20 Burst results for "Sinha"

Surveillance And Local Police: How Technology Is Evolving Faster Than Regulation

Fresh Air

06:11 min | Last month

Surveillance And Local Police: How Technology Is Evolving Faster Than Regulation

"Are used to the idea of that American intelligence services, such as the National Security Agency have enormous capacities to track our phone calls, emails and movements. And we hope that rational and constitutional rules for their use are set by our elected leaders. But our guest journalist John Fast Man says most of us don't realize that thousands of police departments across the country also have access to some really powerful surveillance tools with relatively little oversight. There are devices that scan and store the locations of thousands of auto license plates they encounter randomly on the street. Portable gadgets called Sting rays that Elektronik Lee mimic a cell phone tower and get every mobile phone within range to yield its data and cameras, cameras everywhere increasingly with facial recognition software. Fast ones. New book explores these new technologies, the questions they raise about privacy and the controls he believes citizen should impose on the agencies that use them. His book is we see it all Liberty and justice in an age of perpetual surveillance. John Fast Man is the U. S. Digital editor for the Economist and the author of Two novels. He joins me from his home in suburban New York. John Fast Man. Welcome to Fresh Air. You know this book races? Ah lot of skeptical questions about law enforcement. And I'd like to begin by just having you explain what kind of time you spent with police officers and police chiefs and sheriffs and others. Observing their practice and getting their point of view. Well over the course of my report and going back to 2010. When I was the Atlanta correspondent for the Economist, I've I've written a great deal about criminal justice issues, and I've embedded with a number of departments over the past decade for this book. In particular, I probably spent the most time with the LAPD. I went out with their patrol division. And I spent time with with Sean Danowski, who was then an assistant chief learning about a predictive policing program They use called prayed pole and we can talk about that later. I also embedded for several days with the Newark Police Department. Toe learn about how technology is used by police officers in their day to day job. So one of the one of the challenges and writing about this is that I would hear about this technology from tech companies and from police chiefs from a sort of 30,000 ft view, But I really wanted to see how police officers as they work integrate technology into their daily jobs, how it changes the sort of practice Of being a police officer. Okay, So let's talk about some of these technologies. One of the things, of course, that people are aware of his video surveillance. I mean, there are You know, security cameras in so many places that police typically Consult after there are crimes and given areas, But you're looking at ways that this is being expanded in, particularly in Newark, New Jersey police have something called citizen Virtual Patrol. You don't explain what this is how it works. Sure, the Citizen Virtual Patrol is a network of cameras placed throughout the city. These air public cameras now one of the things when you talk about CCTV cameras, the overall majority of them are privately owned. But these citizen virtual patrol Is the network composed of publicly owned cameras that people can access from a laptop. Now the idea behind this was to sort of allow people to observe and perhaps testified of crimes from behind a veil of anonymity. So it gives people an eye on the entire city and let people see what's going on. And John. When you say people, you mean just ordinary citizens, Anybody can dial up and look through these cameras. So that's right. A citizen anywhere can log into this citizens Virtual Patrol of Newark, So I live about 50 Miles north of New York, and I could log in at my desk and see the feed from any one of the 126 cameras that the New York Public Safety Department is placed around the city. It seems a little intrusive, right? I mean, somebody who just wants to be a busy body. I guess. Other people would say it's no different from looking out a window, right? You're not peeping into somebody's apartment. What concerns does this race? That's right, technically. The cameras don't show anything that an observer on the street couldn't see so that shows public streets. It's not aimed at anyone's apartment. It's not looking inside anyone's window. On the other hand. It does show people's yards, where they have a slightly higher expectation of privacy, and it could provide some information that people wouldn't want known about. For instance, if I'm you know, let's say I had an ex who lived in Newark and I was watching the camera trained on her house. If I saw her leave with some suitcases and then saw no activity at her house for a couple of days. I could surmise that she wasn't there. I could also know when she goes out when she comes home who comes to a house all these things that of course I could. I could find out if I observed her in front of her house. But that would make me visible. This renders me invisible and it lets me observe, lets anyone who logs in observed an enormous swath of the city. So that's another thing. I think we need to think about when we're thinking of police technologies, and that is that any single instance maybe unobjectionable, but when it comes to scale, you're talking about something very different. Do the police think that it's been helpful. Have there been any complaints or any notable benefits to you know, to law enforcement from having all of these windows on the street? The police do think it's been helpful. The police think it helps people keep an eye on their neighborhood. I think the idea was that a citizen of a certain neighborhood could keep an eye on what was happening around her without sort of making herself known to other people around her as as someone who's watching, So it lets her Keep an eye on what's happening around her behind that veil of anonymity and the Newark police think that's good public safety. On the other hand, I spoke to the director almost Sinha, who's the director of the value of New Jersey, who made the same point that that I just made that what we're talking about is it scale quite different and the camera sort of give information about people in their private activities. That you wouldn't necessarily want to know, and that if you did try to find out, you would be observed. This lets you do so anonymously and invisibly and that anonymity. Invisibility has benefits, according to the Newark police, and also detriments, according to U S. C. L U

John Fast Elektronik Lee Sean Danowski Newark Police Department Newark National Security Agency Citizen Virtual Patrol New York Public Safety Departm Lapd New York Atlanta Cctv New Jersey John Sinha
Lucia Lucas: Cracking Operas Trans Glass Ceiling

