17 Burst results for "Sintus"

"sintus" Discussed on True Crime Brewery

True Crime Brewery

02:34 min | 8 months ago

"sintus" Discussed on True Crime Brewery

"Eleven percent were hospitalized for psychological problems and fourteen percent attempted suicide. Not good numbers now. I think it's totally immoral and damaging. I actually had a woman friend middle aged so not a young person who ended up having an affair with her psychiatrist and it really did a job honor. Because that's the person she's supposed to be able to go to talk about her problems in life and he became this whole other entity in her life which was negative. So i could certainly see how that would mess a person up because it takes awhile to develop a certain relationship with a therapist and then once that's breached like that who knows what can happen. It's just so wrong. The i suppose and even even with that. I mean if you starting to have feelings for each other then you need a different doctor. That's true but almost every patient get some transference. Has some feelings for their therapist and the therapist is supposed to deal with that in a certain way. Sure not return those feelings. But if you feel like you're gonna return those feelings. Got to discharge the patient in your practice. Yes find them a different therapist. I for sure. Yes but he certainly didn't want idea that it was really like. He's taking advantage of her. Will he probably heard were to susan's. Mother called pena sintus. Yes a severe case. I would guess yes. It looks to me like you've been wrapping up more gifts over the past month. Yeah we've had a real uptick in subscribers to tcv premium. I think it might be due to the added. Benefit of ed free versions of all of our shows that were offering now so now tie grabbers get a bonus episode each month and a free gift of their choice but they can even get weekly episodes without the ads. Yeah they deserve it. Our listeners are kind loyal and they send us. Excellent comments in case suggestions. Don't you think oh absolutely it's true or looseness are the best. No kidding thanks tigers. Yeah and if you haven't subscribed to the premium show and you're interested just struck by thai grabber dot com and check it out. See what you think. A great idea..

pena sintus susan
"sintus" Discussed on Oprah’s Book Club

Oprah’s Book Club

05:23 min | 9 months ago

"sintus" Discussed on Oprah’s Book Club

"We all have to be on the same page about what has happened and we're not at this point because many many people most Americans might argue because it's not taught in the schools don't have a full understanding would not have understanding of what actually happened in this country of what our history truly is, and that's the reason why people read say the worth of sons and they'll say they told me time and time again, I had no idea I had no idea here that all the. Time and the same for this one people were saying I had no idea. This is just mind blowing I can hardly even process when I'm reading and yet this is our country's history. It's not been some the people known, but it's been hidden in plain sight. It's been out there. You have to pull together all these pieces I have like a quilt. Then you see the entire visa pieces of a quilt fragments that create a quilt that then tell a story, and that's what this book ultimately is. What I believe is it a truth and reconciliation would be one out of many ways that we could then educate ourselves and educate the country so that if we all know what's happened in the past, we can then begin together. No longer in contention about what's happened, but then recognizing what's happened and then move forward from there you know in Berlin Germany where they've been dealing with this for many many decades. There's this monument this memorial to those who perished in the Holocaust it takes up several football fields in the middle of Berlin, taking up prime real estate right in the middle of that major German city and. There's no description of what it's for. There's not a long ro of of Sintus to gives you the back story on why it's necessary. What it represents everyone is taught that so they know what it represents the symbolism of the location and everyone what it represents because everyone is on the same page about what the basic history was. So then that is what needs to happen in our country. A recognition, a knowledge of the history finally going into that basement after rain, you may not want to go in the basement of your house that you may not want to deal with or actually see what the reins of rot. But if you don't go in that basement, it's at your own peril because you're gonNA have to deal with it whether you know it or not. You know. Ignorance is no protection from not knowing not knowing is not a protection from the consequences of one's in action, and so these are things that we all have to deal with, and I think that the greater the benefit historically from this caste system, the higher the responsibility for the people in a group to begin to take some responsibility for addressing these inequities in other words, the more one has..

Berlin Germany Sintus
"sintus" Discussed on Learn Astrology with Mary English

Learn Astrology with Mary English

03:53 min | 11 months ago

"sintus" Discussed on Learn Astrology with Mary English

"And heard you better is in the sign of cancer up retrograde. which is a weird one. So this is the belief it's to do with some so twisted. Family thing maybe. An is pretty such. A Lago cancer is a local Sintus such terraces and international sign and a chart shapes so strange as well. some oppositions and Would probably A. Bowl think could kick away cooling able. One, two, three, four, six. One, two, three, five, empty houses, Polish. And there's a big opposition to. Sutton jump Eunice. But she doesn't WanNa religious inverted commas, organizations. She is about liberating you. Now I had a client the other week. The Month? And we work together who happened to mention that she'd been on a Byron Katie had been out to American Donna thing and I I tried not to be astounded. The blimey spent that money's GonNa see barbeque eighteen to remote it's. Like you've been to see Gordon. Then you're you're coming to me to us are. Blimey you know if you've been to see Barn Katie shortly afterwards, your whole life. It's fine you. You've let techniques now you're so. That wasn't the case because with every. Every system of belief if. Jesus Allah Buddha Christ wherever whoever is that start said who ever belief that you are following you will not be able to experience the same way as that first person didn't mean Jesus you did a wonderful job. Twelve disciples. Them to go out and preaches thing but it was him the had the thing him that had the realization, and if you were to have a realization, it's Why do what I suppose when people do have that realization? They want everyone to be able to experience it as well because it made them feel. So Wonderful World I've got the answer live the universe and everything. So they must be this this burning desire to then. To to to get your message out and and then you must be union night and being must be thinking well now the armed lighted if everybody else could be nine as me wouldn't be a wonderful place post. What goes through the minds as the line because I'M GONNA wind. But that's you know. Could come into it. But I I'm of the opinion that unless everyone all at the same time has that realization. That that they're not going to to to to to be beaten how can your enlightenment enlightened someone else? Surely, they have to go through that same process as you or something similar. Now I do know in the in the Christian faith. I have other relatives are not Catholics, spit or other versions of Christianity in two of them of I think about had. Experiences and converted had conversions and became web pristine religion CEO now. And a lot times people will will get into a religions is belligerent Obama into religion because something critical has happened to them and they're asking those questions in the dark night at the..

