartney man, and you know, it was great to listen to some of that stuff. Some of it for the first time it was mind blowing, but I was still freaking out and finally brand. Sorta talk me down. He's like, you know what? What differences make man? What difference does it make your? You're talking to a Beadle, you know, I mean, this is Paul McCartney. I mean, just go enjoy the conversation with Paul McCartney's in and I'm like, yeah, man. Yeah, that's what I'm gonna. Do. Who cares what gets uncovered or who cares what's been covered or anything else? I'm going to go hang out with Paul McCartney Sir. Paul McCartney but I still little weird. I've still a little way I didn't understand why wasn't more excited. I didn't understand an issue. Why? Why was still a little freaked out? And then like I'll I'll tell you guys this, you know, I don't know that I told Paul in so many words, but, but you know, when you grow up with the Beatles when you are a Beatles nut and really leaned into them a lot when you're a kid and put all that in your head and had a relationship with the Beatles. You have your beetle? Yes, people I'm fifty four years old. So you know, I had my betel and. I did, and, and this was really what was at the core of my exile. And also my my weird reaction was might be the was was John and. And I'm surprised that it stuck so on. There was part of me. That's sort of like Albany interview Paul. But you know, Paul's Paul. I mean, you know, John was my Beatle John man. The raw won the the con. Yeah, the tormented won the the, the one that the war's heart on his sleeve, the intense one. I mean, John was my Beadle. I mean, I was devastated when John was killed. I was, I'd gone before he was killed. I'd gone at some point when I was younger to just look at the Dakota building. I just wanted to run into John and New York City. I just John was my guy, but that was sort of add it. And once I resolved that and was like, dude, dude, it's Paul McCartney. I mean, it's when McCartney's the they're still part of me so I can't. But John was my guide, so we'll shut up and go, go, talk to Paul. We, I mean, come on, it's Paul McCartney, but you have these relationships. You know, but it was. But once I saw Paul people become people very quickly for me, especially after doing this for so long, you know, having them over to my house sitting round with them before and after a talk taking pictures, you know, having conversations after the this was not going to happen with Paul. This is Paul McCartney, Sir, Paul. So I'll I'm at the event in where in some holding area and there's other events going on and we're waiting for Paul. He's running late. And I've got my notes and I kind of put some stuff together 'cause I got about an hour with them. In this event, it's about an hour in live and you wanna you wanna be prepared. You don't want to wing it and alive..

Paul McCartney Beatles John Brennan Egypt station Albany Dakota New York City Beadle fifty four years
"sir paul" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

04:14 min | 2 years ago

"sir paul" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

"I'm not sure, but it was for capitol records. It was the fifth annual capital congress where capitol records. Takes over the arc light movie complex over there or a couple of theaters, anyways runs events all day and Paul McCartney the beetle was the surprise guest, and I was the guy who got to do the talking to him. I was able to interview Paul, but I just want to set you up a little bit. So you know what you're getting into. It is a live event. There was a large audience air Paul, and I were both aware of that and being entertainers that we are. You know, there was an element of involving the audience in in terms of how we pay our conversation, which happens in a lot vent. I've not done a live w t f in a long time, and I've only done a few one on one live events that were later published his podcast and one of the best ones really one of the best podcasts that I've ever done in a lot of ways and a monumental moment for me was doing this type of thing with Terry gross. Several years ago at at bam in Brooklyn for radio event. And that turned out to be a great time as did Paul now, obviously, we all love the Beatles. And if you say that you don't love the Beatles, then there's clearly, you know, you really haven't processed it properly or or you're you're taking a stand for something. There's something fundamentally a little flawed. If you can dismiss the Beatles at all at once you might say like, I didn't like that one, but even that's weird, honestly, and I'm not trying to to to be judgmental. I'm just saying that Beatles songs are like they're almost like Christmas songs in a way where you know I'm a Jew, but I know most of the Christmas songs, at least the first verse there just in your head, they're they're almost biological Beatles songs in the brain. It's almost biological. They're just they've. They're all in there. Now some of us put effort into getting them all in their others. They just in there. You don't even know how they got. In there. It's there's an argument to be made that maybe we're, we're actually born with the raw elements of Beatles songs in our heads. They're just they're ready to gel. You know, they're in there when you're born, they just don't have the form. And then you know, as soon as you hear maybe two notes of any Beatles song magically the song just forms itself in your brain at a very early age. Sometimes prenatal, I think is what happens and within the first year, your brain just loads up with most of the Beatles songs. Now, obviously, as an infant, you can't be responsible for say, revolution number nine or some of the more esoteric stuff. Perhaps a couple of the bits on a magical mystery tour, but most of the other stuff is in there and you can't sing along with revolution ember nine really number nine. Number nine. Number nine. Number nine or perhaps, but even the melody of flying on magical mystery tour up up. Not a lot of words, but how can you forget that? That's probably the most prenatal be of song is the instrumental flying from I believe, magical, mystery tour. I reacted not unlike I did with President Obama when I was offered the opportunity to talk to him and Paul, I was sort of like, oh, man, really? You know, like I mean, what am I gonna? How am I? What am I gonna get? I mean, what am I gonna? I really am I going to do that eight. It happened again with Paul happened with President Obama, but he was president and Paul is a beetle oatmeal. I I would think a beetle probably bigger in some ways. The Beatles are you know, the president all the time, and they're magnanimous and all loving and the, you know, They, the. they don't govern per se, but they, they have governed us through many feelings and emotions and periods in our lives, and they continue to do so for generations and generations. Not gonna go away, but I don't need to plug the Beatles. The Beatles really are the they and they still have for whatever reason are the greatest. They really are. So why? Why would I be adverse to. To this amazing opportunity to talk to Paul. Yeah. Why was I.