LGBTQ&A

03:54 min | 3 months ago

Lucia Lucas: Cracking Operas Trans Glass Ceiling

"Begin with. I want to go back to when you were first coming out. Was there any president or other openly trans opera singers that you could look at to see how being out might potentially affect your career. No actually this is sort of been a rule book that i've written myself over the last six years. Because there wasn't there was some professional singers who previously have careers. Who then transitioned so. There was a little bit of an idea what might happen with my voice which is not much and there was a little bit of an idea. About how the business might treat somebody. Who is trans like examples of it but nobody who was on the stage performing. It was just sort of a. How does this all work. So i had to decide how i was going to handle each individual thing and hopefully it was in a good way. Oh in so in essence to use your word. You're like writing the rule book for every transfer. Sinha fall you. I mean it's my real book for me. But i do hope that if i'm doing my best that at least administration in different opera houses can see that. It's possible that it's possible that this private thing this this very thing very specific to somebody can exist only in their personal life and it doesn't need to exist on stage. The opera doesn't need to be reworked. Nothing needs to happen. You can glue a beard on. And i'll go out there and i'll sang an it's fine and i don't care and i just want to keep doing my job you know if i'm missing. Baritone i just wanna go sing baritone really well and so now you have been. Al came out officially in two thousand fourteen. How welcoming have you found the opera world. Well the public in opera houses. They're typically a little bit more conservative than the people who are performing. But i will have to say that they're way more understanding and willing to at least inquire instead of shutting down somebody who is not someone who they're used to seeing on stage. We're seeing more and more start to break down. I think that that comes with so many tv studios. That are existing. Now there's more tv studios than have ever existed. You know we have. We have netflix amazon. We have who. We have apple with their own series. You don't have to make you know forty million or opening weekend. You're not playing to that many people in a theater. You can play to niche audiences like everybody doesn't have to like it and it setup that we ended and it's beautiful that way we can tell specialty stores to specialty people. You know one. Massive difference between hollywood and opera in correct me if i'm wrong but you have almost only played male roles and that is how your career is likely to continue. Is that right. Yes the majority of characters that i play in my mainstream main stage career are men specifically angry men between the age of thirty five and fifty. That's that's my talk. So the focus. What type of voice you have. And so because of the characteristics of your voice of the timbre and like the notes you are in that category almost only for opera. Yeah i mean unless a new composer wants to right something else which is actually the case with tobias picker. She's writing the danish girl for me. You know that's kinda something special and that's because the composer said hey. I would like to do this for you

Sinha AL Netflix Amazon Apple Hollywood Tobias Picker
"sinha" Discussed on Psychology of Entrepreneurship

Psychology of Entrepreneurship

02:35 min | 4 months ago

"sinha" Discussed on Psychology of Entrepreneurship

"On a warm august morning in harare farai it twenty four year old mother of two walks towards a park bench. She looks miserable and dejected. Now on the park bench sits an eighty two year old woman better known to the community as grandmother. Jack farai hands grandmother. Jack an envelope from the clinic nurse grandmother. Jack invites to sit down as she opens the envelope and reads the silence for three minutes. Or so She reads and after a long pause. Grandmother takes a deep breath. Looks at fireeye and says i'm here for you. Would you like to share your story with me. Farai begins her eyes. Swelling with cheers. She says grandmother. Jack i'm hiv positive of been living with hiv for the past. Four years. my husband. This year ago. I have two kids under the age of five. I am unemployed. I can hardly take care of my children. That was dixon dibango. Who is one of twelve psychiatrists in zimbabwe for the population of more than sixteen million realizing that his country would never be able to scale traditional methods of treating those with mental health issues to bondo helped develop a beautiful solution powered by limitless resource grandmothers. The link to his ted talk is in the show. Notes at psychology of entrepreneurship dot com. I told provide that. I believe that mothers are the original entrepreneurs to which he said. I was very much influenced by my grandmother. My grandmother was a big part. Who sheep me. Who kind of Showed me what is going to a real challenges in my grandmother weather was always there for me and she also taught me how to you. Lead your life. How do you go about it fits. It's very interesting you know. Mothers grandmothers there have always become are very much influenced in part and very much a role model for me when i.