Byron Katie Gordon retrograde. Obama CEO Sutton Sintus Polish A. Bowl Donna
"sintus" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

03:28 min | 2 years ago

"sintus" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"To software engineering daily. Hey, tiff to the U founded sintus data in twenty eleven with your two co founders described the relational database market back then. So that's been vetted defensive picture than or what it is today. So about one part of it. That was similar is there to open source databases on the relational side, that really could move. The needle one is a full scripts on the other is my sequel, and that's kind of remained largely the case on relation side, still today. And now there's of course, Maria Devi as kind of a deductible of my sequel so that side of it was that relational house. And of course, you had the big, you know, the traditional players oracle being largest off them as well, as, you know, Microsoft sequel server, IBM db, two and a bunch of traditional behemoths, if you will. That covered I would say. Say ninety plus percent almost ninety five plus percent actually all of the entire database market about a decade ago. It was old relational much of it from abolished for spectacle was kind of cool source in commercial, and there was very little by mail. Open-source nor sequel, databases, that was actually the beginning of those movements around two thousand ten eleven nine actually, one of my co founders was one of the early people, you know, I'm on who started playing with Dupin. It's kind of early beta days, not even actually prior to bait even alpha days, and we could see an actually kind of actively saw how a lot of the can no sequel as a movement was, was for me, and that was kind of old age, if you will. In fact, started scientists people told us, hey, why are you doing this on sequel? Sequels scale you should do no sequel. In fact, you should Cassandra you know, that was the guy stupid. We found that sites. What was the original go to market strategy for science data? Original one was to actually I build the database and then put it on a kind of a close source version, all scripts, which, you know, in different forms actually had been tackled before you had forks of post grass prior to side us in two thousand five to two thousand ten era of the what's called NTP's the master of the pallet processing databases like green Plum, like master data, you know, teaser, you have a lot of the what's Redshift now it used to be product, Sal, kind of all of those things, you know, had been in the market as forks postcards from kind of a lot of earlier versions, and at sci-fi said, actually we have a different take on this problem. And you know, you're not going to start from scratch, because we see a lot of opportunity, you know, in terms of how quick today to landscape is evolving. How? The scale pieces still missing. I mean to fill that in. But if you were to build it from scratch, that's just going to be over killed. And that's kind of the path that kind of the moment and others took so that part of it to us was clearly not going to start from scratch. We're going to build this on one of an existing stock. Whether my sequel post Christophe had a long debate super happy that he landed on post quest for a lot of good reasons because many started those discussions, by the way, my sequel wasn't yet part of article. So it was fun acquired that and then convert eventually, but that wasn't kind of a given either. So that was one part of the equation..

Christophe Maria Devi Microsoft green Plum IBM
"sintus" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

11:48 min | 2 years ago

"sintus" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"To software engineering daily. Hey, tiff to the U founded sintus data in twenty eleven with your two co founders described the relational database market back then. So that's been vetted defensive picture than or what it is today. So about one part of it. That was similar is there to open source databases on the relational side, that really could move. The needle one is a full scripts on the other is my sequel, and that's kind of remained largely the case on relation side, still today. And now there's of course, Maria Devi as kind of a deductible of my sequel so that side of it was that relational house. And of course, you had the big, you know, the traditional players oracle being largest off them as well, as, you know, Microsoft sequel server, IBM db, two and a bunch of traditional behemoths, if you will. That covered I would say. Say ninety plus percent almost ninety five plus percent actually all of the entire database market about a decade ago. It was old relational much of it from abolished for spectacle was kind of cool source in commercial, and there was very little by mail. Open-source nor sequel, databases, that was actually the beginning of those movements around two thousand ten eleven nine actually, one of my co founders was one of the early people, you know, I'm on who started playing with Dupin. It's kind of early beta days, not even actually prior to bait even alpha days, and we could see an actually kind of actively saw how a lot of the can no sequel as a movement was, was for me, and that was kind of old age, if you will. In fact, started scientists people told us, hey, why are you doing this on sequel? Sequels scale you should do no sequel. In fact, you should Cassandra you know, that was the guy stupid. We found that sites. What was the original go to market strategy for science data? Original one was to actually I build the database and then put it on a kind of a close source version, all scripts, which, you know, in different forms actually had been tackled before you had forks of post grass prior to side us in two thousand five to two thousand ten era of the what's called NTP's the master of the pallet processing databases like green Plum, like master data, you know, teaser, you have a lot of the what's Redshift now it used to be product, Sal, kind of all of those things, you know, had been in the market as forks postcards from kind of a lot of earlier versions, and at sci-fi said, actually we have a different take on this problem. And you know, you're not going to start from scratch, because we see a lot of opportunity, you know, in terms of how quick today to landscape is evolving. How? The scale pieces still missing. I mean to fill that in. But if you were to build it from scratch, that's just going to be over killed. And that's kind of the path that kind of the moment and others took so that part of it to us was clearly not going to start from scratch. We're going to build this on one of an existing stock. Whether my sequel post Christophe had a long debate super happy that he landed on post quest for a lot of good reasons because many started those discussions, by the way, my sequel wasn't yet part of article. So it was fun acquired that and then convert eventually, but that wasn't kind of a given either. So that was one part of the equation. We said, okay, we're going to do this on top of poll scraps. From a business model going to adopt something that's closer to what the earlier, folks post crested about. We are going to build it in a way that's much more kind of closer tall post-chris, does it instead of forking in these broad strokes. We actually want to build our code in a way that the kind of extends full scripts, but we still packaged it as a different binary, which you had to download it was. Still close source when we first begun our journey. And that, of course, quite a lot since then till now. I'd like to put the time in context both then and now. So historically, the world of databases, it's been easier to model all of our data relational e in, in earlier times, when we just had things like user accounts and just simpler forms of data, but the explosion of applications and the cloud, and the complexity of our infrastructure. It's led to things like complicated Jason objects. We have long, and big log messages that we might be storing, how is the evolution of the structure, and the volume of data changed our requirements for databases. That's a very good question. Actually, it's not a new question, either live, when you think about databases going all the way back to post crisis Orage. Jans back and kind of ninety five full Chris even prior to that. I get started life as kind of an undulation database on visit, and then it added the sequel API's in ninety five and became post well, so that question of how much structure to impose and how to contact relation versus non relational has been on uniform time. I think part of it is before got that with kind of that happened in the eighties and the nineties, and then can now be revisiting it in a much grander fashion today and to that effect. A lot of these, let's say, less structured data types have been kind of on the periphery of the relational domain, for example. Right. Or kind of different data sources or data types have been kind of plugged in over time into the different relational databases, but not second class citizens, maybe even third class citizens, and they'll dominant model has always kind of been, you know, relations and the relational paradigm, around hall dot. That gets processed. Now, I think a lot of the reason that Jason on of came to rises one the scale ability of the relational database was very challenged. So, you know, you the paradigm was you had to build a bigger box, and a bigger box, and the bigger box as your data grew and that kind of was okay if you were processing valuable data like transactions in your credit card processing system you could afford that. But as you try started collecting data around the periphery than it, much larger volumes that modeled didn't scale, and then people talk about skin ability, I think one obvious part is just the strict performance on how much volume of data there is. But I think the even more important part of it is the cost and the both the dollar cost of being able to scale and the engineering costs and complexity of being able to scale and, you know, relational didn't do out there. Right. So you know you had the. Kind of existing paradigms, which is, you know, I'm going to charge you, you know, forty thousand fifty thousand dollars per core. That's kind of this flight prices that you're talking about from the lodge vendors back then you know, in many Maine's still are. And then, of course, I'm gonna give you huge discounts. But then you think per core per year or per? It's, it's not religious isn't it, it is per core. Perpetual is the typical model. Say find Siri you know, Mander like oracle. And I've got one core. All you got different auctions. You could add into your database. You got standard version enterprise version bunch of kind of data protection other features, but broad strokes say, I'm charging you forty thousand per core on and then I'm charging you about a baseline of twenty percent. Plus of that per year on maintenance, right? And of course, there's a model where you can do it kind of on a three year term. It doesn't always have to be perpetual, a candidate for. But typically, you would think about this, like, as five years. And if you're looking at forty thousand if you're looking at another twenty percent period on top across five years, you're talking about, like tens of thousands per core. Again, these are list prices, and their public, you can find them like they're kind of like published transparently, and then he would get a larger discount. It could be sixty percent seventy percent eighty. Percent. But still like year in thousands, even in your laptop today. You know, you've got the bunch of cords running. You wanted to do anything meaningful advantage quick, jump into millions. And that structure again, by the way, the database starts running underneath that is ready to powerful that does a lot of powerful and useful things not just for the application, but enterprise integrations. The governor says a ton of things does. However, as you can clearly see it just doesn't scale. And if I were to throw one hundred twenty eight cores at this two hundred on the scores. Not only does the cost of the scale, the equipment, the entire thing becomes very fragile, right? So my database Mark kind of crown jewel is running on this huge machine and I have very little control over it. Then if it's you know how if it's down my entire businesses down and taking backups and kind of maintaining from adults first victim is, is nightmare, rush. So that was kind of the operational side of it on the cost side of it. I think what's really happened over the last ten years, unlike to think of like the cost or the value, baller value per byte of data. If that is such a metric really dropped right? So, like in ran, I previously, a record in a database could be credit card transaction or an phone call billing that's used for billing the dollar value of those bits and bytes are relatively high. Right. Then I can afford to use perhaps kind of one of those kind of older model databases in it. But if I am collecting engine telemetry data ninety five percent of which is kind of the same always throughout and I'm looking for kind of small anomalies like the data by itself, every bite of their I'm storing is much, much less valuable right from dollar for spectrum. So I need a different model to be able to process that. And that's really, what role, the all of the hoodoo movement, the no sequel movement was, hey, you know what I'm going to give you. Free software. It's going to be open source. It's going to be kind of free as in free beer, you can use as much of it, you like, and I'm going to give this on kind of commodity hardware off the shelf as opposed to these specialized appliances, you could go by from from HP, or whomever, you like and kind of essentially off the shelf through hardware, free software. I'm going to solve this problem for you. I think that was the kind of fundamental premise, which got a lot of people excited for good reason. But I think it was also a bit. Maybe two emissions throw man Alexa, and in a sense, kind of over promised and under delivered when you look at that entire life cycle. Promise, for example. Exactly. Because like the pain point is clear. You've got the economy incumbents. They're very expensive, and they don't scale that's a good problem to attack. But if the solution is, I'm going to build the what's been built over the last twenty thirty years with a lot of effort and kind of engineering fundamentals. And if I tried to build up from scratch in a matter of a few years by from scratch, I'm an old away from the file system by I'm not even using like Pat, I'm starting with HDFS and everything. It's got a very useful set of applications, which Google champion than kind of to, to good effect. But it's not a database, right?.

