36 Burst results for "Singapore"

Fresh update on "singapore" discussed on Orlando's Evening News

Orlando's Evening News

00:37 min | 19 hrs ago

Fresh update on "singapore" discussed on Orlando's Evening News

"When Manuel was attacked, or is there more install a Muslim has Montana's cameras, Maria Romero, the antithesis repent haven't not the way the casino famous chicken. It's tacky, but I do love either. By Jovian Abla. We couldn't enter the state farm. Even a shaman has supported mostly high muskets. Negocios Caminos must leaving Daniel's experience Those categories. Almighty's indoor Cementos, almost indifferent to the stand, Take a step to set a level spears really that no sickness, no fear of either. Cyril is a shaman, jammy cuatro tres cero. They see a risk they'll media giving have in the case of Benny the train passing Quinta for simple Alexander Corvinus convinces Nina Alexandra pick surgeon in Queens Center, this Quinto they must our having to think upon our Singapore sentence. Alexander He required that house and threatened to out us in contact with any of the six people. He's more calories but of the Lord is our blood. But I told him you maximum traded Livia's portable of the view. That means that the load is that you're back to more trading. I went up to immune Warbird CBS will bring in exit. They say spoon the single.

Alexander Corvinus Alexander He Jovian Abla Negocios Caminos Cyril Maria Romero Manuel Livia Montana Queens Center CBS Nina Alexandra Cementos Benny Daniel
Pitcher Plant Symbioses

In Defense of Plants Podcast

04:48 min | 5 d ago

Pitcher Plant Symbioses

"You know is a big group, florist speaking Southeast Asia is insanely diverse, but then just even think about it from symbiosis specifically like there's already a laundry list of possibilities in there. So how do you even begin to start to sort through where you can make your mark on the science because as part of it as as like a young eager scientists in trainings to be like, okay. Where do I fit in here? Very. True. Yeah. That that was that was quite a process. The first two possibly even three yet mostly the first two years but Essentially what I did is I took a strategy to to find that niche I, kind of just tried everything. Works but. I will say. I did start wanting to focus on the symbiosis between the plants and the the frogs which marina them. That such, a an unusual niche interaction with barely little known about it. So I I thought of that is oh, that would be a nice place to. State my claim but. There there's a reason why some things are not so while studied. In this case, the interaction is not so common as her interactions with insects. Amazon permits again is is is a key thing. So apparently, there's at least one region insider walk in Malaysia which it's not so uncommon to find it but then getting the permits and work, there is another hassle but. As I mentioned like the the more I read about the group and just seeing I just had so many questions and still. Have so many. Questions A on. The first chapter is not one that I anticipated really. So while I was working on trying to. See if I can find breeding frogs in in Singapore I. Wasn't really getting data on that and but I noticed this color polymorphism of the the the common species there nepenthes. Priscilla's. Added on that. But by first chapter ended up looking into coloration. Fees and. Studying that from evolutionary perspective and then also teasing apart what are the possible adaptive benefits of the differences in Ignatius that you see. So even within a species, there's variation between red and green editors and you could see within any individuals species but that was not a question that I went in with right and that's important to realize is how much of this is informed budgets being out there walking around being curious you know that's part of it to kind of have to enjoy what you're doing and and enough to kind of have that relaxed state of mind as they like. My notice that there but not there that's this color not over here and even on the same individual and it's cool that those can then just creep up into your work and become a big part of it without ever really realizing it. But that's where you know having the passion for the system kind of comes into play because God forbid you sent her on something I didn't want to do that and I should have said that in the meeting kind of thing. But Again. You're in the super bio diverse area. You're studying a group of plants that are super charismatic in also diverse themselves and you mentioned you know these Priscilla's a common species in that area and and as that another limitation to the work to as you mentioned, just finding frogs breeding in pitchers alone is difficult but you don't want to stay your entire PG or really. Any research on an organism, you might find maybe two of in your entire time surging or have to climb repel into all this crazy stuff just get to it So is that a big motivating factor to is just being able to work with species where you can get enough data and ask the kinds of questions to to even start investing the sorts of stuff Yes definitely. and. That's A. That's a nice thing about nepenthes actually. So all although. It's this some exotic species from. Our perspective from coming coming from the West sides difficult. Get there bought once you're there once you're in those places, they're usually locally pretty abundant. You can usually get a lot of plans when when you're in that site. Let's really encouraging in also again, if you're like us, living in the Americas, no experience with any of the tropical pitcher plants outside of maybe botanical garden or a nursery like Oh that must've been a sight for sore eyes just walking into an area that is dominated

Priscilla Southeast Asia Amazon Singapore Americas Malaysia Ignatius
Nearly 20 people killed in aftermath of plane crash on Indian runway

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

00:29 sec | Last week

Nearly 20 people killed in aftermath of plane crash on Indian runway

"People were killed and at least one hundred injured when an Air India Express flight from Dubai crashed after skidding off a runway while landing in heavy rain in the south. Indian state of Kerala the plane was traveling to the city called CALCUTT. It was carrying people to India after they became stranded abroad because of covid nineteen th aircraft split into killing sixteen people Indian Civil Aviation Minister hardeep Singapore said in a tweet about one hundred, twenty three people now have been named as injured in the

Indian Civil Aviation Hardeep Singapore Calcutt India Dubai Kerala
Decentralized Storage: The Final Frontier, w/ Bluzelle CEO & founder, Pavel Bains

CRYPTO 101

04:09 min | Last week

Decentralized Storage: The Final Frontier, w/ Bluzelle CEO & founder, Pavel Bains

"Is Blue Zell and how is it different from other blockchain's? is a decentralized database. It's a delegated pufus state network and what we found was how came about was when we started a couple of years ago, we're doing projects for banks and insurers and trying to do the whole thing of enterprise blockchain and. Try to bring that in and saying, Hey, this is where the space is where it's going, and while we're doing some of those projects. We realized that okay. We do. For example, today attorney management system for three banks in Singapore. Great used know. But then all the data and certain parts of it we had to actually store in a centralized database. Then we had done in other one for insurance. Travel Insurance for one of the bigger insurance companies in Asia and that one same thing wait part of this information and what's happening store and centralised database, and we realize that you're not getting a full decentralized stack. It's only partial, and then you know you start thinking about at that time everybody's trying to figure out the decentralize web all the components we. Realized that our problem been solved if he had a decentralized database behind it. And that's where we kind of. That's where it came from. We dug in more and said, okay, that's you want to complete the entire decentralize staff and that's how he basically came together and said, this is the player. This theory we're GONNA play interesting. So it was when I think of blockchain's generally I, kind of analogize them with a decentralized database. Say That about. Bitcoin. Decentralized Database which holds ledger information. And stuff like that. So. Is it maybe the the design that makes it the design of Blue Zell makes it more just as secure as Bitcoin like first office. Is it just as secure as Bitcoin and you know that kind of thing and is it just faster or is it optimized specially to do a certain purpose that you know maybe bitcoin or a theory cannot? Yeah. So it's a different use case. So when it comes to ledger transactions, you know blockchain's are great for that. Just quick information things like that. But if throwing wheel data, let's say if you're building a financial product, can you need to store user information or building a game like profile sessions inventory management? You can't really put that on the blockchain because one it would be very slow. For all that hard data behind it, and it'd be very expensive I mean look the prices of cerium now. So what you said was who build a decentralized network database descended database with nodes at strictly are for storing data we get that security that one hundred percent up time of availability is there and you get and you can store large amounts of data edit or even. Less than half the price of centralized databases. So it's a different case. So your transactions, definitely, those things at the stadiums create at bitcoin the other blockchain's you keep doing that but the hard data lakeview application and you know, let's say you're using an APP whether it's Base Camp Mail chimp facebook. All data has to sit somewhere behind it and that's you put on. US interesting. So it's almost like Blue Zell would be a direct competitor. to any of those data centers that we would see that are be owned by Amazon web servers. Right or you know we drive past the freeway and we know that there's a big data center over there. Those are centralized and owned by certain companies right? So you're saying. If a group of people all came together to. Contribute their computing power to storing in serving files to anybody who calls it then you'll compensate them or somebody will be compensating them in Blues, L. Tokens. Right. Right. So think of it as AIRBNB. We've just discovered that, hey, there's a lot of people out there with a lot of computer space on on their laptops devices, xboxes that are sometimes most of the time not used right because everything's really run on the cloud. So what we're saying is made just give extra room in your apartment. Extra space on your computer. To, US will manage it and we'll have somebody rented. So

Blue Zell Blockchain United States Singapore Airbnb Asia Attorney
Why does Donald Trump want to ban TikTok?

Risky Business

06:26 min | Last week

Why does Donald Trump want to ban TikTok?

"For those who are blissfully unaware late last week, us? President Donald Trump announced that he would ban Tiktok and furthermore he said he would block Microsoft from taking over the APP which was apparently a deal that was in the works Then he's back flipped and given Microsoft, forty five days to complete the transaction and he's, but now he signed that the US Treasury should get a copy of the deal which seems weird in a country, which is terrified of socialism so like That's a basic recap, but there's so many little weird bonkers nuances to this Britain I actually bret benefit and I actually read about published on risky Biz in the Linke's quakes showing. But look, let's let's get the conversation going now and we'll start with you, alex, know they're probably some national security ramifications or concerns around APPs lactic TIKTOK. But why do we get the impression? That's not what's driving this whole thing? Well, you make it then. Prussian, because the president of the United States continues to change his justification of what he's doing is making a national data protection law up on the fly on twitter. and. So you know it's it's quite possible that watching what's going on that. You'd reasonably conclude that this isn't a well-considered change in policy, but perhaps part of the ongoing trade war and yell perhaps a mix of trump's anger at what would normally be protected speech against him on Tiktok and partially to distract from the fact that at the same day that he made that announcement, it was announced that the United States economy shrunk by nine percent in just one quarter. And so you know all those things together. Is really polluting this process now that being said I, think there are some interesting risks here in there is something we have to talk about about Chinese APPS and the data of Democracies sitting servers available to the PR. But if you're going to do that for my perspective Tiktok is probably not even the top five or top ten companies. I'd be concerned about there's a lot of Chinese companies that are much more critical inner city and much more important data than they are. This seems. To be completely driven by trump and not by some kind of process and either the White House or or the agencies were, there can rationally considering these things. Now look you and I, we have access to gripe bonds that most people don't actually have access to. A wonderful part of the job. I mean, my gripe tells me that this is not going through the usual processes. I mean the US investigation into Tiktok did start last year. Right? This is a legit sign. Lee Rooted investigation, but it's the escalation since like last week, that is just the just the mad pot, and as you say I mean why the hell out we talking about we chat and that's that's a curly a one to a strategy. I know that there are politicians here. Who Use we chat as a way to communicate with Chinese Australians, for example, right? So that whole thing is a can of worms and I think blocking chat in. A, lot of places around the world is going to be a real loser, right? So that's maybe one reason people don't WanNa. Touch it. But yeah, this is a very complicated. Nuanced issue that has just been. The whole thing strange. Isn't it? It is so syphilis. The law that we're talking about here is was really built to protect kind of the American industrial base around defense. Rightly, you have an important helicopter manufacturer and you don't WanNa get bought by Iran. That's what cities is for. It has never been used as a back door for data protection framework right here. In the United States, we do not have data protection framework. There is no law that says you cannot ship social security numbers of Americans to a Chinese company. Nothing prevents that in theory now, obviously, we have A. Rules that have been created through FTC decisions and such. But overall, we don't have a framework for deciding what is really important Pi and work in it set up, and so to create that out of whole cloth, using a stiffest interpretation is really probably the worst way to handle what is eight really really complicated problem, and like you said, there's other companies put away the top and I think for my perspective, we chat the top Vermont for me. Right is used by the entire chinese-speaking Gaspara. Anybody who has any in China uses it, and that includes people in Singapore people in Hong Kong people in Taiwan. So lots of these places where Chinese intelligence is really interesting. What's going? We chat has become. Part of People's daily lives, and unlike tiktok, it carries very sensitive data. Right? People run their companies. All we chat, they have their personal communications reach at the. They probably arrange affairs and do things that are very black maleable on we chat and there evidence from Citizen Lab, and some other folks who have done worth that demonstrate that you can kind of get side channel information out of we chat that demonstrates that they are watching and they are doing at least scanning of certain phrases, even communications that go. I. Mean I m point, I. think that's well known and well established that we chat is certainly used by the EPA to do surveillance, right? Like that is the reason. So successful in the reason that they can block other communications, funnel people through it, but this brings us to an important question. There are some concerns that say censorship on TIKTOK. For example, there was a case where they would deleting videos that referred to. Human Rights abuses occurring in Xinjiang in in China, right, and that turned into a into massive Khufu four. Good reason. Don't get me wrong Let's not pretend for a second, the PSE or a bunch of fluffy. Fluffy pandas. Okay. That is that is certainly not the case. But let's, be real. Trees names for them. But let's look. Let's be be real here. Right? Like the hottest security angle to this, right? It's it's. It's hard to make a case that it's. It's a terribly dangerous APP now when the United States blocked the sale of grinder. To to an offshore concern I, mean I think that was another Chinese company that wanted to buy that. Absolutely. Anyway, near when they wanted to buy a company that track Global Hotel reservations again, that it's type of information is incredibly valuable to US intelligence in two, thousand, six, the US government's blocked checkpoint, which is an Israeli from blind buying sauce fly because source for. Through. SNORT had deep in US government networks. The right in all of these situations where this has happened before you can point to a single reason and you can say this is why. Absent here,

