17 Burst results for "Sinn Toya"

"sinn toya" Discussed on Women and Crime

Women and Crime

11:02 min | 6 months ago

"sinn toya" Discussed on Women and Crime

"It's in our show notes that's women and Crime and talk space dot com while she was on the streets and I say on the streets because she was between houses living with people that didn't have her best interest you know. She was brutally raped on a few occasions. And it was around this time that she met a guy named cut throat cutthroat. Okay believe it or not that was not his given birth name sorry cutthroat Good Okay Right. Oh even better okay. His name was actually Gary in mccloughan. Okay so against. What was his name? His name was Garin mccloughan. Okay and she fell for him fast. She said that he was the first person that ever listened to her and she really felt like he was the one she really was into this guy and he was also in his mid twenty s along with the other people she was hanging around with. She very quickly moved in with him. No he did not have a house. They lived in hotels very shortly after the honeymoon stage was over. She looked at him as a boyfriend but he started forcing her to have sex with him. He taught her how to be quote unquote a good slut and he abused her horribly. Both physically and sexually and degraded her. I can't even repeat some of the things I read what he did to her. She says she didn't bother trying to leave. This is not surprising. She felt cared for for the first time in her life because although he was brutalizing her the other side of that was him also loving her or pretending to love her or showing her some sort of love that she had never felt before and because he had started off differently. They don't start off with the brutalization starts off with all the good stuff and then by the time she's hooked into this relationship and in love. That's when you know you would be surprised. It took maybe days weeks. This moved pretty quickly but I think unfortunately in Toyah had such a poor self image already that it didn't take long. He often called her his bitch and she says in her memoir she knows that is degrading term and made her feel like she belonged to somebody and it made her feel really special so very sad. She's a child. Yeah let's tell him a few days. After they were getting settled in their. You know their hotel cut said she needed to start earning her keep so. Unfortunately what do you think this means I when you were saying before describing him? I'm like he's definitely going to try to prostitute her out so I I assume that means he wanted her to prostitute herself. He was grooming her from day. One right right so I she just pretended to be a sex worker and she would basically take money from men and then leave so in other words she would rob men and she felt like this was a way that she didn't have to exploit herself but she can also give cut what he wanted. Unfortunately it wasn't long before she actually started having sex for money. She says in her memoir that she started to accept the reality that she was a slut as co has been telling her all along. So this is really sad so she with labeling right you eventually become it's a self fulfilling prophecy it is. That's exactly what happened here. And she's defeated cut would bring over men and forced her to have sex with him and then he would just take the money so in other words he was her pimp right. Although at the time Sinn Toya did not realize that. She thought she was helping them. Live a life together because of course cut mates until you believe that this was all just temporary and once they got enough money they would move to Vegas and live happily ever after sure so one night. After being almost strangle to death by cut Let me just tell you why she was almost strangle to death. He was pissed because she was not bringing in enough money so he choked her and in fact almost killed her so she went out to find the client the evening of all eighth two thousand and four Sin Toya headed over to the local sonic in Nashville to try to get some business. A gentleman stopped. His car asked her if she was doing okay and she started chatting with this man who turned out to be forty three year. Old Johnny Michael Allen so Johnny. Michael Allen was a local real estate agent. He was also a youth. Pastor and a Sunday schoolteacher. Wow Oh I'm sorry. And he was also an army bet so he sounds like a pretty good guy right. Yeah I mean he's going to be a very sympathetic victim here to yet. We'll get to that okay. So at first he seemed Nice. He asked her questions instead. Of just saying you know how much he asked her. You know how she was if she was hungry he her food. They went back and forth on. How much for Savoie escapes okay? I'm sorry so he's a client. I thought you meant. He was just concerned pastor. Who Stopping to help her. I'm curious to see where you're going to go with this. One Orion hold wetlands so they decided on one hundred fifty dollars for her services. He suggested they go to her house. She didn't feel comfortable with that. She wanted to go to a hotel room ads. She normally did to conduct business but she thought he seemed Nice. Oh she gave in. They ate their sonic. They went to his home. He showed her around the house making short stop to show her his gun collection which included two shotguns and a handgun. She said she started to feel nervous. I think she realized nobody knew where she was. Okay and she was at this random person's house and he has this collection and she thought he was acting strange so she asked if she could watch. Tv and relax a little. She claims it's because she wanted to be closer to the door which was downstairs by the television set okay. She said he talked a lot about his guns and about how important he was in the community. She asked if she could take a shower and when she got out of the shower he was in bed waiting for her naked so obviously she was there for a reason and she knew that but she did not feel comfortable so she said she wanted to take a little nap and she pretended that she was sleeping of course to avoid having sex with him at that moment according to Sin Toya at this point he grabbed her very hard between the legs and kept bothering her and then he turned seemingly reaching for something she assumed. Here's reaching for a gun. So she grabbed the gun out of her purse and shot him in the back of the head. So why does she have a gun? Well could always gave her gun for safety all right because we know that unfortunately sex workers are often assaulted. Yes after shooting him in the back of the head. She stole a hundred seventy two dollars from his wallet. She took two of his firearms and fled the scene in his truck and he questioned. I mean right now this is bad I see how this is gonNA play out really bad for her at this point Yep but I pretty much solve the issue of what What what. What was the purpose of their exchange? That was my initial. Yes exactly but you know I think like you mentioned who the victim was of course is always important. In every case she immediately goes back to the hotel and tells cut what happened. She told cut. I shot this guy and I took his truck cut was of course pissed. Why the hell did you bring the stolen truck here? Go Get rid of it. She drops it off at a local Walmart. Hitches a ride back to the hotel. She claims she had no clue. If this guy was even dead she says the reason she took the guns and the money and the car was because she was afraid he was still alive and she wanted to get out of there fast so she actually found out. He died by watching the news and it was interesting. She said that after this. That cut was so much nicer to her and she felt like she really earned his respect so although he wasn't happy because that might make things more difficult for him. She really felt like she. She was in his good graces. Now maybe he was scared of her. Maybe all right so their plan was move hotels the next morning but unfortunately or fortunately depending how you look at it they got woken up by the police barging in with guns sin. Toya's first response was don't touch cut. He didn't do anything. Let him go. This just shows what we often see by women who are abused. Not even women. She was a child right. She's trying to protect him. Even though he was the one who has been brutalizing her she also says all along that she was never worried about getting in trouble because she believed that she was defending her life so her number one concern was just making sure that did not get in trouble. I'd also shows you her You know enforce the emotional immaturity of someone who so young and who gets arrested exactly. I think that's a very good point. It does show US her frame of mind. At the time she tells police she is nineteen. Although at the time she was just sixteen at first they believed her so they did not call her parents because she was not considered a minor But not surprisingly there the police and it did not take them long to figure out that she was in fact a minor and apparently they were extremely pissed off when they found out that she had lied to them so they take her in for an interrogation and one of my favorite things about this case is there's footage of everything you can see footage of the interrogation. There was actually a documentary. Filmmaker who started following sin. Toyota's case very early on. We'll talk about that later on but I just want to urge everyone to look up some of this stuff amy. Sorry before you go on When she was taken into the Interrogation Room. Do they know her age? She taken in or I guess my question is was she taken in alone and did they question her? Okay Yeah so she waved her Miranda Rights member. She was only sixteen. She was very tired. This was about three. Am and she was high so this is a situation where somebody WHO's underage. Under the influence tired the are no position to be interrogated at that point. Let alone the fact that she had no attorney or parent. This is not surprising because we know that the numbers are in ninety percent of juveniles. End Up speaking to police without an attorney or parrot present right so of course. I was not surprised to hear that. They promised her leniency. If she talked they told her she as upper life go in for ninety nine years. But if you know she talks to them then they could catch her a deal but they're allowed to say these things right right. Well the police are allowed to lie to suspects in an interrogation room in the United States. So the big question in this case from early on was whether she should stay in juvenile court or be transferred up to adult court if she was transferred to adult court she'd be facing mandatory life because in Tennessee with first degree murder charge. That's what the sentence was. So she had to have what is known as a transfer hearing. And that's when the judge would decide whether or not they're going to waive her case up in preparation for the hearing. She actually met her birth mom for the first time while which I thought was pretty interesting. Yeah any idea why she why her birth mom was included here. I would imagine it's because they're trying to make a case to keep her in juvenile court and her situation her background being so bad that It would kind of mitigate her responsibility and keep her there. Yup One hundred percent right so there. They had called on her birth mom to testify as to her own issues to show this biological link and also to testify to the fact that she drank everyday during pregnancy. I think Sin Toya on some level felt that her mom was helping her out so I thought that was the right thing to do really what her legal team had to do. They had to show that. Sin Toyah had issues that could be addressed in a juvenile facility. And that she would be able to be rehabilitated and be a productive member of society. The prosecution of course was arguing that she should be transferred to adult court because from early on the prosecution claimed that she shot him while he was asleep but they never touched on self defense even worse they never touched on the fact that a forty three year old man was picking up teenager for sex..