Jack farai Farai hiv zimbabwe bondo ted
"sinha" Discussed on Everyonecast

Everyonecast

02:52 min | 6 months ago

"sinha" Discussed on Everyonecast

"I think there's a risk <Speech_Male> of that job. I also <Speech_Male> think that <Silence> <Speech_Male> you know, when looking <Speech_Male> at certain companies, <Speech_Male> you know, a lot of them are <Speech_Male> religious big advertisers, <Speech_Male> you know, like if <Speech_Male> you enter a recession, <Speech_Male> you know, one <Speech_Male> of the quickest things to be <Speech_Male> able to cut is <Speech_Male> advertising expenses <Speech_Male> and with the pandemic <Speech_Male> going <Speech_Male> on <Speech_Male> there's less and less <Speech_Male> things to do <Speech_Male> advertise, you <Speech_Male> know in that sports <Speech_Male> are such a big industry <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> they're not happening right now. <Speech_Male> So I think there's <Speech_Male> going to be a market correction. <Speech_Male> I don't <Speech_Male> think you can have gold <Speech_Male> at all-time highs <Speech_Male> and Equity Capital markets <Speech_Male> at all-time highs. They're <Speech_Male> not they're supposed <Speech_Male> to go in <Speech_Male> line with each other the supposed <Speech_Male> to be diversification, <Speech_Male> but they're supposed to get <Speech_Male> back to go the opposite way. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> So I think there's a bubble <Speech_Male> forming and <Speech_Male> I think there's going to be a large <Speech_Male> Market correction. <Speech_Male> I do think that <Speech_Male> if <Speech_Male> you time <Speech_Male> it which is one of the most <Speech_Male> difficult things to do <Speech_Male> do it. <Speech_Male> Try it. I personally <Speech_Male> am I I'm <Speech_Male> not I mean, I <Speech_Male> don't get me wrong. I've definitely <Speech_Male> bought some stuff cuz <Speech_Male> I think you know on a speculative <Speech_Male> basis book, but <Speech_Male> which itself which <Speech_Male> I can afford to and <Speech_Male> and have a longer <Speech_Male> investment Horizon, <Speech_Male> but <Speech_Male> I would <Speech_Male> pursue. Yep. Wait until <Speech_Male> the vaccine comes <Speech_Male> out and it's <Speech_Male> really being distributed <Speech_Male> and people <Speech_Male> and we <Speech_Male> have <Speech_Male> hit or getting <Speech_Male> close to herd immunity and <Speech_Male> there is a real <Speech_Male> recovery because until <Speech_Male> there is a true recovery <Speech_Male> because at <Speech_Male> the end of day like what's <Speech_Male> happening right now <Speech_Male> in <Speech_Male> certain countries in <Speech_Male> like like <Speech_Male> for example, South Africa, <Speech_Male> they're in Winter <Speech_Male> right now. And <Speech_Male> so they have rampant <Speech_Male> covid-19 <Speech_Male> apnay <Speech_Male> that country <Silence> and so <Speech_Male> when we hit fall <Speech_Male> when we hit the <Speech_Male> winter there is going <Speech_Male> to be a second <Speech_Male> wave and I think <Speech_Male> that that's going to <Speech_Male> topple a lot of <Speech_Male> a lot of markets <Speech_Male> so I <Speech_Male> don't be like, you know. <Speech_Male> I'm over here but <Silence> I <Speech_Male> would just say proceed <Speech_Male> with <Speech_Male> caution. I <Speech_Male> know that Boeing <Speech_Male> I know that Delta <Speech_Male> looks nice but <Silence> proceed <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> with caution fantastic <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> advice home. <Speech_Male> It's my <Speech_Male> pleasure. Well, <Speech_Male> it was great talking <Speech_Male> to Josh <Speech_Male> and of <Speech_Male> course, I appreciate you <Speech_Male> coming <Silence> I <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> learned a lot and <Speech_Male> I'm sure everybody everybody <Speech_Male> else has learned <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> a lot to open and <Speech_Male> birth. Guys all deaths <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> because talking <Speech_Male> about Scotch next time. <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> I'm really into that to <Speech_Male> Scotch. <Speech_Male> Oh <Speech_Male> man we missed out on <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> that motorcycle <Speech_Male> gang, <Speech_Male> <Silence> <SpeakerChange> you <Speech_Male> know what maybe in the future <Speech_Male> you could be on again <Speech_Male> and we could <Speech_Male> talk about all that cool <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> stuff. <Speech_Male> Glenfarclas. <Speech_Male> Okay, <Speech_Male> write that down when <Speech_Male> drawing a glenfarclas <Speech_Male> <Silence> and if you like. <Speech_Male> Stuff Laphroaig <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> lack of one <Speech_Male> now, we can talk <Speech_Male> and talk for hours about Scotch. <Silence> <SpeakerChange> Yeah. <Speech_Male> I don't know anything you <Speech_Male> just said, but <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> well <Speech_Male> great <Speech_Male> talking to you and <Speech_Male> have a great <Speech_Male> rest of your day and <Speech_Male> rest of your <Speech_Male> week and <Silence> rest of your <Speech_Male> investment <Speech_Male> and credit <Speech_Male> career. <Speech_Male> We got a medium <Speech_Male> real life <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> post code. <Silence> I hope so. <Speech_Male> Yeah. <Silence> <Speech_Male> Take it easy. <Speech_Music_Male> Take care. <Music>

Equity Capital South Africa Josh Delta Boeing
"sinha" Discussed on Everyonecast

Everyonecast

05:07 min | 6 months ago

"sinha" Discussed on Everyonecast

"That the FED always makes statements point to the CPI saying oh look inflation is down and we have to increase it, but I mean, maybe that's just something to kind of appease the lame an even though they have all these sport complex reasonings that they're not really putting out there. Well, they can't jack up rates, you know home at the end of the day if inflation did creep up and you did Jack up rates and then they're going to create a recession, you know, then it becomes political, you know, and then I unfortunately there is like this this human bias too in which you know, if you've ever noticed like we do have more expand like the period of expansion is always longer than the period of bust down the and overall rationale for that is because people like expansions rather than like bus, even though theoretically you need both in order to be able to moderate and economic cycle what panics are also usually allows her just because people panic yeah panics are think are due to a fundamental issue. But an extra sharper because people panic I don't know how to I meant to say I meant to say Corrections or sharper because people panic psychologically. Yeah, there's a lot of there's a lot of psychology. It's difficult to be able to assess why things happen the way they do, you know, and that's why they really say that, you know the market of an animal their their own animals their own be sometimes they feed into themselves like with all this high-frequency trading going on bubbles appreciate faster than they should because it starts filling in all these algorithms which they they feed into it, you know, all this or the lowest go lower like when we had the flash crash in 2010 that was literally created by just high-frequency trading. You know, now that they have all these these these brakes that are put into place to to basically stop that. Yeah. I don't know we just Who knows man? Like I think realistically the biggest concern which which I think is becoming people talking about more investor Community is people are talking about climate change, you know, see the rise of something called ESG guidance, you know, which is environmental social governance..