Jason Maria Devi Microsoft IBM Google Christophe green Plum Maine Jans Mander Pat HP Chris twenty percent five years forty thousand fifty thousand ninety five percent
"sintus" Discussed on Slate's Culture Gabfest

Slate's Culture Gabfest

12:56 min | 2 years ago

"sintus" Discussed on Slate's Culture Gabfest

"Air or water. And we all remember sine waves from trigonometry. Sintus soil ways represent the shape of sound waves. The sounds we hear are not simple sinus, Odal waves, the more like a bunch of waves interacting with each other. It'll be a really complex wave form that can be modeled as some of sinus awards. I'm Casey O'Callaghan. I'm a professor of philosophy at Washington University in Saint Louis. Sine wave speech takes a sample of spoken, language, and decomposes it into sinus oil constituents when you first hear this. It doesn't sound like speech at all. It just sounds like a series of whistles, and squeaks. When you hear the original signal the original speech that it's based on. And then listen, again to the sinus, oy. It's clear that it speech. And the words that are uttered really just pops out as evident to you the beauty of views done the boy. It starts immediately to sound like spoken language, and it's intelligible and following the queue, the steady, drift is worse than a drenching rain. So this is really fascinating because it's just the same sand. That's presented to you on the two occasions perceptual. There's all the difference in the world between the two episodes. In nineteen fifty three the philosopher Ludvik Stein took a picture of the duck rabbit, you know, that famous drawing where it looks like a duck facing one.

Odal waves Casey O'Callaghan Ludvik Stein professor of philosophy Washington University Saint Louis
"sintus" Discussed on AFP: American Family Physician Podcast

