18 Burst results for "Sir John Herrington"

"sir john harrington" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

08:42 min | 3 d ago

"sir john harrington" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"R A in Dallas. This is think I'm Chris Boyd, the toilet technology used in most homes and businesses. Today, it's similar to what was available a century ago. But scientists and environmental advocates say we can and must do better transforming toilets so they use fewer precious resource is and even generate useful things from bio fuels and plastics to building materials, even purified water and fertility medications. Science journalist Chelsea Ward is here to walk us through the possibilities. She's the author of a book called Pipe Dreams, the urgent Global quest to transform the Toilet. Chelsea. Welcome to think. Thanks for having me you're not unaware that some people think it's weird to read a whole book about toilets. Do you were not one of those kids who enjoyed potty humor and for a long time you were as reluctant as anybody to talk about toilets. What changed your mind? Yeah, I am would have been possibly the last person voted most likely to write a book about the toilet by my high school classmates. I would say, um, I You know, didn't like potty humor. I didn't even like to talk about the toilet. I had a friend visiting me when I lived in Austria, about one who wanted to talk about the toilets in that part of the world that have Ah, special shelf, and I remember Looking at her and horror. Why would you bring that up? Um, And here I am on. So what changed for me was in 2013. I got two assignments. One was to write about. New technologies for places where people don't have toilets who might have very poor toilets, innovative technologies for those contexts that something I care very much about. So you know, I took that on another had a A connection to toilets that surprised me. It was about heat in our cities and how we might be able to reclaim the heat in our cities and create a kind of new new sources of heat. And that story had Anel Ament. Of toilets because there's a lot of heat in our sewers that we put down there with our our warm water that we put in our sewers and those two stories together. Through my attention toward this topic, and I realized that there was just this very broad topic of sanitation that I wanted to know more about, and I've been reporting on the topic and researching and learning. Ever since. And overtime. My trepidation with regards to talking about toilets fell away, and now I have no shame about it at all. The ancient Greeks and Romans build very sophisticated sewer systems for the time did they build actual toilets as we think of toilets today? And so They didn't have. They did have public latrines. That was something very special about the Romans as well so well that we know about their sewer systems, and they did have public latrines, and they also had a lot of other kinds of Toilets like pit latrines. The interesting thing is that when we think about sewers today, we tend to think about, um you know, waste from our toilets going into them. But that's not how the romance thought of their sewers I learned They really thought of Themis storm water and water drainage. And so to the extent that toilets were sometimes attached to the sewers, it was sort of incidental. There would be like a public latrine at near a bathhouse. And so then the bathhouse the bath When the water from the big bath in the bathhouse was drained, then it could wash the I'm poop from the train through the sewers, But otherwise people didn't necessarily want to attach their toilets to sewers because they didn't have traps as we know them as we have them today. So we have these traps these water traps and our toilets that seal the pipe. So that sewer gas doesn't come back up. They didn't have that. So if they were connected to the sewer with their toilet, any number of things could have come up from there. So you know Sent a Pedes Maybe rodents, maybe reptiles. Sure gasses. And there's even a story which maybe was a joke, But about an octopus coming up eating cheese from a larger or something like that. So you know, some people joked about it, but To a great extent, people didn't think back then of sewers as receptacles for toilet waste. Okay. We owe the modern toilet to Victorian England. What sort of phases of development to toilets go through before the design most of us have in our homes right now was pretty much standardized. Yes. So the the Toilet. That water is is very useful in a toilet. As I said, because it does seal the the truth. It seals the whole the traps that smells don't come back up, and so Toilets, you know before that. You know, we're smell was a really big problem. So in the late 16th century, an inventor, so this was quite a while. Back Name, Sir John Harrington invented really the first. Flush toilet in the in the The development of the modern flush toilet. There were some concepts for the flush toilet prior to that, but this was the sort of the Earliest. That led to the toilets that we have today, but was really only until the 18th and then 19th century. The toilet started toe look like And act like the toilets that we use today. But by buying the mid of 19th late 19th century toilets were pretty much the same as the toilets we have today in the sense that they Had water in a basin that then flushed through the toilet and that cleans it out and then seals it up once the water is gone. The problem then was that the water doesn't really quite have anywhere. To go. I mean, it was just a patchwork of solutions in England at the time, so sometimes it would flush into Ah cess pool sometimes would flush into a Bitch, and then it just made the outside of people's houses in that outside of the city, you know, very messy, and so it was in the middle of the 19th century that that became a really big problem, and then they had to build sewers like a proper system. Of coordinated system of sewers that would then take all of that watery mix out of the city and put it far away from the city. So not just into, say the Thames right outside of London, but take it. Take it some distance away from the city so people didn't have toe live with all that stench. I was surprised to learn that the earliest toilets were like elaborately carved and decorated, which seems like such a bad idea when you describe what they looked like and how they ultimately move toward kind of Smooth ceramic design that are easy to clean. Yes. So some of the earliest toilets I mean, it depended on your on your class, right? But some expensive toilets were very beautiful. Um, there's one that I remember. That's you know, got all the God all these curly Q's on their sort of they sort of have watery themes like when I think it's called the novelist or the Dolphin, and they really celebrate this with water. Concept. Hand and but it but it was later when, um Scientists realized that the cause of diseases like cholera and typhoid were.

Chris Boyd 2013 Austria Chelsea Ward England London Chelsea Dallas two stories 18th 19th century Pipe Dreams Today late 16th century Thames a century ago John Harrington mid of 19th late 19th century One two assignments
"sir john harrington" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

NEWS 88.7

09:14 min | 3 d ago

"sir john harrington" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

"Waste away to some mysterious place, where becomes someone else's problem. Is when we've had trouble finding one and yet toilets and the sanitation services that make them work have literally transformed the world, making everyday life vastly cleaner, more pleasant and less dangerous. It's fair to say the advent of toilets played a role in extending human life spans this fewer people were susceptible to killer diseases like cholera, polio and dysentery. So today we both celebrate the toilet and consider how it could be better still from K E. R A in Dallas. This is think I'm Chris Boyd, the toilet technology used in most homes and businesses. Today, it's similar to what was available a century ago. But scientists and environmental advocates say we can and must do better transforming toilets so they use fewer precious resource is and even generate useful things from bio fuels and plastics to building materials, even purified water and fertility medications. Science journalist Chelsea Ward is here to walk us through the possibilities. She's the author of a book called Pipe Dreams, The URGENT Global Quest to transform the Toilet Chelsea. Welcome to think Thanks for having me you're not unaware that some people think it's weird to read a whole book about toilets. Do you were not one of those kids who enjoyed potty humor and for a long time you were as reluctant as anybody to talk about toilets. What changed your mind? Yeah, I am would have been possibly the last person voted most likely to write a book about the toilet by my high school classmates. I would say, um, I You know, didn't like potty humor. I didn't even like to talk about the toilet. I had a friend visiting me when I lived in Austria about anyone who wanted to talk about the toilets in that part of the world that have Ah, special shelf, and I remember Looking at her in horror. Why would you bring that up? And here I am on. So what changed for me was in 2013. I got two assignments. One was to write about. New technologies for places where people don't have toilets who might have very poor toilets, innovative technologies for those contexts that something I care very much about. So you know, I took that on another had a A connection to toilets that surprised me. It was about heat in our cities and how we might be able to reclaim the heat in our cities and create a kind of new new sources of heat. And that story had Anel Ament. Of toilets because there's a lot of heat in our sewers that we put down there with our our warm water that we put in our sewers and those two stories together. Through my attention toward this topic, and I realized that there was just this very broad topic of sanitation that I wanted to know more about, and I've been reporting on the topic and researching and learning. Ever since. And overtime. My trepidation with regards to talking about toilets fell away, and now I have no shame about it at all. The ancient Greeks and Romans build very sophisticated sewer systems for the time did they build actual toilets as we think of toilets today? And so They didn't have. They did have public latrines. That was something very special about the Romans as well so that we know about their sewer systems, and they did have public latrines, and they also had a lot of other kinds of Toilets like pit latrines. The interesting thing is that when we think about sewers today, we tend to think about, you know, waste from our toilets going into them. But that's not how the romance thought of their sewers I learned Um they really thought of Themis storm water and water drainage. And so to the extent that toilets were sometimes attached to the sewers, it was sort of incidental. There would be like a public latrine at near a bathhouse. And so then the bathhouse the bath When the water from the big bath in the bathhouse was drained, then it could wash the I'm poop from the train through the sewers, But otherwise people didn't necessarily want to attach their toilets to sewers because they didn't have traps as we know them as we have them today. So we have these traps Thies water traps in our toilets that Seal the pipe. So that sewer gas doesn't come back up. They didn't have that. So if they were connected to the sewer with their toilet, any number of things could have come up from there. So, um, you know, Sent to Pedes. Maybe rodents, maybe reptiles? Sure gasses. And there's even a story which maybe was a joke, But about an octopus coming up eating cheese from a larger or something like that. So you know, some people joked about it, but To a great extent, people didn't think back then of sewers as receptacles for toilet waste. Okay, we owe the modern toilet to Victorian England. What sort of phases of development? Toilets go through before the design most of us have in our homes right now was pretty much standardized. Yeah. So the the Toilet. The water is is very useful in a toilet. As I said, because it does seal the the true It seals the whole the trap so that Smells Don't come back up and so toilets you know, before that You know, we're smell was a really big problem. So in the late 16th century, an inventor, so this was quite a while. Back Name, Sir John Harrington invented really the first. Flush the toilet in the in the In the development of the modern flush toilet. There were some concepts for the flush toilet prior to that, but this was the sort of the Earliest. That led to the toilets that we have today, but was really only until the 18th and then 19th century. The toilet started toe look like And I actually like the toilets that we use today. But by buying the mid 19th late 19th century toilets were pretty much the same as the toilets we have today in the sense that they Had water in a basin that then flushed through the toilet and that cleans it out and then seals it up once the water is gone. The problem then was that the water doesn't really quite have anywhere. To go. I mean, it was just a patchwork of solutions in England at the time, so sometimes it would flush into Ah cess pool sometimes would flush into a Bitch and then it just made the outside of people's houses in that outside of the city, you know, very messy. And so it was in the middle of the 19th century that that became a really big problem, and then Um, they had to build sewers like a proper system. Of coordinated system of sewers that would then take all of that watery mix out of the city and put it far away from the city. So not just into, say the Thames right outside of London. But take it. Take it some distance away from the city so people didn't have toe live with all that stench. I was surprised to learn that the earliest toilets were like elaborately carved and decorated, which seems like such a bad idea when you describe what they looked like and how they ultimately move toward kind of Smooth ceramic design that are easy to clean. Yes. So some of the earliest toilets I mean, it depended on your on your class, right? But some expensive toilets were very beautiful. There's one that I remember. That's you know, got all the God all these curly Q's on their sort of they sort of have watery themes like when I think it's called the novelist or the Dolphin, and they really celebrate this with water. Concept. Hand and But but it was later. When Scientists realized that the cause of diseases like cholera and typhoid were.