FED Jack
"sinha" Discussed on Everyonecast

Everyonecast

05:46 min | 6 months ago

"sinha" Discussed on Everyonecast

"I also think that there is a lot of inequality in the Spectrum within within the five boroughs. I think it's just it's a place which is not for everybody, but she has a lot of opportunity if you want, you know, it's there. And it is a lot of fun and it is expensive but I think the other thought is like, you know, is this a place that you want to raise kids in? I don't know the answer that part of me likes that idea of having a house with with a backyard. It's different. I don't know how to scribe it. Like I I haven't really lived in a lot of other places. I mean I've lived in New Jersey suburbs and have lived here. It has the best of everything but you know, as you know, as you can also solve it also has some dangerous, you know, that definitely has the worst of everything too and not only are there crazy variety just food, but as far I remember, it's all delicious to looks good. And I think the reason why it's because like in order to be able to survive in the city, you need to know what you're doing. Oh, yeah, and I mean even in even in Dallas, there's like a variety of places to eat, but I think I think New York City is probably still the gold standard when it comes to food. Yeah like the most, Michigan Standard like Michelin starred restaurants, too. It's interesting. And and unfortunately, you know covet I think is really just taking a huge toll on the city. Like, you know, I'm now looking at I definitely noticed month which individuals now which is unfortunate and it's sad, you know, it is definitely sad to see like, you know, there are a lot more shuttered restaurants, you know, it's unfortunate part is another way to say it and I think that if we have effective stimulus spending you could help because small businesses are such a key portion of the economy. Have you gotten a chance to eat at any Michelin starred restaurants? Yeah. I had a while back. I am an Indian restaurant. I'm blanking out now, I'm name cuz that is an opportunity. I haven't had myself yet. Yeah, I think think it's a little bit hyped. I think it's C ROM. Leave it go to 1 and order a.

New York City Michelin New Jersey Dallas Michigan
"sinha" Discussed on Everyonecast

Everyonecast

03:09 min | 6 months ago

"sinha" Discussed on Everyonecast

"Is this a mathematical formula literally it's just the discount rate on on the bottom of the cash flows that are coming in, you know, as that discount rate goes up the value of your money goes down and another way though is way more which is more common which is equally as common rather is is credit risk. And so if if the probability of a corporation defaulting increases then the discount price goes up also vice versa, you know, like if the probability of a company not defaulting if they get upgraded by rating agency then in that pushes down the field now pushes the project. So like a good example is you know, if you you bought tenure paper for Amazon, you know, and bought it may be in 2010, you know, they were not what they're rated. Now. You should see the value of your investment literally increase which it just interesting cuz normally when people think about bonds you don't think about the market value of the bond, but the market value of bond does go up and down. So that's a form of thing especially capital appreciation the two forms of income right and going back to interest rates. Even when the FED does seem to be hawkish and they raise rates. It seems to still be at a relatively low level compared to most of History. Yes. Is there a reason for that? Yeah. It's basically because we've you know through every cycle whenever you have a downturn time to cut rates about 5% and I think what basically is happen is that central banks are much more prone to cut than they are to raise and I think that the old dog There's actually like a an expression for this like no one wants to the feds job is to take the punch bowl away from the part. So theoretically, you know, we we only think about the sad when things are going bad, but the the other aspect of the FED is because you have a dual mandate is which the other mandate being is. It's not only to keep inflation in check but it's also to keep unemployment low wage, but they're other mandate is to theoretically prevent the economy from overheating and so just historically the way it's happened like other than vulgar who who's the one who jumped up rates and I think the seventies which forced the US economy into a recession. It's rare for it's been rare over the past twenty years for the FED to precipitate a recession by jacking up rates in at normally what's happened is that there's been crises which have been initiated which then caused the FED to start cutting rates and so long Has been more cutting rates in there has been increasing rates, you know, and and even over the past ten years, like even though we've had such a great recovery because it's been such an extended long recovery. The recovery has not been as sharp as other recoveries. He's had a tepid, you know, like the call like a hockey stick. It's not an obvious thing like an L. It's not been a great. It's not been like a month or something to be shaped recovery that we had from we've had a very slow moderating recovery..

FED hockey Amazon US
"sinha" Discussed on Everyonecast

Everyonecast

03:57 min | 6 months ago

"sinha" Discussed on Everyonecast

"Right you've had negative interest rates in Japan for such a significant period of time, you know in Japan that's already entering a recession pre covet a lot of people think that just negative interest rates don't work. And the reason why is because the main mechanism is that it really puts undue pressure on the banks because they start looking elsewhere in order to be able generate excess return. It pressures them too much. That's really what it does, you know, because they they need to make money and if you have negative rates, like for example, like we're just looking at a bond for Apple a bond for Apple issued in Europe has a negative return which literally means that yep. I park a billion dollar a dollars into Apple five years from now. I'm going to get 999 million dollars. I'm literally going to get less money than I gave to them. It just turns it turns topsy-turvy and the thing within the thing other that happens is that it doesn't seem to necessarily work. It doesn't necessarily seem to stimulate the economy. There's other methods of being able to stimulate the economy in Australia. What they're doing is they're doing something called yield curve control, which is I think that they're targeting the 3-year paper and the keeping it at a certain rate. And so what that basically does is it provides expectations that you know interest rates are not going to go up like one of the things that's been going on right now with the FED is that the FED has been explicitly talking about they're going to keep interest rates that close to zero for the next two years. So there's not going to be any, you know, hawkish. Hawkish is another way of saying, you know raising rates, they're not going to be hawkish for at least two years. And what's interesting is that when when they gave that guy dead Couple of months ago it sent this the equity markets in into a spiral because it basically indicated that you know, we're going to be in a recession for at least two years but to give.