AFP: American Family Physician Podcast

03:20 min | 2 years ago

"sintus" Discussed on AFP: American Family Physician Podcast

"Let's start with a puff sintus and osteo Conroy, this common causes of pain in growing bones from doctors at char, and Yamanaka common causes of growing pains in kids, in adolescence with disorders that carry some really awesome names if ever a topic called for a haiku challenge. I thought it was this one. Yeah. Oh, yeah. So I reached out to a few haiku enthusiasts to help us out. But first a quick review. If you remember a puff sintus disorders are traction injuries. They involve the cartilage and bony attachments of tendons and typically occur in kids, due to overuse, think running sports, competitive gymnastics, etc. Inflexibility that comes with so-called gross berz is often set up and you see localized pain and swelling at the in question rays can be helpful to look for Belgians or stress fractures, but aren't necessary. The mainstay of treatment is stretching and relative rest. Yeah. These are so. Limiting disorders that often resolve by improving flexibility, or when the patient stops growing most do well with conservative therapy, and only a small minority requires surgery. So let's get to some of these high coups, the first one comes from Laney. She's a fifth grader in Phoenix. She's a student in my friend Brett's class. Kim. I'll let you take this one. I threw my ball so far. Ouch. I got throwers elbow. I will throw no more. Yeah. Great job, Laney, little, leaguer or throwers, elbow is a common overuse disorder in throwing athletes, especially those who played baseball. It's a traction injury of the medial. Epa Kondile exam findings include pain over the medial, Ethicon bell, or with the milking maneuver Leany had it, right? Treatment involves refraining from all over head throwing. Unfortunately, in fact, shutting down for up to year should be considered because recurrence rates are so high. Yeah. And interesting to note, major league baseball and USA baseball have guidelines that support at least a four-month rest from competitive pitching per year to help prevent the disorder. Okay. This next haiku came from Zoe. She's a sixth grader in Brett's class, Sean, a knee pain disease that starts in adolescence. It's osgood. Slaughters pretty good really isn't and Brett decided to throw. His hat in the ring as well. So we've got one from Brett Oshkosh Lodder is this the pain in my knee. Walk it off. Weakling. Unfortunately, we gotta go Zoe's on that one, because that is not the treatment for Osgood. Waters Brett's not a doctor. Yes. So this is a traction injury involving the insertion of the patellar tendon to the tibial tuber, coal pain is noted over the tibial, tuber, oddity when going downstairs jumping, or applying direct pressure, consider x rays to check for a tibial stress fracture or version fracture. If weight-bearing is difficult or tenderness is significant otherwise treatment is conservative. We got this next haiku submission from our friend of the pod, and.

pain Brett Oshkosh Lodder Laney Zoe Osgood knee pain osteo Conroy baseball Phoenix Kim USA Ethicon bell Epa Leany Sean four-month
"sintus" Discussed on WINT 1330 AM

WINT 1330 AM

03:23 min | 2 years ago

"sintus" Discussed on WINT 1330 AM

"Cr fight some formula from purity products. Okay. This item has to do with the overuse of antibiotics. Among outpatients. How many how long have we been talking about this is that unnecessary prescriptions for antibiotics or causing a lot of problems, you go the doctor and you had a cold. And maybe your site is slow congested. You'll yellowish green stuff's coming out this, okay? Unit of Arctic or alternatively, maybe have some leftover antibiotics or somebody in your family has has semantics buttocks, and you know, you're going on a trip, and you just came down with a cold, you're worried, you know, I gotta get well because I'm going to be in a plane of going to be broad soil. Take these antibiotics just in case. Well, are we making products progress against over prescription of antibiotics? And they did a survey on this note about this for a long time. I think I've been talking about this for almost my entire radio career they'll spending three decades despite public health campaigns aimed at reducing unnecessary prescription for antibiotics the drugs continue to be prescribed at startling high rates. It out patient settings. So it has clinics physician offices. We're not talking about patients in hospital who were four plus sick. We're talking about just people who go to the doctor and. Ended up getting a prescription for antibiotics. Ninety eight million outpatient out about a prescriptions were filled by thirty nine million people during the three year period from twenty thirteen to twenty fifteen. That's a thirty nine million lets, you know, like fifty percent of the population got antibiotics over that three year period. The study suggests. Does to put it mildly. The study suggests that current guidelines on prescribing antibiotics are not being followed. If they were than we would have seen an overall decrease net about prescribing rates over time. And is concerning because the overuse of antibodies costly and contributes to the rise of drug resistant superbugs and only that he caused side effects people have allergic reactions. Okay, albeit rarely, but the vast majority of people take antibiotics have gastrointestinal problems associated about women have east infections. And we change our microbiome in harmful ways. I wish I had a book for every patient comes to see me with Elsa required us or Crohn's disease, and we do a little digging like wizard precipitating event in. Yes, I had Sonya sintus or ahead infection or had bronchitis. And it was given an antibiotic and later started having blood my stool diarrhea. And then it went got cold Oscar being low behold. I had. Colitis often in the wake of intensive antibiotic treatment for Lyme disease. We saw a woman with that situation. Last week, lots of antibiotics given the net result disruption of the intestinal bacteria and the onset of a severe inflammatory disorders of the gastrointestinal tract..

gastrointestinal tract Lyme disease Arctic allergic Sonya sintus Crohn's disease Oscar Elsa bronchitis three year fifty percent three decades
"sintus" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