United States Tiktok President Donald Trump Microsoft China President Trump Alex Wanna Vermont Iran Bret Britain EPA Twitter. White House LEE FTC
When Covid Subsided, Israel Reopened Its Schools. It Didn’t Go Well.

The Takeaway

13:57 min | Last week

When Covid Subsided, Israel Reopened Its Schools. It Didn’t Go Well.

"Since its debut and twenty seventeen, the Chinese APP tick tock has become one of the fastest growing social media tools with more than eight hundred, million active users. The APP lets users make short videos that are often shared across the Internet, but Tiktok isn't all fun games for months. Now, a lot of the attention about the APP has been focused on the national security concerns and the collection of user data, and as a result, the platform has been banned in India, by multiple branches of the US military and by Wells Fargo employees most recently however, president trump took aim at tiktok himself by threatening to ban the APP. We're looking at Tiktok we may be banning TIKTOK. We may be doing some other things, a couple of options, but a lot of things are happening. So we'll see what happens but we are looking at a lot of alternatives with respected dictum. Those remarks were before reports surfaced that Microsoft was pursuing a deal to buy TIKTOK in a press conference at the White House yesterday president trump claimed Microsoft or any other company would have to wait until September fifteen to acquire the APP and would be expected to give a percentage of the profit from the sale to the US Treasury. Joining me now is Graham Webster editor of digit China Project at Stanford University's Cyber Policy Center and a fellow at New America Graham thanks for being with us. Thanks for having me. And Cowan Rosenblatt is a youth and Internet cultural reporter for NBC, News. Dot Com callen thanks for being with us as well. Glad to, be here. Cowen who is the average tiktok user? The average tick tock user really is is a dynamic question because there is a huge range of different people who are using the APP but I'd say the most common person you're gonNA find is someone who is either at the tail end of high school or College who is definitely a solidly in generation the Gen Z. and he was using me APP mostly for fun to do dance challenges trends an engaged with communities that serve to their world. Graham. All of that sounds pretty basic I mean it doesn't sound like there's anything to be concerned about so far what type of data does tiktok collect from its users Graham? We'll TIKTOK is like a lot of social media companies these days It's using an AI driven or machine learning driven algorithm to figure out which content to to individual users. So to get this accomplished, they pay attention to obviously whatever you post that also you know what posts on your feed you look at how long you look at them where your device location is They also tried to track individual users like many apps do by looking at things like screen size and operating system and of course, they have a fair amount of information about your social graph, your your connections to friends and other people that you follow. And so what were some of the concerns around the data collection that way Graham given that it feels like there's a lot of, as you mentioned, other social media platforms and advertisers and the like that are tracking everything that we do already. Why? Why is Tiktok being highlighted here and banned in some of the institutions that we mentioned at the top Well, the basic reason is that tick tock is owned by a Chinese company named Bite Dance and they're a fairly new social media company. They had a breakout a few years ago in China with an APP called junior Tokyo that that is a you know an algorithm, IQ news feed and this is China's first big breakout internationally in terms of social media APPS and really getting take-up in in many different countries around the world not just the United States. So there's A concern that data collected by Tick Tock could end up in the hands of the Chinese company or the Chinese government and wild tick. Tock says that it stores all US user data in the US or in Singapore we don't really have a good way as a society right now to check that type of thing and to make sure that companies commit you when they commit to you know storing data and the Safeway making sure that they're actually doing that. Doesn't sound like we have a lot of that in the United States either though Graham. I mean, we have constant security breaches left and right Right. Well, the United States doesn't have a central data governance or data security or privacy Regulatory System the most prominent example of one globally as Europe, which has the general data protection regulation called the GDP are, and that governs things like when an apper services going to collect your personal information they have to gain certain types of consent and follow certain types of rules and there's also kind of limits the. Idea that if you collect data for a certain reason that you got consent for you shouldn't be able to use it for other reasons and that type of governance is just not that prominent in the US partially because the big US social media companies are not especially keen to have their practices heavily regulated they. They find GDP are in Europe to be burdensome and You know get in the way of making money. Kalland back in June president trump organized a rally in Tulsa Oklahoma and rumor has it that tiktok users promoted buying tickets for the event and didn't show up so that the event would be empty. What do we know about how that rubbed of the administration? So, what we know is it seemed to sort of frustrate the administration. Now, there's no evidence that the Tiktok users and K pop stands who are fans of Korean pop music that they had any impact on turnout. We are going through a global pandemic. There are a lot of factors going on right now. So it is really hard to know sort of what that impact was. But what we do know is it likely inflated expectations for turnout. The administration was planning to have a second rally after the main rally in Tulsa. which they then had to cancel, and so we think that it really messed with them. It was a it was a real genuine troll on the part of these tic TAC users against the president, and it really seemed to rub him the wrong way and there are lots of Tiktok users young first time voters who are telling me that when trump said, he wanted to ban this APP that was a retaliation for what they did the stunt they pulled the prank they pulled in Tulsa most what they think is happening. That's what they think is happening why there is no evidence that that's the president's line of thinking but that's what these eighteen to twenty two year olds are telling me that that's their beliefs. Cowan, we talked about The you know whether or not talk users actually had any effect on the trump rally in Tulsa back in June but more more directly here wondering if you're seeing any more political movement on the APP, whether it's a pro trump or pro biden or anti-trump anti, Biden has it started to move away from dance and song and move towards more political leaning so far. It can do both things at once actually. So there are still the dance trends. There are massive accounts that are just enjoying music on the APP but we see a lot of politics on Tiktok now maybe more than ever some young people are telling me they feel that because their home in quarantine and because politics ramping up nationally as we get closer to this election that they're seeing more and more politics in their feet, and what we're seeing is a not so much pro by content, but a lot of anti-trump content and I WANNA be clear. There is Republican Todd Democrat tiktok liberal Tick Tock conservative Tiktok. But what it appears to be is a lot of generation. Z.. Has a anti-trump sentiment and that does not mean they heavy pro biden sentiment. But things that we see our young people say, Hey, on this day, everyone go to president, trump's campaign store and put these products in your cart. But don't check out because allegedly that messes with their inventory or everyone on this day go to president trump's twitter account and report account, and let's see we can get a taken down. So we're still seeing these sort of organized movements sort of Troll, the president and a lot of discussion of politics but whether or not that is in in favor of vice, President Biden or in favor of president trump is sort of yet to be seen. Graham LE. Let's talk a little bit. But I mean, it sounds like tiktok users are for the most part having fun on the site sort of trying to do the things that Collina's talking about here but. On a more serious note, the trump administration has been trying to ban the APP. They're citing national security concerns, concerns over censorship by the Chinese government. Valid are any of those concerns really given what you know about China US politics Well I think it's you have to separate them out So the the concern about censorship I think is legitimate there was there was an example a little while ago where it looked like some of the censorship that they would do in China restricting conversations about things the Communist Party doesn't like discussed had bled over into the international product Now, Tiktok said that they were addressing that wasn't intended again, we don't really. Have a good way in the United States to check up on that and to kind of make sure that speech isn't being censored one way or the other the national security issue I think requires a lot more imagination Now, you know as was mentioned, the the military has has told service members to not use the APP and I think that makes a good amount a sense you know if if you're concerned about an APP Having links to a potential adversary There's all sorts of possibilities of ways that it could be exploited even just using location data of of service members or people who work in sensitive facilities. But if you don't work in sensitive facilities, if you're just sort of going around and and and doing the fun things and engaging in some of the political discourse that Cowan was mentioning you know there's not. A real big national security issue there a I will say that some people think that collecting the full aggregate totality of US Tiktok users could be used later in a analysis to try to do something, but it's really imaginative at this point whereas I think the censorship concerns a real and could be checked on and data privacy concerns are real but should be able to be checked on as well. What about the fact that we we just heard from Ian Bremmer, the president of the Eurasia Group in the previous segment talking about how the United States is viewed internationally in terms of our response to the corona virus. But I did ask in also about his thoughts on what this Tiktok dust up between president trump and China what seemed to Be Rooted in and he said, you know this is also part of trump's sort of relationship with how he views China and Chinese technology he's gone after while way he's gone you know talked a lot about five G. technologies. So do you see that I mean? Do you see that as a pattern in how the president views technologies specifically that's coming out of China. Yeah I think the you know the trump administration's been. Pursuing a campaign of you know escalating what could be a new type of Cold War approach to China and a lot of it is wrapped up in technology and and I think the focus on Tiktok really makes the most sense. If you consider it a distraction from two things I is a distraction from actual problems with China you know the the trump administration got this phase one trade deal which didn't really get to the deep issues of subsidy and market access and intellectual property protection. And, on the other hand, it's distracting from the fact that a lot of these security concerns should apply across many apps. Why just tick Tock you know you're talking about including American made apps like facebook and twitter. Yeah I mean the concerns are different when the parent company is in China but there are really unaccountable data collection methods going on across ad networks and data brokers are building profiles of Americans and people in other countries that can be purchased just with money and you know it's not only add companies that by this data governments can get it to. Callan, as we sort of touched on this earlier. But of course, we I, say this all the time we're heading into one of the most consequential presedential elections in my lifetime at least social media is constantly changing is tiktok going to be a thing and twenty twenty and November, or is it going to be eclipse with something else or it'll change the? Will it change the election? Calvin what are your thoughts on that? I don't see Tiktok going away anytime soon, as long as the president allows it to operate in the United States I think we're gonNA see more is eight organizing on the APP among young people and I think we're GONNA see. TIKTOK. As long as Microsoft buys it or another company comes in to allow it to operate in the US I think it's going to stick around for a long time. I mean the president did Callan has also asked that Microsoft give money to the Treasury. If it makes this sale, we is anybody else interested in buying tiktok or is it just Microsoft right now? I don't think anyone else has come out as far as I'm aware and said that they are interested in purchasing Tik. Tok I think Microsoft even just recently confirmed that they were interested in this conversation, but it appears a deal needs to be made by September fifteenth. So if someone's going to buy it, it has to happen soon. Well you heard it here I guess I callan Rosenblatt is a youth internet culture reporter for NBC News Dot Com and Graham Webster is the editor of the digit China Project at the Stanford? University Cyber Policy Center and he's also a fellow