Apple Japan FED Europe Australia
"sinha" Discussed on Everyonecast

Everyonecast

04:50 min | 6 months ago

"sinha" Discussed on Everyonecast

"But you also can then generate another investment vehicle to buy more companies, you know, how long you get really good at it then you can start going for were called like Mega lbs where you know, you start throwing out a ton of money and being able to buy stuff which people normally weren't able to buy but that that's no be out but going into what happens when you have more down the balance sheet and why you calling back to the original question of what why it's Covetous acting these companies the reason why is because when yep, Like a normal person. If you have more debt on your balance sheet your ability to get out, you know, and of the whole it's just more difficult like the way I like to think of it is imagine you have to Navy Seals right? Like they're both exactly the same, you know, they're awesome. They're athletes their Prime physical condition right off and you have a hill right and they're both running up the hill. Now you give one Navy SEAL a fifty-pound bag back backpack, you know, that's dad is that the Navy SEAL is the same knee besides the other Compass as other Navy SEAL, you know, they're both excellent, but it's just the fact that the guy with a fifty-pound backpack is going to go slower and he has less options available to him. So it's a realistically when it happens, you know, as it's happened your ability to be able to raise more debt and investors are going to look at their you know, your balance sheet and they're going to say oh I you know, don't know like he already has a fifty-pound bag. Back on him can really put on another fifty-pound backpack on him. Like I don't think he's going to be able get up to that hill where it's look at the other guy and he has no backpack on like okay. Yeah. I can give him a fifty-pound backpack and he can he can be able to compete. So basically when you already have Devon your balance sheet when you run into an emergency, you can't tap the debt Capital markets to raise more debt because investors not to say that you can't be able to do it. So yes, the answer is it reduces your options. Now, this might be outside your area of expertise. Do you think interest rates can stay home of forever or do they need to come up at some point for some reason? So we're talking about this all the time. So just just to give you a bit of background on me. Like I have something called the CFA which is basically just approved calling, you know, three years of exams and what you need to be able to understand a lot of basically everything there is in finance. You need to be able to go through but all right, so you are qualified. I only assumed maybe log No, just because I know you work a lot in the private credit markets. So that's why I actually I didn't mean to question your credibility other words. Now. I actually work in Public Credit markets now and as long as you know, realistically, you know, I what what the lower lever what not lower level the lower credits which were often private but now I work in public credit. And another thing is that, you know took away zooming.

Navy SEAL Navy Seals Devon
"sinha" Discussed on Everyonecast

Everyonecast

03:37 min | 6 months ago

"sinha" Discussed on Everyonecast

"The concept is you are a large private Equity Firm think Kay Kar off think Apollo think Carlisle. Okay, and you have raised 10 billion dollars from your investors, right? So free lbl, what you could do is you could find ten good companies and their total Enterprise Value. Their Enterprises value is equal to the amount of current debt on their balance sheet the job. How do you Market Capital which is the market capitalization which is the market value of equity less cash. That's all it is. Just yet plus the market value of equity less cash. That's the Enterprise value of money and supposing you know, the Enterprise value of the company was 1 billion dollars. So you divvy out your ten billion to buy, you know, ten ten companies and then theoretically, you know, you make it all Equity. There's no debt on their balance sheet. It's a theoretically what you hope in five to ten years is that you grow to Enterprise value of that Corporation should maybe two billion dollars, right? So two billion dollars minus 1 billion dollars over 1 1/1 is 100% return on your money, right? Now imagine that instead of buying ten companies you buy twenty companies and the way you do it is that you put five hundred million dollars in each company of equity which is as cash in terms of cash, you put another $500 of debt and the way you do that is you make the company raised its own debt to fund its own LVL. So it's 50-50 debt-to-equity structure in reality. It doesn't it actually doesn't operate that way in reality. You will have maybe sixty forty or seventy Thirty 70% debt 30-40. And so then now now all of a sudden you've literally bought more companies with the same amount of money. Okay? That's number one. Number two is the fact that now you look at the actual economics of each of each model. So over ten years you have two forms of basically growth one is the fact that the company is naturally paying down debt, right so long Is it pays down debt? Just as you would happen in your own house and think of your own mortgage as you pay down debt on your mortgage you earn more Equity, right? So just by naturally paying down debt. Your Equity is increasing so supposing it's fifty-fifty. It's 1 billion dollar Enterprise Value just, you know, five years from now. It's now 250 million dollars of debt 750 million dollars of equity just from that that's 250 million dollars of equity generated on $500 of equity literally you if there's no Enterprise Value accretion, you've already made fifty percent of wage 50% return right just by literally keeping the lights running and by paying down debt, you've already made money right now on top of that you throw on another billion dollars of Enterprise valuation. You've grown the equity base. You can see how leveraged has enhanced the return, you know, you've bought more companies you've been able to put less Equity into the business through delivering naturally of paying down debt off through the growth of the Enterprise Value. You've been able to generate a higher return. And so you're the money goes to the investors and by doing so then you know, you're collecting the percent of interest on the overall assets deployed..

Equity Firm Market Capital Kay Kar Carlisle Apollo
"sinha" Discussed on Everyonecast

Everyonecast

02:40 min | 6 months ago

"sinha" Discussed on Everyonecast

"I mean ideally wish you should actually be able to see how many of those they have their, you know, like and in order to be able do that requires huge it investment requires huge Logistics and Supply operations like but they weren't doing that because they have dog. My interest rate bill that they were just basically just paying the interest and they were dealing with cutting expenses rather than reinvesting in themselves. Like I read a really in-depth report on them in which they said that they weren't even doing high dusting so high dusting is basically literally this idea that you know, every couple of months. You should clean the top of of fans or or lights in your store. And the reason why is because if you don't every now and then a large clump of dust will fall off the light and down onto the floor which is which is crazy like you as a customer if you walk into a store like that you're not going to want that so they were cutting high dusting, you know, they were cutting janitorial expenses. They were just cutting to the Bone and if you cut too much because you have such a high interest burn off and then you start losing your customer, you know, and so they obviously I mean everyone talks about Amazon that you know Amazon dick. It's hard to compete with Amazon, but but there are examples of brick-and-mortar retailers that were able to compete with a month. Because they were keeping they were reinvesting in their business and they were keeping up with with the competitors, you know, a good example would be again. This is pretty covid-19. Other competitors within there and when you were talking about corporate day you were talking about how these low interest rates have made the debt more affordable. But with covideo going do you think covid-19 or punishing to these companies because they were so levered. Yes. So Leverage is Leverage is a dual edged sword suck. What what leverage I'm going to give you a rundown of an lbl..