Paul McCartney Beatles President Obama Terry gross Brooklyn president Paul
James McCartney, Ethan and John Lennon discussed on 24 Hour News

24 Hour News

00:18 sec | 2 years ago

James McCartney, Ethan and John Lennon discussed on 24 Hour News

"Most iconic role clearly dictates the needs of the many out with the needs of the few TV actor Ethan. Pack the son of. Academy Award winner Gregory, Peck has been cast to play Mr. Spock in the upcoming season of Star Trek discovery which will feature an encounter between the discovery crew and the enterprise

James Mccartney Ethan John Lennon Mr. Spock CBS Peck Sir Paul Gregory
Sir Paul McCartney, CBS and Alejandro Silva discussed on 24 Hour News

24 Hour News

00:17 sec | 2 years ago

Sir Paul McCartney, CBS and Alejandro Silva discussed on 24 Hour News

"But there was plenty more that we did not. See and now CBS will, run a one hour special carpool karaoke when corden met, McCartney live from Liverpool it said to air Monday. August twentieth at eight PM new project for Perot Williams joined forces. With American Express to launch

Sir Paul Mccartney CBS Alejandro Silva Perot Williams Richard Gere Amex New York American Express Liverpool ABC Corden Hollywood Million Dollars Four Years One Hour
"sir paul" Discussed on FT Alphachat

FT Alphachat

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"sir paul" Discussed on FT Alphachat

"If an g gets into that kind of trouble again the not going to have the kind of agonies that geithner went through as they works at what's do there is there is no need for them to do so i mean the law speech i gave while owes and office was in washington and i said the us now has the laws on through a kind of slight miracle an accident of banking and financial history the firms have structure where these firms could be resolved bailed in as it's become known so that the bondholders take the losses rather than the tax payers and you know countries may not prepare themselves to do that properly all they may choose not to do it when it comes to it but my view has been an remains but then they'll have some answering to do there because they will not be able to say we had no choice this they will have had a choice this is getting onto the substance of financial regulation but the job of my generation of officials in the aftermath of the crisis was to give our successes and politicians choice while i think they've got a choice i didn't say we pretty but they they are not in the position of having to rescue all the central banks having to lend and so what this means is i think the central banks are insulated from some of the horrendous judgments that they had to make in the in the past does this ultimately reduce the moral hazard in the system there was very strong since june the crisis that whoever else was going to take losses on hold his could not hear that they had to be allowed to stay home because so many people were assuming that they would be maintained they they would be kept whole i mean does that reduce the moral hazard in the system yes in general because we have yes but it makes it vital and frankly i would like to see the leaders of the federal reserve the fdic an sec.

washington geithner fdic
"sir paul" Discussed on FT Alphachat

FT Alphachat

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"sir paul" Discussed on FT Alphachat

"In the uk most major jurisdictions now have much better statutory regimes legislated regimes for sorting out a fundamentally bust financial institution in a moral 'sort leeway i mean this isn't going to be pretty but i think i think the world has got to a place where politicians onto the position where the only sane thing to do is to rescue this bust firm and the question is who in the big secutive part of government should execute the rescue and this for mile tribe full for the central bankers i think this is manner from heaven i mean the lender of last resort role people will know that expression which stems from the late eighteenth century as an expression articulated most clearly in the middle of the nineteenth century is the idea that central banks should lend end plentifully albeit at a reasonably high cost so firms that are suffering a liquidity crisis but a fundamentally sound that they're not they're not fundamentally finished because you have to make judgments about sound soul fundamental unsoundness in the heat of the moment and there is a suspicion particularly in the united states and i don't know whether the suspicion is federal there is a suspicion that the federal reserve has ed in the direction of lending to firms rather than letting them go into bankruptcy because bankruptcy would be so disorderly and they are now relieved of that tie them i mean that is how strongly i i mean i it's i i really think.

uk united states
"sir paul" Discussed on FT Alphachat

FT Alphachat

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"sir paul" Discussed on FT Alphachat