Chris Boyd 2013 Chelsea Ward Austria London Dallas 19th century Chelsea Today 18th late 16th century today One mid 19th late 19th century John Harrington a century ago two stories first two assignments both
"sir john harrington" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

04:43 min | 2 months ago

"sir john harrington" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Better known as the municipal wastewater treatment plant Nearest you every time you flush But have you ever considered what else we could be doing with our poop and pee are you probably don't really want to think about it. And neither does pretty much anybody else. Which is why the flush toilet We 21st century humans use hasn't changed much since it was first patented in 17 75 by Scottish watchmaker named Alexander Coming Cummings Toilet was a slightly altered version of the CA Mod designed for Queen Elizabeth, the first by her God. Son, Sir John Harrington in 15 92. Cummings had an S shaped pipe to trap bad odors, while Harrington's had not Of course, self flushing toilets, heated seats, and those vacuum parties like you see on airplanes and tour Busses came later. But our one and done attitude towards come out innovation probably comes from the fact that we simply don't want to think about poop that much. We spoke with Deanna McDonagh, a professor of industrial design and the Beckman Institute of Advanced Science and Technology at the University of Illinois at our banish champagne. She said. Within the American culture, there's still a resistance and reluctance to discuss body waste. The toilet has remained relatively unexplored, I think, because we're failing to realize that to quote a British saying where there's muck, there's brass. We're failing to see the potential opportunity. Our modest toilet is offering us because the notion of immersing yourself in such a product makes us all feel so uncomfortable. But going to the bathroom isn't something we've always been squeamish about long ago. It was just another experience an opportunity for relaxation and hanging out. The ancient Romans used toilet time is a time to catch up with their friends. The year. 315 BC Rome had 144 bustling public toilets lined with stone benches with keyhole shaped cutout situated all along them where people would sit together and do their business and maybe some gossiping too. Later in medieval England. You could be walking down the street and someone might throw the contents of their chamber pots out the window onto you. Oops. They might say sorry about it, but it would kind of be on you for walking too close to their house. Fancier medieval people use a garter robe. A little closet stuck onto the side of a castle with a hole in the floor that emptied into a moat or cess. Pit clothes were also kept in the guard a row but because it was that stench of human waste would keep the fleas and moths out of the garments. Public garter robes in London empty directly into the Thames, which was an unbelievably poor public health move. As the population of Europe grew over the course of the 18 hundreds up to 100, people would share the same public guard a robe. And the waist just washed into the rivers tainting the drinking water supply, which explains why so many outbreaks of cholera, typhoid and other water borne diseases bedeviled 19th century Europeans, resulting in more than half the working class population dying before the age of five. It was a mess. As a result of a particularly hot summer in London in 18 58 when the smell of rotting sewage maid living in the city completely unbearable Parliament Commission to the construction of the London sewer which was finished in 18 65. Deaths resulting from waterborne diseases plummeted and cities all over the world followed suit and constructed their own sanitary sewers. Toilet, patented by coming eventually became standard and houses and wealthy countries all over the world, along with slight variations patented by others, like Thomas Crapper. Yes, that's his real name whose contributions to the overall design of the toilet were minimal but whose legacy endures because he made sure his name was visible on all of his products. And, hey, it's great that fewer people are dying due to poor sanitation in these places anymore, but the toilet is due for an upgrade. So what do we need our new toilets to do? McDonough said. The toilets offer a relatively unexplored territory that offers significant potential in respect to healthy living and healthy aging. As individuals are taking more responsibility for their health eating habits and well being. The bathroom offers a somewhat blank canvas for us to integrate intuitive technology to support the individual. Imagine a toilet that could tell you how hydrated you were. Whether you were deficient in particular vitamins warn you of blood in your stools and changes in your hormones. We literally flush all that information away each day in the form of waste matter. So we could find out a lot about our own health from our toilets. But according to the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, which launched their reinvent the toilet challenge back in 2011, the next generation of toilets will also be able to kill pathogens, compost human waste and keep up with the fast urbanization of the 21st century and all that without sewer, infrastructure, electricity or a water source. They might even be able to mind our waste for valuable elements like fast first nitrogen and potassium and separate, solid and liquid waste in order to use them to make things like building supplies. But will the new toilets look very much different from the one in your bathroom now? Or the one Sir John Harrington made for Queen Elizabeth in the 16th century..

Sir John Harrington Alexander Coming Cummings London Queen Elizabeth waterborne diseases Beckman Institute of Advanced Europe typhoid Deanna McDonagh Thomas Crapper Melinda Gates Foundation professor of industrial design England University of Illinois McDonough Parliament Commission
"sir john harrington" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

06:10 min | 2 months ago

"sir john harrington" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"I mean, yeah, I mean, I feel more mature than I've ever felt like you're the adult here s O. And then now I'm acting like one s so literally. When you say calm, And when you say that you're mature. Can you share with us? What does it actually feel like? Because you're saying that, you know, two years ago. Before we started the work. It was one way of being And then something happened. We could talk about what actually happened. But now there's a different experience of being on the planet that you have. Yeah, same or about what that feels. It's like everything's much brighter. Like the trees, and the leaves and like being outside is is much more vibrant. I feel like elevated, but not in an arrogant way. I feel like calm. I appreciate everyone a lot more. I think when I started seeing you after the election, I had lost my faith in everything. And now and everybody like I thought everybody was unreliable. Nobody could we could count on and then now I feel like I have faith in everybody. Like even in people I don't like or are drawn to. I kind of can see. Oh, everyone has goodness. People who do bad things aren't necessarily bad people. They're lost. Like I realized I was lost and so like getting back on the track, I think it is. I think I see everything. I could go outside and sit on my balcony like I did this morning in silence without music without news without TV, And just think about my day And also this is what's so important is like reflection like the time to think the time you allow yourself to think about the things you've done and the things we're going to do. Is so underrated and undervalued or was with regard to my own. You know my own self, So it's much more calm. Keep listening. You can hear the rest of this podcast and all of its episodes and discovered thousands of others. All available to you for free right now by downloading the I heart radio app number one for podcasts. Welcome to brain stuff from Howstuffworks. Hey, Brain stuff. Lauren Vogel. Bomb here. Consider the flush toilet. It's a fascinating device, if you think about it. This giant porcelain chairs installed into every modern American bathroom, using up gallons of precious drinking water every day toe whisk your urine and feces into oblivion. Better known as the municipal wastewater treatment plant Nearest you every time you flush But have you ever considered what else we could be doing with our poop and pee are you probably don't really want to think about it. And neither does pretty much anybody else. Which is why the flush toilet We 21st century humans use hasn't changed much since it was first patented in 17 75 by Scottish watchmaker named Alexander Coming Cummings Toilet was a slightly altered version of the CA Mod designed for Queen Elizabeth, the first by her God. Son, Sir John Harrington in 15 92. Cummings had an S shaped pipe to trap bad odors, while Harrington's had not Of course, self flushing toilets, heated seats, and those vacuum parties like you see on airplanes and tour Busses came later. But our one and done attitude towards come out innovation probably comes from the fact that we simply don't want to think about poop that much. We spoke with Deanna McDonagh, a professor of industrial design in the Beckman Institute of Advanced Science and Technology at the University of Illinois at our banish champagne. She said. Within the American culture, there is still a resistance and reluctance to discuss body waste. The toilet has remained relatively unexplored, I think, because we're failing to realize that to quote a British saying where there's muck, there's brass. We're failing to see the potential opportunity. Our modest toilet is offering us because the notion of immersing yourself in such a product because all feel so uncomfortable. But going to the bathroom isn't something we've always been squeamish about long ago. It was just another experience an opportunity for relaxation and hanging out. The ancient Romans used toilet time is a time to catch up with their friends. The year. 315 BC Rome had 144 bustling public toilets lined with stone benches with keyhole shaped cutout situated all along them where people would sit together and do their business and maybe some gossiping too. Later in medieval England. You could be walking down the street and someone might throw the contents of their chamber pots out the window onto you. Oops. They might say sorry about it, but it would kind of be on you for walking too close to their house. Fancier medieval people used a guard, a robe, a little closet stuck onto the side of a castle with a hole in the floor that emptied into a moat or cess. Pit clothes were also kept in the guard a row but because it was that stench of human waste would keep the fleas and moths out of the garments. Public garter robes in London empty directly into the Thames, which was an unbelievably poor public health move. As the population of Europe grew over the course of the 18 hundreds up to 100, people would share the same public guard a robe. And the waist just washed into the rivers tainting the drinking water supply, which explains why so many outbreaks of cholera, typhoid and other water borne diseases bedeviled 19th century Europeans, resulting in more than half the working class population dying before the age of five. It was an ask As a result of a particularly hot summer in London in 18 58 when the smell of rotting sewage maid living in the city completely unbearable Parliament Commission to the construction of the London sewer which was finished in 18 65. Deaths resulting from waterborne diseases plummeted and cities all over the world followed suit and constructed their own sanitary sewers. Toilet, patented by coming eventually became standard and houses and wealthy countries all over the world, along with slight variations patented by others, like Thomas Crapper. Yes, that's his real name whose contributions to the overall design of the toilet were minimal but whose legacy endures because he made sure his name was visible on all of his products. And, hey, it's great that fewer people are dying due to poor sanitation in these places anymore, but the toilet is due for an upgrade. So what do we need our new toilets to do? McDonough said. Toilets offer a relatively unexplored territory that offers significant potential in respect to healthy living and healthy aging. As individuals are taking more responsibility for their health eating habits and well being..