11:26 min | 2 years ago

"sintus" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"Is right. Smack dab in the future that we read about in Washington, movies and science fiction. For the longest time. And I'm and I've talked about this prior to all of this happening. I've done I I've done shows or I've created shows based on a lot of this stuff. Some of it for you is academic. But the Chinese have announced. Sintus is attempted to genetically or had succeeded in genetically engineering human embryos. Something that took the well much of the world by surprise. But for those familiar with the. Latest, gene editing. Technology was a longing. -ticipant inevitability. Chinese scientists claims that he helped create genetically edited twins. Resistant HIV now with this announcement comes the soon NAMI of dialogue about ethics and what this does the overall gene pool in the human species. Dr Hy John que- says that he is proud of his work using a tool known as crisper. Remember the Christopher nine. We've talked about it before he used the tool known as crisper to remove a, gene. From the embryos of twin girls altering their DNA to make them resistant to HIV. Now, it's true. This is a violation of international agreements and ethical norms. In fact, the co creator of this technology. Jennifer, Jennifer, Dudin said that what he did was extremely inappropriate. Now, the scientists are concerned this kind of genetic engineering this genetic engineering and editing could cause genetic defects. Generations or harm other genes. So we're looking at what watching this over forty years? See how these babies hold up. But looking back at some of the things we've talked about, especially the crisper technology crisper always had this promise that it would be able to eliminate many inherited diseases for good from families. But some scientists in Britain actually, appalled by the Chinese research. And the argued that it overstep the ethical boundaries separating good scientific practice from badly conceived experimentation of dubious, ethical standards. Now crisper as tool. Basically, it allows biologists to search and replace components of DNA meaning that they can rewrite specific segments of something's genetic code. Now, if you don't want the code that's related to a particular disease. All you have to do is allow science to go in and rewrite the code. It's literally an editing tool. It's like going. It's it's like remember how we used to edit tape cut and paste or on the internet lift cut pay scrape throw it up there. It is. So researchers are developing ways to use Christopher to treat genetic conditions like sickle cell, anemia, cystic fibrosis, and they're also experimenting with genetic changes. And of course, now they were working on how to eliminate the aids virus, and it looks like this Chinese doctors succeeded, but we don't know we don't know yet. How? This is going to be tried or the trial is gonna come out. Really? I mean, even though viruses aren't genetic diseases. Certain jeanette. It's been shown to prevent the virus. Respraying new cells and destroy inactive HIV is residing in human genomes by altering critical viral genes. Now one consequence. Of routine editing is that individuals may find out that. They are carriers for a number of genetic conditions, and we all carry hundreds of potentially. We got hundreds of potentially just weird mutations some of which are are known to cause disease. Of course. Though. You know, only if both inherited copies of the gene mutated we have. These deal at serious rotations. Now. What we've discovered and this is some recent dialogues some recent studies, we've we've actually realized now this is what I think is fascinating. And we've I think I covered this cash maybe last year or two years ago, we have learned. That the early embryo is a hotbed of activity for Indo genus retroviruses. And these studies have been published in medical journals. And basically and also in a molecular molecular science journals and to understand why embryonic cells big viral proteins, scientists have run experiments to see what happens went viral genes are silenced. So they can turn them on and turn them off using these genetic studies and scientific miracles and these experiments suggest that viral proteins helped the embryo develop a variety of tissues. Early on in the cells in an embryo, basically these. These cells in an embryo turn into many tissues. They all have a duty to perform they do it to make a body, and these stem cells divide, and I mean, they they lose flexibility, but they commit to be one kind of cell and another commits to another type of cell and after that sells typically shut down their viral genes in July. Last july. Scientists reported that a strange alien protein courses through the veins of pregnant women. No, no, one knows why. It's there. He just is there. Today, lean protein of some kind and what makes this protein called Hemas? So unusual is that it's not made by the mother. Instead it's made in her fetus and in the placenta by Jean that originally came from a virus that infected our mammalian ancestors more than one hundred million years ago. And so the Chinese. Have seen fit to tinker with this protein, and perhaps disrupt what most people would call. God's perfect soup. Think about it. God put that there for a reason. Right. And so you go and tinker with it who knows what will happen next. I mean, whatever's in it. To find out what all's in it. I mean, whatever this protein is. Jada maybe could unlock the key is to our origins, and whether or not we had ancient ancestors have had relationships with today aliens. Let us go down and McMahon in our image after our like all that. Right. Let us go down. I will argue it. Let us go down means. But yeah, let us go down at McMahon in our image after our likeness relationships with these ancient aliens, creating mankind and providing something like Hema in the body to protect us and make us grow and identified as a cell structure that cell structure becomes you? You are you you're either you or you're not you. And what is left is the sole in the consciousness that's up for the? The people who want to wander into the. Into the areas of dimensions and consciousness and all of that quantum physics. I mean. It's all it's all one working model right now, it's all one working model. And if you talk about it being a person who's not necessarily a student of this. But studies it because he finds it fascinating. Mueller lot. You learn a lot of things you're wrong about you. Learn a lot of things that you aren't wrong about. But you see it all happening around you. And you try to catch catcher tails. Out of what's going on? And of course, you know, for most of us we we have to rely on scripture. We have to rely on aren't we have to rely on science fiction. But going back through science fiction and going back to art and then going back to the bible where it all began. This leads to these discussions about the Netflix. Neville, having relationships with the women coming down from the sons of God having relationships with women coming down from heaven, the men of renown this the strongman the titans coming down and having sexual relations with the women. You can find that in Genesis six whether you want to call Amelia's now, that's your business. But he worked called the to recall the Grigori there were called the the watchers were somewhat strong somewhat reptilian in their in their in their strength. They look like reptilian some look like a huge insects. I mean, that's how they were described. When Moses Senate troop out to Canaan. And of course, we learned that God, God was not happy. With these beings. These Netflix or fallen angels when he went to calm, the they were not happy with these beings tinkering with the creation process and thus began the task of flooding the planet. I mean, it's hard to believe. Right. It's just a disaster. So great. A disaster. So great that it kills most of the world's population. And then. Another civilization comes out of that. Comes into the picture and the whole process starts all over again. The God battle the God process. And all these things that build up over time. All these things are evidence. But we have had our our civilizations. Our species have had relationships. With ancient aliens or ancient beings, or or beings that we're not of this earth that beings that somehow found a way to, you know, go in and mixed with the Neanderthals mix with the crop Magnin and mix with all these until finally bam. We have what we are. Now. And we're on a collision course with another fate in another disaster because we're messing in places that we shouldn't be messing. And I'm not saying that this is all bad or all good. What I'm saying is what is this going to do? To the germline. What is this going to do with the perfect soup that God has given us hime? Oh, whatever it may be alien or not what is it? What are we doing? We're basically affecting that soup that primordial super that primordial virus. That's giving us Oliver immunities. Now, it can also do bad things for us. But certainly, I guess. I guess apocalypse is are here to Clinton's the earth of what can be seen as viral. That's that's all I have to say. I mean, calamities disasters cataclysms they're all here for a reason because the earth maintains itself through complexity. It's complex, and it renews itself constantly, and for some reason civilizations the disappear. Come back out of nowhere. They just come back come back into existence in some way, life always finds away. And what was said in the first hour same with viruses same with diseases same with some of these genetic Bally's?.

Christopher Netflix McMahon Jennifer Dr Hy John que NAMI Sintus Washington Jada Britain jeanette Bally Oliver Clinton Jean titans Canaan
"sintus" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