Sinn Toya US attorney Garin mccloughan Sin Toyah mccloughan Gary Tennessee Johnny Michael Allen Toyah Nashville Toyota Michael Allen Vegas Savoie first degree murder Walmart Miranda
"sinn toya" Discussed on Nightline

Nightline

10:50 min | 1 year ago

"sinn toya" Discussed on Nightline

"Are you hiring with indeed you can post a job in minutes set up screener questions than zero in on your shortlist of qualified candidates using an online dashboard get started today at indeed dot com slash podcast. That's indeed dot com slash podcast. Good evening. And thank you for joining us. She was sentenced to life in prison for murder she committed as a teenager. But after a headline grabbing fight for clemency sin. Toya Brown will be a free woman in August. And when she walks out of prison, it will change more than just her life. Here's ABC's Adrian banker. I just want to say, thank you. I on a lot of people get to see you. But I have prayed. On top. Two. Sinn Toya Brown is begging for mercy. The thirty year old is a college graduate an advocate against sex trafficking. And a convicted murderer. There's there's nothing to say to justify you can't justify. Can't. Kill donate. Alan. He's gone. I was reading. Brown admits she did it. But maintains her sentence was too harsh for a teenager. It would take nearly fifteen years and attention from a list celebrities to put her case in the national spotlight and highlight juvenile Justice in America. Documentary. Filmmaker Dan Berman has been following Brown's case since the beginning within a day after Toyo was arrested, the juvenile public defender who was defending sin Toya gave me a call and said, we just arrested somebody who we think you ought to meet officials in Tennessee granted Berman access to the then teenager all the way through her criminal trial. The idea of the original film was really to explore how one child's situation could be adot connector for juvenile's across America round was arrested for the murder of forty three year old Johnny Allen. The teen said she was being prostituted by a pimp named cutthroat. Cameras were rolling as she described cutthroats psychiatrist. I. Tell me best out. He was a joke. What else did he do to? People. On this j hockey I in. Have you ever have sex with the guys? Sinn Toya's says cutthroats sent her out to work on that August night in two thousand four he ended up at a sonic where she met Allan he offered to pay her a hundred and fifty dollars and took her home where the two ended up in bed at first disturbed me. But then it's like he just grabbed me like in between my legs. I he just grabbed a real hard. And he just gave me this look if as a fierce, look and just Cindy's chills, mice fine. I'm thinking he's hitting or do something like that. But then he rose over and reaches like, he's reach inside the better something. So I'm thinking he's not gonna hit me. He's gonna get a gun. And once you do that. I just got the gun and shot him. Prosecutors argued Brown's real motive was robbery she ran away with cash guns, and Allen's car, which she abandoned she eventually anonymously called nine one one of the facts of the case didn't look good. What I couldn't see is that Cynthia was at the tail end of three generations of violence against women in Berman's two thousand eleven documentary. Me facing life's in Toya's story. The filmmaker dives deep into Brown's family background. She was given up for adoption, very young firm and met Brown's biological mother. Gina who had sin Toya when she was just sixteen. When I got pregnant, I was I was drinking. And even after my pregnancy. I still drink on a daily basis I could drink a bottle that was this big by myself. Every day. Tests would show Brown was on the fetal alcohol spectrum disorder that impacts the brain and behavior. Brown also says she was sexually abused as a child abuse that continued into her teens both by relatives. And strangers that first Alaba sleep I woke up, and he might him. He choked me into it. He was his best friend, and he got me in Allen's murder Brown was eventually charged. Tried and convicted as an adult. In Tennessee that carries a life sentence, sixty years behind bars. Even with good behavior round would have to serve at least fifty one years before any chance of parole. What now? We are the most Conan in nature when it comes to how we handle juvenile's in this country with sentencing laws a pair of recent supreme court rulings found mandatory life sentences without parole for juveniles were unconstitutional, except in rare circumstances since two thousand fourteen at least twenty four states have enacted new measures like requiring reviews of life sentences given to teenagers. Tennessee isn't one of them. A lot of people not just in Tennessee. But across the country believed that the juvenile Justice system they used to be reformed to recognize that juvenile offenders are different. From a dull defenders attorney Eddie are, bro. Joined Brown's case more than a year ago. The generally juvenile's brains are not fully developed before age eighteen and obviously the younger they are the less development. You have one thing that has changed in Tennessee since Brown's trial sex trafficking laws though longer a child arrested for prostitution is. Considered as a prostitute under Tennessee law. They are now considered victims of sex trafficking of human trafficking. That's new it suggests that his sin Toyo were arrested today. She would have been looked at through a different lens. What has the world outside evolved? Brown grew up behind bars at first struggling. For the past two years working on making a personality. I've ever had before. She went on to earn her GED, then her associate's degree after years of unsuccessful legal. Appeals Brown's case got an unexpected boost from Hollywood in two thousand seventeen riana put round story on Instagram posting under the hash tag free sin. Toya Brown saying something is horribly wrong. When the system enables these rapists, and the victim is thrown away for life. The hashtags spread like wildfire attracting other celebrities like actresses, Ashley Judd, Amy Schumer, Elizabeth banks alyssum Alano and Kim Kardashian saying we'd have to do better and do what's right Kardashian making headlines last year after lobbying President Trump to pardon Alice Johnson, a grandmother who was sentenced to life in prison for a first time, non violent drug charge. She is someone that has completely rehabilitated ourselves. The president granted Johnson's pardon saying those who pay their debt to society and better themselves in prison deserve a second chance instead of waiting out her sentence last year, the now thirty year old Brown and her lawyers petitioned, Tennessee, governor Bill has lem to grant her clemency. Got a lot of publicity. Our job is to look at it on the legal merits in her case and treat it just like every other one at her hearing Brown acknowledged her crying when I was sixteen. I did a thing. I have carried that with me this whole time, but also pointed to her rehabilitation behind bars, I have a college degree hound. I have a family a home family. New community of people who love me who believe in me who support me including the glitter projects a program. She developed to help girls who've been trafficked and exploited like she was I've been able to help people which is amazing. Young people young kids might listen. She was backed up by witnesses, including teachers and advocates even a former prosecutor who was in charge of Brown's two thousand eight appeal argued that she needed to spend the rest of her life in prison soon after he became one of her college teachers, you grant her early release. She is going to invest herself in people who might otherwise come to this institution. She will seek them out. She will find them. She will mentor and minister to them, and she will keep other people from coming here. I do pray that you show me mercy that you get miss James Brown had to wait more than seven months to find out the governor's answer clemency. Granted she was elated, and she started to do a little dance the moment with electric, I do think we made the right decision. But we tried to make it kind of apps and all the noise a spokesperson for. Johnny. Allen's family told the media. They aren't happy with the decision. But hope round has changed. She will be released in August after serving fifteen years in prison instead of fifty one. Dan Berman is now working on a sequel to his documentary out later this year focusing on Brown, and how criminal sentencing, particularly for juvenile's needs to change maybe the blindfold of Justice can be removed just a little bit. So that we can consider a bigger perspective for all children. Brown isn't asking the world to forget what she did. She would readily admit that she committed a crime and that the prison system in effect has saved her life. She says she just wants a chance to help other girls. Not make the same mistake. I'm too I will not let you down. I promise.