Amazon Logistics and Supply operation
"sinha" Discussed on Everyonecast

Everyonecast

04:58 min | 6 months ago

"sinha" Discussed on Everyonecast

"Yeah all all Insurance businesses actually are also hospital called institutional investors, which means that they have on top of their side business on top of their main business. They have a side business which is investment income. So I wonder how much of their actual income is their investment income versus is higher. It's actually a good portion of their business and actually in It's actually kind of funny because like down here for for the company. I work for the investment income from an insurance operations perspective. We were effectively at break-even but virtually all over the money that we made last fiscal year was from the investment income that Limit that actually makes a lot of sense because then you can you can charge people lower premiums. I'm guessing exactly and yeah, it gets it gets competitive. I'm sure amongst different Company's trying to get the lowest premium and that's that helps them do that helps offset know a hundred percent. I think you're right. The investment income is invest in businesses. It's both it could help with with competitiveness for the insurance operations to be able charge a lower premium. Correct? So you also have a lot of experience with bad credit from Bad companies right? Have you ever seen some credit? That was so bad where you kind of like were baffled and you're like, hey Steve, look how bad this company looks and like just you guys chuckled in amusement park. Yeah, I think you know one of the interesting things that just developed over the past ten years post. The great financial crisis is just the investment might offer of private Equity firms. So, you know, basically after the great financial crisis you had you had the institution of you know, the Dodd-Frank rule which which which is essentially separated created a walk again between investment banking and and Commercial Banking operations in which you know, if your Bank of America or JPMorgan you can no longer do what's called proprietary-trading. Which means that you cannot speculate in the markets and extend yourself and also came with it leveraged lending guidance, which basically said that as a bank, you can't underwrite a deal in which it's more than six times levered or that it won't be able to pay off..

Commercial Banking operations Steve Bank of America JPMorgan
"sinha" Discussed on Everyonecast

Everyonecast

04:14 min | 6 months ago

"sinha" Discussed on Everyonecast

"I'm sorry about that. I didn't mean to make like any wage. Options no, no worries. Most people do but yeah now we got we got the puppy and we're just getting him potty trained and getting them used to the new the place a new surroundings and teaching him, you know all the commands. That's as I mean to get insight into my life right now, like I'm working from home actually. It's crazy like through this pandemic. I've actually changed jobs both was in the same company but changed jobs on the puppy deferred the wedding shoving. How does that work changing jobs in your company? Yeah, so it's funny because I technically interviewed for the job in February off an internal role. So to give you a little bit of background on me, I work in finance. I graduated about nine years ago during the first, you know, Global financial crisis dead. And with a degree in economics and you know kind of bounced around from different jobs, and I really learned, you know, cut my teeth within the industry when I landed at a rating agency and worked there for about three and half years where I specialized in something called High Yield Corporate debt. And so that game that gave me the background of what's called just general credit analysis, which what it is, you know in layman's terms is really it's just determining the likelihood of that company defaulting or filing for bankruptcy defaulting is the technical term for saying that, you know, all companies issue debt, and if you don't make an interest payment or if you don't make a principal payment principles to actual, you know piece of the loan that's due interest is interest then we consider that as a fault so so I did that for off for a while then it went to an insurance company and I specialized in a very esoteric form of insurance which pays out if a company evolved bankruptcy. And again, this is all very happy old high yield is another way of saying just very distressed corporates some crappy companies. Yeah bad companies, but but then from there I basically just pivoted to A different role within the company we're basically because you know, it's a large insurance company. And so they you know, they have all these different policies the primarily a property-casualty insurer so often they on top of managing the insurance business in which you know, they want to hopefully collect more premium than pay out claims, which is the general operations. They have a they side business where they basically invest the premiums that they aren't and so that's that's that's an investment fund and so a credit analyst position opened up within that fund the schools that have a nice very transferable. So I interviewed for that and in February, I interviewed a lot of people and I got the job in March and I was actually supposed to transition earlier in March of this year. But but due to the pandemic I was really needed in my current in my former role where I had to you know, help navigate the you know help out the team. Navigate through the price especially during the most earlier early terms The Early times in March and April were literally no one knew what was happening. But yeah, I've been in that role since May and so now I cover very high grade companies because the insurance companies essentially have a mandate where they can't invest in in low-yield stuff. You can see my dog in the background their home. Hi, doggie. What's what's his name his or her nango? Oh. Mangos are a Delicious Fruit. Yeah, but it's also Indian like we wanted to go with something cute. But yeah, he's just he's just a walk-in teddy bear. That's really what he is. He's a miniature poodle. He looks very much like a teddy bear for sure. Yeah. So do most insurance companies actually invest their the premium. Yeah..

credit analyst The Early times principal
"sinha" Discussed on Everyonecast

Everyonecast

02:17 min | 6 months ago

"sinha" Discussed on Everyonecast

"This is a show where you get to be. The star will make a great episode together. No matter how boring or awkward you feel. The best part is that it's all done remotely. So participating is really easy you have to do is contact us at everyone cast.com and you can have your own episode on this show. Let's begin. I'm Anthony salvato and this is Josh Sinha. Hey, what's going on? Well, first of all, you know, thanks for having me on your podcast glad to I think it's really cool experience. You've never done anything like this before but you know, I think you know the past year has been kind of crazy. I think you know in May 2019. I got engaged down and up to basically March of this year. I thought we were going to get married. This was to have a big big, you know, like four hundred people wedding, but you know coronavirus came along. I think it's interesting. You know, I've been living in New York City through it all I think one interesting thing which happened was no, we hit the surge The Surge happened, you know, my fiancee works in the medical profession. So she had to deal with it on the front line some really scary stuff. To be honest, so, you know this inconvenience of not having a wedding. It's not it's a small price to pay given what's going on but through all of it, you know what I mean? We both lived in, you know at the time separate Apartments now, we're moving into an apartment together in the East Village of New York City. So right now just you know, my mom has a mass because I'm just unpacking everything but the good news is that we did get a puppy. So that's been a huge distraction for everything. But yeah, that's what's going on right now that does sound crazy having to do a nursing job in the midst of all this she's not in her she's a doctor. But yeah my mistake for some reason I don't know why I like from a past conversation. We had I thought it was like a nursing thing. I don't know. But yeah, okay..