President Trump Tiktok United States Donald Trump Graham China President Biden Microsoft Tulsa Graham Webster Callan Rosenblatt NBC Us Treasury Chinese Government Stanford University Cowan
Ballot blocks: the squeeze on Hong Kong

The Economist: The Intelligence

17:45 min | Last week

Ballot blocks: the squeeze on Hong Kong

"The squeeze on political freedoms in Hong Kong is ramping up and fast. On Friday, the territory's Chief Executive Carrie Lam announced September's planned elections would be postponed for a year and poss- sediments. I've always had to make difficult decisions but then the announcement I have to make today is the most difficult decision that I have to make in the. Insisted, the delay was only to avoid the spread of COPA, nineteen. The decision to postpone them the training train t electrical election has nothing to do with politics has nothing to do with a likely outcome of this round of. PRO-DEMOCRACY PARTIES, AD HOC for success in the poll riding a wave of discontent at Beijing's recent imposition of sweeping national security law. The legislation broadly defines and harshly punishes subversion sedition collusion with foreigners. Nathan law one of Hong Kong's most prominent pro-democracy activists recently spoke with our sister podcast economists asks why? Phones. Movement is still really strong though there have been protests against the new law. The millions of people who wants surged onto the streets have largely stayed home is police have cracked down harder just try to imagine if you live. In a country place that that is no freedom of expression freedom of them fraiche ethan freedom of thoughts. Then definitely, like protests does not exist or will be lushly quashed earlier last week, twelve pro-democracy candidates were banned from running whenever the elections happened. On Saturday, on Kong's police issued arrest warrants for six political activists living in exile in the West. Since the promulgation of the national security nor on July the first of the scope for political expression has been very much. Dominic Ziegler writes Banyan, our call him on Asian affairs. And because of that, there haven't been any street protests. of any size since July the first because of the consequences. For those taking part. But nevertheless, there has been widespread concern about postponing the election by a year, the Bar Association, representing senior barristers and other lawyers in the territory has expressed what it called grave concern and it said that a decision to postpone September's elections for the Legislative Council, which is known as Mexico was undermining a vital constitutional rights and so what does that mean in practice? What happens with the sitting lawmakers? There are all sorts of implications about what it. Means in practice because hitherto Hong Nor has been very clear you have to hold elections for this quasi-democratic legislature every four years. So the government of Kerry lamb, the chief executive is in a bit of a pickle about how it justifies this. Although she said, it was for reasons of the pandemic several other jurisdictions have been able to carry out elections, and that includes recently elections. In Singapore, there are certainly suspicions that the decision was taken not because of. The pandemic, but because Democrats had a good chance in fact. Gaining for the first time a majority in this rather gerrymandered council and indeed even obstructing a government policy or criticizing the government has it has been suggested by the authorities the risk of falling foul of the new. National Security Law. So this decision is absolutely shot through with politics, but nevertheless to take some finessing by the government. To show that the move is legitimate, the chances are that how it will manage that is to get a ruling from on high from Beijing saying that this is the appropriate course and it's worth bearing in mind that Beijing has always since Hong Kong's return to China. Has Always had the authority to intervene in Hong Kong's has the understanding would be that this would happen only rarely. But in the last few weeks, we've seen it happening time and time again, I think this is going to be the practice for the future. But what about the the the candidates who were banned from running here is, is there a risk that that Beijing will start to essentially stack the LegCo with with loyalists there in this interim year? This certainly is a risk Jason the bear in mind that all the moves around legend. have been made in order to ensure that the pro democratic camp does not secure a majority in the legislature. Now early last week, the authorities did this by disqualifying a dozen also candidates caming that even for criticizing the National Security Law that gave the government grounds for not allowing them to run. Now, a few dozen candidates actually sit in the current Legislative Council. So one big question that the authorities have to find an answer to is whether those four legislators continue to sit in a council session is is now being extended by a year. The chances are that the government will find means to disqualify. Those four and Beijing's moves go further than that. Recently, they're speaking of arresting pro-democracy activists outside of the territory, which is also unusual. That's right has happened in the past week on July the twenty ninth four students were detained for supposedly inciting secession. This seems to have had something to do with facebook page and shortly after became clear that the police had put on a wanted list, a number of activists who are currently in exile. So, there is an example for instance of how China intends for this new national security in order have jurisdiction beyond the borders of the country itself. These people were in the United States, the UK and elsewhere. One of them was not even a Hong Kong citizen better taken up US citizenship and so as as Beijing's hands gets heavier in Hong Kong Antoine Indeed all over the world. How are people coping normal life goes on so far as both the virus and the new political restrictions allow what is certainly happened is that the street protests that so colored and royal the territory last year are now very much a thing of the past. So the act the concerned the worry that. Has. Taken hold in the territory is one that is not always voiced publicly but in private conversations and the concerns really are about Hong Kong's long-term future. One of the possibility is certainly that many people discussing is immigration and a number of countries have. Roots towards long term permanent residency or even citizenship. Those countries include the United Kingdom Australia Canada, the United States. But many people are not in a position to leave immediately. But what happens now with all of the momentum that was behind the protesters but this whole movement now that protests themselves have died down to the protesters are moving abroad. What happens now it looks like well, over half of Hong Kong's population is in favor of democratic change but the possibilities for that through politics and through the ballot box have been very sharply restricted in in recent weeks. So there's a conversation emerging. About what form opposition should take? So people are starting to draw parallels with the Eastern European bloc during the Soviet era too many people here the national security nor is starting to look like the Ray quick building of the Berlin Wall in the early nineteen sixties and people are drawing comparisons with opposition in the decades following that in eastern Europe and that opposition took perform of underground dissident, it took the form of dissident writers and The church played a big role in eastern. Europe. Some hope that it may do here in Hong Kong one positive sign has been taken from last year's protests is an extraordinary. Creativity in in the form of protest art in the form of. Video making. So the hope is that maybe these avenues might at least allow a civil society not only to to hang on by its fingertips but also to grow. Don Thank you very much for your time fact Jason. For. Inciteful pair of interviews about Hong Kong's politics. Look for our sister show the economy asks my colleague and mckelway spoke to activist Nathan Law and to Regina Yip a Pro Beijing member of Hong. Kong's cabinet who said it's the activists themselves who bear responsibility for the mainland's latest moves. It's their choice they had. A goal on the provost part to self-destruction you. Choice. To want to commodes a separatism. From China I. Feel sorry for that. All the problems that they face now are of their own way. No. In fact, they are true young they are too young to commit judgments on these fundamental issues. Why should they be involved in promoting separation from China? Why should be that look for the Economist asks wherever you find your podcasts. Today more than ever. It's essential that we do all the right things to keep our bodies healthy inside tracker is the ultra personalized nutrition platform that analyzes your blood GNA and lifestyle to help you optimize your body from the inside out transform your body's data into meaningful insights and a customized action plan. Back recommendations you need to reach your goals. Are you ready to take control of your health and wellness journey unlock the power of your potential with inside tracker get twenty five percents off today at inside track or dot com slash listen. America's recent protests against racism and police brutality have drawn much interest in the Middle East. Some people have reacted with shock some with Schadenfreude. For others though America's unrest was an opportunity to discuss the problems with race in their own countries. Most Arab states have a black minority, each of which faces its own discrimination. The worst treatment though is reserved for migrants. There is a scene that played out almost every day for weeks for months outside of the Ethiopian embassy here in Beirut he would see cars pull up and drop off their passengers if the OB and women who were carrying their possessions and suitcases are in bags. Great girls from is our Middle East correspondent based in Lebanon these weren't women catching plane or catching a train. They had nowhere to go actually word maids, domestic workers whose employers. Could no longer afford to pay them because of the economic crisis here in Lebanon also couldn't send them home because the airport was largely closed because of covid one, thousand, nine, hundred, and so they dump them off outside the embassy they simply left them there to be someone else's problem. You would meet women who said they'd been sitting there on the curb for days on end using their bags as pillows simply left the fend for themselves. And isn't that kind of a general comment on how Lebanon treats migrant domestic workers? It is even before cove in nineteen. Before the economic crisis, there was widespread racism and harsh treatment of migrant workers here there are a number of cases where Lebanese have advertised their maids on facebook as if they were property, there was a post back in April that offered a Nigerian made who was described as being very active and very clean and she. was being sold for one and a half million Lebanese pounds, which is worth about a thousand dollars at the official exchange rates. There was also a clip that was circulated widely here in Lebanon in June it was from a television channel in Ghana that covered the return of two hundred or so Ghanaian citizens from Lebanon most of them. One, hundred, eighty of them were women working as domestic workers here, and they described horrendous conditions and treatments. Fit. After that sexual harassment. They bit s like animals. I have videos of this. I went through in that country and they also warned other people not to follow them to Lebanon not to come here to work. No. Doubt Music and go back to Lebanon is not a country that we should be. How does this situation come about? Where for instance, an people find themselves trapped with arguably abusive employers often starts with unscrupulous recruiters are agents migrants who come here to other countries in the middle. East. Are often promised good salaries, respectful working conditions and they arrive and find out that it's anything. But but then they find themselves trapped for two reasons. One is they often have to take out loans to pay fees to these recruiters and the loans can run thousand dollars two. Thousand dollars which when you're making only a few hundred dollars a month and you're trying to send much of that to your families back home it can take many months if not years to pay off those loans. So they find themselves trapped by debt. They also find themselves trapped by something called the Catholic system, which again exists here in Lebanon and many other countries in the Middle East whereby migrant workers are bound to their field or their sponsor, and so they can't simply. Changed jobs because their residency in their work permit is connected to their sponsor, and if they leave that job, they have to leave the country. So you meet migrants who say despite the awful conditions they're making more money here than they would make back home, and so they're willing to they're forced to continue to put up with US conditions because they're blocked from finding another job, and so all of this is a function of how the Lebanese feel about migrants or is this. Strictly a racial thing. It's hard to separate the two because almost all of the migrants here are either from east and South Asia or from Africa. So it's often connected to race as well as their status being migrant workers but the racism here it cuts across socio-economic lines I spoke with a black diplomat too says been pursued through upscale shopping malls Lebanon by security guards thought she was a housekeeper and they wanted to know why she was shopping without her madame without her employer. So Racist, certainly a problem here and in other countries around the Middle East and not only when it comes to migrants states across the Arab world have black minorities. You have Egypt for example, the Nubians who have been there for thousands of years you have in the Levant and the Gulf states black communities that are often the descendants of slaves taken by Islamic empires or the descendents of African Muslims who made pilgrimages to places like Saudi Arabia and decided to stay again, those communities face various kinds of commission as well. Would you mean by that? Will you hear some of it? Simply in the language that people use darker skinned people referred to with terms like opt, which means slave Anwar Sadat was president of Egypt darker skin than his predecessor was sometimes referred to as his predecessors black poodle you turn on the television in the Middle East and black face is fairly common sight on Arabic language television and no doubt that kind of racism manifests in in everyday life in lots of ways, it does you see it in areas of life. March choice of partner you have families that will see skin color as a marker for Associate Comic Status Lighter skinned people seen as being wealthier and more educated. You see it in the workplace as well in Iraq, for example, where there's a black community that has been there for at least a thousand years they to this day struggle to obtain government jobs and they're often relegated to doing menial work and living on the outskirts of society. You see it as well in the Gulf states where there's almost a racial hierarchy to employment. If you walk into a Nice Hotel and the Gulf you might see black migrants from Africa working as security guards or as porters. You will see them far less often in jobs that require interaction with customers. Waiters hairdressers, things like that those jobs which are better paid than less taxing often go to lighter skinned workers from Asia or from Arab countries I mean racism has been very much on the agenda over the past few months because of the the killing of George Floyd protests that erupted across the world did that wave of protests hit the Arab world as well? The protests themselves. Didn't reach the Arab world. This is a region fortunately protest often a criminal offence of we didn't see much in the way in street demonstrations either in solidarity or around the region's own issues with racism but it has certainly escalated the conversation that's taking place both online and offline. There was a video that circulated quite widely earlier this summer was shot by a Palestinian actress condit's. Who recounted some of the just casual bigotry that she's heard and day-today Life Semis Ben Aston Headache. Mariam. People often argue that it's harmless. It's just words. And allow. Them. One of the points that she was trying to make in this video is that it does hurt people and that it does have an influence not only on the targets of it but on societies broader attitude towards Black Arabs, and do you think having these kinds of discussions on social media and the like will make much of a difference? Is it enough having a conversation about these? Things is certainly better than nothing. But one thing that we've seen certainly in America through years and years and years of protests against racism and police brutality is that just having a conversation doesn't actually bring political change or social change. That's something that takes a long time and it also takes concerted effort in politics and education, and unfortunately one of the problems in countries across this region. Is that there are few avenues to do that, and so it's good to have a conversation about these things but. The ways that you actually go about making concrete change. Unfortunately, those ways are often blocked in the middle. East. Thanks very much for joining US greg.