Sinn Toya Brown Tennessee Sinn Toya Johnny Allen Dan Berman murder ABC Toyo Adrian banker fetal alcohol spectrum disorde America president Alan Alice Johnson Cindy Instagram Cynthia Conan Ashley Judd
"sinn toya" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

02:52 min | 1 year ago

"sinn toya" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"Was sin Toya Brown at sixteen. She's now thirty years old set to be released in August for more. We're joined by Mariam Kaba organiz, your educator who's worked on anti-democratic violence programs as well as anti incarceration racial Justice program since the late eighties. She's the co founder survived and punished in organizations that support survivors of violence who've been criminalised for defending themselves aboard member of critical resistance Mariam Kaba, welcome to the accuracy. Now. Thanks for having me talk about what has taken place in this case and the significance of the Republican governor of Tennessee granting her clemency. How did this happen? Well, I think it's important to note that Sinn Toya has been surrounded by a support team of people for at least the past decade in the beginning. She had a very kind of proactive lawyer who was very supportive of her. And has become a lifelong friend and continues to support her her subsequent lawyers where people also who really fought for her. To try to make sure that she wouldn't end up with a life sentence. She has had community members family people who've kept her story and her name alive. For all of these years. I think I want to make sure people understand that this didn't come out of nowhere. And that people have been fighting on her behalf for almost as long as he's been incarcerated. It was recently with in two thousand seventeen of last year, you mentioned riana and Kim Kardashian posting some stuff on Instagram, which got more people to know her case in the modern era. Most people actually still thought she was sixteen and most people also thought he'd just happened. Well, let's step back for a moment. Yeah. What did happen? Well, happen to Santo. You Walston Toyota in two thousand and four scenario was sixteen years old. She was picked up four sacks by a forty three year old man named Johnny Allen who took her to his house and sin Toya's says that when she got there first he was haggling her for money about the money. Secondly, he showed her a bunch of guns that he had in his possession Thirdly as you heard in the tape before she was worried because he was. Asking what she felt Louis strange. And when he leaned over on his bed. She he she he had showed her some guns under his bed. She thought that he was going for a gun. He was going to harm her. She had a gun that had been given to her by her pimp a guy named cutthroat who she'd been living without a motel from the time. She was about sixteen years old because he'd run away from home at that point. And she used the gun that had been given to her for protection suit this man, and he ended up dying. Let me go to a clip another clip from the film me facing life sin Toya's story, which aired on PBS independent lens in this clips and Toya's questioned about her trafficker. What's.

Sinn Toya Toya Brown Johnny Allen Mariam Kaba organiz sin Toya Mariam Kaba Kim Kardashian co founder Toyota Instagram Tennessee Santo Louis sixteen years forty three year thirty years
"sinn toya" Discussed on Throwing Shade

Throwing Shade

03:20 min | 1 year ago

"sinn toya" Discussed on Throwing Shade

"Club Friday night. January eleventh do you have any recommendations? No, do you have any recommendation dump it I have a positive story on Anthony's positive. I'd love. Let me get my recommend. It'll be okay. I listen to the entire three seasons of revisionist history podcast with Malcolm, Malcolm, dwells, podcast, so good. They are such short. I've heard some of episodes, and they're just really good. And I would start with the one about Brian Williams. Honestly thought you were gonna say me. Oh, are you? Did you have one? What would be your business history? We didn't that people got wrong about you. But you've really oh actually remembered it, so it's actually it actually went down like this. That's how yours would start probably everything I say, I only talk in hyperbole, then memory episodes. This episode of the reason I think people should start with that is because it really encapsulates the show is also talks about how memory works. And how am I is a longitudinal study also in there about people who after nine eleven which they call like a flash point. They did this longitudinal study and interview people every year after like days after nine eleven than a year after year, your euro. And they're even they. Look at their own hair writing and say, that's not mine. That's not how I remember it. I do have a quick recommendation. I just saw vox lox which like so many people hate it. I thought it was brilliant. It's if you don't know it again, this is another like teeny tiny movie it was only playing at one theater in LA right now. But when it comes up just give it a world, it's sort of like the anti stars born, it's Natalie Portman, it's Natalie Portman in one of the crazy, it's produced by SIA and Natalie Portman see at a singer, and now the permanency wrote all the music for it. Oh, awesome. And it's basically in a post nine eleven world how a star is made. And it is deeply darkly wild. It's crazy. Did you see the favorite yet? I did. It was great account. Okay. That's very good. I'm looking forward to that. You'll you'll enjoy your look at me. All three of those performances are so fucking killer. They're great. Okay. Sam ended on a positive, Sean housi-. Well, there's a case I hear about this case every couple of years, and it always makes me mad. There's a woman who's now. Thirty name Sinn Toya Brown. Oh, yeah. Yeah. When she was sixteen she was forced into sex trafficking and killed one of it. John. Yeah. You're killed her John. She's getting out of prison. Yeah. I saw in August seventh. She'll be out. She's now Hertie she'll be on parole for ten years. But it's fine. But the they they they're letting well, let's say you does she get a pay to right? I don't think if if they found her wrongly, but you're just getting released high CIC. Yeah. I believe we have. Shaun king to to hell to for that. Because I love that guy. Basically just got the internet outraged about it. You should follow him on Instagram. I I well will you can you now. cannot meet people on Instagram. I just found out. Games. Now. But I do know you look and see who who likes her things bet they needed me. No. Hi, I'm Paul f Tompkins my podcast spontaneous. Asian is wrapping up at episode two hundred and that final show will drop on Monday.