New York City Josh Sinha Anthony salvato
Seattle - Monroe School District students collect Chromebooks for oniine learning

Tom and Curley

00:13 sec | 11 months ago

Seattle - Monroe School District students collect Chromebooks for oniine learning

"Down Washington state schools are closed for the rest of the year but students at Monroe went back today I was seventy views Ranji Sinha reports they were picking up Chromebooks is not what teacher body and George thought the rest of the school year would look like

Monroe Chromebooks Washington Ranji Sinha George
"sinha" Discussed on Richard Herring's Leicester Square Theatre Podcast

Richard Herring's Leicester Square Theatre Podcast

01:51 min | 1 year ago

"sinha" Discussed on Richard Herring's Leicester Square Theatre Podcast

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"sinha" Discussed on Richard Herring's Leicester Square Theatre Podcast

Richard Herring's Leicester Square Theatre Podcast

05:21 min | 1 year ago

"sinha" Discussed on Richard Herring's Leicester Square Theatre Podcast

"Okay I did go to a wedding in Calcutta many many years ago which we didn't want to go because we didn't know anybody there but my dad set me and my sis you've got to go. My cousin said his adopt. These is dying to meet you and you can guess that story goes. We've got the date. We met him on a slap but doesn't quite counters. That person isn't a go. No I mean maybe they might requesting that's the closest. Yeah but you've got to see the spirit aside from the body if they if they're dead persons there and then this is like that's how about this question. How this question for you Paul if you could have anyone from any art gallery or museum. All the museum's we're GonNa you one of our things we can take it away. You can choose anything from any museum art gallery. What one thing would you take Iran of Bush's Garden of earthly delights? Okay don't if you've seen it it just never stops. I've never seen any painting with more on it. And more data you could look at it for five days and then you go to. Copeland's fucking is the one that would keep me occupied for a good answer so you need fifty coming up to fifty next year. I've told you a younger than you look younger than it's the medication how you how you feeling about fifty so the thing is Richard. It's not it's not even close to being on my agenda I don't care I don't care I'll be more worried if it wasn't to fifty four. It's never been important to me and Ovo just realism doing something. Very special in my fiftieth birthday. Yeah which is that. I'm going to see the pet shop boys at the O. Two I couldn't quite believe that there were favorite band by a country mile the soundtrack to my lonely standing gable in London years and solely for a once waited till the end and found last blog standing and he was so old he told me used to be a sexy to Harold. Wilson that was a perfect soundtrack that bleakness and the music by far my favorite band tweet from going. Have you put the picture boys and not only was astonished to find a plan? The A two on my fiftieth birthday but it is a greatest hits tour because there's one thing about the picture boys don't want to listen to any of the songs in the last five years it's a horrible reminder. That doesn't matter how creative you get you soon. Eventually lose it. And so the greatest hits tour and that's causing any better weights fifty i. I didn't do anything on my fiftieth birthday. Well the pet shop boys will tour. They weren't. I don't think I would have chosen the pet shop boys but I'm not sure what I would have and tell you. How did you find taskmaster pop? Did you tell US monsters? My dream job really? I'd love to do. You're quite you're competitive not remotely competitive as you may have seen them Thomas. I I've been first things first. The cavaliers are the way. The team are amazing. Alex Horne is a genius. Greg Davis when the funniest human beings that has ever lived the great. And you're treated incredibly. Well I felt old and on somehow another letting down a family heirloom because the show so popula has such a sort of loyal fan base who turn up to the low show. Wanted to know how we've done in the tasks and they watch me and they just go the fuck and what it was was a man who didn't know any logical disease who spent his entire life being unable to do the simplest tasks he's only sticky. You ever called as a kid with me and the Sinha family fell to make a boat for scientists open date. I've never been able to do anything else in luxury thing this quizzing. This is why I don't put myself pedestal. Because this quizzing thing this quizzing things the one intellectual pursuit of actually good anything else. I don't Shit to be honest with you. And it can cause a comic stuff physically create stuff and I just didn't spoke every single trick and shock felt spot again and again and again and it was tough but I'll ask must've that's quite good. It's quite good. Topsoil is but that's the best person earlier film Wang and this can give you a job local and Michelle from The catchphrase die when it went into more dressy and I said why are we why we always as a nation. The Boris Johnson is going to become prime minister because people find his incompetence appealing and Gemma Collins made a Fortune Buford incompetence appealing. My agent then turns and says what away. Your money's just come through.