London Alexander Coming Cummings Sir John Harrington Beckman Institute of Advanced waterborne diseases Thomas Crapper Howstuffworks Lauren Vogel Europe typhoid Queen Elizabeth McDonough Deanna McDonagh Parliament Commission professor of industrial design England University of Illinois
"sir john harrington" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

04:56 min | 2 months ago

"sir john harrington" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Better known as the municipal wastewater treatment plant Nearest you every time you flush But have you ever considered what else we could be doing with our poop and pee are you probably don't really want to think about it. And neither does pretty much anybody else. Which is why the flush toilet We 21st century humans use hasn't changed much since it was first patented in 17 75 by Scottish watchmaker named Alexander Coming Cummings Toilet was a slightly altered version of the CA Mod designed for Queen Elizabeth, the first by her God. Son, Sir John Harrington in 15 92. Cummings had an S shaped pipe to trap bad odors, while Harrington's had not Of course, self flushing toilets, heated seats, and those vacuum parties like you see on airplanes and tour Busses came later. But our one and done attitude towards promote innovation probably comes from the fact that we simply don't want to think about poop that much. We spoke with Deanna McDonagh Ah, professor of industrial Design and the Beckman Institute of Advanced Science and Technology at the University of Illinois at our banish champagne. She said. Within the American culture, there is still a resistance and reluctance to discuss body waste. The toilet has remained relatively unexplored, I think, because we're failing to realize that to quote a British saying where there's muck, there's brass. We are failing to see the potential opportunity. Our modest toilet is offering us because the notion of immersing yourself in such a product because all feel so uncomfortable. But going to the bathroom isn't something we've always been squeamish about long ago. It was just another experience an opportunity for relaxation and hanging out. The ancient Romans used toilet time is a time to catch up with their friends. In the year. 315 BC Rome had 144 bustling public toilets lined with stone benches with keyhole shaped cutout situated all along them where people would sit together and do their business and maybe some gossiping too. Later in medieval England. You could be walking down the street and someone might throw the contents of their chamber pots out the window onto you. Oops. They might say sorry about it, but it would kind of be on you for walking too close to their house. Fancier medieval people used a garter robe. A little closet stuck onto the side of a castle with a hole in the floor that emptied into a moat or cess. Pit clothes were also kept in the guard a row but because it was that stench of human waste would keep the fleas and moths out of the garments. Public garter robes in London empty directly into the Thames, which was an unbelievably poor public health move. As the population of Europe grew over the course of the 18 hundreds up to 100, people would share the same public guard a robe. And the waist just washed into the rivers tainting the drinking water supply, which explains why so many outbreaks of cholera, typhoid and other water borne diseases bedeviled 19th century Europeans, resulting in more than half the working class population dying before the age of five. It was a mess. As a result of a particularly hot summer in London, and 18 58 when the smell of rotting sewage maid living in the city completely unbearable Parliament Commission to the construction of the London sewer which was finished in 18 65. Deaths resulting from waterborne diseases plummeted and cities all over the world followed suit and constructed their own sanitary sewers. Toilet, patented by coming eventually became standard and houses and wealthy countries all over the world, along with slight variations patented by others, like Thomas Crapper. Yes, that's his real name whose contributions to the overall design of the toilet were minimal but whose legacy endures because he made sure his name was visible on all of his products. And, hey, it's great that fewer people are dying due to poor sanitation in these places anymore, but the toilet is due for an upgrade. So what do we need our new toilets to do? McDonough said. The toilets offer a relatively unexplored territory that offers significant potential in respect to healthy living and healthy aging. As individuals are taking more responsibility for their health eating habits and well being. The bathroom offers a somewhat blank canvas for us to integrate intuitive technology to support the individual. Imagine a toilet that could tell you how hydrated you were. Whether you were deficient in particular vitamins warn you of blood in your stools and changes in your hormones. We literally flush all that information away each day in the form of waste matter. So we could find out a lot about her own health from our toilets. But according to the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, which launched their reinvent the toilet challenge back in 2011, the next generation of toilets will also be able to kill pathogens, compost human waste and keep up with the fast urbanization of the 21st century. And all that without sewer, infrastructure, electricity or a water source. They might even be able to mind our waste for valuable elements like fast first nitrogen and potassium and separate, solid and liquid waste in order to use them to make things like building supplies. But will the new toilets look very much different from the one in your bathroom now? Or the one Sir John Harrington made for Queen Elizabeth in the 16th century. Probably not much unless you've got any bright ideas. Today's episode was written by just windshields and produced by Tyler playing for I Heart.

Sir John Harrington Alexander Coming Cummings London Queen Elizabeth Beckman Institute of Advanced waterborne diseases Deanna McDonagh Ah Europe typhoid Thomas Crapper professor of industrial Design England Tyler University of Illinois McDonough Melinda Gates Foundation Parliament Commission
"sir john harrington" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

06:37 min | 3 months ago

"sir john harrington" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"In. She was like a hotel. And they're like, Hey, Adrian, can I just escaped? This spell is speaking of names. Yeah, Like what I thought was so funny with these credits were it's obviously sequel, the surgical in the franchise of the Jobs films. We talked about jobs for. I would say the only defining thing about this movie is it's better than just for was just saying much, but when they're rolling the credit, this is Louis Gossett Jr as Calvin Broussard was like, What does that mean that anything? That's a nothing thing. It would be like as President Abraham Lincoln like there's That name is not a character from the movie. All right. Well, did they do that? For all the names I skipped? Okay, Because I was gonna say, I wonder if they were doing it so that it told us that because the Dennis Quaid and the Little brother character were Are Roy Scheider. Sons? Yes, that's correct, which I feel like that's Quaid, please. I mean, I guess let's just get into it. But the chief engineer, I guess I don't know what his job is. I have ever Yes. Yeah, you go ahead. He is like, so I had any so hearing like the tunnels, and he built that whole underwater facility. I I thought he was a marine biologist. Okay, but then later on when he's welding, literally welding and These guy, okay? And she's the marine biology. What's strange about that? I understand why you thought that because he's a man, and so he should be the primary ball. Got me, right? But but she was the doctor, and he was just like a handyman. Yes, he wasn't just a you know that I know he was like a true like it was weird about it because he seemed to be an engineer. But also like the operations manager like the guy you call in to come fix the things which It seemed odd was also how old is he? Do you think he seems quite young to have the level of authority? Maybe that's why everything kept breaking down. By the way. Yes, No. Because of the shark? No, because there are problems that the gates before the shark. No, that was the shark. The shark. It's a gate. That was the shock and by the way to sharks, we didn't even know sorry, but I would think he would create, he could create something with that high level position to withstand a shark. Well, I think the shark is so powerful so big. It just knocked it off the rails. It wasn't like it broke. Keep listening. You can hear the rest of this podcast and all of its episodes and discovered thousands of others. All available to you for free right now by downloading the I heart radio app number one for podcasts. Welcome to brain stuff from Howstuffworks. Hey, Brain stuff. Lauren Vogel. Bomb here. Consider the flush toilet. It's a fascinating device, if you think about it. This giant porcelain chairs installed into every modern American bathroom, using up gallons of precious drinking water every day toe whisk your urine and feces into oblivion. Better known as the municipal wastewater treatment plant Nearest you every time you flush But have you ever considered what else we could be doing with our poop and pee? You probably don't really want to think about it. And neither does pretty much anybody else. Which is why the flush toilet We 21st century humans use hasn't changed much since it was first patented in 17 75 by Scottish watchmaker named Alexander Coming Cummings Toilet was a slightly altered version of the CA Mod designed for Queen Elizabeth, the first by her God. Son, Sir John Harrington in 15 92. Cummings had an S shaped pipe to trap bad odors, while Harrington's had not Of course, self flushing toilets, heated seats, and those vacuum parties like you see on airplanes and tour Busses came later. But our one and done attitude towards come out innovation probably comes from the fact that we simply don't want to think about poop that much. We spoke with Deanna McDonagh, a professor of industrial design and the Beckman Institute of Advanced Science and Technology at the University of Illinois at our banish champagne. She said. Within the American culture, there is still a resistance and reluctance to discuss body waste. The toilet has remained relatively unexplored, I think, because we're failing to realize that to quote a British saying where there's muck, there's brass. We're failing to see the potential opportunity. Our modest toilet is offering us because the notion of immersing yourself in such a product because all feel so uncomfortable. But going to the bathroom isn't something we've always been squeamish about long ago. It was just another experience an opportunity for relaxation and hanging out. The ancient Romans used toilet time is a time to catch up with their friends. The year. 315 BC Rome had 144 bustling public toilets lined with stone benches with keyhole shaped cutout situated all along them where people would sit together and do their business and maybe some gossiping too. Later in medieval England. You could be walking down the street and someone might throw the contents of their chamber pots out the window onto you. Oops. They might say sorry about it, but it would kind of be on you for walking too close to their house. Fancier medieval people used a guard, a robe, a little closet stuck onto the side of a castle with a hole in the floor that emptied into a moat or cess pit. Clothes were also kept in the guard a row but because it was that stench of human waste would keep the fleas and moths out of the garments. Public garter robes in London empty directly into the Thames, which was an unbelievably poor public health move. As the population of Europe grew over the course of the 18 hundreds up to 100, people would share the same public guard a robe. And the waist just washed into the rivers tainting the drinking water supply, which explains why so many outbreaks of cholera, typhoid and other water borne diseases bedeviled 19th century Europeans, resulting in more than half the working class population dying before the age of five. It was a mess. As a result of a particularly hot summer in London in 18 58 when the smell of rotting sewage maid living in the city completely unbearable Parliament Commission to the construction of the London sewer which was finished in 18 65. Deaths resulting from waterborne diseases plummeted and cities all over the world followed suit and constructed their own sanitary sewers. Toilet, patented by coming eventually became standard and houses in wealthy countries all over the world, along with slight variations patented by others, like Thomas Crapper. Yes, that's his real name, whose contributions to the overall design of the toilet were minimal but whose legacy indoors because he made sure his name was visible on all of his products. And, hey, it's great that fewer people are dying due to poor sanitation in these places anymore, but the toilet is due for an upgrade. So what do we need our new toilets to do, McDonough said. The toilets offer a relatively unexplored territory that offers significant potential in respect to healthy.