Hertie Natalie Portman Anthony Malcolm Brian Williams Sinn Toya Brown Paul f Tompkins Shaun king LA SIA Sean housi John Sam ten years
"sinn toya" Discussed on What Next | Daily News and Analysis

What Next | Daily News and Analysis

04:52 min | 1 year ago

"sinn toya" Discussed on What Next | Daily News and Analysis

"I wanted to talk to Mariam Kaba about sin Toy Story because Mariam has been an advocate for rethinking our Justice system for years. I in Chicago, and now in New York, my name is Mariam Habba. I am the founder and director of an organization called project NIA, which is a grassroots organization dedicated to ending youth. Incarceration Mariam is written about how the media talks about sin Toya, Brown, the tropes and the stereotypes. We lean on. She pushed me to see this narrative differently. She started off by telling me that Sinn Toya's story is just one story there really three ways of looking at it. I mean, I think it's pens on what part of the world. You're hearing the story from there's a story told by state. Prosecutors state offered a story in court about her being someone who intentionally shot a man in his sleep in order to rob him. It's the story that dot told that trial. It's the story that landed her with a life without pro sentence and try and adult there's almost nothing about the actual brutality of the pimp who had coerced her, you know, that's the way it got erased completely from the state story. Then there's the story told by sin Toya Browns defense by her family and friends, a young girl who is incredibly a. Prayed and up because she's being coerced by this older. Tim getting picked up for sex. I have forty three year old man when she's sixteen and she goes to the house chief fines that this person has a gun under the bed. She is scared this she's afraid that he's going to use for done on her. She ends up taking the gun and shooting him because she's saying that she was trying to basically defend herself. He threatened her and she ends up killing him. Then there's this third story. The one that's often told on the internet over the last couple of years tweets and Instagram posts from celebrities like Ashley Judd and riana have pushed the courts, and then the governor to reconsider some Toya's case. But in doing that, many people have frame sin Toya Brown as a girl. Not woman, you know, sixteen at the time. She is there for not in the dull she cannot consent to sex. She's being trafficked by this cutthroat guy her pin, and he's basically coercing her in general, but also coursing her to go out and get money. And you know, their narrative is a rescue narrative. You know, this is a child this should not have happened. She should you know, she she's basically complete and utter victim in the whole entire story. He you raise this issue that these well intentioned advocates really do this work that you see his damaging. Can you explain that a little bit? I think the story of rescue often negates people's agency and people's choices that they make under constraints and under horrible circumstances. I have worked many years in support of young people who trade sex for money. Survival needs. There is a issue around. No child can consent to sex that completely negates. The fact that there are young people who trade that's for money and survival needs rationally in order to live, you know, that also links to the larger question of making Cintra into the perfect victim who had no choices whatsoever. Somebody who was you know, completely devoid of her own agency. If that's the frame you adopt for her life. Then how do you make sense of choice to defend her life? I think part of the challenge and part of what you're talking about with sin Toya is one of the ways. People shared her story with his artwork that showed her in pigtails from when she was on trial, these pigtailed braids, and I guess what you're saying. Is that portraying her in this way, as really a girl it really denies her person hood? Yeah. People really wanted. You know, I think this is important to say when when folks are paying attention to a story a large part of the kind of social media audience for this story thought that this situation had just happened. Right..

Sinn Toya Toya Brown Toya Browns Mariam Kaba Mariam Mariam Habba Tim founder and director Chicago Instagram dot New York Ashley Judd Cintra riana forty three year
"sinn toya" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

04:47 min | 1 year ago

"sinn toya" Discussed on Here & Now

"Sinn Toya Brown, the former teen sex trafficking victim serving a life sentence for murdering a man who had paid for her will soon be free yesterday. Tennessee's Republican governor Bill Hasler granted clemency to Brown. Who's now? Thirty and became a hashtag. 'cause after the documentary Meave facing life this in Toyo Brown story, we covered it in two thousand seventeen in it. Her lawyers say she suffered fetal alcohol syndrome because of her birth mother's drinking ran away from an adoptive home and was taken in by predatory pimp named cutthroat. She testified in court that when she was sixteen amend named Johnny Allen hired her and showed her his gun collection v. Something to me, I'm sitting here thinking what can I do? I'm in his house. Ain't nobody going nowhere. My mom. And then they don't know why I met the people that are stay with cheek on them. They don't know why meant nobody's going to know. What happens to me cut? He doesn't care. He doesn't even know how left with and all this is just runs in my mind. I'm just another it. She said she pulled out her own pistol and shot him for self protection. She was tried as an adult in two thousand six convicted of murder and now clemency. She'll be out in August. Charles bone is one of us in toy Brown's attorneys. He's in Nashville Charles you told her yesterday. What's what was your reaction? You did a little dance. I did a little dance. We all were very very excited to share that news with her, and she's so thankful and looking forward to the future. She's going to finish your bachelor's degree in may twenty nine hundred gutter GED has a newfound faith, which she expresses quite a bit. But you know, that there are people in Tennessee. We're going to be angry about this. There were prosecutors arguing that she killed him in and so should serve the time. There's also the law in twenty ten the supreme court ruled against life without parole for juveniles. The state argued that this didn't affects in toy. Because the state law has an opportunity for review of a case after fifty one years, so they made the case that look after fifty one years somebody does have the chance at parole, you're obviously arguing against that the case all of this goes away now, but would impact you think this will have on. So many young people who are in jail, maybe arrested on prostitution charges, and maybe many advocates say they likes in Toya are actually the victims of sex trafficking. Well, we would think that this would give hope to those who are still in prison who are under similar circumstances. And hope that if they rehabilitate themselves in any way, like Toya had that some government governor somewhere who would recognize that rehabilitation and give them the same opportunity that governor has them has given toyah. When she became a 'cause it was so many years after the documentary after she went to jail when suddenly you hearing from riana and Kim Kardashian tweeting out freese and Toyota Brown. The team who's been working on this engine toy. Obey grateful for all the support. She has had we were shocked that it became such an international opportunity for people to speak out on on this issue. And we don't think that necessarily that the governor at all considered all of the international outreach in the telephone calls that they received, but but he did really study in pay attention to the rehabilitation of of sin toyah. What is she going to do? Now. She's thirty will we hear from her what she gonna do. Well, you won't hear from her. I don't think until August when she's released and maybe not even then this this transition is for her is so employment. You know, you have to think about the fact that the sixteen year old who's never had a driver's license. You never voted never had a job would now at eight thirty begin that walk outside the prison walls. And and I think she'll be a great voice for those who need hope that they can also survive and become the bible citizen that she's going to be as you say, I got to figure it out how to live her own life, and she'll have ten years of Pearl..

Sinn Toya Brown Toyo Brown Tennessee freese Meave Bill Hasler Johnny Allen Charles bone Nashville murder prostitution riana Kim Kardashian fifty one years sixteen year ten years
"sinn toya" Discussed on The Daily Zeitgeist