WHAS 840 AM

11:27 min | 2 years ago

"sintus" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

"Places has right smack dab in the future that we read about in Washington, movies and science fiction. For the longest time. And I'm and I'm talking about this prior to all of this happening. I've done I I've done shows or I've created shows based on a lot of this stuff. Some of it for you is academic. But the Chinese announced. Sintus is attempted to genetically or had succeeded in genetically engineering human embryos. Something that took the much of the world by surprise. But for those familiar with the. Latest, gene editing. Technology was a longing. -ticipant inevitability. Chinese scientists claims that he helped create genetically edited twins. Resistant HIV now with this announcement comes the soon NAMI of dialogue about ethics and what this does to the overall, gene pool the human species. Dr he John que- says that he is proud of his work using a tool known as crisper. Remember, the crisper nine we've talked about it before he used the tool known as crisper to remove a, gene. From the embryos of twin girls altering their DNA to make them resistant HIV. Now, it's true. This is a violation of international agreements and ethical norms. In fact, the co creator of this technology. Jennifer, Jennifer, Dudin said that what he did was extremely inappropriate. Now, the scientists are concerned this kind of genetic engineering genetic engineering and editing could cause genetic defects. Bit last generations or harm other genes. So we're looking at what watching this over forty years? See how these babies hold up. But looking back at some of the things we've talked about, especially the crisper technology crisper always had this promise that it would be able to eliminate many inherited diseases for good from affected families. But some scientists in Britain were actually appalled by the Chinese research. And they argued that it overstep the ethical boundaries separating good scientific practice from badly conceived experimentation of dubious, ethical standards. Now crisper as a tool. Basically, it allows biologists to search and replace components of DNA meaning that they can rewrite specific segments of something's genetic code. Now, if you don't want the code that's related to a particular disease. All you have to do is allow science to go in and rewrite the code. It's literally an editing tool. It's like it's like remember how we used to edit tape cut and paste or on the internet lift cut pay scrape throw it up there. It is. So researchers are developing ways to use Christopher to treat genetic conditions like sickle cell anemia. And cystic fibrosis, and they're also experimenting with genetic changes. And of course, now they were working on how to eliminate the aids virus, and it looks like this Chinese doctor succeeded, but we don't know we don't know yet. How? This is going to be tried or the trial is gonna come out. Really? I mean, even though viruses are genetic diseases. Certain genetic have been shown to prevent the virus. Respraying new cells and destroy inactive HIV is residing in human genomes by altering critical viral genes. Now one consequence. Of routine editing is that individuals may find out that. They are carriers for a number of genetic conditions, and we all carry hundreds of potentially. We got hundreds of potentially. Just weird mutations some of which are are known to cause disease. Of course. Though. Only at both inherited copies of the gene. Mutated. We have. These. Mutations. Now. What we've discovered and this is some recent dialogues in recent studies, we've we've actually realized now this is what I think is fascinating. And I think I covered this gosh maybe last year or two years ago, we have learned. That the early embryo is the hot hotbed of activity for Indo, genus retroviruses and these studies have been published in medical journals. And basically and also in a molecular molecular science journals and to understand why embryo excels big viral proteins, scientists have run experiments to see what happens when viral genes are silenced. So he could turn them on and turn them off using these genetic studies and scientific, you know, miracles and these experiments suggest that viral proteins help the embryo develop a variety of tissues. Early on in the cells in an embryo, basically these. Lease cells in an embryo turn into many tissues. They all have a duty to perform, and they do it to make a body, and these stem cells divide, and eventually I mean, they they lose flexibility, but they commit to be one kind of cell and another commits to another type of cell and after that sells typically shut down their viral genes in July. Last july. Scientists reported that a strange alien protein. Courses through the veins of pregnant women. No, no, one knows why. It's there. He just is there. It's an alien protein of some kind and what makes this protein called so unusual is that it's not made by the mother. Instead, it's bathe in her fetus and in the placenta by Jean that originally came from virus that infected our mammalian ancestors more than one hundred million years ago. And so the Chinese. Have seen fit to tinker with this protein, and perhaps disrupt what most people would call. God's perfect soup. Thing about it. God put that there for a reason. Right. And so you go and tinker with it who knows what will happen next. I mean, whatever's in it. Maybe they were to find out what all's in it. I mean, whatever this alien protein is to find out. What's it maybe could unlock the key is to our origins, and whether or not we had ancient ancestors that they have had relationships with age aliens. Let us go down and McMahon in our image after our why all that right? Let us go down. Now will argue it. Let us go down means. But yeah, let us go down to make man in our image after our likeness relationships with these ancient aliens creating mankind and providing something like he in the body to protect us and make us grow. And and and identified as a cell structure that cell structure becomes you? You are you you're either you or you're not you. And what is left is the sole in the consciousness, and that's up for the. The people who want to wander into the. Into the areas of dimensions and consciousness in all of that quantum physics. I mean, it's all it's all one working model right now, it's all one working model. And if you talk about it being a person who's not necessarily a student of this. But studies it because he finds it baffling Mueller a lot you learn a lot of things you're wrong about you. Learn a lot of things that you aren't wrong about, but you see it all happening around you. And you try to catch tales out of what's going on. And of course, you know, for most of us we have to rely on scripture. We have to rely on art we have to rely on science fiction, but going back through science fiction and going back to art and then going back to the bible where it all began. Mean this leads to these discussions about the Netflix. The netflix. I'm having relationships with the women coming down from the sons of God having relationships with women coming down from heaven, the men of renown this the strongman the titans coming down and having sexual relations with the women. You can find that in Genesis six what you want to call millions. Now, that's your business, but he were called the cost to recall the Grigori. There were called the the watchers were somewhat strong somewhat reptilian in their in their in their strength. They look like reptilian some, you know, look like, you know, huge insects. I mean, that's how they were described. When Moses Senate troop out to Canaan. And of course, we learned that God, God was not happy. With these beings these Nepalese fallen angels when he went to calm, the they were not happy with these beings tinkering with the creation process and thus began the task of flooding the planet. I mean, it's hard to believe. Right. It's just imagine a disaster. So great. A disaster. So great that it kills most of the world's population. And then. Another civilization comes out of that. Comes into the picture and the whole process starts all over again. The God bottle the God process and all these things have built up over time. All these things are evidence. We have had our our our civilizations. Our species have had relationships. With ancient alien ancient beings, or or beings that we're not of his earthly beings that somehow found a way to go in and mix with Neanderthals and mix with the crow Magnin and mix with all these until finally bam. We have what we are now. And we're on a collision course with another fate in another disaster because we're messing in places that we shouldn't be messing. And I'm not saying that this is all bad or all good. What I'm saying is is what is this going to do? To the germline. What is this going to do with the perfect soup that God has given us hime? Oh, whatever it may be alien or not what is it? What are we doing? We're basically affecting that soup at primordial soup that primordial virus. That's giving us Oliver immunities. Now, it could also do bad things for us. But certainly, I guess. I guess apocalypse is are are here to cleanse the earth of what can be seen as viral. That's all I have to say, I mean, calamities disasters cataclysms, they're all here for a reason because the earth maintains itself through complexity. It's complex, and it renews itself constantly, and for some reason civilizations that disappear. Come back out of nowhere. They just come back come back into existence in some way. Life always finds a way. And is what was said in the first hour same with viruses same with diseases same with some of these genetic maladies..