US cavaliers Greg Davis Calcutta Richard Alex Horne first things first Boris Johnson London Copeland Iran Paul Michelle Wilson Wang Sinha Gemma Collins prime minister Harold Thomas
"sinha" Discussed on Richard Herring's Leicester Square Theatre Podcast

Richard Herring's Leicester Square Theatre Podcast

02:59 min | 1 year ago

"sinha" Discussed on Richard Herring's Leicester Square Theatre Podcast

"That's the key. Part of the whole process is my mind body. Were breaking down. There were ten episodes of Dave's most popular comedy show. The could be used as a clinical study in this. This is what happened. I'm not saying that I was shit on task just because I would never be that disingenuous. I can't task say well I know I just have no idea how bad it was going to be. A toss just didn't know why also didn't know was in las tedious task. There's some just couldn't do because I physically couldn't do and that was. That was one of the big worries to the comedy with New Zealand's. I knew something was up. Yeah but equally. You knew that people were people who were tweeting. The talking about it if you didn't if you didn't take control of it that somebody actually the the Sunday after diagnosed. Somebody actually sent me a photo of Rory Kathryn Jones. A BBC journalist who has Parkinson's and said no offense pool but I'm just showed me a photo of somebody else with this is this is a lovely way that strangers communicate with you that he thought had never crossed my mind avenue logical disease. Thank thank you for filling in the gaps in my knowledge and understanding. Yeah well people I was GonNa ask you was. The people must be in different way. I'm no you ask in your blog to be treated the same. Yeah it's an interesting one. That did same blow. All at one is for people to tree the same and ever since I completed that blog all is for people to treat me differently. You say we think is right but actually there's some people that behave with spectacular thoughtlessness people are Selfie and go come on then smile. That's nice people go you go ratio frozen shoulder but can you sign these seventeen photographs of things. That would be a source. Thoughtless things like that. I went on a very horrific train journey last week and one of my very good friends on facebook. This is why we have cars and I wanted to go well. I don't because I'm not allowed to drive anymore. Had every recurred. You don't draw because I'm no longer allowed to drive. We can't expect everybody to live the life of the prism of what your going. They say they will when they send you messages. Comedians admissions going anything. You won't put anything you want. Just say so. And then you turn on Marcus Brigstocke House demanding foot massage and a Ratatouille tells you where to go. There is a sincerity and insincerity. But of course the life gives you and.

Parkinson Rory Kathryn Jones frozen shoulder Marcus Brigstocke House Dave New Zealand facebook BBC Selfie
"sinha" Discussed on Remainiacs – the Brexit Podcast

Remainiacs – the Brexit Podcast

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"sinha" Discussed on Remainiacs – the Brexit Podcast

"But where does most of the online abuse come from? It's hard to tell on Twitter sometimes obviously because you know the semi nuts, but what does the people? Well does two types there are actual individuals who and I get to know them because actually to my Twitter feed. So I, you know, you see the same name and sometimes I tweet and I, I guess, who's going to be the first one back at me kind of, I know that types, but there are also concerted effort. So sometimes I might talk about an individual and I know I'm actually going to get a coordinated bombardment of insults and pushbacks so it doesn't stop me. It doesn't bother me one iota, you know. But I, I know, I know what I'm in that territory. I knew conceal it. You know, you can see. And also I I know I know who bought Sinha trolls who would just, you know, just having a pulp, some of the book has. So we'll be it's amazing. David, two, nine, five, six, seven, eight to English. I. Language fail the teller. Response currently tends to be. I went to school with a two five cents. Us. But you have to say over and over Brexit won't affect my lifestyle, but it will affect the most vulnerable. Does I get through? Well, I it does to people who it's it's what we will talk about. It does to people are pro base. It people don't like me. I, yeah. Well, what would you know you living in your big mansion union on your, you know your lovely lifestyle, and that's really my point. I think actually I'm in a very good. I'm in a well-placed position to care about other people because I don't have to worry about me and I didn't say out of joy. I say that I took concern for my society. I don't wanna live in his broken society. I want to society that fills in some way unified. So I think I'm very well placed to to to worry about the effect is gonna have on people who can't weather. The storm is well as me and actually to be fair, I tell you what I do. I, I actually re tweet it to my followers and they deal with it for me..

Brexit Twitter Sinha David
"sinha" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"sinha" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Hour Adarsh, Sinha Bank of America Merrill Lynch co head of FX strategy is, here with me Dr China I, mean, stable not, stable has it? Stabilized do we become unstable? Again so I think we've stabilized probably in trade-weighted terms has shown its hand by introducing the concept cyclical fixing them just as the Fed's skit was testing its. Laws so I think that tells us they won the trae beta basket to be. Stable doc- and wine is obviously a completely different. Story I think we see continued dollar strength as we sing Bucket currencies, and probably, ultimately, versus the, major currencies all? Year and the Japanese yen? Then I think the BBC will have no choice but to let dollar and wife thrift higher in line with the broader move which is why we still have. A forecast moving up above six ninety before your rent would it be a big. Deal if it does prospects nine even get the. Seven seven ten I mean those are nominal levels I The economy slowing it so that's a great question because in my opinion, will not be a massive deal I. Think the market understands the fixing the understand the Seaford spouse skit as long as the Ceefax a stable and moving up in line with the dollar. Moves elsewhere I think the Baucus being comfortable in, terms of what happens to the forwards what happens to volatility all of that, in my opinion would be pretty contained even why would move towards seven hear more interviews. Like this one on Bloomberg television? Streaming live on Bloomberg, dot, com and on the, Bloomberg, mobile. App or, check your local cable. Listings Global news twenty four hours a. Day at Bloomberg dot com the Bloomberg business app talk on Twitter This. Is a Bloomberg business flash and I'm Karen Moskow US stock index futures pointing to a weaker start European stocks are. Also lower following a downbeat session in Asia after President Trump stepped up his tough talk on trade we check the. Markets every fifteen minutes throughout the trading day on Bloomberg SNP futures down four and. A half points Dow futures down forty five NASDAQ futures down six Dax, in Germany's down eight tenths I said ten year treasury, up to thirty seconds yield two point eight four percent yield..

Bloomberg Sinha Bank of America Merrill Adarsh Fed BBC Ceefax Baucus co head Asia Karen Moskow Twitter Trump Global news President US Germany dot eight four percent twenty four hours