The Daily Zeitgeist

04:42 min | 1 year ago

"sinn toya" Discussed on The Daily Zeitgeist

"Golden Globe for best comedy and best actor for Andy Sandberg, also won two Emmys, critics call Brooklyn nine nine the TV's. Yes. We know you're a fool if you don't watch. I'm just insecure about my own pencil gay insecure about that Spanish, pronunciation Altair. Okay. So many great reasons to make sure catch the premiere of Brooklyn nine nine Thursday January tenth. On NBC. And we're back, and unfortunately, this is going to be a bit of a theme across the first half of our episode. So I mean, not unfortunately in the respect that Sinn Toya Brown who was serving a life sentence for murdering a man who was paying to have sex with her when she was sixteen was just granted clemency which a lot of people were pushing for for a long time. She was a victim of human trafficking. And what when she was first convicted they just like didn't take into account that she was underage that she was being sexually abused that. She was a victim of human trafficking and human trafficking is actually, you know, it's between a ten billion thirty two billion dollar worldwide industry, which to put that in perspective. Ten billion is four times the entire Burger King chain and eighty three percent of sex. Trafficking incidents in the US involved victims that were US citizens test mater that right now three hundred thousand kids are in that situation by the FBI, and you know, the FBI freed in June of two thousand fourteen they freed one hundred sixty eight kids who had been sold into sex slavery since two thousand eight at least four thousand kids. So it's it's a problem that I think just in general, we don't we don't like to look at it. Whether it's our Kelly, or, you know, just somebody in our inner city, and I think it's one of those things that we tend to hope that when we see somebody in a really unfortunate circumstance that it's not as bad as we might think or it's you know, that that they did something to deserve that or some shit like that. And it's just you know, there are victims all around us that an and more of them them. We might think. Thanks for bringing me onto a super light show. I think this is something that I'm going to say, and I'm just I whatever people wanna fuck kids. And it's an it's something that that we don't talk. We don't talk about sexist society. And as a result of that we allow these systems of bad unhealthy exploitative sex to exist, and that's a very basic understanding of it. But like, I don't want to defend Roseanne Barr too much. But she used to talk a lot about how Hollywood is full of pedophile, and it becomes clear and clear that that is real, and it becomes clearer that that's real throughout society. And so it's a crazy thing to say, but it's real and we need to talk about weird stuff more openly as a society. I don't they've saying that's going to happen. But like like that's why like this secret industry of ten billion dollars. We could open up the government with half that. Okay. And. It's a lot of money. And I, you know, I don't I don't really have anything intelligence beyond like this like people, humans are crazy. And and and kids are kids are often, you know, the ones who are dealing with things that fucked up adults too. I think you're absolutely right. I mean as also speaking of crazy shadows, come gay. She put a lot of her set celebrity behind some Toyo Brown and behind the publicity behind, you know, what essentially free this black woman. This is the second black woman that Kim Kardashian has helped get out of jail. And I just I can't say nothing better asking them. I might have to go out and get some of this KK WBZ again. Listen, I used to be like, oh, Kim cake by but from us, listen, you earn that Budi child K, thanks so much, and I'm not gonna there's a there's a woman who used sex to her advantage openly and unashamedly and and now as doing good things with the benefits she's reap and anyone wants to call her slut. Yeah. But she's doing social good work. So I'm never called her that people very happy to see a woman get paid from some damn sex shit. Tell pussy for free, and but but sexual coins on the nightstand..

Roseanne Barr Brooklyn US FBI Andy Sandberg Sinn Toya Brown NBC Burger King Kim Kardashian Kim cake Toyo Brown Kelly Budi Hollywood ten billion thirty two billion eighty three percent ten billion dollars
"sinn toya" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:07 min | 1 year ago

"sinn toya" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Things considered from NPR news. Sinn Toya Brown is getting out of prison in Tennessee. Brown was sixteen years old when she was convicted of killing a man who had paid to have sex with her the case drew national attention after the supreme court ruled that most juvenile should not be sentenced to life without parole today. The governor of Tennessee granted her full clemency. Sarajevo Martinez BELTRAN of member station. W P L N reports you are getting out in August. Those were the first words and Toya Brown heard from her lawyers today when the governor granted clemency. I've known since I since the day after she was arrested, and I've never seen the peace. Enjoy on her face that I saw today that's Catherine sin back Brown's attorney in juvenile court explaining how Brown reacted when her noise went into the Tennessee prison for women and told her about the decision of governor Bill Haslam Brown has already served fifteen years of a life sentence for the murder of Gianni Allen who she claims paid her for. For sex Brown was sixteen at the time. And she contends secured him in self defense. The governor of praised Brown's rehabilitation in his decision to grant haired clemency round is thirty now and mentors troubled youth. She already completed a college degree while behind bars, and he's working on a second one. In a written statement read by Sinbad scintilla Brown said she will do everything she can to justify the governor's faith in her. My hope is to help other young girls avoid ending up where I have been the outgoing governor's decision to commute. Her sentence comes after mounting national pressure from celebrities politicians and criminal Justice advocates and a federal appeals court has been considering whether Tennessee's requirement that Brown's serve at least fifty one years of a life sentence is too harsh in two thousand twelve the US supreme court ruled most life without parole sentences for juveniles are cruel and unusual. Ron's case could serve as legal precedent for others involving sex trafficking and miners says. Jerry Smith, the executive director with end slavery, Tennessee, the US cream court has already made several key rulings saying that not reasonable who sentence a minor with a life sentence. And the fact that we have a cultural mindshift, obviously, recognizing that affects of trauma and the exploitation. That's involved has got to have an impact on future legal decisions. In the meantime, Brown's own future post release is still in question. So get out of prison in August. And state Senator Brenda Gilmore says she wants to make sure Brown has the appropriate support. Once he's out of prison when she's released I think she's gonna need a lot of resources so that she will not ever have to look back and thanked that I will have to resort to prostitution to put bread on my table or have a roof over my head round will be unpire for the next ten years a spider here commutation, she'll need to come. Plead her bachelor's degree Montaigne employment and continue her community service for.

Bill Haslam Brown Tennessee Senator Brenda Gilmore Catherine sin NPR US Sarajevo Martinez BELTRAN Gianni Allen Ron Jerry Smith prostitution murder attorney executive director fifty one years fifteen years sixteen years ten years
"sinn toya" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

02:44 min | 1 year ago

"sinn toya" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

"Stop it needs to. Stop because we're bearing the brunt of this. We have nothing to do with it. It's like mom and dad fighting and and we're the kids that have nothing to do with it. But we're the ones that are feeling like we're in trouble. Pam coulter. CBS news, by the way, KNX will carry the president's nationwide address live. It's scheduled to start at six o'clock tomorrow night, the government shutdown is impacting farmers across the country, and here in California, they're missing payments from the government met to help them during the trade fight with China. Sarah negu raid is with the federal policy department of the California Farm Bureau Federation. She tells Kate actually hasn't heard from any farmers just yet about the best payments. They're kinda just waiting and hoping that the. This carries on for a lot longer than I'm sure I'll be hearing more about concerns can just strategy and our gerstle be shifting damage. They plant and harvest in the coming year and official of the American Farm Bureau. Federation says the shutdown is also slowing down the implementation of the new farm Bill push back from President Trump's legal team over a report that the White House could try to keep parts of the Muller investigation. Secret report from Bloomberg suggests the White House could try to block parts of the report by using executive privilege, but the president's lawyer Rudy Giuliani says there are no plans to block the material for the White House. It looks like they have things that they're trying to hide and especially things have relate to the president's conduct himself, Loyola Marymount university law. Professor Laurie Levenson tells KNX executive privilege has been used before but related to investigations that did not personally involve the president the only other situation where it has involved. The president was the Nixon case, and there is a supreme court ordered that they. Turn over the tapes. It should be noted that Rudy Giuliani. Well, saying there are no plans to block. The Muller report did not rule out the president invoking executive privilege after his legal team reviews. The report Chris Seaton's KNX ten seventy NewsRadio an expert in surveys as ADEMA citizenship question to the US census would worsen the undercount of Latinos and non-citizens compared to other population groups, call him a market testified at the start of a trial in San Francisco. He said a citizenship question would reduce the percentage of Latinos who respond to these census questionnaire annotation elaborates by the census bureau to count. Those people would not be enough. She's thirty now, but was sentenced to death for murder when she was just sixteen years old to DOI today. Sinn Toya Brown was granted clemency by Tennessee's Republican governor Bill has them. She'll be released from prison in August. Her lawyers say she was victim of sex trafficking. Many criminal Justice reform advocates and celebrities including Kim Kardashian west have fought for her release Brown's lawyer Houston, Gordon says Brown has taken. Extraordinary steps to rebuild her life. It's been a singular.