"Eating principles there's no magic in those words that too by the way would be a bigger change than people think and i think the debate in the united states about whether the federal reserve should follow a rule when it sets monetary policy or should be assessed against a rule which is slightly different thing is i think really a particular manifestation of desire to see what the underlying operating principles i i'm doubtful myself that it could be expressed as a mechanical rule we do know there are people who have who prepared to give it a try yes yes well a non mechanical role released the full is again this will sound obvious but i think it's quite demanding is transparency and accountability here i just wanted to underline the importance of accountability to committees of the legislature committees of congress committees of parliament or this emily and this concern sound as though it's kind of undermining the independence so what do i mean by count ability and it's best summed up and i'm not going to get the words exactly right i quote in towards the end of the book a parliamentary hearing in london when mervyn king and i were testifying to the house commons treasury committee and what americans would call the ranking member the senior member of the committee from the labor party george moody said to us what is all this for these hearings you you come here and and we we ask you questions and you give these eloquent answers then you go away and nothing that we say makes makes any different sorts of ever to what you do and moving gave the maintenance of it i was asked to contribute as as well they asked me with what i thought and we both said the same thing which is so long as the sovereign parliaments decided that the powder said interest rates lies with the bank of england monetary policy committee as an independent body it it must just do that.

united states london mervyn king congress emily house commons treasury committ george moody bank of england
"sir paul" Discussed on FT Alphachat

FT Alphachat

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"sir paul" Discussed on FT Alphachat

"We wanted i think the labor government did too but we wanted what a call hierarchy co objectives we had thought about these things during the course of the nineteen nineties mervyn king told about them georgia thought about them and the people below them people like me i held the pen for the paper we submit it to the incoming labour government on what the new regime might be so that's the first that the the second one is an again this is gonna sound innocuous but it isn't is the powers that are delegated to an independent agency should be as clear as possible the powers should not go further than a needed to do the job now let me give you an example in financial stability area there are these things that are called macroprudential powers i think it's pretty unfortunate label actually looking back and the fashionable macroprudential power around the world is that some an elected body will announce that the people can't take out mortgages with a loan to value ratio of above x or or alone to income ratio of above why i tried to be quite careful and expressing that so this applies to every individual irrespective of whether or not they personally their household or individual would be capable of servicing and repaying mortgage with a very high land value ratio because maybe they've got an inheritance coming all maybe they own a plot of land that they can sell and this is an interference of the liberal freedoms this is not proportionate in the language that we have all inherited from the german constitutional court and nor is it necessary because you could instead say if the objective is the stability the resilience of the banking system do not allow more than x percent of your mortgage.

labour government mervyn king georgia
Ringo Starr knighted by Prince William

Scott Shannon in the Morning

01:26 min | 2 years ago

Ringo Starr knighted by Prince William

"That for us call him serving go now or richard to be more precise ringo starr the former beatles drummer now seventy seven years old got his longawaited knighthood from prince william yesterday he used his real name richard starkey for the big event he said the honor medal locked to him the other surviving beatle paul mccartney was knighted in nineteen ninetyseven ringo said i had dinner with paul last week and we were both laughing about where we came from and how we ended up in the palace and it's now sir paul and sir richard funny enough when they went to buckingham palace to become members of the most excellent order of the british empire way back in one thousand nine hundred sixty five proper british types were horrified many returned their members medals in disgust one man sent back twelve medals he had earned fighting in both world wars decorating the beatles he said has made a mockery of everything this country stands for i have heard them sing and play and i think they are deplorable but they said the queen then in her late thirties it's very cool and very sweet to them black panther has set another record most tweeted about movie ever twitter said it has been tweeted about more than thirty five million times beating the previous record holder star wars the force awakens the most recent star wars installment the last jedi ranked third over the weekend black panther also became the first film since two thousand nine avatar to top the box office in north america five straight weekends so blake shelton was.

Prince William Richard Starkey Paul Mccartney Ringo Sir Paul Beatles Twitter Sir Richard Buckingham Palace North America Blake Shelton Seventy Seven Years
"sir paul" Discussed on Kristi Lee Uninterrupted

Kristi Lee Uninterrupted

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"sir paul" Discussed on Kristi Lee Uninterrupted

"On my apartment and sent actually sent uh who i said buddy home gamal no i did i said somebody flowers he sent somebody flowers you know i don't remember i think it was the general manager the other radio it said speaking of time yes sir time for flowers bobcar volume great done so yeah so that's how i got that kick s apartment nice my for it all right well all the years in all the shoes it we've all been a part of do you have a favorite guest that's been on the show for me with a question dolly part yeah when does he was in the studio that's a good too it was it was a great warning she spent three hours were this was as open and wonderful is could be but not my favorite guest my favorite will be sir paul mccartney yeah yeah it's hard to beat him mr smith your skin is right behind all libor with a camera the region said mr skin on last week yeah he soon though i missed a you miss them he missed you theory brought that up when he calls he missed you and i have a lot in common yes india dear skin to win with you do get away what about you mark favorite guests while wow her yes yes yes i enjoyed having my own voices as my guess i was uh i know what i'm thinking you did oh it going to be a rumble wow i i.

gamal general manager sir paul mccartney three hours