Alexander Coming Cummings London Dennis Quaid Sir John Harrington President Abraham Lincoln Louis Gossett Jr Adrian waterborne diseases Roy Scheider Europe typhoid chief engineer Thomas Crapper engineer Calvin Broussard Howstuffworks Lauren Vogel operations manager Queen Elizabeth
"sir john harrington" Discussed on This Anthro Life

This Anthro Life

08:01 min | 3 months ago

"sir john harrington" Discussed on This Anthro Life

"We are immediately. Abhorred by what would you think about that. Yeah it is an interesting thing to bring up because yes of course we as humans tend to shy away from we think it's taboo to be around hooper excrement of these type and it is interesting that our ape cousins don't feel the same way as interesting. I wonder why they use it as a weapon if they feel it's not necessarily gross interesting something. No no i'd love to know about that. Why is it a weapon. Good question thank you. You know the example of a chimpanzee throwing poop editor people at their visiting or pansies. Maybe just because it's readily accessible thing you can throw am. I might be as simple. As i don't know if any biological anthropologist or listing hit us up let us know this. Anthrax djamil dot com. Let us know. Why are chimpanzees throwing poo versus sticks and stones. You know something that is interesting about. This is the conundrum of to sit or to squat right. How does somebody go to the bathroom. We live in the united states and though we live on different coasts. We have the same kinds of toilets far as we know. I've never been to your house. But i assume that you also have a western toilet you can sit on yes and i bet most people listening also have one of those right. You may have a squat toilet if you have an outhouse in the back of your yard or something. but we've been sitting on porcelain toilets for awhile. I mean the the flush toilet itself was invented in the sixteenth century. Which is interesting. By sir john harrington but really became mass produced and used by by the masses in the nineteenth century. So it's not even the two hundred years it's not super we've been sitting but it's really interesting just to think about this as a way that we have chosen culturally to sit if you've never thought about this before still today. Actually you pointed this out before liz. That in a lot of places around the world a squat toilets are norm. You see this india. You see this. In large parts of south america. When i lived in peru and i was hanging on arms with farmers most of the time they would have an outhouse for the squat toilet and it actually took a little time to get used to it. But there's scientific research that it's actually a little bit better for you to squat than it is to sit in. This has to do with the way that our bowels in our muscles are configured down south. In that when you're sitting at your finger muscles are not entirely able to be relaxed. But when you're squatting they are and if you only been sitting in toilets for two hundred ish maybe longer they may have had medieval privies where you can sit down. But for the most part the squatting over a pot or the ground and it's not because we lacking a toilet to sit but it's actually just the way that we normally would defecate or go to the bathroom so that's interesting to contemplate that we have we consider to be a modern amenity of toilet flushing toward. There's no question about naked feels cleaner that way at least two us right but it's not necessarily better for us in terms of our biology and so even just recognizing our culture will shape the literal way that we go to the bathroom and it's not necessarily just a question of more sanitary to flush toilet versus being able to go into a hole in the ground if you have a squat toilet but really also what is actually better or good for us in our bodies right if you try squat toilet. It's just interesting how culture we usually think of culture as divorced from biology but really it so interconnected. We define what we do. Biologically i mean we have biological needs like eating in-depth accounting but we define how we do them. What we eat how we defecate where all of the above your meaning that we're not we're never just purely at the whims of our biology right. We have really shape them in multiple different ways and even contemplate what that means in our past cells to archaeology. Obviously like there's the study of copper lights which is the study of human shit randomly to and but even that can study fossilized pu as a way to understand what ancient diets were like in people's health was we can't necessarily see how they went to the bathroom toilet. Maybe squat toilet. We can see that right but culture shapes everything that we do in terms of the kinds of things that we think we should eat. Our should use the bathroom or something that seems so that is so basic biology that we have to do it but how we do it in where we do it right. Arina room by ourselves. The colonial british had this idea in colonial africa. There was not nice discourse that britain's thought that africans would just kind of defecate recklessly in they needed to have a more clean sanitary idea of going to the bathroom so this is actually where we saw the name of the wash closet. Come up to that. They need to build the trains a hole in the ground and then a concrete slab over it with four walls and that becomes the wash closet door they call it but even this idea to culturally how one group especially when there's unequal power at play thinks that something should be what is cleaner like. This is the proper way or improper. Wait to go to the bathroom Think we know that the british were famous for having the ideas of propriety. But i'll cultures have really and and then trying to impose that also on on different groups of people and and so it's interesting to even see that in the level of of defecation right and we see this not super differently today even if if we're talking about developing versus developed nations in that i mean there are. Un led sanitary in public health programs. That are about building and latrines and ending open defecation what they call it in rural areas across the world because there is public health concerns about just having shit out there like if somebody has intestinal parasite it may come out in their somebody steps in it they could catch it in passed along but also then just the idea of of what does it mean to be sanitarium at least acknowledging that there are power differentials to come in with with what council sanitary and. What's the safe thing to do in what's the best way to use the toilet all the come back and say that the most basic biological axe is laid with power is laden culture. And how we do it when we do it in with whom we do it or not is all these big kind of cultural parts. Don't often find ourselves contemplating the life in the toilet bowl but it is quite a complex space. I think you know so thinking about coping. Cova was of course we can't do an episode about twenty twenty and not mentioned covid nineteen. That would be insane. But it's interesting. As adam pointed out earlier we can find out a lot about our health from our stool samples and from sewage as well and some scientists have been doing to monitor the kovin nineteen outbreak. Because you can see in stool samples earlier than people are presenting symptoms or in people who don't present symptoms at all as well and we can see where cope nineteen is highly congregating. So one hundred. And forty universities and places with congregate living like nursing homes or homeless shelters are surveilling their wastewater and too quickly impassively just assess risks. And see where they can allocate the resources see where they need. You know what. Cities need more hospital beds. What cities need more ventilators down to that kind of stuff. But also where. We need more testing. Where do we need more masks. I feel like this is probably been a very common practice for scientists and medical researchers for a while. But it's interesting how it almost takes on a new need in a new a new level of help just like if we focus on waste watering screen as something that we can measure at a building level that we can get a sense of where a higher levels of risk because obviously this has huge implications like if shortages of testing or takes a lot more work to go test every single person that there was a nursing home with three hundred people or dorm rights as a thousand students in it. It's a ton of work to go test every one of them. But then as you can you can get a vision at the water level or at the waist level right of what the level of covert is or other kinds of patterns. And you know where to put your money risk. I think that's super interesting. This is how we can solve problems with shit right. It's not just about trying to get rid of it but it's actually since it's a part of us are was you know. There's there's much that we can learn from it in terms of how we can improve our.

sir john harrington Arina Anthrax liz peru south america united states india britain africa Cova Un adam
"sir john harrington" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

06:10 min | 8 months ago

"sir john harrington" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Morning bill handle here on a Wednesday, August 12th and every Wednesday, right about this time. I'm we go right into handle in the house. Whisper with Dean Sharp. Good morning, Dean. Good morning, and let's just go right into it. Toilets. Yo. Yeah. I had to have the sound of fact. Yes, you did. All right. I am, And there's a lot to be said Okay. How long can a Fox go on? What sound effects that sound if l well said Let's say Let's take a page out of what naked guns and you know, put on the mic. You have no idea where I am broadcasting from. Yes, as true Hey, Toilets obviously are well, we could make a lot of fun of toilets. They are obviously a huge part of our lives. And the first thing is that you sent me because this is what you always tell me. And I'm assuming this weekend you're going. Talk about toilets, right? Sunday's show all about toilet toilets. OK, so toilet Trevor Trivia who was the first famous person to sit on a toilet? That is almost a and this is your question to me. That is almost a trick question. Because I'll tell you. Why are we going back to the Romans that had toilet seats? With water flowing underneath? They diverted? Ah, water to make a not No, No, no, no, no, no, no, no. Okay, I'm talking about who is the first to say ms person, too? On what we would consider a toilet. A modern flush toilet Queen Victoria. Oh, your clothes. Oh, well. Oh, well, yeah, OK, I'm going to say it was who was a queen. It was a queen. And who was that queen was Queen Elizabeth, the first Queen Elizabeth. Okay, the first now we're not talking about a modern toilet with the flush system, which Queen Victoria Lee did sit on. Actually, we we are really strangely enough. John Sir John Harrington in 15 92 who was Elizabeth's God's son actually invented what we today would call the the prototype for the modern flush toilet. Really? Oh, I didn't know they'll take me for Her. I thought it was in England in the 18 hundreds of late 18 hundreds, but so be it. We could go through the history. Ah, whole lot, but things that we have to know about about toilets because there is a world God, I love this things. You know, before you buy a toilet, one of them and I, Of course I immediately went to this banjo top issues. The first thing I think of right, you sit on the toilet. All said the music from delivering starts playing first thing that comes to mind right? I figure I figured you would zero in on that one immediately. But it's actually important point and that again is one of the things we're going to do Sunday. We're going to go through a list. There's actually 12 of them in total. I just gave you a smattering of things to know. Before you replace your existing toilet. One of them. Is this going to make total sense. Do you know? You know what a banjo top is? It is those old style countertops that are wide at the sink, but that continue across with that little six inch ledge over the toilet. You know what I'm talking about? Oh, I know you can come on alleged ago talking about your vanity countertop. Hey, vanity count. This were very popular in the sixties and seventies of vanity countertop where your sink is. That actually extends past the vanity gets real thin. OK, over the over the toilet. The tank. Yeah, that's what we call a banjo talk. Okay. Got it. Okay. I don't know why it doesn't look like a banjo. Somebody called it a bit so that the issue there is, of course. That today's toilets are getting more streamlined. But they are also getting a little taller. And so you can't just run out and buy willing Millay any old replacement toilet. If you've got that countertop, running across over where the toilets that you need to measure it, and you need to be aware of the overall height of your toilet, not just that it fits. But that you've got room to get the lid off the tank. And if it's a top flushing button toilet that you could even get your hand over there, Tio to flush the toilet, So it's just one of many concerns. All right, So let's talk about innovations because some point people do replace their toilets. And the modern toilet is extraordinary. In what it it does relative to older toilets. Dual flush, Okay, you flush once that flushes again. Dual flush toilet comes from the fact that there are now there used to be only one kind of flushing mechanism in American toilets, a siphon mechanism where actually, most people think that water Pushes stuff down through the toilet. The reality is over 80% of American toilets. It's being sucked out. It's being siphoned out, not pushed down. Because of that there has been an influx of European style toilets now into the U. S. A European style toilet is not a Seif phonic toilet. It has a much, much larger drain on it, which means that they clog less and one of the advantages of these kinds of toilets. Is that it's a dual flush. Which means you can press one side of the flush button. If you just go in number 10 yes, I've seen those many others button for number two. So you you'll end up if you remembered it pushed the right button. You could end up saving ah, third or more of the water that you normally spend on a toilet because let's face it. Pee does not need the same kind of of flush that number two does Alright on DH. That's probably true. And by the way, if you both both simultaneously, there isn't Ah, 1/3 button for number three. I'm gonna take a break right now. And we're going to come back and check in with Jennifer Jones. Lee.