president Rudy Giuliani California Farm Bureau Federat KNX Sinn Toya Brown executive Pam coulter census bureau American Farm Bureau Muller White House Professor Laurie Levenson CBS Loyola Marymount university Kim Kardashian Sarah negu California governor Bill murder
"sinn toya" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:06 min | 1 year ago

"sinn toya" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Things considered from NPR news. Sinn Toya Brown is getting out of prison in Tennessee. Brown was sixteen years old when she was convicted of killing a man who had paid to have sex with her the case drew national attention after the supreme court ruled that most juveniles should not be sentenced to life without parole today. The governor of Tennessee granted her full clemency. Sarajevo Martinez BELTRAN of member station. W P L N reports you are getting out in August. Those were the first words sin Toya Brown heard from her lawyers today when the governor granted clemency. I've known since I since the day after she was arrested, and I've never seen the peace. Enjoy on her face that I saw today that's Catherine sin back Brown's attorney in juvenile court explaining how Brown reacted when her noise went into the Tennessee prison for women and told her about the decision of governor Bill Haslam Brown has already served fifteen years of a life sentence for the murder of Gianni Allen who she claims paid her for. For sex Brown was sixteen at the time. And she contends she killed him in self defense. The governor of praised Brown's rehabilitation in his decision to grant hair clemency round is thirty now and mentors troubled youth. She already completed a college degree while behind bars, and he's working on a second one. In a written statement read by Sinbad, Cynthia Brown said she will do everything she can to justify it. The governor's faith in her. My hope is to help other young girls avoid ending up where I have been the outgoing governor's decision to commute. Here sentence comes after mounting national pressure from celebrities politicians and criminal Justice advocates and a federal appeals court has been considering whether Tennessee's requirement that Brown serve. At least fifty one years of a life sentence is too harsh in two thousand twelve the US supreme court ruled most life without parole sentences for juveniles are cruel and unusual. Ron's case could serve as legal precedent for others involving sex trafficking and miners says there. Smith, the executive director with end slavery, Tennessee, the US supreme court has already made several key rulings saying that not reasonable. A minor with a life sentence. And the fact that we have a cultural mindshift, obviously, recognizing that affects of trauma and the exploitation. That's involved has got to have an impact on teacher legal decisions. In the meantime, Brown's own future post release is still in question. So get out of prison in August. And state Senator Brenda Gilmore says she wants to make sure Brown has the appropriate support. Once he's out of prison when she's released I think she's going to need a lot of resources so that she will not ever have to look back and think that I will have to resort to prostitution to put bread on my table or have a roof over my head round will be unparalleled for the next ten years spite of her commutation, she'll need to complete her bachelors degree maintain employment and continue her community service.

Bill Haslam Brown Tennessee Catherine sin Senator Brenda Gilmore US NPR Sarajevo Martinez BELTRAN Sinbad Gianni Allen Ron prostitution murder attorney Smith executive director fifty one years fifteen years sixteen years
"sinn toya" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

03:06 min | 1 year ago

"sinn toya" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"All things considered from NPR news. Sinn Toya Brown is getting out of prison in Tennessee. Brown was sixteen years old when she was convicted of killing a man who had paid to have sex with her the case drew national attention after the supreme court ruled that most juveniles should not be sentenced to life without parole today. The governor of Tennessee granted her full clemency. Sergio Martinez BELTRAN of member station. W P L N reports you are getting out in August. Those were the first words sin Toya Brown heard from her lawyers today when the governor granted clemency. I've known since I since the day after she was arrested, and I've never seen the peace. Enjoy on her face that I saw today that's Catherine sin back Brown's attorney in juvenile court explaining how Brown reacted when her lawyers went into the Tennessee prison for women and told her about the decision of governor Bill Haslam Brown has already served fifteen years of a life sentence for the murder of Gianni Allen who she claims paid her. For sex Brown was sixteen at the time. And she contends she killed him in self defense. The governor of praised Brown's rehabilitation in his decision to grant hair clemency. Brown is thirty now and mentors troubled youth already completed a college degree while behind bars, and he's working on a second one. In a written statement read by sin back, Cynthia Brown said she will do everything she can to justify it. The governor's faith in her. My hope is to help other young girls avoid ending up where I have been the outgoing governor's decision to commute. Her sentence comes after mounting national pressure from celebrities politicians and criminal Justice advocates and a federal appeals court has been considering whether Tennessee's requirement that Brown serve. At least fifty one years of a life sentence is too harsh in two thousand twelve the US supreme court ruled most life without parole sentences for juveniles are cruel and unusual. Bronze gates could serve as legal precedent for others involving sex trafficking. And miners says there. There is myth, the executive director with end slavery. Tennessee supreme court has already made several key rulings saying that not reasonable who a minor with a life sentence. And the fact that we have a cultural mindshift, obviously, recognizing that affects of trauma and the exploitation. That's involved has got to have an impact on future legal decisions. In the meantime, Brown's own future post release is still in question. So get out of prison in August. And state Senator Brenda Gilmore says she wants to make sure Brown has the appropriate support. Once he's out of prison when she's released I think she's going to need a lot of resources so that she will not ever have to look back and think that I will have to resort to prostitution to put bread on my table or have a roof over my head round will be unparalleled for the next ten years here commutation she'll need to. Plead her bachelor's degree Montaigne employment and continue her community service.

Bill Haslam Brown Tennessee Tennessee supreme court Catherine sin NPR Sergio Martinez BELTRAN Senator Brenda Gilmore US executive director Gianni Allen prostitution murder attorney fifty one years fifteen years sixteen years ten years
"sinn toya" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:34 min | 2 years ago