Hong Kong Lebanon Beijing Middle East United States China America Kong National Security Law Legislative Council Chief Executive Facebook Jason Nathan Law Carrie Lam Africa Hong Nor Copa Hong Kong Antoine
The Spontaneous Fulfillment of Desire

Daily Breath with Deepak Chopra

03:43 min | Last week

The Spontaneous Fulfillment of Desire

"ECHO living synchronicity? By the way I have a book on this series as well. It's available online and in bookstores. And the book is, of course, called spontaneous fulfillment of desire. So today we deal with the fourth principle of singer destiny. It is found in a sutra. That is properly. Pronounced as some Culpa Hassan. Up some cult. Let's translate this into the following principle. My intentions have infinite organizing power. Intentions. Are An expression. Of the total universe. Why do I say that? Because we ourselves? Are, an intention of the universe we ourselves are a process. In the total universe. So, our intentions are an expression of the totally anonymous. That's a very fundamental principle to grasp. Your intention itself is an activity of the universe. Therefore. Intentions contain the mechanics for their own fulfillment. In other words, intentions fulfill themselves be addity. If the intention comes from the original source which is. Your consciousness and is not filtered through the condition. Mind a what we call the EGO. When intentions come directly from the source which is being They're not interfered with. And filtered through the condition ego mind. Dapple. Those intentions are naturally. In alignment with the elements and forces of the universe and the elements and forces of the universe. Present themselves to us as events situations, circumstances relationship. And on and on every experience that we have. There is therefore no need to get involved in figuring out the mechanics of how. You fulfill and intention to just allow non local intelligence. Which is consciousness that we referred to as I am before it conditions itself into this particular story. So we allow intentions to orchestrate. Their own fulfillment undiscerning that intention a force of nature just like gravity but even more powerful. So we grounded ourselves in being in order to unleash the power of intention we connect. Directly, to the conscious energy. FIELD THAT WE CALL Awareness of pure awareness and meditation is one of the best ways. To accomplish this. Singapore also request the deeper understanding. That the most powerful intentions just require. Attention to the deepest impulse of desire. And detachment at the same

EGO Culpa Hassan Singapore
Travel to Penang Malaysia

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

06:14 min | 2 weeks ago

Travel to Penang Malaysia

"Welcome to the amateur traveler. I'm your host Chris Christensen. Let's talk about paying. I'd like to welcome the show ruth from Vancouver and that's not the one in Canada but the one in Washington and that's the state of Washington. DC. WHO's come to talk to us about Penang? Malaysia Ruth Welcome to the show. Thank you. Glad to be here and some of you met ruth. If you traveled a with me to Morocco ruth was one of the people on that trip and we're friends from long before that and you have spent the last. Three years up until the coronavirus down in southeast. Asia's that have I got. The timing writer was longer than Well, we had three years in Singapore. And then we were into our just pass our first year in Penang when the covert virus and I actually was here in the states and got stranded here as the movement control order went into effect inning and I wasn't able to get back into the country. So we're now home back in the state of Washington and Yeah. But Penang was our home for about a year. Will, and when we get to the point where we can, why should someone go to Penang? Penang is just a very interesting piece of as. You have three distinct people ethnicities who make up panning opening is one of the thirteen states of Malaysia. It's the second smallest. It's the only one that has a island plus mainland components, and the island is the part that we are familiar with. That's where we lived. We lived in Penang Island Penang. Island. Has Like I say three different distinct groups. There's the Chinese, which are about fifty percent, which is more than the most of Malaysia, your Chinese percentage, and then you have forty percent Malay- and about nine percent of the Indians who are mostly Tamil speakers so there from southern. Yup and then we have the expert groups and in particular, there's one large group of experts that now reside in Penang as a result of Malaysia's M. M.. Two H. Program, which is Malaysia my second home. So quite a few people have actually retired they've made it their permanent home. So it's a very eclectic group of different ethnicities and different cultures and they do not intermixed very much. So you really do have these distinct. And distinct foods and distinct ways of living and languages, and you can do it all in a very small space and people have been to Singapore Penang. It's about the third of the size of Singapore. And only has about fifteen percent of the population of Singapore's on the island about seven hundred thousand people that makes it much more spread out. You're not just in these big crowds of people and yet you're experiencing the same kind of cultural mixing and interaction that you might get in Singapore. I like to think of Penang sort of like Singapore before Lee Kuan Yew came in and modernized and sanitized. Everything, so Penang gives you that old feel I think of what Singapore would have been like. Before everything was cleaned up and so and not to say that it's dangerous or unhealthy to be there but you just get that kind of older. Feel you have people cook it on the streets for food and things like that. So the I highly recommend going just because it's different than a lot of other places you might go in Asia will in terms of Malaysia we're on or just off of the mainland portion of Malaysia in the. West Coast in the north. So we on cow before we're south of that which is way up by the border with Thailand and then we`re Two thirds the distance from Kuala Lumpur up to the type border. Yes yes. Like you say we're to the west of the mainland and very close actually up. I think there's only one one state may be two that are above pinning on the mainland before you get to. Thailand. So it is still pretty close to time. There is some influence of Thai Culture Thai food. In. What is in Penang Yeah I? Think you're forty miles from Thailand. yes. Yeah and what's interesting about pinning to is, and we'll talk about this a little bit more but you came and visited us when we were in Singapore and we went to the parental museum to remember that in singer. So Penang is one of three places in that Malaysian Singaporean area that has Parana Akin Chinese or also called the Straits Chinese also called the bubble Nokia's so they are located in Penang Malacca and in. Singapore. So I've actually been to all three places. I've been to the museums in each of those places and it's a fascinating culture. People from that culture came from China from mainland. China many years ago. treaters remember correctly yet and they came in and adopted many of the Malay Practices and cultures, and some of the foods and sort of turn them into their own. They were usually very very wealthy and their homes were extravagant and their furniture was lavish and carved, and they also incorporated some of the colonialism of the British. So they had fancy dinner ware and fancy glasses and mirrors and their homes were just beautiful and in Penang you can go onto Church Street, which is down in Georgetown and there is a Paranthan Museum there for Twenty Ringgit. which is almost nothing that's four ringgit to a dollar. So it's five dollars you can go in and get a tour of the product museum there, and it's fascinating. It was owned actually by a gangster. A Chinese gangster and his family I and It's now part of the state I believe as a museum and they do try to preserve this product can culture because it is only really in these three distinct places.

Penang Penang Island Penang Malaysia Singapore Penang Singapore Penang Malacca Ruth Washington Asia Thailand Chris Christensen Thai Culture Thai Morocco DC China Canada Writer
Trump Says He'll Ban TikTok From U.S. As Soon As Saturday

TIME's Top Stories

04:26 min | 2 weeks ago

Trump Says He'll Ban TikTok From U.S. As Soon As Saturday

"President Donald Trump said he will take action as soon as Saturday to ban TIKTOK for popular chinese-owned video APP that has been a source of national security and censorship concerns. Trump's comments came after published reports that the administration is planning to order China's bite dance to sell tick Tock. There were also reports Friday that software giant Microsoft is in talks to buy the APP. As far as Tik Tok is concerned we are banning them from the United States trump told reporters Friday on Air Force One as he returned from Florida. Trump said, he could use emergency economic powers or an executive order to enforce the action insisting I have that authority he added it's going to be signed tomorrow. Reports by Bloomberg News and the Wall Street. Journal citing anonymous sources said the administration could soon announce a decision ordering by dance to divest its ownership and TIKTOK. There have been reports of US tech giants and financial firms being interested in buying or investing in Tiktok as the trump administration said its sights on the APP, The New York Times and Fox business citing an unidentified source reported Friday that Microsoft is in talks to buy Tiktok, Microsoft declined to comment. Tick Tock issued a statement Friday saying that while we do not comment on rumors or speculation, we are confident in the long term success of TIKTOK. By dance launched tick tock in two thousand seventeen then bought musical dot L. Y. of video service popular with teens in the US and Europe and combined the two a twin service do yen is available for Chinese users. Tick talks fun goofy videos and ease of use has made it immensely popular and us. Tech giants like facebook and snapchat. See it as a competitive threat. It has said it has tens of millions of us, users and hundreds of millions globally. But it's Chinese. Ownership has raised concerns about the censorship of videos including those critical of the Chinese government and the potential for sharing user data with Chinese officials. Tick Tock maintains it doesn't censor videos based on topic sensitive to China, and it would not give the Chinese government access to U. S. user data. Even if asked, the company has hired a US CEO, a former top Disney executive in an attempt to distance itself from its Chinese ownership. US, national security officials of been reviewing the musical dot L. Y. Acquisition in recent months while US armed forces have banned their employees from installing Tiktok on government issued phones. Secretary of State Mike pompeo said earlier this month that the US was considering banning tiktok. These national security worries parallel a broader US security crackdown on Chinese companies including telecom providers while away and Z. t. e.. The trump administration has ordered that the US stop funding equipment from those providers in US networks. It has also tried to steer allies away from hallway because of worries about the Chinese government's access to data which the companies have denied it has. The trump administration has stepped in before to block or dissolve deals on national security concerns including stopping Singapore's broadcom from its one hundred seventeen billion dollar bid for US chip maker. QUALCOMM in two thousand, eighteen in an effort to help retain US leadership in the telecom space. It also told China's Beijing Quinlan Tech Company to sell off its twenty sixteen purchase of gay dating. APP Grinder. Other countries are also taking action against. TIKTOK. India. This month band dozens of Chinese APPs including Tick Tock citing privacy concerns amid tensions between the countries.