Queen Elizabeth Queen Victoria Lee Dean Sharp Queen Victoria Jennifer Jones John Sir John Harrington Trevor Fox England Millay Seif
"sir john harrington" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

03:51 min | 11 months ago

"sir john harrington" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Welcome to bring stuff in house stuff worth Hey brain stuff flowing vocals on here consider the flush toilet fleeting device if you think about it this giant porcelain chairs installed into every modern American background using up gallons of precious drinking water every day to whisk your urine and feces into oblivion better known as the municipal waste water treatment plant nearest you every time you flush but have you ever considered what else we could be doing with our poop and pee are you probably don't really want to think about it and neither does pretty much anybody else which is why the flush toilet we twenty first century humans use hasn't changed much since it was first patented in seventeen seventy five by Scottish watch maker named Alexander coming a Cummings toilet was a slightly altered version of the commode designed for Queen Elizabeth the first by her god son of Sir John Harrington in fifteen ninety two Cummings had an L. shaped pipe to trap bad odors well Harrington's had not we're still flushing toilets heated seats in those backing parties like you see on airplanes and tore buses came later but our one and done attitude towards commode innovation probably comes from the fact that we simply don't want to think about that much we spoke with Deanna McDonough a professor of industrial design and the Beckman institute for advanced science and technology at the university of Illinois at Urbana Champaign she said within the American culture there is still a resistance and reluctance to discuss body waste the toilet has remained relatively unexplored I think because we're failing to realize that took quite a British saying where there's muck there's brass we are failing to see the potential opportunity are modest toilet is offering us because the notion of immersing yourself in such a product it's all feel so uncomfortable but going to the bathroom isn't something we've always been squeamish about long ago it was just another experience an opportunity for relaxation and hanging out the ancient Romans used toilet time is a time to catch up with their friends in the year three hundred and fifteen B. C. E. brown had one hundred and forty four bustling public toilets lined with stone benches with keyhole shaped cutout situated along them where people would sit together and do their business and maybe some gossiping to later in medieval England you could be walking down the street and someone might throw the contents of their chamber pot out the window onto you they might say sorry about it but it would kind of be on you for walking too close to their house fancier medieval people used a garden a little closet stuck on to the side of a castle with a hole in the floor that emptied into a mode or sex pet clothes were also kept in the garden road because it was thought stench of human waste would keep the fleas and moths out of garments public guard arrives in London empty directly into the Thames which was an unbelievably poor public health move as the population of Europe grew over the course of the eighteen hundreds of two hundred people would share the same public garderobe in the ways just washed into the rivers tainting the drinking water supply which explains why so many outbreaks of cholera typhoid and other waterborne diseases bedeviled nineteenth century Europeans resulting in more than half the working class population dying before the age of five it was a mess as a result of a particularly hot summer in London in eighteen fifty eight when the smell of rotting sewage made living in the city completely unbearable parliament commissioned the construction of the London sewer which was finished in eighteen sixty five deaths resulting from waterborne diseases plummeted in cities all over the world followed suit and constructed their own sanitary sewers the toilet patented by coming eventually became standard in houses in wealthy countries all over the world along with slight variations patented by others like Thomas Crapper yes that's his real name whose contributions to the overall design of the toilet were minimal but his legacy indoors because he made sure his name was visible on all of his products and Hey it's great that fewer people are dying due to poor sanitation in these places anymore but the toilet is due for an upgrade so what do we need a.

"sir john harrington" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

10:50 min | 1 year ago

"sir john harrington" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"Pay welcome to invention my name is Robert Lamb. And I'm Joe McCormack and we're back with part two of our discussion of the history of toilet technology in the last episode. You should probably go back if you haven't been listened to that episode first before you listen to this one. That's where we get all into the history of toilets in ancient civilizations into Latrine tack into the Klay Maxima the the the maximum sewer of ancient hailing a ship. Right through it But today we're going to get more into directly into the invention of the flush toilet and I think we gotta start off today by Dispelling Common Myth that myth and I've actually. I've heard this like repeated in movies and stuff. It seems to be a thing. People actually do think is that the flush toilet was invented by a Mr Thomas crapper now crapper does play a role in the history of the toilet but he is not its inventor by any means whatsoever not even close now first of all. We can debate about what it means to have a flush toilet. If we're going to be discussing the the idea of its invention I'd say by some definitions since waste was like washed away by water. You could argue that. Some people's of like ancient Rome in the ancient Indus Valley had flush toilets. But that's not usually what we mean when we say a flush toilet we we usually mean a device that automatically removes waste with a simple mechanism. It's not like a whole over a drainpipe in which you can pour water. It's not something that constantly has water run running underneath it. It's a machine with mechanical flushing action. That doesn't need to be situated over like a flowing ditch or anything like that and so there are a number of technologies. That really needs to be in place for this to come together like your your plumbing. Technology has to has has to reach the appropriate level of advancement before you can attach a toilet as we. Modern flushing toilet to the scenario and to and make it practical. Yeah and this is going to be a big problem with the earliest models of the flush toilet so to see one of the Pro probably the first real flush toilet since we mean but an impractical early model. We need to meet a poet And I think it is appropriate that the first real flush toilet was created by poet We mentioned him in the last episode. Inter Sir John Harrington so Sir John Harrington was an English courtier and an author who lived from fifteen sixty or fifteen sixty one to sixteen twelve is in his life stories that his father had repeatedly sort of married up into royal circles. I HIS DAD married one of Henry. The eighth illegitimate daughters and then later his father married a woman who served Queen Elizabeth. The first before she was queen in this seems to be what led to Elizabeth Queen Elizabeth Becoming John Harrington's Godmother Though apparently little John Harrington was a troublesome Godson he was prone to writing on embarrassing and morally impure subjects. That repeatedly got him in trouble with the crown he wrote insulting stuff about other Kind of pompous court people As for his literary works he was probably best known for his translation of the Italian poet. Ludovico Ariosto's epic Orlando Furioso And we can come back and mentioned that in a minute but That's like a that doesn't know or Landau for IOS. Got Like a big dragon slaying thing in it Turner remember. I know I came across it when I was in school. That sounds familiar. I I feel I feel like I read it in schools. Well but I don't recall much about it but at any rate Harrington guys that sounds a little bit like he was kind of a a brat. Yeah a little bit. I mean so he wrote these poems and epigrams and boy. You can find these online. I don't know maybe something's lost in the mix here but if this guy is considered himself a poet I I really hope toilets were good so the poems are full of like really obvious. Groan inducing turns of phrase and then all these kind of catty burns on other court. Here's who he gives these like classical influence. Nixon nicknames like sex stice and Itis It also seems it seems to me. At least like Harrington was serve kind of a fan of himself like he the he thought he was pretty. Cool Robert you feel like reading a couple of his short little poems here. Oh sure why not okay. So this is This is the one he wrote called A comparison of a book with cheese old Haywood rights and proves in some degrees that one may well compare a book with cheese every market some by cheese to feed on Eddie Free Mart. Some men by books to read on all sorts eat cheese but how there is the question. The poor food. The rich for good digestion. All sorts read books. But why will you discern the fool to laugh? The wiser sort to learn the site taste sent of cheese to some his hateful. The site taste sense of books to sums ungrateful no cheese. There was that ever pleased feeders. No book there. Is that ever liked to all readers? Yeah already hate this. You're delaying better here. This one's just a short four line epigraph here. It's called against writers that carpet other men's books this and sounds like there's a little venom and yeah the readers and the hearers like my books but yet some writers cannot them digest. But what care I for when I make a feast I would. My guess should praise it. Not The cooks So as an ABA rhyme scheme there. But I think he's saying like hey I don't write for the critics I write for the fans man. I don't know maybe this is all just like if we think of the the literary scene at the time as being like kind of you know kind of like a like a few driven hip hop culture than you know that that's probably the place for all of this. Well there's some of that I mean I get the feeling that he was sort of he was sort of like you know man about the court. He was like within the scene He was he added. These relationships as poems are very like gossipy. And they're full of all these burns and stuff you you get the sense that they were sort of writ written not for a wide audience but for a select audience who would get the you know who. He is anonymously before sending his burns at. I also notice how a lot of his work is about how his poetry is good How his critics are dumb about food and comparing things to food is kind of weird? Al is usually thrown back by the idea that the poor cheese for food but the rich only eat cheese for digestion. What I'm missing something there. It's like the rich donate food. What seems like it reveals some kind of attitude. I can't quite put my finger on plus eating nothing cheese. Sounds exactly like the kind of thing that some You know upper class royal would do and then be guilty for it. Didn't Henry the eighth die of a surfeit of cheese? Yeah so anyway. So John Harrington Little Godson of Queen Elizabeth I John Harrington. He's busy at court. He's trying not to get caught up in political rat traps. And there's a lot of those going on right now you know they're they're all these plots and stuff He gets in trouble anyway. He writes some terrible poetry. At least in my opinion I should point out that around the same time. This is around the same time that Shakespeare is writing his plays and Christopher Marlowe ended. One Point Harrington addresses some of his little barbs and epigrams to somebody named Faustus I have to wonder if Christopher Marlowe is the target solid burn referring to To him as the the great work that he would forever be remembered for right and yet we don't we didn't even name the toilet after Harrington so decree all the toilets in the land will be named Harrington's all right. So how does he get around to inventing the choice? Sounds like he has a pretty full plate with all of this. These promos that he's cutting on other literary figures. Well he's getting in so he gets in and out of trouble like apparently one of the I mentioned earlier. The thing is most famous for historically. Is this translation of Orlando Furioso Apparently the way the story goes is that he had translated one particularly racy passage and sharing it around with ladies of the court and Queen. Elizabeth was not amused and as punishment for his body behavior in his corruption of good ladies. She told him he would be banished from the court and that he shouldn't bother returning unless he had finished translating the entire epic poem so he did he finished the translation and he came back only to get banished again some years later for insults and toilet humor so sometime in this whole mix. Zinn like the fifteen ninety S. It seems I think maybe around fifteen ninety four so he actually invented the flush toilet. He put together the plan for one any installed one in his home and then later he actually installed one four Queen Elizabeth herself at her home at Richmond. Palace in what was then. Surrey and we have some details on this because in fifteen ninety six Harrington publishes his notes on the invention of the flush toilet in a very strange book link text called a new discourse on a stale subject called the metamorphosis of Ajax. Okay as so. This book is part description of an invention in part like satire and then part meditation on excrement and Related Subjects And a lot of like it seems like a big part of it is just like a defense of him publishing the book that you're currently reading I I was trying to understand. Like what the real vibe of this work is. And it just seems extremely odd The title is kind of interesting. What's the deal? With the Metaphor metamorphised. Ajax Herrington apparently referred to the flush toilet. He had he had invented as Ajax is in like. Aj Ex character in the Iliad right now in the great Greek Warrior yes And so apparently this is a pun on the word Jake's which was already at the time a slang word for toilet obviously wouldn't be a flush toilet before like you know normal types of like pit toilets and stuff who'd be like going to the Jake Sir you know I'm GonNa go sit on the Jake's it's like I need to use John so now. He had the Claire. The clever nature of the titles reveal. But it's still weird. It makes me wonder what stages syphilis was was that well maybe we should take a quick break and when we come back we will discuss. We'll discuss the details.