"sinn toya" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It's the takeaway, I'm tansy Nevada. How does the teenage trafficking victim end up facing more than five decades behind bars? That's the story of sin Toya Brown who's fifty one year sentence. Reignited the debate over the treatment of young women of color in our criminal Justice system. Brown was just sixteen when she shot and killed a forty three year old man who solicited her for sex. She was tried as an adult in Tennessee convicted of murder and sentenced to life behind bars in two thousand and six her legal team challenge that sentences unconstitutional pointing to a twenty twelve supreme court ruling that protects most juvenile's from life sentences without parole, but last week at Tennessee supreme court ruled that Brown won't be eligible for release until she served. Fifty one years. I spoke about Brown's case with Marshall Levick the chief legal officer at juvenile Law Center and Jerry Thomas the policy director with the campaign for youth Justice. It is deeply. Upsetting that it wasn't recognized that she was she was a teenager. She was underage and being solicited for sex, my organization, along with a number of organization truly believe there's no such thing as as a teenage prostitute. And this is this is a young girl who should not have been solicited. And this way, I do believe that she felt it was self defense. If you listen to her her describing the situation, she was she was in fear for her life. She believed that the man had will she knew that he had many guns that he was a sharp shooter in the military, and she believes that he was going to harm her that night. But unfortunately, that belief wasn't really taken into consideration. I feel to the extent that it, and it should have been Marsha. I wanna bring you in here. You could give us a sense of the supreme court decision that could provide a backdrop here, and how Brown's legal team has been. In using that to argue for her release unsuccessfully. Sure, the United States Supreme court in a series of decisions that began in two thousand five and then continued through two thousand sixteen essentially addressed sentencing for children who are being prosecuted and sentenced in the adult criminal Justice system and relying on our eighth amendment's ban on krone unusual punishment. The supreme court not only van the death penalty, but also banned life without parole sentences for children convicted of homicide in particular mandatory life sentences, and what has happened in the wake of those decisions is that we have seen a kind of I think toying with the decisions mandate in the sense that while courts are not in fact imposing life without parole sentences on many children across the country convicted of homicide, they are imposing virtual life sentences on those individuals, and by that, of course, it's exactly. What we see in sin Toya's case to impose a fifty year sentence on someone a forty year sentence or even higher sixty seventy year sentences on young people as they go into prison. We are dooming them if not necessarily to die in prison. We are creating a scenario where they will likely come out of prison on a stretcher or they will come out of prison with very little quality life experience left for them. Also want to bring up the issue that I think is is quite obvious in this conversation which is race and gender sin. Toya was a sixteen year old woman of color, and we know from federal data that women girls of color are disciplined more harshly in school. For example. I'm wondering if either of you could give me a sense of how race plays into her case specifically, and the reason why I'm asking this is because I think about more recent rape cases, for example. Jeffrey Epstein, I think about Brock Turner. I think about. Jacob anderson. These are all white men who while are not being convicted of murder their sentencing for, you know, sex crimes has been quite light to nil. So how does race play into this? It's it's impossible to have any conversation about our Justice system in this country without confronting race and racism, and the system is largely populated by men and women young women and young men of color, whether they are black or Brown, and that that legacy the legacy of racism slavery, white supremacy in this country has created a system that has I think frankly, become untenable and a constitutional democracy to tolerate the degree to which we have ravaged. I think communities of color in this country to re any any thoughts on that the racial disparities. Yes. So I would add again, what you when you mentioned that, you know, historically, there has been this issue of black youth and Brown youth being disproportionately impacted by the system. That's absolutely what we see in the data. So in two thousand and sixteen lucky were about fourteen percent of. The population. But fifty one point nine percent at the youth who were transferred by juvenile court judges in our country. And so we see we see the disproportionality and the number of young people being transferred to the dot system. We also see it in the types of sentences that young people receive. So according to the campaign for the pair sentencing of you. They have a new report, and which they they find that seventy two percent of the children's sentenced to life without parole sentences since the Miller decision by the supreme court have been black children. So Marsha was absolutely correct. There isn't really a way to disentangle the issue of black and Brown children being disproportionately negatively impacted by the adult criminal Justice system. Marcia does sin Toya have any legal recourse at this point? And more broadly. Are there other changes that our legal system needs to make to improve? So. That we don't see Morrison Toyo Brown's happening with respect to her legal options right now there is a clemency petition that has been presented to the governor of Tennessee. And there has been quite a bit of public support that has been expressed through social media helping that that clemency petition will be favorably reviewed. I think that what her case represents to me when I think about both here on personal circumstances and other sin Toya's out. There is that we need a new punishment paradigm in this country, and we need a new paradigm for how we deal with offending by by young men and women and boys girls, and I think what's important is that to the extent that we imagine our Justice system is about both holding individuals accountable and promoting public safety. These are two legitimate goals of any Justice system. The the sentence imposed on Sinn Toya what she is confronting in facing right now absent intervention. Is one that serves neither of those purposes. She is not a risk. She's no longer risk the time to protect the public through her incarceration has long since passed, and she's been held accountable. She's she's surely been held accountable having spent the number of years in prison that she has already spent there, and what what we hope and I think Jerry and I working in this field. We are constantly confronted. Unfortunately with stories like sin toys, and we are ever hopeful that that this will be the one this will be the one that will make us reevaluate that will make us sit up and say, no this can't be. But again, that's my hope here that the specter of a sixteen year old girl facing fifty one years in prison for a crime that was conducted in the in the face of sex trafficking and self defense situation, and even without those particular mitigating circumstances. We cannot allow our young people to face these kinds of sentences in this country. Marshall Levick is chief legal officer at juvenile Law Center. Thank you, Marcia. Thank you. Andrew Thomas is policy director with the campaign for youth Justice. Thank you jury. Thank you. And that's our show today. Remember, you can always find us on Facebook. And.

Toya Brown Sinn Toya United States Supreme court Tennessee supreme court Brown juvenile Law Center chief legal officer Tennessee Marshall Levick Jerry Thomas murder Marcia director tansy Nevada Morrison Toyo Brown Jeffrey Epstein Jacob anderson Facebook Marsha
"sinn toya" Discussed on Pod Save the People

Pod Save the People

04:21 min | 2 years ago

"sinn toya" Discussed on Pod Save the People

"So recently, some of you may have heard the name Sinn Toya Brown comeback up in social media conversations. Her case has come back into the forefront. As we see the criminal Justice system continuously not work for black people and black women in particular. So if you don't know her story sin Toya Brown was sixteen years old in two thousand four she was a victim of sex trafficking had been purchased by a forty three year old man, he took her into his home, and she was afraid for her life. And so in that space, she found a handgun on his shelf and she killed him. She was sentenced to life without parole at sixteen years old four killing this, man. Even though she was in fear for her life. She has been in jail ever since in the state of Tennessee, Enin, Tennessee, a mandatory life sentence is sixty years. She has appealed for clemency that appeal was. Rejected with opposing counsel saying in Toya was not in fact in fear for her life, but was planning on robbing the man and recently, she has appealed to the Tennessee supreme court essentially saying that juvenile life without parole is unconstitutional in twenty twelve Skoda's made a ruling of that sort most recently in Toya's made an appeal to this Tennessee State supreme court appealing on the fact that in two thousand twelve the supreme court of the United States ruled that mandatory juvenile life without parole is in fact, unconstitutional and so on the basis of that ruling she made an appeal to the Tennessee State supreme court and five justices unanimously ruled against her essentially, what that means is that she's going to have to serve at least fifty years before she is eligible for parole. So it is one thing after the other in this case over and over again, we see that when black women try to defend themselves. That the law is actually not on their side. We look at the case of Jacqueline Dixon who was being abused by her husband and killed him. Because she was in fear for her life in Selma, Alabama, and she is currently in jail. We look at the case of Meriva Alexander who spent six years either incarcerated or under house arrest before her case was overturned as she continued to try to appeal on the stand your ground law over and over. Again, we see that the criminal Justice system, obviously is not working well for people of color, but I'm particularly worried for black women who keep trying to defend themselves and can find no defense or support in this system. He Britney like you said, we see the courts and the criminal just system site there need to defend themselves from some sort of a threat in order to exonerate them in these cases. But when it is a black person, a black woman in particular that right doesn't seem to apply the data supports this too. So when you look at for example, stand your ground. Dates and compare them to non stain your ground states, while they're more justified homicides overall and stand your ground states. Meaning that the stand your ground law protects a larger number of people who claim self defense when they commit a homicide, those affects are not shared evenly across groups, and in fact, the type of homicide that is the most likely to be protected or most likely for the person who commits homicide to be found to have acted justified way self defense by the courts are when white people kill black people. So it increases from two hundred and fifty percent higher likelihood of a white person being found justified when killing a black person compared to a white person killing another white person almost a two times increase in the likelihood that they'll be found justified in that situation. But when those are flipped, and it's a black person killing a white person. The likelihood is virtually the same in a stand your ground state or. A nonstandard around state of being found justified by the criminal Justice system. So it's pretty clear who stand your ground laws. Protect and who they apply to and who is not protected by those laws. They definitely don't protect us. So I just want to bring up a study by Stanford law school that tracked recidivism rates for more than eight hundred parole people serving licenses over a fifteen year period.