United States President Donald Trump Tiktok Chinese Government China Microsoft Executive Tik Tok Facebook Bloomberg News India Beijing Quinlan Tech Company Qualcomm Mike Pompeo FOX Europe Florida Broadcom
Chateau Marmont to be converted to members-only hotel

KNX Midday News with Brian Ping

00:39 sec | 2 weeks ago

Chateau Marmont to be converted to members-only hotel

"Back here on Earth in West Hollywood, The Chateau Marmont is making some big changes, becoming a members only hotel from now on the swanky West Hollywood estate will turn into a hotel for a select group of buyers who will be offered extended access to the property. Membership includes a personal butler and extended stays members Khun Cell Back there shares like any other real state investment, the Chateau Marmont saw a steep decline in business due to the pandemic management was forced to let go A number of staff members back in March. The owner of the 91 year old building says he may also expand the members only concept. Other properties he owns in London, New York, Singapore. And Tokyo.

Khun Cell Back The Chateau Marmont Hollywood Tokyo Singapore London New York
Speaker System Blocks City Noise

60-Second Science

01:53 min | 3 weeks ago

Speaker System Blocks City Noise

"Restaurants Schools Dennis Office. They're all keeping more windows open to increase ventilation and hopefully decrease the chances of encountering the corona virus, but letting in fresh air also, let's in more noise. Now researchers come up with a device that's like noise cancelling headphones, but for a building it looks the same principle, so he detects noise coming into the windows and. Considering the. Bon lomb and ACOUSTICAL engineer at Nanyang Technological University in Singapore device looks like a grid of small speakers and fits over an open window, a microphone samples incoming noise, and then sends the Speaker Grid. Instructions on what sort of anti-noise to omit. The result is to cancel out the incoming sound for example. Here's the sound of a commuter train in Singapore with no noise control. Now here's that same sound with the array of noise. Cancelling speakers turned on. Compare that to a closed window. The anti-noise device is almost as good, and it allows air to keep flowing into and out of the window. The details are in the Journal, Scientific Reports The devices just a prototype, so it's still expensive, and it doesn't block out all sounds it only masks sound at frequencies from three hundred thousand Hertz which includes the rumble of freeways, trains and planes, but even that could come in handy in a place like Singapore. Again base a plane flying past. Bond says Singapore already has a lot of green buildings that use natural ventilation, but they don inside this when you have a lot of openings in the building that noise comes in so you need. Some wake managed aid increasing noise. A grid of window speakers could do the trick especially if people prioritize peace and quiet over good view, which folks at home and do all

Singapore Schools Dennis Office Nanyang Technological Universi Bon Lomb Bond Engineer
The Twitpocolypse

Let's Talk Bitcoin!

05:03 min | 3 weeks ago

The Twitpocolypse

"Some time ago about a year ago, or maybe two years ago, twitter introduced time based one time passwords google authenticated as most people know that mechanism where you have an authentic eater APP on a mobile device, and that gives you six digit codes to log in as to factor, which is much more secure than SMS SMS of course can be hijacked if your Sim Card is hijacked, so a lot of people were speculating all of these different methods of attack to me. It seems unlikely that accounts that are very familiar with some checking because. Because it happens a lot in crypto and has had a lot of high profile. Reporting would have SMS. It also seemed unlikely that even if they did that, someone was able to Sim Jack phones from big accounts across two different continents, at least because some of these accounts are china-based or singapore-based, some are europe-based. Some are a us-based that involve several different phone carriers in different countries all done within a matter of hours. It seemed to me very unlikely that I would be the case so assuming that they did have hardware two factor authentication. Or at least an authentic eater op, you can't really steal a password. That's not enough. So then, if the account security is likely to be quite secure, what are the other avenues someone can get in? The next most likely mechanism of attack would be API's so twitter has API's that allow various social media, aggregate or sites to post so that whole team of people can schedule and review and posts to multiple platforms similtaneously I. Use platforms like that, too. It allows me to work with a team of people and collaborate on what we post and schedule it out in advance. So. When you see a personal message from me, his personal, but when you see an with like I'm doing this video on Saturday, you know that's scheduled in advance and it's posted automatically. Are, not sitting there, attaching images and typing in Hashtags in real time. These services of course access the twitter API using off which is a nation protocol. It's the same protocol that's us when you log into a site using your google account and it redirects. You gets an encrypted challenge response message from uses that antedates into sight. And these gain full access the twitter time and presented in some of the site. You're probably familiar with things like hoot, sweet and buffer, sensible and various other sites like that now. These sites are not always as well secured. So that was my immediate suspicion. Because from there you can easily post the message, and if that site security isn't a strong with two factor, etc, I assumed. had been compromised than because there are only a handful of social media postings services eight. It was quite possible that all of these disparate companies were using the sang. Then the attack continued to escalate. One of the things that was noticeable was that the tweets that will come out? Were saying twitter web APP. Now when you have an off service that is posting remotely through the API. It has a clear identifier, says twitter for iphone, says hoot suite, it says some social media, posting or something like that. It doesn't say twitter web up. So my immediate suspicion was that this was a browser extension again much easier to compromise it. Browser extension that is a common single point of failure across all of these different accounts, and would have access to twitter web API to post on behalf or maybe sore credentials for users. There are a lot of sloppy browser extensions out there and then people started talking about the possibility of zero day browser exploit now. That'd be a very serious problem. Because Zero Browser, exploit effectively means that someone was compromising browsers through some click through mechanism, revolt, execution, or something like that and hijacking credentials from inside the browser secure store. That's a very serious. Because I would affect not just twitter, but then again it was only happening on twitter. And why would you use a zero day? Browser exploit that can be enormously powerful to hack only one site twitter, and then to use it to do this silly. Nigerian scam. I'm using the term Nigerian scam because Nigerians have anything to do with us, but because this type of scam originated with the Nigerian Prince Story, I mean it's a story, actually the we've seen repeat over and over and over again for two decades exactly I was reading through some kind of gaming coverage of this and many of them are likening it to scams that. That have been pulled in Yvonne Line, which is a popular sort of Laissez Faire, M., o. and ruined scape, also, which is really like a mostly for kids type of environment, and again like seven years ago. Apparently there was a rash of this type of give your money and I'll give you double back and again of course in crypto currency. We've seen this since.

Twitter Google Laissez Faire Yvonne Line
Capital Allocation with Blair Silverberg and Chris Olivares