John Harrington Harrington Queen Elizabeth Inter Sir John Harrington Robert Lamb Henry Klay Maxima Joe McCormack Christopher Marlowe Mr Thomas Ludovico Ariosto Jake Rome Indus Valley Eddie Free Mart syphilis Turner Orlando Furioso Nixon Herrington
"sir john harrington" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

06:20 min | 1 year ago

"sir john harrington" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"Hey Welcome to invention. My name is Robert. Lamb and I'm Joe McCormack more back with part two of our discussion of the history of toilet technology in the last episode. You should probably go back if you haven't been listened to that episode first before you listen to this one that's where we get all into the history of toilets in ancient civilizations into latrine, tack into the Klay Maxima the the the maximum sewer of ancient hailing a ship right through it. but today we're going to get more into directly into the invention of the flush toilet and I think we gotta start off today by dispelling. Common Myth that myth and I've. Actually I've heard this like repeated in movies and stuff. It seems to be a thing. People actually do think is that the flush toilet was invented by a Mr Thomas crapper. CRAPPER does play a role in the history of the toilet, but he is not its inventor by any means whatsoever, not even close now first of all we can debate about what it means to have a flush toilet if we're going to be discussing the the idea of its invention, I'd say by some definitions since waste was like washed away by water. You could argue that some people's of like ancient Rome in the ancient Indus. Indus Valley had flush toilets, but that's not usually what we mean. When we say a flush toilet, we we usually mean a device that automatically removes waste with a simple mechanism. It's not like a whole over a drainpipe in which you can pour water. It's not something that constantly has water run running underneath it. It's a machine with mechanical flushing action that doesn't need to be situated over like a flowing ditch or anything like. Like that and so there are a number of technologies that really needs to be in place for this to come together like your your plumbing technology has to has has to reach the appropriate level advancement, before you can attach a toilet as we modern flushing toilet to the scenario, and to and make it practical. Yeah, and this is going to be a big problem with the earliest models of the flush toilet, so to see one. One of the pro, probably the first real flush toilet since we mean but an impractical early model, we need to meet a poet and I think it is appropriate that the first real flush toilet was created by poet We mentioned him in the last episode Inter Sir John. Harrington so Sir John Harrington was an English courtier, and an author who lived from fifteen, sixty or fifteen, sixty one to sixteen twelve. is in his life stories that his father had repeatedly sort of married up into royal circles, I, His dad married one of Henry the eighth illegitimate daughters, and then later, his father married a woman who served Queen Elizabeth the first before she was queen in this seems to be what led to Elizabeth Queen Elizabeth Becoming John. Harrington's mother the apparently little John Harrington was a troublesome Godson. He was prone to writing on embarrassing and morally impure subjects that repeatedly got him in trouble with the crown. He wrote insulting stuff about other. Other kind of pompous court people as for his literary works. He was probably best known for his translation of the Italian poet Ludovico Ariosto's epic, Orlando Furioso and We can come back and mentioned that in a minute, but That's like a that doesn't Orlando. Furioso got like a big dragon slaying thing in it Turner remember. I know I came across it when I was in school. That sounds familiar. I I feel. I feel like I. Read it in school as well, but I don't recall much about it. But at any rate. Harrington guys that sounds a little bit like. He was kind of a a Brat. Yeah a little bit I mean so. He wrote these poems and epigrams and boy. You can find these online. I don't know. Maybe something's lost in the mix here, but if this guy considered himself a poet, I I really hope his toilets were good. So the poems are full of like really obvious groan inducing. Phrase and then all these kind of catty burns on other court here's. who he gives these like classical influence, Nixon nicknames like sex, stice and itis It also seems it seems to me at least like Harrington was serve kind of a fan of himself like he the. He thought he was pretty cool Robert. You feel like reading a couple of his short little poems here. Oh sure. Why not okay, so this is This is one. He wrote called a comparison of a book with cheese. Old Heywood rights and proves in some degrees that one may well compare a book with cheese, every market some by cheese to feed on Eddie Free Mart some men by books to read on all sorts, eat cheese, but how there is the question, the poor food, the rich for good digestion. Books, but why will you discern the fool to laugh? The wiser sort to learn the site taste sent of cheese to some his hateful, the site taste sense of books to sums ungrateful, no cheese there was that ever pleased feeders, no book there. Is that ever liked to all readers. Yeah already hate this. You're delaying better here. This one's just a short four line epigraph here. It's called against writers. That carpet other men's books. This and sounds like there's a little vitamin. Yeah The readers and the hearers like my books, but yet some writers cannot them digest, but what care I for when I make a feast I would, my guess should praise it, not the cooks. So as an ABA rhyme scheme there but I think he's saying like. Hey, I don't write for the critics. I write for the fans man. I don't know. Maybe this is all just like. If we think of the the literary scene at the time as being like kind of you know kind of like a like a few driven hip hop culture than. You know that that's probably the place for all of this. Well, there's some of that, I mean I get the feeling that he was sort of. He was sort of like. You know man about the court. He was like within the scene he was. He added these relationships as poems very like Gossipy, and their full of all these burns and stuff you, you get the sense..

Sir John Harrington Orlando Furioso Robert Queen Elizabeth Inter Sir John Klay Maxima Indus Valley Rome Lamb Ludovico Ariosto Mr Thomas Joe McCormack Eddie Free Mart Nixon Orlando Turner Henry
"sir john harrington" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

03:09 min | 1 year ago

"sir john harrington" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"Hey Welcome to invention. My name is Robert. Lamb and I'm Joe McCormack more back with part two of our discussion of the history of toilet technology in the last episode. You should probably go back if you haven't been listened to that episode first before you listen to this one that's where we get all into the history of toilets in ancient civilizations into latrine, tack into the Klay Maxima the the the maximum sewer of ancient hailing a ship right through it. but today we're going to get more into directly into the invention of the flush toilet and I think we gotta start off today by dispelling. Common Myth that myth and I've. Actually I've heard this like repeated in movies and stuff. It seems to be a thing. People actually do think is that the flush toilet was invented by a Mr Thomas crapper. CRAPPER does play a role in the history of the toilet, but he is not its inventor by any means whatsoever, not even close now first of all we can debate about what it means to have a flush toilet if we're going to be discussing the the idea of its invention, I'd say by some definitions since waste was like washed away by water. You could argue that some people's of like ancient Rome in the ancient Indus. Indus Valley had flush toilets, but that's not usually what we mean. When we say a flush toilet, we we usually mean a device that automatically removes waste with a simple mechanism. It's not like a whole over a drainpipe in which you can pour water. It's not something that constantly has water run running underneath it. It's a machine with mechanical flushing action that doesn't need to be situated over like a flowing ditch or anything like. Like that and so there are a number of technologies that really needs to be in place for this to come together like your your plumbing technology has to has has to reach the appropriate level advancement, before you can attach a toilet as we modern flushing toilet to the scenario, and to and make it practical. Yeah, and this is going to be a big problem with the earliest models of the flush toilet, so to see one. One of the pro, probably the first real flush toilet since we mean but an impractical early model, we need to meet a poet and I think it is appropriate that the first real flush toilet was created by poet We mentioned him in the last episode Inter Sir John. Harrington so Sir John Harrington was an English courtier, and an author who lived from fifteen, sixty or fifteen, sixty one to sixteen twelve. is in his life stories that his father had repeatedly sort of married up into royal circles, I, His dad married one of Henry the eighth illegitimate daughters, and then later, his father married a woman who served Queen Elizabeth the first before she was queen in this seems to be what led to Elizabeth Queen Elizabeth Becoming John. Harrington's mother the apparently little John Harrington was a troublesome Godson. He was prone to writing on embarrassing and morally impure subjects that repeatedly got him in trouble with the crown. He wrote insulting stuff about other. Other kind of pompous court people as for his literary works..