Toya Brown Tennessee supreme court Sinn Toya Brown Tennessee State supreme court Jacqueline Dixon Tennessee Stanford law school United States Selma Skoda Meriva Alexander Britney Alabama Enin sixteen years forty three year fifty percent
"sinn toya" Discussed on Super Station 101

Super Station 101

02:26 min | 2 years ago

"sinn toya" Discussed on Super Station 101

"It's just so loud and we all ready ready here appealed it the boycott has officially ended i mean it's okay people on i hereby declare may twenty third twenty eighteen to ford faction will officially be watching nfl football no longer boycotting nfl unless that rule falls through we're going to boycott it it'll be it'll be it's over we're back to watching our usual pba boeing we'll be right back live from tampa be right back around the corner this is yellowhammer news i'm andrea thais a gunman in panama city florida is dead after an hours long standoff forty nine year old kevin holroyd was wanted for the death of a thirty year old birmingham man police responded to a nine one one call on tuesday afternoon holroyd fired from the second story of an apartment building when police arrive witnesses in the area say there had to be a hundred rounds exchange between holroyd and the police one woman fleeing the building was grazed by a bullet holroyd was later found dead by police robot he was soaked in gasoline a woman serving a life sentence in nashville tennessee is making her case for clemency today sinn toya brown was convicted for killing a man when she was a sixteen year old prostitute the tennessee board of paroles will hear from brown today her lawyers say that brown was a sex trafficking victim who feared for her life when she shot the man celebrities like kim kardashian and singer riana have launched social media campaigns pushing for brown's release a gay man who wanted to challenge republican county clerk kim davis in kentucky loses his bid in the state primary this past tuesday david ermal was seeking to win in the democratic primary however he was up against three other candidates davis went unchallenged on the republican side davis was jailed three years ago for refusing to give a marriage licenses to gay couples davis said she could not violate god's authority and follow the us supreme court decision city officials in lake worth florida still don't know who sent out a zombie alert to residents after a power outage this past weekend the text message was sent to over seven thousand customers an independent investigation is underway after an internal review reached a dead end this news is brought to you by attorney.

andrea thais lake worth florida david ermal kentucky sinn toya brown nashville birmingham panama city boeing nfl attorney us kim davis kim kardashian tennessee kevin holroyd florida tampa
"sinn toya" Discussed on Super Station 101

Super Station 101

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"sinn toya" Discussed on Super Station 101

"Visit yellowhammer news i'm andrea thais a gunman in panama city florida is dead after an hours long standoff forty nine year old kevin holroyd was wanted for the death of a thirty year old birmingham man police responded to a nine one one call on tuesday afternoon holroyd fired from the second story of an apartment building when police arrive witnesses in the area say there had to be a hundred rounds exchange between holroyd and the police one woman fleeing the building was grazed by a bullet holroyd was later found dead by police robot he was soaked in gasoline a woman serving a life sentence in nashville tennessee is making her case for clemency today sinn toya brown was convicted for killing a man when she was a sixteen year old prostitute the tennessee board of paroles will hear from brown today her lawyer say that brown was a sex trafficking victim who feared for her life when she shop a man celebrities like kim kardashian and singer riana have launched social media campaigns pushing for brown's release he's a gay man who wanted to challenge republican county clerk kim davis in kentucky loses his bid in the state primary this past tuesday david ermal was seeking to win in the democratic primary however he was up against three other candidates davis went unchallenged on the republican side davis was jailed three years ago for refusing to give a marriage licenses to gay couples davis said she could not violate god's authority and follow the us court decision city officials in lake worth florida still don't know who sent out a zombie alert to residents after a power outage this past weekend the text message was sent to over seven thousand customers an independent investigation is underway after an internal.

birmingham lake worth florida us david ermal kentucky sinn toya brown nashville florida panama city andrea thais kim davis brown kim kardashian tennessee kevin holroyd forty nine year sixteen year thirty year
"sinn toya" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"sinn toya" Discussed on KQED Radio

"So um you know this raises two issues that our particularly troubling one is the vanishing use of clemency to correct for excessive sentences clemency used to be regularly used across the country to sort of cat recalibrate systems that were uh sentences that were placed on people that were extreme and so since toys case without the other issue is that tennessee has the longest as well as far as i know the longest wait period before your first parole hearing on a life sentence in the country tennessee you wait sixty years and if you have good time it could be 51 years six zero six zero years and she is she is she is one of those that's why she heard parole first pearl hearing is so late with good time now called sentence credit she could wait fifty one years but you know she is stuck in a state that's like the worst in the nation for life with parole to gonzalez what do you see as the outlook for sinn teuer brown to be able to get clemency in tennessee is this a real long shot or or could it could it be possible i think we're seeing so much energy and attention being paid to her case both as by advocates an activists that that continued pressure is where we might see i'll the possibility of clemency and so that the continued renewed n i am focused energy around that is where i think that that possibility becomes more real but i do i want to turn us back to chris's point because you know having i'm chris wright in as the listener and say you know he he went into an education programme instead of the juvenile justice system that's actually what needs to happen more right because that's where sinn toya's and others who have had these complexities of life experiences in particular around sexual exploitation and sex trafficking they shouldn't be immediately placed into an adult facility or even a juvenile facility where they're going to have all.

tennessee the outlook sinn teuer brown sinn toya gonzalez chris wright sex trafficking six zero six zero years fifty one years sixty years 51 years
"sinn toya" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"sinn toya" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Shed light around issues not only of central air brown but young women like alexis martin latisha claes case a couple of years ago russia meadows and others around the country but i think that what is interesting about sinn toya's cases that she was arrested back in two thousand four four which was a year before our federal anti trafficking laws even contemplated the fact that americans could even be victims of sex trafficking and so now of course we know all these years later that not only are american citizens able to be victims of sex trafficking but in fact the vast majority of sex trafficking victims here in the united states are usborn and us citizens many of them likes and toyota are girls of color many of them have suffered multiple instances of child sexual abuse have had some interaction with the foster care system and so her story really shows the narrative of so many young women and girls that we know to that point you were one of the authors of a two thousand fifteen report titled the sexual abuse to prison pipeline could you talk a little bit more about what the study found sure so what we actually found in the report was that in a number of states that had available data looking at girls in the system the overwhelming majority of girls behind bars had suffered instances of sexual physical violence in some states unlike south carolina it was eighty one percent of girls in places like oregon it was upwards of ninety three percent so we looked at those high rates of trauma together with the most common offenses the girls were being arrested for it really made clear that it was that victimization that was driving the abuse so sometimes that looks like a young girl who's running away from an abuse of home or foster care situation who was then arrested for the offence of running away and sometimes that looks like a girl who is engaging in substance abuse to cope with the years of trauma and in the most extreme cases it looks like what happened to meadows what happened to send toy of brown in the case that they were actually forced to take more extreme measures to protect themselves as a result of society essentially failing them.

sinn toya sex trafficking united states toyota south carolina oregon russia ninety three percent eighty one percent