Software Engineering Daily

54:31 min | Last month

Capital Allocation with Blair Silverberg and Chris Olivares

"Blair and Chris Welcome to the show. Thank, you good to be here. We're talking about capital allocation today and I'd like you to start off by describing the problems that you see with modern capital allocation for technology companies. I'm happy happy to start there. So I think it might be helpful to give. The listeners, a little bit of our backgrounds so I was a venture capitalist at draper. Fisher Jurvetson for five years I worked very closely with Steve. Jurvetson and we were financing are very MD intensive. Technology projects that became businesses things like satellite companies companies that were making chips to challenge the GP you new applications of machine learning algorithm so on and so forth and I think the most important thing to recognize is that the vast majority of technology funding does not actually go to those kinds of companies. The venture space is a two hundred fifty billion dollars per year investment space. The vast majority of the capital goes to parts of businesses that are pretty predictable like raising money in in investing that in sales, marketing and inventory or building technologies that have a fairly low technical risk profile, so the vast majority of tech companies find themselves raising money. From a industry that was designed to finance crazy high technology risk projects at a time where that industry because technology so pervasive you know really do the great work of of many entrepreneurs over the past twenty to thirty years, technology is now mainstream, but the financing structure to finance businesses not has not really changed much in that period of time. Yeah, and then I guess I'll talk a little bit. My my background is I came from consumer education sort of background, so direct to consumer, thinking about how you use tools and make tools that ingrained into the lives of teachers, parents students I was down in the junior class dojo before starting capital with Blair. We were working on the Earth thesis He. He was telling me a lot about this. The the date out. There exists to make more data driven in data rich decisions. How do we go software to make that easy to access in self service and sort of servicing the signal from the noise, and we kicked around the idea and I thought that they were just a tremendous opportunity to bring. What Silicon Valley really pioneered which is I think making software that is easy to use in agreeing to your live into kind of old industry fund raising capital Haitian. The kinds of capital allocation that exist there's. And debt, financing and different flavors of these. Of these things say more about the different classes of fundraising in how they are typically appropriated two different kinds of businesses. So. You have the main the main groups you know. Absolutely correct, so there's. Equity means you sell part of your business forever to a group of people and as Business Rosen succeeds. They'll get a share in that. Success and ultimately income forever. Debt means you temporarily borrow money from somebody you pay them money, and then at some point in time that money's paid back and you all future income for your business, so equities permanent, not permanent. If you think about how companies are finance like. Let's take the P five hundred. About thirty percents of the capital that S&P five hundred companies use to run. Businesses comes from debt. In the venture world that's remarkably just two percent. And the thing that's crazy is this is two percent with early stage seed companies, also two percent with public venture, backed companies in places like the best cloud index, which is like a one trillion dollar index of publicly traded technology companies started their life, and in with injure backing many of them SAS companies, these companies, also just two percent finance with debt, but nonetheless within these these classes, the reason it's obviously economically much better for a business and pretty much every case to finance itself with debt because it's not. Not It's not permanent, and it can be paid back. It's much much cheaper to use debt. That's why you buy a house with a mortgage show. You know you don't sell twenty percent of your future income forever to your bank help you buy a house, but the reason that people use equity comes back to the risk profile so just like. If you lose your job and you can't pay off your mortgage. The bank owns your home. Same exact thing happens with debt in so restorick Louis, if there's very low. Certainty around the outcome in typically early stage investment you're you're doing a lot of brand new are indeed you have no idea if it's GonNa work you cope. You know over time that you'll be successful, but there's really quite a bit of uncertainty equities a great tool because you're. You'RE NOT GONNA lose a business, you know everybody can basically react to a failed. Are Indeed project. Decide what to do next had saints. Equity is kind of the continent tool for high technical risk, high uncertainty investments, and then debt is basically the tool for everything else, and it can be used as most companies do for. Ninety percent of The places that businesses are investing so if you're spending money on sales and marketing, and you know what you're doing and you've been running campaigns before. That were successful, very. Little reason you should use equity for that if you're buying inventory if you are a big business that's. Reach a level of success that on. Means you have a bunch of diversified cashless. Coming in businesses might take out dead on business kind of overall, so it's less important what specifically you're using the money for, but it's important to recognize that most companies are financed roughly fifty fifty equity versus dead, just just intra back companies that. That are kind of uniquely Equity Finance. Scaling a sequel cluster has historically been a difficult task cockroach. DB Makes Scaling your relational database much easier. COCKROACH! DVD's a distributed sequel database that makes it simple to build resilient scalable applications quickly. COCKROACH DB is post grass compatible giving the same familiar sequel interface that database developers have used for years. 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It's often originating in a large source, a sovereign wealth fund or family office in it's being routed through something like capital allocators cater like a venture capital firm for example or a bank. How does this capital get allocated to these smaller sources? What is the supply chain of capital in the traditional sense? You know it's kind of funny to think about capital and things like the stock market in the form of a supply supply chain, but this is exactly how we think about it so at the end of the day. Capital originate. In somebody savings, basically society savings right you. You have a retirement account or your population like you know in in Singapore and Norway with a lot of capital, it sort of accumulated from. From the population and these sovereign wealth funds, or you're an endowment that's you know managing donations of accumulated over many many years, and ultimately you're trying to invest capital to earn a return and pay for something pay for your retirement pay for the university's operation so on so forth so that's Capitol starts, and it basically flows through the economy in theory. To all of the economic projects that are most profitable, inefficient for society, and so, if you step back, and you think about like how how is it that the American dream or the Chinese Miracle Happen? You know in in both of those cases different points of the last hundred years. Why is it that society basically stagnated? You know the world was a pretty scary. Scary place to live in up until about seventeen fifty, the industrial revolution started. Why is it that you know basically for all of human history? People fought each other for food and died at the age of thirty or forty, and over the last two hundred fifty years that it's totally changed. It's because we have an economic system that converts capital from its original owners. Diverts it to the most productive projects. which if they're successful, replace some old more expensive way of doing something with newer better way and so I think when when I described that like you know I, think most people can step back and say yeah, okay I. kind of see how capital flows through the system, it goes automatically to someone making an investment decision like a venture capital firm ultimately gets into the hands of the company company decides to invest in creating some great product that people love. Let's. Let's say like Amazon and then everybody switches from you know buying goods at some store that may or may not be out of you know may or may not being stock to the world's best selection of anything you'd never wanted. The most efficient price that's society gets wealthier basically through these these kind of steps in these transformations, but it's asking if you step back and think about it like nobody actually thinks it's processes as efficient as it could be like. We asked people all the time. People were interviewing journalists companies. We work with sewn. So how efficient do you think world's capital allocation is? I've never met a person that says it's pretty good. You know we're like ninety percent of the way there. In fact, most people think it's pretty inefficient. They think of companies like you know we work, and some of the more famous cases lately of of Silicon. Valley back businesses that that totally. underwhelmed disappointed. Their initial expectations and I think most people admit that the efficiency of capital allocation is either broken or nowhere close to achieving its potential, and so we basically we'll talk more about our technology and how we do we do. We basically think of this problem our problem to solve. There's an incredible amount of Apache inefficiency in how data that goes from a project or a company, ultimately funneling up to an investor flows, and so you know it's hard to place blame because there's so many people in the supply chain, but. But I think it super clear that if it's difficult to measure whether or not a project or a business is good at converting capital into value in wealth, and you know products that people want, it's nearly impossible for society to become really good and efficient at allocating its capital, so we're we're here basically to make the data gathering data transformation visualization communication of what's actually going on under the out of business as efficient as possible and you know from that, we thank some great things are going to happen to the economy. Goes a little bit deeper on the role that a bank typically plays in capital allocation. If you think about our bank works like let's take. Let's take a consumer bank that most people think about you gotTA checking account. Right, now you've got some money in that checking account. That account actually takes your money or dot and most people know this your dollars sitting in that account. You know just waiting around. You'd withdraw them. Your dollars are actually rolling up into the bank's treasury. There's somebody at the bank working with the regulators to say hey, how much of this money can we actually put into things like mortgages, commercial loans, all of the the uses of capital that society. Has In some some effort to. To, move the world forward and make the economy efficient, and so those deposits basically roll up into a big investment fund, and there's ratios that regulators set globally that say those dollars needed to be kept in reserve, versus how many are actually able to be invested, but with the portion that's able to be invested. It's there to fun. You know building a house to fund a business back -Tory to fund sales and marketing or inventory procurement for some other business, and so a bank was was basically the original investment fund, and a bank has unlike venture funds and other sources of. We typically think private capital. The bank has tricky. Problem were any moment all of the depositors holding the checking accounts could show up and say hey. I want my money back and so that's why banks have to deal with reserving capital predicting the amount of withdraw and classically everybody wants her money at once at the worst possible time, and so banks have to deal with quite a bit of volatility now if you take an investment fund on the other hand. Totally totally different structure, so your typical venture fund will have money available to it for a period of ten years from you know typically these larger pools of capital. We talked we talked about so very rarely. Individuals are investing retirement savings in venture funds, typically sovereign wealth funds down that's. Basically pools of that individuals capable. Win One of these funds makes a commitment to a venture fund. It'll say you've got the capital for ten years. You've gotta pay back. You know as investments exit, but other than that will check in ten years from now. We hope that we have more than we gave you the star with and there there's no liquidity problem because the fun has effectively carte blanche to keep the money invested until some set of businesses grow and succeed and go public and make distributions so one thing that's fascinating. The Tappan in the last twenty five years is private capital capital in the format of these kinds of funds. Have just grown tremendously and so today. There's a little over five trillion dollars. Of private capital being allocated in this way to think like buyout funds venture funds so on and so forth. Funds don't have the liquidity problems of banks. They can make much longer term for looking investments. This is created tremendous potential to make the economy more more efficient by taking out the time spectrum. You know this is why venture investors can do things like finance spacex or Tesla. Really. Build fundamental technologies in the way that a bank never could so this is an amazing thing it. However leads to a very long. You DAK cycle, so the incentive goes down when you take out the time line over which investment needs to pay back. To carefully monitor and understand what's going on in the business day today, so it's pretty interesting thing about the different pools of capital. There's not not to. Make it sound too confusing, but I think everybody will admit that the financial markets are incredibly diverse complicated we track basically about fifteen different kinds of capital, and they're sort of pros and cons with each one, but you know a bank is one. A private fund is wanted insurance companies balancing as another. You've got things like ETF and public vehicles that hold capital so there's quite a bit of complexity and the the structure of the financial markets. All right well. That's maybe the supply side of Capitol on. All kinds of middlemen and all kinds of different arrangements, but ultimately there is also the demand side of Capitol, at least from the point of view of companies getting started which is. Startups or computer in later stage with the maybe they're not exactly considered startup anymore, but they're mature. These companies have models for how they are predicting. They're going to grow, but oftentimes these companies are very. Lumpy in terms of how their their revenues come in how closely their predictions can track reality. So how do technology companies even model their finances? Is there a way to model their finances? That actually has some meaningful trajectory. Sure so first. Companies you know need need a base think of all the places that they're spending our money and. We're pretty. We Do I. Think a pretty good job of organizing this and making it simple so when we look at companies and we can, we can talk more about how the the cabinet machine operates, but when we look at companies, we basically think they're only a handful of places of money. Get spent you spend money on. Short term projects that you hope proficient things, sales and marketing. Houston money on paying for your sources of financing like paying interest on debt, making distributions to your investors, and then you spend money on everything else and everything else can be designing software building products on, and so forth, and so if you break the demand for capital down into just those three buckets. And look at them that way. Some pretty interesting things happen. The first is for the short term investments that you hope productive. You can track pretty granular nearly whether or not they are, and we'll come back to that. For paying back your investors, you sort of know exactly how much you're paying your investors so a pretty easy thing to track, and then for the operating costs you know most people will help us. Apax, that you're paying to keep the lights on things like Renton the your accountants, the CEO salaries on and so forth these are these are table stakes expenditures. You need to stay in business and so. Amongst each of those three things, there's different things that you wanna do to optimize and I'm happy to go into more detail sort of go through each one. If you think that'd be useful. Yeah Bliss a little bit more about about how these companies should be a modeling, their revenues are that is meaningful to model their revenue so that you can potentially think of them as targets for for capital allocation so. If we think about. Understanding what company might be a viable recipient of capital? How can you accurately predict the trajectory of that company, or or do they? Would they present a model? Would they develop a model good through a little more detail? How a company would serve justify? It's need for capital. So typically what what most companies do and this is not terribly useful or accurate, but I'll tell you what most people do I mean by the way like how central the entire economy predicts, predicts demand for capital works like this. Companies take. Their income statement on their. Balance Sheet historically. And they they basically have this excel file got a bunch of you know, rose and have different things like my revenue, my you revenue that sort of linked or my expenses that are linked revenue Mukasey could sold so on and so forth, and they grow each of those rose by some number that they hope to hit so if you want your revenue to double next year, you'll say my revenue one hundred dollars today I wanted to be two hundred. Hundred dollars twelve months from now I'm just GONNA draw a line between those two points and every month. There will be some number that's on that line, and that's why monthly revenue I want my expenses. You know everyone knows. Expenses are going to have to go up if my revenue goes up but I don't want them to go up as much as my revenue, so I'm going to draw a line. That's you know somewhere less than a doubling. and. You pull these lines together on one big excel file and there's your you know they're your corporate projections. In general, this is true for big companies small companies, but that's not actually how. Company revenue works because if you go back to the three categories, we talked about before, and you just focus on the one that talks about the short term investments. The. Way Company Revenue Actually Works is a company this month. Let's say they spend one hundred dollars on sales marketing. Well. They're hoping to get a return on that sales marketing, and so they're hoping that in the next you know six months. That's paid back. Twelve months that's paid back. You can actually track every time they spend money on sales and marketing. how quickly it gets paid back so it's that level of precision that can accurately predict revenue, and so what we do is we basically just get a list of every time? Money was spent on one of these short-term investments, so you sales and marketing for for an example, and then we get a list of all of the revenue that was ever earned. And we attribute between both of those lists causing effect. And we do that using a bunch of techniques that are pretty commonplace in your typical data, company or machine learning company. We use some math things like factor graphs. We use simple kind of correlations. We have You know a whole kind of financial framework to. Guess. What attribution should be because you learn a lot as you see different businesses and you see a bunch of different different patterns, which you can basically cluster on, but it is this linkage between spending on something like sales and marketing emceeing seeing revenue, go up or down, but makes or breaks a business, and you want to look at it and I is. Not a bundled. Entirety which is how financial projections are typically built? Okay, well! Let's talk a little bit more about what you actually do so if you're talking about early stage technology companies. Describe how you are modeling, those companies and how you are making decisions as to whether they should receive capital. When a company comes to capital they they come to our website. They sign up for this system that we built which which we've called the capital machine. And the first thing that they do is they connect their accounting system their payment processor typically, so think like a strike, and then sometimes they'll provide other things like a pitch deck or a data room, or whatever other information they have prepared. The system pulls down. All of the date in the accounting system and the the payment processor, and we look at other systems to these are the two key ones that all all dive into detail, and so, what ends up happening is from the accounting system. We get a list of all the times. Businesses spend money on these things like sales and marketing that we were talking about before. From the payment processor we get a list of all the revenue transactions in crucially we get it at. The level of each. Each customer payment, and so you know we scrub I all we really care about is having a customer ID, but once we have data at that level. We can start to do this linkage and say all right look. You know this business spent. A million dollars on sales and marketing and March of two thousand eighteen in April of twenty eighteen, and we saw revenue grow by twenty percent. That was a pretty substantial chain. You know what actually happened here. You can typically identify the subcategories of sales and marketing and start to do this link between these two, and this is really the you know the magic behind our our data science in our team pairing with our engineering team to figure out this problem and solve away that is, that's robust. Bud once we have these two data feeds, and the system goes through, and does all of these attribution. Populations were able to present that back to accompany a pretty clear picture of what's going on, and so we'll say things like hey. Your Business is pretty seasonal, and in the summer is when you're typically more more efficient at converting your sales and marketing dollars into growth so I, you want to finance growth in the summer. The second thing is only about eighty percent of your businesses financeable. There's twenty percent where you might not know it because you're not looking at this level of detail, you're busy building your business, which is exactly exactly what you should be doing, but Twenty percent of your businesses, not efficient. You're spending money on on your sales and marketing categories, product lines, and CETERA that just shouldn't exist and so if you get rid of those. If you double down on the part of Your Business, it is efficient. Then we predict your revenue will be act fifty percent higher, and we'll tell you exactly how much money you need to invest to raise money to to raise the revenue by fifty percent. We give you a bunch of charts that allow you to see how history and projections merged together and dig down. Inspect how we do that linkage to make sure you agree, but. This is what the capital machine does at its core. It Converts Company data into a fully audited completely transparent picture of. How business works where it sufficient where it's not efficient. And then that's where our technology stops, and where balanced she comes in, and so we then take this information, and we make balancing investments directly in companies, and so primarily at this point we lend money to technology companies that we see from their data are eligible for non dilutive funding. We make capital available to them directly. We basically allow them to access it through the capital machine. We use one system to communicate changes to the business. No keep both sides and form so