Sir John Harrington Joe McCormack Inter Sir John Queen Elizabeth Indus Valley Klay Maxima Rome Robert Lamb Mr Thomas Henry
"sir john harrington" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

04:56 min | 1 year ago

"sir john harrington" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Urine and feces into oblivion better known as the municipal wastewater treatment plant nearest you every time you flush but have you ever considered what else we could be dealing with our poop and pee are you probably don't really want to think about it and neither does pretty much anybody else which is why the flush toilet we twenty first century humans use hasn't changed much since it was first patented in seventeen seventy five by Scottish watch maker named Alexander Cummings Cummings toilet was a slightly altered version of the commode designed for Queen Elizabeth the first by her god son of Sir John Harrington in fifteen ninety two Cummings had an L. shaped pipe to trap bad odors well Harrington's had not we're still flushing toilets heated seats in those vacuum parties like you see on airplanes and tore buses came later but our one and done attitude towards commode innovation probably comes from the fact that we simply don't want to think about that much we spoke with Deanna McDonough a professor of industrial design and the Beckman institute for advanced science and technology at the university of Illinois at Urbana Champaign she said within the American culture there is still a resistance and reluctance to discuss body waste the toilet has remained relatively unexplored I think because we're failing to realize that took quite a British saying where there's muck there's brass we are failing to see the potential opportunity are modest toilet is offering us because the notion of immersing yourself in such a product because all feel so uncomfortable but going to the bathroom isn't something we've always been squeamish about long ago it was just another experience an opportunity for relaxation and hanging out the ancient Romans used toilet time is a time to catch up with their friends in the year three hundred and fifteen B. C. E. brown had one hundred and forty four bustling public toilets line because stone benches with keyhole shaped cutout situated all along them where people would sit together and do their business and maybe some gossiping to later in medieval England you could be walking down the street and someone might throw the contents of their chamber pot out the window onto you they might say sorry about it but it would kind of be on you for walking too close to their house fancier medieval people used a garden a little closet stuck on to the side of a castle with a hole in the floor that emptied into a mode or sex pet clothes were also kept in the garden road because it was thought stench of human waste would keep the fleas and moths out of garments public guard arrives in London empty directly into the Thames which was an unbelievably poor public health move as the population of Europe grew over the course of the eighteen hundreds of two hundred people would share the same public garderobe in the ways just washed into the rivers tainting the drinking water supply which explains why so many outbreaks of cholera typhoid and other waterborne diseases bedeviled nineteenth century Europeans resulting in more than half the working class population dying before the age of five it was a mess as a result of a particularly hot summer in London in eighteen fifty eight when the smell of rotting sewage made living in the city completely unbearable parliament commission to the construction of the London sewer which was finished in eighteen sixty five deaths resulting from waterborne diseases plummeted in cities all over the world followed suit and constructed their own sanitary sewers the toilet patented by coming eventually became standard in houses wealthy countries all over the world along with slight variations patented by others like Thomas Crapper yes that's his real name whose contributions to the overall design of the toilet were minimal but his legacy indoors because he made sure his name was visible on all of his products and Hey it's great that fewer people are dying due to poor sanitation in these places anymore but the toilet is due for an upgrade so what do we need a new toilets to do McDonough said offer a relatively unexplored territory that offers significant potential in respect to healthy living and healthy aging as individuals are taking more responsibility for their health eating habits and well being the bathroom offers a somewhat blank canvas first integrate intuitive technology to support the individual imagine a toilet that could tell you how hydrated you were whether you were deficient in particular vitamins warn you of blood in your stools and changes in your hormones we literally flush all that information away each day in the form of waste matter so we could find out a lot about our own health from our toilets but according to the bill and Melinda gates foundation which launched their reinvent the toilet challenge back in twenty eleven the next generation of toilets will also be able to kill pathogens compost human waste and keep up with the fast urbanization of the twenty first century and all that without sewer infrastructure electricity or a water source they might even be able to minor waste for valuable elements like phosphorus nitrogen and potassium and separate solid and liquid waste in order to use them to make things like building supplies but will the new toilets look very much different from the one in your bathroom now or the one Sir John Harrington made for Queen Elizabeth in the sixteenth century probably not much unless you've got any bright ideas today's episode was written by Justin shields and produced by Tyler playing for I.

What's the History (and Future) of Toilets?

BrainStuff

05:00 min | 2 years ago

What's the History (and Future) of Toilets?

"Consider the flush toilet. It's the fascinating device. If you think about it. This giant porcelain chairs installed into every modern American bathroom using gallons of precious drinking water everyday to whisk your urine feces into oblivion better known as the municipal wastewater treatment plant nearest you every time you flush, but have you ever considered? What else we could be doing with our poop in pee? You probably don't really want to think about it. And neither does pretty much anybody else, which is why the flush toilet we twenty-first-century century. Humans us hasn't changed much since it was first patented in seventeen seventy five by Scottish watchmaker named Alexander coming Cummings. Toilet was a slightly altered version of the commode designed for Queen. Elizabeth the first by her godson, sir. John Harrington in fifteen ninety two Cummings had an s shaped pipe to trap, bad odors, while Harrington's had not, of course, self flushing. Toilets heated seats in those vacuum potties like you see on airplanes in tour buses came later. But. Our one and done attitude towards commode innovation probably comes from the fact that we simply don't want to think about poop that much. We spoke with DNA. Mcdonagh a professor of industrial design in the Beckman institute of advanced science and technology at the university of Illinois at our banish campaign. She said within the American culture, there's still resistance and reluctance to discuss body waste the toilet has remained relatively unexplored. I think because we're failing to realize that to quote, a British saying where there is muck. There's brass we are failing to see the potential opportunity are modest toilet is offering us because the notion of immersing yourself in such a product because all feel so uncomfortable. But going to the bathroom isn't something. We've always been squeamish about long ago. It was just another experience and opportunity for relaxation. And hanging out the ancient Romans used toilet time as a time to catch up with their friends in the year three hundred and fifteen BC Rome had one hundred and forty four bustling public toilets lined with stone benches with keyhole shaped cutouts situated, all along them where people would sit together and do their business, and maybe some gossiping to later in medieval England, you could be walking down the street and someone might throw the contents of their chamber pot out the window onto you. They might say sorry about it. But it would kind of be on you for walking too close to their house. Fancier medieval, people used Garda robe a little closet. Stuck onto the side of a castle with a hole in the floor that emptied into a moat or cesspit clothes were also kept in the Garda row. But because it was thought stench of human waste would keep the fleas moths out of the garments public Garda roads in London empty directly into the Thames, which was an unbelievably poor public health. With move as the population of Europe grew over the course of the eighteen hundreds up to one hundred people would share the same public garter robe and the waste just washed into the rivers tainting, the drinking water supply, which explains why so many outbreaks of cholera typhoid and other waterborne diseases bedeviled nineteenth century Europeans, resulting in more than half the working class population dying for the age of five it was a mess. As a result of a particularly hot summer in London in eighteen Fifty-eight when these smell of rotting sewage bay living in the city completely unbearable Parliament Commission to the construction of the London sewer, which was finished in eighteen sixty five deaths resulting from waterborne diseases plummeted and cities all over the world. Followed suit and constructed their own sanitary sewers the toilet patented by coming eventually became standard in houses and wealthy countries. All over the world along with slight variations patented by others like Thomas, crapper. Yes, that's his real name whose contributions to the overall design of the toilet were minimal. But whose legacy endures because he made sure his name was visible on. All of his products. And hey, it's great that fewer people are dying due to poor sanitation in these places anymore. But the toilet is due for an upgrade. So what do we need? Our new toilets to do. Mcdonagh said toilets offer a relatively unexplored territory that offers significant potential in respect to healthy living and healthy aging as individuals are taking more responsibility for their health. Eating habits and wellbeing. The bathroom offers a somewhat blank canvas for us to integrate intuitive technology to support the individual imagine a toilet that could tell you. How hydrated you were whether you are deficient in particular vitamins or new of blood in your stools and changes in your hormones. We literally flush all that information away each day in the form of waste matter. So we could find out a lot about our own health from our toilets, but according to the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, which launched their reinvent the toilet challenge. Back in twenty eleven the next generation of toilets will also be able to kill pathogens compost human waste and keep up with the fast urbanization of the twenty first century. And all that without sewer, infrastructure electricity or a water source. They might even be able to minor waste for valuable elements like phosphorus nitrogen and potassium and separate solid and liquid waste in order to use them to make things like building supplies. But we'll the new toilets. Look very much different from the one in your bathroom now or the one, sir. John Harrington made for Queen Elizabeth in the sixteenth century, probably not much unless you've got any bright

John Harrington Queen Elizabeth Mcdonagh Garda Waterborne Diseases London Garda Row Cummings Europe Alexander England University Of Illinois Rome Melinda Gates Foundation Professor Of Industrial Design Beckman Institute Thomas
"sir john harrington" Discussed on Citation Needed

Citation Needed

05:01 min | 2 years ago

"sir john harrington" Discussed on Citation Needed

"But the rule was only an affect during the daytime for some reason. Yeah, I mean, if you're walking around in night, you're just asking for it. In Rome everyone's dressed like the front row of Gallagher show just head to toe in a poncho and crying racist assist. Assist. The toilet technology from was pretty much the high watermark for centuries during the middle ages in Europe, for example, they never really moved past the idea of backyard shit pile if you're lucky you're pile would get emptied occasionally by tradesmen known as a gung farmer who separated the liquid from the solid hopefully using a merry go round like centrifuge device. Anyway, or maybe a fan. What's the ad the solids all collected which they referred to as night soil. They'd sell it to farmers as fertilizer, some farmers actually got smart about it. And they'd cut out the middleman by just inviting people to shit in their fields directly be this. I've been I've been. Shit in your field for a monk. Now, what are you growing with loom, solvents kiss? And Royal castles they did slightly better during this period, but not by much. They usually have a little room off to the side of the building that had a bench with a hole in it. And this often had a shoot leading into the moat which was good defense during an attack. But it was a ring of wet shit surrounding your house. All those other time wasn't attack and even during an attack. It didn't really stop anybody. It just made him extra angry by the time. They got there. So they'd get inside. And you know, you definitely get smeared with shit one hundred times attackers because they were pissed all right. And with our back porta colas finally breached the sick a quick break. And try to forget what we've learned. And why we're learning at with a little apropos of nothing. The really surrealist getting you. Yes. Pretty much every Roman emperor ever take a look, what do you need to really? I'm going to call it the clo- Ekka maxima. It's going to be you. Huge literally it's going to be. Wow. Wow. Yeah. This is. Sewer system. I'm looking not just any system. Sarah, the biggest and the best in the world. We're going to make Rome shit again. All right, fantastic, sir. Fantastic. Everyone's gonna love it. Right. Okay. Yeah. Just one question doesn't lead directly into our water supply the river Tiber. Yeah. Does. But, you know, avoid a floater and you're probably fine, right? Actually, guys. The the Romans were well aware of that. Do I eat you? All right. You wanna go make HUD eye contact in a public toilet. Try and stop me. Didn't get any better at all. Actually, he's when you were less talking, and we were listening. We regretting allowing you to pick topics for this show. I think you just finished telling us about the humble origin of. Medieval PU rivers. Yeah. I mean, there's more out of other humble origins shore. Now that we've got a pretty good background on the origins of the toilet. I think it's time to get into the modern evolution of this beautiful beautiful device that we all know and love today in the developed world device that we all have a wonderful intimate connection with the flushing toilet who is excited. Oh, look at Mr. Brady over here. My toilet flushes. Some of us bought a two hundred year old house. He. No, I'm with the fact that sliced bread even gets an honorable mention as a real testament to how much we just take those mother fuckers for granted. Right seriously. Right. There's there's no panic in the world as perfect as when that thing backs up, and you can't fix it. It's like. I think they have special kind of panic where you Searcy contemplate just putting your shoes on and leaving forever under an assumed name using that birth certificate number. You bought just in case? It's that yet, Tom I've dove out of three windows in my life. All for that reason. So the original prototype was created by sir. John Harrington of England who created a flushing toilet with a raised tank. And he published his design in a book entitled a new discourse. Upon a.