Netflix Jennifer NAMI John que Sintus Washington Britain titans Christopher Oliver Jean McMahon Canaan Mueller Grigori bam
"sintus" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:42 min | 2 years ago

"sintus" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"And a lot of cases, I think a lot of our kind of the pop music peers within relate to a lot of the people that we did relate to older than us, you know, and so on so forth. And so you kinda constantly find yourself in this place going, well, I guess I gotta trust vice self gotta trust my own path in my own gut because at the end of the day, even though we're having a lot of success. There's also a lot of kind of question marks in the air that you're constantly dealing with. And so I think that independence came from the fact that we were kind of conditioned to. To because of our life experience feel feel like what we need to just do it our way and also the so the the facts of what occurred was we witness the largest music merger in history. The time apply Graham in universal came to somewhere like ninety nine the time in ninety nine that was the biggest merger ever. And so we had a choice on that that second record actually suffered immensely because our whole team just disappeared. But everybody has it came to third record. It was it was essentially a choice to say we we can say in we've seen view from the top. We've actually already been there were standing on the top of the mountain, and and the I mean, it's nice, but it's cooled up here in we're alone. And so I think we we could see that that we we couldn't get if we were getting the best there was because we actually were surrounded by legal with spending our money that we were gonna recoup, but, you know, very records working recoup, you pay back the money to the label, and then, you know, then they still own it. But you we said, you know, what we? We we can't suffer the reality of being in huge machine. That didn't actually sign us label at sintus is gone. So we just made a decision really I think what you're pointing to. Appreciate your your point of view saying it because I think what you're pointing to. It hasn't always been the easiest path and hasn't necessarily been the popular path, but it has been consistent. The we have chosen to choose our gut, and and we say to our fans last last year, especially on the infantry tour. We said, you know, we took a chance on you. We took a chance on our audience. And we said we'd rather take a chance between us in our audience than a chance on the huge corporation that is made get bought again and sold again. And we don't know who's going to be with us. And so we knew their fans were with us. Witnessed by the labels. So can I just say two different way, you say that labels are in search of commodities, and we're the commodity that we're selling is a relationship with our fans is is the stories we tell us a band, and and so that has led us down the path of always sort of being in control because you can't be in connection with someone. If you're not there.

Graham sintus
"sintus" Discussed on Talk Filmy to Me

Talk Filmy to Me

04:15 min | 2 years ago

"sintus" Discussed on Talk Filmy to Me

"Yeah, he's done such a good job where there and he just, he acts like his life. Depends on it. He's just he's brilliant in this movie. And as it gets harassed, a musician, it sickens me that he managed to learn to play and sing in the last few years and already get away with be coming across as a real rock star. Sintus is some strong means of this film side as a famous scene in this film where Bradley caper says, hey, she turns around and says, I was to have another look at you, and I can't help think if it wasn't a really handsome man that was there in the car. It will be really creepy and pervy anyway. That side and there's been loads of paper. I've taken that saying in light in our films and the one that might me laugh. The most was Ray goes, hey, and she turns around and then it switches to in Domin Dhamma when Loyd crashes the car. Fucking genius, but I really want to give this film good, good running and have a look. I will say this at some point, the price sounds like it's really worth it. In terms of your reviewed out, sounds like a paper enjoying the Senate probably will do something at the awards ceremonies, one night pope around. So they have four, five star is born. Here's a little bonus review from the sidewalks of London by my Rahva overdramatic wife, Jamie. On the sidewalk in the middle of London, and here's what I thought about a star is born while I loved it so much. I also cried my little eyeballs out. It was such a bureau. Oh my God. A firework. Everything's fine. No, it was just a fireworks. You know, I'm just not sure. I'm not sure what's happening here. That was horrifying. Okay. Here we are now. I thought I thought it was a brilliant film. I was so impressed with lady got us performance and Bradley Cooper direction on it is really quite a feat to lake. Forget that that actresses lady Gaga and totally buy into her performances alley. But you totally do forget or I did. I was just amazed. Also the chemistry is like way, bam, Caparo, so gorgeous together on. So just seamless. I'm going to say, okay, love you. All. That's all I have to say. So two weeks is passed. And in that last two weeks, lords has happened. I'm actually going to start with breaking news. We should have like a little breaking news banner, which makes no fucking sense from the podcast anyway. But anyway, that aside breaking news as of tonight, wonder woman eighty four has been pushed back until June twenty twenty. Even though to film actually rats quite a while ago, they had a date scheduled for early twenty nine teen. There's no reason as to why this happens or just breaking. I'm sure we'll be talking about it in a week or two's time when when the full picture gets drawn. But I'm quite surprised at this because wonder woman of seat on so well, the first time the when that film came out Gow Godot is fantastic. Is a really cool, super, super actiony fill in fingernails, but for whatever reason, if decide to make this delay Johnny whiten with by breath, you I couldn't care less. I'm yeah, after lean more towards the. Latter Baranov tend to be interested closer to the time they. All right. Cheers. My voice guarantee. Thanks, bye. Germany, I, she really enjoyed the first film. Even our folks. She was kind of like a saving grace of this file DC movie universe. I'm kind of hoping at crewman bucks the trend and goes towards more wonder woman than than Justice league. Anyway, let's let's say at that story and vows in future pods anyway. Let's move on to some traders that drugs the last week. So rocket man, the ocean, John movie starring can never pronounce that. Those name is Tara negative on the guy from he was in Eddie eagle movie. But also most famously those Kingsman movies I tried effect dropped. He actually put on a wait for the role..

Sintus London Ray Bradley caper Tara Senate Bradley Cooper Caparo Justice league Loyd lords Jamie Eddie eagle John Germany Johnny two weeks
"sintus" Discussed on Izzy and Spain