on and so forth, but this is the kind of analytics layer that's essential to making these capital allocation decisions more efficient, and so I think you could imagine a day at least for us in the not too distant future when it's not just US using our balance sheet in this tool to make investments, but in fact, just like excel, every investor can benefit from a similar level of analytics and transparency, as can companies by getting more accurately priced faster access to capital less friction so on and so forth. Get Lab commit, is! Get labs inaugural community event. Get Lab is changing how people think about tools and engineering best practices and get lab commit in Brooklyn is a place for people to learn about the newest practices in devops, and how tools and processes come together to improve the software development life cycle. Get Lab commit is the official conference. Forget lab. It's coming to Brooklyn new. York September Seventeenth Twenty nineteen. If you can make it to Brooklyn, on September Seventeenth Mark Your calendar, forget lab, commit and go to software engineering daily dot, com slash commit. You can sign up with code commit s E. D.. That's COM MIT S. E. D.. And Save thirty percent on. Conference passes. If you're working in devops, and you can make it to New York. It's a great opportunity to take a day away from the office. Your company will probably pay for it, and you get thirty percent off if you sign up with code, commit S, e. There a great speakers from Delta. Airlines Goldman. Sachs northwestern, mutual, T, mobile and more. Check it out at software engineering daily Dot Com slash, commit and use code. Commit S. E. D.. Thank you to get lab for being sponsor. The inputs specifically if you think about a model for determining whether or not, a company should should be eligible to receive capital. I'd like to know how the the models are built. The the data science models that you're building are constructed from the point of view of the inputs. So how are you determining or how do you like company comes to you? How do you turn that company into some structured form of data that you could put into your models and determine whether it's worthy of capital. Yeah I mean it comes down to what what the data is your down so when we talk to a system like striper transaction records system, you know that that's the revenue of the company now where things get interesting when we connect to balance sheets in penalizing, it's of accompanying really onto understanding. Weighing. What exactly these numbers mean, and that sort of where we made our pipelines were built from the ground up to give us that granular. Of A company's cash family revolutions. Where's the money going where they allocating? And it's savable greenway or you once. What do you understand that data through that Lens? That let's build pretty sophisticated financial models Linda. And you know as soon as you have the picture of Company You can really do a lot of flexible analysis on the back leg distributed computation. Come stuff that you would never be able to excel and quite frankly a lot of these companies don't have the stacking internally or really the tools to understand for themselves, so you'd be surprised it you know when we surface this analysis back to the company by virtue of just being transparent on how we're making decision how it is perceived their business, the signals that were uncovering. These operators the CEO's the CFO's that are really focused on building company. Really surprising. They're really making these insights really transforming. How they think they should have capital. Should invest growing business. Are there any? Sources of Third Party data that you can gather to improve decision making. There are at a macro economic sense, and so it's actually quite useful to look at public company performance and say hey. SAS businesses in general. Most people notice, but facilities in general are seasonal in the fourth quarter. Budgets basically expire and people come in, and they buy a bunch of SAS. Software and so to take concepts like that basically shapes of curves, signals and apply them to private company. Financials is useful. Crucially though there is no private company. Data repository of any kind like it just doesn't exist, and you know notoriously even even with small businesses. It's actually quite quite difficult to get access to any sort of meaningful credit data, and so, what ends up happening is these aw. These businesses. Give you a picture of their business directly as an investor and you have to interpret it directly, and that's basically how this works totally unlike consumer credit, there's no credit bureau that people paying so most investors are analyzing the state and excel. Excel notoriously breaks when there's about a million cells worth of data, and so we've got this great visualization showing our data pipeline, and it's basically a bunch of boxes, and there's a little tiny. Tiny box in the bottom of corner that's excel, and there's a bunch of other boxes across the entire rest of the page that are nodes in our in our distributed computations, but accelerate very very limited, and so it makes it impossible to actually understand what's going on in business from the source data, and it's at the source that you see this variability in this linkage between profitable capital allocation decisions in unprofitable capital allocation decisions. Describing more detail, the workflow so a company comes to you and they're going to put their inputs into the. Would you call the capital machine? What does that workflow look like in a little bit more depth? Yes when they come to the website, they creighton count much like you would on. Twitter facebook account. When your details your email, you terrify your email, and then you on what's recalling like the capital portable on there? You have et CETERA. Tools to connect your sins record and these are typical offload. So you know people are very familiar with you. You know you say hey, let's connect by quickbooks you in your credentials and sort of be as secure way, and you click okay and the system checkmark by your quickbooks in the system start pulling that data out of regular cadence and. Depending on what system you're connecting you of the characteristics of that's not go systems of record, and how much data you have you know. The data's available anywhere from ten minutes to a couple of hours later and you know once we have Dr. System, we run that through our partake analysis pipeline in the users as a company. You get you get charged. In Tableau kind of call it, the insight Saban's these refused that we think would be helpful for you as an operator company understanding about Your Business in separately. We also get views of that data that are useful to our our internal investment team. Whoever is looking to capitalization systems? Are there certain business categories that are a better fit for modeling in better fit for the kind of. Predictable capital returns that you can, you can expect with the investments that you're making so like you ride sharing or Gig economy businesses or some businesses. What are the categories that are the best fit? Say Very few categories don't shit from the from the perspective of of linkages, but they're certainly models at their easier to think through and easier to understand, but our our system can underwrite today A. Lease on a commercial aircraft, a fleet of ships and Insurance Agency ask company the most important. Thing about our system is that the financial theory that underlies it is very general, just like p. e. rate is very general, and so that's kind of sounds crazy like. A lot of. A. Lot of people say what what businesses the best fit for your your system and you know it's kind of like asking what businesses the best for Warren Buffett like Warren. Buffett is a generalist. In any business, and he has a framework in his own head to figure out how to make ship comparable to American Express our assistant has a very similar framework. It just operates at the level of transactions instead of at the level of financial statements, but certainly within. That framework there's some examples that are just easier describes I think like you know thinking through the fishing of sales and marketing something. That's a lot more obvious than thinking through like the stability in refurbishment of commercial aircraft parts, which is a key question you know. Pricing pricing refurbished parts, which is a key question if your financing commercial aircraft and Our team, the ambassadors that use the capital machine internally which we primarily do internally do a little bit of partnering with without the groups to to use this as well. These people are all specialists in some particular area, but it's crucial to understand. They're looking at the exact same chance as all the other specialists and all the other areas, so it's like literally the the Fast Company and a commercial aircraft will have the same series of charts at investors. Are there two two draw their conclusion? Is the question for Chris. Can you describe the stack of technologies that you built in more detail? Yeah Yeah. Of course on the front, we are react type script, xjs, you know everything is on aws, and in the back, and we're. We're all python, and in really the reason for that is if you're doing any serious machine, learning or data science today can't really get away in python stack, so we're all python them back in. We have flasks. As a as our API late here and That's the that's a high level. And get a little bit more detail about how the data science layer works. Yeah, yeah, yeah, of course, so we put on the dea into basically a data lake the that goes down into Ardito pipeline in that's all air orchestrated on top of each called airflow, and we use a technology called desk for are distributed computation, and I think that this is a good choice. Choice for us at this moment you know I see us doing a lot of work on. You know using a spark in other distributed technologies in the future and his team and it turns out that when we pull this data down organizing the data was really important to us as we build a lot of attractions to make accessing that data, really easy for quantitative analysts. Important central to our whole technology is that we're able to do a lot of different financials experiment very quickly on top of this so the the implications of that really cascade down all the way into. You know what technologies where choosing how we structure our delayed. Even even how strokes are teams, so it really is brought up locations across all product. How is it when you're analyzing company that you have enough data that it warrants a spark cluster because I can imagine? The financial data around the company. How can there really be that much data to analyze how you do surprised in a lot of these transactions systems taking up the companies have been around a couple of years and their direct to consumer. These data sets can be can be pretty large. You know we're talking about in the millions and millions and millions of transactions that were pulling down and storing. Storing and that just on a per company basis. You know that's not even talking about if we wanted to. Benchmarks Cross companies, and also if we want to do scenario analysis, so you know one of the things we was part of a pipeline is take this data, and through like nine ninety nine hundred thousand simulations to understand the sensitivity of different variables on the performance of Your Business and If, you're starting out with starting that already large. Sort of a multiplying effect. On how much data the system is the old process? is you go through those different stages? And, can you tell me a little more detail? What would a typical spark job? Look like for a company that you're assessing. Yes, so first episode is ribbon. Our our financial didn't ingestion parts, so we download something on the order of you know forty fifty bytes of Tim's action data for for a company. We have to do all the work to interpret and understand what that means in reorganized that data in a way that are downstream analysis and primitives can. Make sense of and use for useful analysis so really the first step at this point job is is transformed the datum some it's useful, and then there's all the work on what are the clusters in order to machines and analysis in the computational. Resources needed to run simulations. You know not not just say local computer locally owned of fall over the only about thirty to sixty four gigabytes of Ram what league, so that's where workflow comes in creating easier faces into data, clusters and being. Should you know when you run a job? You know when it fails. You know it's done. You know when the team can't okay. This part of analysis done I had intermediate date asset to do more analysis on now get back to work is a lot of the time we spend developing internal tools to make. One other thing that'll mentioned that I think's important is. A lot of the underlying technology in our data pipeline it's no different than like what a tableau or you need. Traditional BI business would have access to, but what's fascinating when you have a vertically specific domain so financial data in our case you can make a lot of interpretations about the date of the let you do much more intelligent things, and so for example we. Don't have to make your own charts as a user of the capital machine. We make all the charts for you can of course. As a business we work with. Give us ideas for charts. You can mock up your own. We we basically have an interface for for business. The I team's to to write some code if they if they want to bought when you have clients who are thinking about financial risk, financial attribution across all of the companies that we see distilling that down into a series of indicators that are detailed, but generalize -able, and then publishing that back to all of the companies that use the capital machine to run their own capital, allocation, decisions and access, external fundraising and capital. Some pretty amazing things happen in so it's only with a vertical view. You actually having these we, we call our data scientists Kwan's, but but actually having these people who you know typically are graduate level economists, thinking for the first time about using transaction level data in their analysis, which is notoriously not not available to to normal economists that you get the kinds of insights and analysis the actionable for businesses, and then in terms of the data pipeline that then means we actually store a bunch of intermediate data that's opinionated in that way, and that makes it much faster to access much easier to benchmark much more useful across a network of companies, versus just that isolated excel model that. Explains only one business. One thing I'd like to ask you about. Capital intensity so there are kinds of businesses that are capital intensive for example where you have to pay upfront for a lot of ridesharing rides, and you know as Uber or lift. His has known in much detail. You allocate all this capital two things to subsidize rise because you try to win a market, there's all kinds of other capital intensive businesses. How does capital intensity change? What makes sense with regard to the equity financing the debt financing that you are shepherding for these companies? That is a great question and be because of where you focus in your audience. You totally get the most financiers don't so. The first point exactly like you said. Capital intensity means a business consumes a lot of capital. It doesn't mean a business has a physical factory or plant or railcars, so it is absolutely true exactly like you said that there are a lot of tech businesses that are incredibly capital intensive. If you are capital intensive business that means UNI especially if you're growing, you need to raise a lot of external capital, and so it is even more important that your capital or a big portion of your capital base is not dilutive. That's that's just essential. Table stakes because what you see with these businesses, the ride sharing companies are great. Example is by the time one of these things actually goes public the early owners in the business on a very very very miniscule. KEESA that business, still if you contrast that to company like Viva Systems which I think is one of the most capital capitol efficient businesses in venture history, I think that this race something like twelve or fifteen million dollars total before it went public in a at a multi billion dollar market cap. So capital intensity. Is a synonym for dilution your own way less. Than you think when you exit entities even more important that you figure out a way to raise capital non ludicrously upfront. Some broader questions zooming out in in getting your perspective. Do a thesis for what is going on in the economy right now where you look at. The fact that We have. Obvious pressures to. Reducing the size of the economy through the lack of tourism, the lack of social gatherings while the stock market climbs higher and higher, and it appears that the technology side of things is almost unaffected by Corona virus is there. Is there a thesis that you've arrived at or or their set of theses that through conversations with other people, you've found most compelling. Sure the most important thing to realize about the stock market is that it discounts all cash flows from all businesses in the stock market to infinity, and so the value, the stock market about eighty percent of the value. The stock market is. Pretty far into the future like more than three years from now, and so if you believe that the current economic crisis and this is why there's always a. At least in the Western, world, last two hundred fifty years after an economic crisis. If you believe the crisis will eventually revert, and there will be a recovery, then it only makes sense discount stock market assets by anywhere between ten and twenty five percent. If you believe businesses fundamentally going to go out of business because of this crisis, that's a different story, but that explains why something as terrible as Kobe nineteen and a pandemic. Only discount the stock market by by roughly thirty thirty five percent in a in March, but that's not what's actually going on today as you mentioned and so stock market prices now have completely recovered. That is something that we think is a little bit of out of sync with reality but I. I mention you know we're not. We don't spend too much time about the stock market beyond that we just look at you. Know Private Company fundamentals. We try to understand what's actually going on in individual businesses across all businesses that are network to see what you know what we can understand, and you know what kind of conclusions we can draw, and so if you take that Lens and you actually look at what's happening to businesses due to Cova nineteen, it's fascinating. Some businesses like think the food delivery space have gotten a lot more efficient, so those businesses lot like ridesharing businesses back twelve months ago, there was sort of a bloodbath between bunch of companies competing in local markets to acquire customers all all fighting Google and facebook console, and so forth you subsidies drivers, etc.. That's essentially stopped. These businesses incredibly profitable, the cost acquire customers has fallen by more than half a lot of cases. The channels were slot less competitive, and so if you're running one of those businesses. Now is a great time to be aggressively expanding. Weird things like commercial construction businesses. They're actually a handful businesses that we've seen do things like install windows and doors and commercial buildings whose businesses have accelerated because all of these buildings are closed down. Construction project timelines have gotten pulled up. All of these orders are coming. Do in they're you know sort of rapidly doing it solutions? There's obviously a bunch of other businesses have been that have been hurt by by the pandemic, but our general thesis are we've studied. Pretty detailed way the Spanish flu in nineteen eighteen, you know. These things eventually go away. There will be a vaccine. Economy will get back to normal, and as long as we can stay focused on working through this as as a society and of maintain our our fabric of of kind of economic progress then. DESAGUADERO values today will eventually make sense just sort of a question of of win for the stock market, and then if you're if you're actually running business in thinking about your own performance in isolation, really being clear about is now the time to invest and grow my business now the time to be very careful with my expenses interest, get through this for the next year or however long it takes for there to be a vaccine. So the way to think about your company, if I understand correctly if I was to to put in a nutshell, is that. I think of you as a data science middleman between large capital allocators, and and start ups deserving of capital, so the the sovereign wealth funds the banks the I guess. Funds of funds. These kinds of sources are essentially looking to you for guidance on where to direct the capital, and you're on the on the other side, absorbing data and creating opportunities from these startups to source the good directions of that capital. Just wrap up. Would you put any more color around that description or or refining anyway. Yeah I mean I. think that at the core of what capital is is where the. Core Technology Ambler of sort of. The private market if you think about public markets today, you've clearing-houses like the New York Stock Exchange, and you have companies that provide analysis on top of that like Bloomberg, you know we see a tremendous opportunity to shift the paradigm where you know the place where all the financial transactions happen. is also the place that collects the data improvise information for those making these decisions and yeah, so I think capitals really at the center of making a transparent technologically enabled financial marketplace. Guys. Thank you so much for coming on the show and discussing capital, and I guess one last question is. Do you have any predictions for how capital allocation for startups will look differently in five ten years? Sure so! The first prediction. And this is happening now. I mean the the infrastructure is. In place both within. And others. Most startups fairly early in their life. Think is equity only way to do this and. So. That's a cultural shift. That's that's already happened. People are starting to ask that question. The second prediction is. Seed and series a funding will be entirely unchanged. After series. There'll be a bifurcation between businesses that. Are Really. Capital intensive gigantic rnd projects think like SPACEX. The series, B. C. d. e. enough are really about building and launching a rocket. Those businesses will by and large not. Turn outside of equity to finance themselves, but there's very few of those businesses. Pretty much every other business businesses that you see raising a series B. Serie C. Will like any normal business in the entire rest of the economy raise maybe half of that capital nine allegedly either in the form of debt. Royalty financing factoring all of the other instruments that normal companies use to finance themselves in the void delusion that will happen roughly three years her. Now that'll that'll kind of we'll see obvious obvious signs of that from very early very early base, and then the final the final thing is. Steve Case talks a lot about this. With the rise of the rest, he's got this great venture fund that invests explicitly outside the coast, so kind of the rest of America and we've seen that there's there's a pretty dramatic distinction between being a coastal business non-coastal business from capital access perspective, but there's no distinction from an actual performance perspective, and so we'll start to see some of the regional. Differences in bias sees around where capital flows, go away. And so I would maybe put that on a five year timeline like raising capital is actually much more predictable, much less biased, and that's great back to the beginning of our conversation. That's great for the economy I mean every project or business that can convert capital, two products and services that people love should get finance. No questions asked doesn't mean it doesn't matter what the color of your skin is. What background you have whether you went to college didn't go to. College doesn't matter. You have a business with data that can prove whether people love it