John Harrington Mr. Brady Rome Europe Gallagher Sarah Tom England two hundred year
"sir john harrington" Discussed on WINT 1330 AM

WINT 1330 AM

05:41 min | 2 years ago

"sir john harrington" Discussed on WINT 1330 AM

"Not attempt always drive safely. Made in America. I'm your host Neal Asbury together with co host Dr rich rough and erasure. I know you got a news flash for us. But I just want to make this one point, you know, all those global warming pushers, you know, the folks at like, the lecture us of many of the elite players like the go-to Davos, you know, once a year to the economic form there, they all get together, and George Soros and the Clintons, and all of those type of folks, and Al Gore, John Kerry, you know, the kind of folks who like to tell us about climate change will how we live our life. Yeah. Yeah. But you know, they arrived in Davos this year on more than fifteen hundred private jets. I know there's an amazing and the air is so pure. They're thinking about that. Now. I can't drive my SUV because oh my goodness. You know, my carbon footprint. I'm just. The morally wrong, right? That's very very wrong of you, very wrong. Yeah. It's not. It's not right. But if I had a jet, and I were invited to Davos, I would be right in with the in crowd, and I would go. No, no, no. I would go there. Absolutely. I just find the hypocrisy on the left is just unbelievable. These guys is. So an ladies are so crazy, absolutely crazy. But I want to let me let me just this new slash this. Well, it's because of the show I have to have the follow up on this for we always care about our listeners. All right. So who really didn't invent a toilet. I just have to tell you that. Because while we're on the show just research by actually in the late nineteenth century. Neil a London plumbing, impress our impresario name Thomas crapper manufacturing, one of the first widely lines of flush toilets, Mr. crapper. Did not invent the toilet. No. No. No, no, no, John, sir. John Harrington is the guy who really got involved invented the toilet along with Alexander guy named Alexander Cummings who received the first patent for. For the toilet. Now. What did crapper? Invent to help us. Well, crapper. He invented the the ball. Cock that when you look inside your toilet. You know, when you flush it goes down, and then this floating thing he comes up and shuts off that's what event did. And he made a fortune. Just we're still using the same concept the same patents in place today. Right now, we're still using it. So it alternate. Sir. John Harrington, and you have a Thomas crapper over the time people merged the names, and they got the John for the John. And they got another terminology the crapper for well. Crapper. I suppose so I just thought it's important for you to know that it's very important for many people. I feel better having told you will boy, I I'm just totally species. And I'm very very rarely speechless. I just don't know how do you? How do you recover from something like that, you know that bit of news? Well, it's nice to know where the term came from, you know, you're going well, except that the Brits and use the term WC, you know, many many years when I went to the English area in the sixties. They said, well, the w c means water closet. So you go to the water closet. You have to go to the bathroom. They also call the Lou. I don't know where the Lou came from it. We don't have time to go into that right now. But I promise elegant threw it over the weak. And but everyone seems to know I have to go to the John which is remarkable. But, but I find amazing now, here's here's here's here's the the whole idea of, you know, somebody doing well with an idea and pushing it and making it work. You know, Thomas crapper came up with this idea got a patented in the owns the rights as family and is going forward owns the rights that so I just pretty good invention. So hey, the follow up on that. Something that another invention. That's coming out here. And it's something that made the news this week is about the artificial intelligence. I think that's kinda like the, you know, the new economy version of a sort of an old economy invention. Hey were into artificial intelligence right now. And it looks like truck drivers chefs fast food workers many, many different types of jobs in. How is this connected? Rich to the whole fifteen dollars an hour sixteen dollar an hour. And you know, I mean, hey, look, there are just simple jobs in certain jobs that are meant to be sort of entry level jobs. And, but you know, people wanna make jobs that and maybe it's because of our broken immigration policy. Maybe we just have so many unskilled labourers around that, you know, we know these shows are supposed to be for students and right now, you know, there's just so many people competing to get these jobs because there's just not the higher paying jobs being created. And artificial intelligence is being created the takeover those lowering lower paid jobs. He rich. We're out of time. You make a very sour face. It just goes so and we love the audience, and I love talking to you all out there. And and now I just have to wait. So wow. What's a good news, Richard? We're going to be back again next week it wait for another adventure. Made in America where we never stop fighting for your jobs..

John Davos Thomas John Harrington America Neal Asbury John Kerry George Soros Lou Al Gore Alexander Cummings Neil Richard Alexander guy London
"sir john harrington" Discussed on WINT 1330 AM

WINT 1330 AM

05:24 min | 2 years ago

"sir john harrington" Discussed on WINT 1330 AM

"Co host Dr rich Ruffin Iranian. You got a news flash for us. But I just want to make this one point, you know, all those global warming pushers, you know, the folks at know like the lecture us of many of the leaders like the go to Davos, you know, once a year to the economic forum near the August together, and George Soros and the Clintons and all of those type of folks, and Al Gore. John Kerry, you know, the type of folks who like to tell us about climate change will how we should live our life. Yeah. Yeah. But you know, they they arrived in Davos this year on more than fifteen hundred private jets. I know there's an amazing and the air is so pure. They're thinking about that. Now. I can't drive my SUV because oh my goodness. You know, my carbon footprint. I'm just a morally wrong, right? That's very very wrong of you, very wrong. Yeah. It's not. It's not right. But if I had a jet, and I were invited to Davos, I would be right in with the in ground. I would go. No, no, no. I would go there. Absolutely. I just find the Apocrypha on the left is just unbelievable. These guys is. So an ladies are so crazy. You know, absolutely crazy. But I wanted let me let me just this new slash, well, it's because of the show I have to have the follow up on this for we always care about our listeners. All right. So who really didn't invent the toilet. I just have to tell you that. Because while we're on the show. I just researched this by actually in the late nineteenth century. Neil a London plumbing and press in our impresario name Thomas crapper. A manufacturer of the first widely lines of flush toilets, Mr. crapper. Did not invent the toilet. No. No. No, no, no, John, sir. John Harrington is the guy who really got involved in invented the toilet along with Alexander guy named Alexander Cummings who received the first patent for the toilet. Now. What did crapper? Invent to help us. Well, crapper. He invented the the ball. Cock that when you look inside your toilet. You know, when you flush it goes down, and then this floating thing he comes up and shuts off that's what event it and he made a fortune because we're still using the same concept the same patents in place today. Right now, we're still using it. So it alternately because Sir John Harrington, and you have a Thomas crapper over the time people merge, the names, and they got the John for the John, and they got another terminology the crapper for crapper. I suppose so I just thought it's important to know that it's very important for many people to I feel better having told you will boy, I I'm just totally species. And I'm very very rarely speechless. I just don't know how do you? How do you recover from something like that, you know that bit of news? Well, it's nice to know where the term came from you know, where you're going. Well, except that the Brits. And use the term, you know, w c you know, many many years I went to the English area in the sixties. They said, well, the w c means water closet. So you go to the water closet. You have to go to the bathroom. They also call the Lou. Came from it. We don't have time to go into that right now. But I promise elegant threw it over the weak. And but everyone seems to know I have to go to the John which is remarkable. But, but I find amazing now, here's here's here's here's the the whole idea of, you know, somebody doing well with an idea and pushing it and making it work Thomas crapper came up with this idea to got a patented in the owns the rights to his family and his going forward owns the rights that so I just pretty good invention. So hey, the follow up on that. Something that another invention. That's coming out here. And it's something that made the news this week is about the artificial intelligence. I think that's kind of like the, you know, the new economy version of a sort of an old economy invention. Hey, we're into artificial intelligence right now. And it looks like truck drivers chefs fast food workers many, many different types of jobs in. How is this connected? Rich to the whole fifteen dollars an hour sixteen dollar an hour. And hey, look, there are just simple jobs in certain jobs that are meant to be sort of entry level jobs. And, but you know, people wanna make jobs, and maybe it's because of our broken immigration policy. Maybe we just have so many unskilled labourers around that, you know, we we these shows are supposed to be students and right now, you know, there's just so many people competing to get these jobs because there's just not the higher paying jobs being created. And artificial intelligence is being created the take over those low in lower paid jobs. Hey, rich. We're out of time. You make a very sour face. It just goes. So you're very upset, and we love the audience, and I love talking to you all out there. And and now I just have to wait. So wow. What's a good news, Richard? We're going to be back again next week and wait for another adventure. Made in America where we never stop fighting for your jobs..

John Kerry Davos Sir John Harrington Thomas Dr rich Ruffin George Soros Al Gore Clintons John America Alexander Cummings Neil Richard Lou Alexander guy
"sir john harrington" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"sir john harrington" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"A time starting with yours let's just start with yours hey before the break i said this you know we we uh joke about the toilet being the porcelain thrown but when you really think about it and you know what i could do a whole show one toilets because they are if you have any appreciation for fluid dynamics and and fluid engineering get a no the toilet is an amazing thing i know we give it all sorts of crap and it gets a lot of disrespect but the the fact of the matter is toilets are are unbelievably a brilliant inventions anyway uh it has turned us all into royalty by human history standards but who was the first monarch to sit on a fully operational indoor flushing toilet it was queen elizabeth not the current queen elizabeth the first queen elizabeth she enjoyed the benefit of a flushing toilet heard godson sir john harrington built one for her in fifteen ninety six was made out of wood and it is believed still to this day that the his name john harrington is why we still so sometimes call the toilet the john i cannot verify the the truthfulness of that claim it's just what i was told all right we are on a journey a plumbing journey in from the street to your faucet and whatever other fixtures you have in your house we've made it all the way up to something we call the manifold when the main line runs underneath your front yard and emerges out of the ground just outside your house somewhere usually on the front of the house sometimes on the side corner but near the front of the house it comes up it makes a couple of bend there's a couple of other pipes involved one goes one direction back into the ground the other goes into the wall itself that is what we call the.

elizabeth sir john harrington