Izzy and Spain

02:49 min | 3 years ago

"sintus" Discussed on Izzy and Spain

"Football is here the shell Pennzoil from sintus where we find Adnan Virk who like me starting tomorrow. Probably about eleven AM. We'll be embedded here in Bristol, Connecticut, watching nothing, but college football, the differences Adnan won't be leaving. I eventually will add in joins us on the shell Pennzoil from it signed what's up buddy. Kevin. Yeah, area. We say, said to make sure that you stepped out of the cafeteria and that you weren't a good cellphone reception area. Radio laugh is always a little bit wonky, right? I'm sorry. I felt no, not not not a problem. You Jesse Palmer, Joey gallery field Yates told me last night. You know, it's college football season when you see Jesse Palmer, Roman, the hallways here at ESPN. What's the game? You looking forward to the most tomorrow? And I'll give you the two options. Notre Dame, Michigan, Auburn, Washington, speaking of jesse's literally steps away from you right now locked and making notes of both of those games. You're right. I know feels is fired up as anybody to see Jesse patrolling. You're right. We're gonna be ready to go tomorrow. Notre Dame I think is fascinating order day why? Michigan I think is the one for me Kevin just because of the fact that they're switch scrutiny around both these programs to the story programs ever in college football, history, Michigan's first wizard, eight, six shape. Patterson's finally legit quarterback now for Jim Harbaugh who someone says in the hot seat considering his disappointing record against Ohio State and Michigan state's kind of a feeling of put up or shut up from Michigan and Notre Dame. I mean, listen to some people have them go the playoff or Trevor Madison that earlier today on ESPN Radi. Jio and my concern there was a brain whimpers to quarterback who can make plays this feet, but I haven't seen enough with his arm, but there's no question. I think Notre Dame's really good team strong schedule as always, but I'm right out of the gate to go Irish and wolverines. I think that's gonna be something special admin. We both know that real coach's coaching khakis. We both know they're real coaches Invite navigate. him. Eat a vitamin every day. It's called the stake. Okay. This guy's drinking milk like it's nineteen fifty four. So Jim Harbaugh is not on any hot seat. I think that's a store that's been created this summer as we're eagerly anticipating college football. Yes. His record against state and state hasn't been excellent. Play here, a play there, a punt fourth-down call. He's brought so much excitement back to Michigan and so much to the culture and has them in the conversation every year for the college football, playoff, do you genuinely believe that if say, Harbaugh loses his game tomorrow on the road at Notre Dame that people are going to be saying he should be fired. First of all, Ben always talk in Michigan. You always going to be so objectives. I'm glad. They come this. Into your question? No, I think they lose against Notre Dame, not not huge Jewish no-name, like I said, is it national playoff contender? I don't think many people think Michigan is going to win the big ten much less appear in the college about plants. You're right one loss won't ratchet.

Notre Dame Michigan Jesse Palmer football Jim Harbaugh Adnan Virk Ohio State Football ESPN Kevin playoff Adnan Bristol Connecticut sintus Auburn Jio Washington Trevor Madison Patterson
"sintus" Discussed on Watch What Happens Live with Andy Cohen

Watch What Happens Live with Andy Cohen

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"sintus" Discussed on Watch What Happens Live with Andy Cohen

"Uc oh my god ricky h poses you vis question you can only have one for the rest of your life we'd oral sex or cheese ricky must work in the cheese industry so let's just say so let's you love cheese i love cheese but you don't you don't text me every morning about shoes right i had the best cheese last saxon gosh tell tell room room and and we we do you think i would go without we'd or oral sex we'd you'd go stick with sintus yeah i think i think that's true i wouldn't find another okay i you know i mean we might as well go for a couple more here e n s asks if you had to choose one of your bff's to be stranded on an island who would it be s jp kelly ripa anderson cooper or john mayer don't even go john maher don't go john that's not fun that's jp kelly ripa for anderson cooper stranded on an island well i've got to say that i i going to pick anderson here's why he now that you've taken yourself out of it he is a catastrophe st and he thinks he and i have there was a moment year ago or eight months ago where i thought we were going to be in a nuclear holocaust and i was talking to him about it and his he understood what the world would be in that situation in a way that i had never thought about and he had so many survival techniques so i actually think that he could keep us alive the long you get so hungry that he goes insane and you wake up one morning and he's interviewing a coconut right wow that could have been a great interview.

john maher jp kelly ripa anderson ricky john mayer anderson cooper eight months
"sintus" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"sintus" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Sighted stated can scale your post grass database horizontally for many of you your post grass database is the heart of your application you chose post grasp because you trust it after all post gress is battletested trustworthy database software but are you spending more and more time dealing with skill ability issues seitis distributor data and your queries across multiple nodes are your queries getting slow is can paralyse your sequel queries across multiple nodes dramatically speeding them up and giving you much lower latency are you worried about hitting the limits of single node post grass and not being able to grow your app or having to spend your time on database infrastructure instead of creating new features for application available as open source as a database is a service and is enterprise software sintus makes it simple to sharp post grass good bositis data dot com slash se daily to learn more about how sintus transforms post grass into a distributed database that's c i t u s d a t a dot com slash s e daily scientists data dot com slash s e daily get back the time that you're spending on database operations companies like al goal era prosper works and cisco are all using seitis so that no longer have to worry about scaling their database try it yourself at seitis data dot com slash s daily that's seitis data dot com slash s e daily thank you to cite us data for being a sponsor of software engineering daily.

cisco
"sintus" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"sintus" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Sighted stated can scale your post grass database horizontally for many of you your post grass database is the heart of your application you chose post grasp because you trust it after all post gress is battletested trustworthy database software but are you spending more and more time dealing with skill ability issues seitis distributor data and your queries across multiple nodes are your queries getting slow is can paralyse your sequel queries across multiple nodes dramatically speeding them up and giving you much lower latency are you worried about hitting the limits of single node post grass and not being able to grow your app or having to spend your time on database infrastructure instead of creating new features for application available as open source as a database is a service and is enterprise software sintus makes it simple to sharp post grass good bositis data dot com slash se daily to learn more about how sintus transforms post grass into a distributed database that's c i t u s d a t a dot com slash s e daily scientists data dot com slash s e daily get back the time that you're spending on database operations companies like al goal era prosper works and cisco are all using seitis so that no longer have to worry about scaling their database try it yourself at seitis data dot com slash s daily that's seitis data dot com slash s e daily thank you to cite us data for being a sponsor of software engineering daily.

cisco
"sintus" Discussed on The Empire Film Podcast

The Empire Film Podcast

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"sintus" Discussed on The Empire Film Podcast

"That's my crown plan well guys it's good to have you here i'm very excited to have you on the podcast is weak shall we have a question should we do it all right so this is a question this is from this is the first time question asker as far as i can tell it's at peter would find twitter and he asks or he says rather you lose your job no through judicious use or injudicious early of company expenses hashtag nineteen inch galactic dalla is disgraceful accusation i paid for collectors with my own money what movie themed business do you start to pay the bills puns greatly appreciated i'd go for deli colt admiral snack bars probably i'm work him and admiral snack bone i'm not the best that was kebab van that used to come rental jose residents university and it was jason donovan that was pretty spot and he's never down cabras well that's pretty avoca barbie yeah there is i in terms of the pun stuff i mean i've i've longed on about my range of drinks at the sack snyder's snack cider compared to the site of brands out there and seems like the colorization and the and the texture of is is it docker ingredient sintus no man it's more conceptual than than your average drink most drinks just liquid not sack snyder snack cider eight has bits of gravel i've tried some of this next side and you know it looks good it tastes good initially there's just too much going on and it becomes a home mess and the taste is come on guys come on sax nighters snack cider coming to a cafe near houston hashtag releases snyder cup.

peter twitter jason donovan snyder jose houston nineteen inch