Steve Case Business Rosen Fisher Jurvetson New York Chris Welcome Blair Silicon Valley CEO Restorick Louis Spacex Facebook Singapore
Singapore economy contracts 41% on quarterly basis

Bloomberg Law

00:54 sec | Last month

Singapore economy contracts 41% on quarterly basis

"Singapore's economy plunged into recession last quarter as a lock down shut down businesses. GDP declined an annualized 41.2% from the previous three months. Stephen Ennis is chief global market strategist at actually core. I think Singapore was one of those economies are more prone to the lock down, especially given the given the extension orders that they had to go through. This really created a lot of the enthusiasm around reopening, particularly because you couldn't get out of your house but also hurt a lot of turns and then closing that really resulted in a lot of the Sectors that are really really servicing sectors really drug thing. Of course, economies were really on the downs, and I think this is what's getting portrayed in the queue to dynamics. Stephen Ennis at Actually Corp That figure minus 41.2% was worse than a Bloomberg estimate of a 35.9% drop.

Stephen Ennis Singapore Bloomberg
Singaporeans vote in snap election under coronavirus cloud

Monocle 24: The Globalist

08:56 min | Last month

Singaporeans vote in snap election under coronavirus cloud

"It's a little after two PM in Singapore reverted to taking part in a snap. General election announced a little over a fortnight ago. The ruling People's Action Party has ruled since independence in. In one thousand, nine, hundred, sixty five, and it is expected to win big again. Even the leader of the country's only elected opposition party in parliament has warned of a wipeout that could see the sitting government win every seat. Well, let's hear now. From Monaco's Asia, editor James Chambers will. The election is due by next year. but everybody knew in Singapore that the government would call an election this year. Year at some points so even before Kovic. Struck, the plan was to to call a general election but back then before the pandemic, the idea was to capitalize on Singapore's economy, because it was still doing well but they could foresee time because of the trade war without would no longer be the case that they were going to try and get the election in before the Economy Turns Sour. And as you mentioned you might, you might have thought that's given the pandemic, and and the fact that Singapore is facing its biggest recession. In decades they have postponed that and perhaps for for next year, but they've gone ahead with its and the strategy now is to I guess play up the crisis I mean the Prime Minister Lisa Lomas, calling this the crisis of generation, and I guess he's appealing to votes. His kind of stick with who you know, stick with the. Because, they've guided Singapore to got to so well since independence so take you know it's not time to gamble now. you know stick with the party that you can depend on? was there any chance that people would take a gamble on anybody else other than the People's Action Party? The People's Action Party as you mentioned, has won every election since independence and we're talking about. Huge majorities. Of the the worst ever done, it was getting sixty percent of the votes. And last year last, sorry, last time around in two thousand fifteen. It got sixty nine percents. So the only question we we're all waiting to see the answer to is how big the wind will be this year the prime minister has been calling on, Singaporean say to give. His party and him a strong mandate which would suggest that there for aiming for something you know above seventy or eighty percent. And that's because because of. The crisis face facing Singapore, but also the party is having this major generational transition the Prime Minister Lien Long. He's the eldest son of the founder of Singapore. Lee Kuan Yew and he's planning to step down. He's sixty eight now. He wants to retire by at least seventy. So this is his last election and he's he's. He wants to be able to hand over his party to this next generation, and you know with a with a good mandate. The I. Guess what the opposition is worried about is is they might get you know wiped out because. He's the prime minister's has made a lot about him. and voters may may rewarding for for the job that he's done since becoming premise in two thousand and four. the opposition in Singapore is is quite weak, even though there are ten opposition parties standing this election, the the major ones really running for about twenty seats out of about ninety three, so it's not as if even if they did well, they could take control of the parliament. But there's there is a quirky quirky system in Singapore. So even if the opposition lost all seats, and they only hold six in the current parliament, even if they lose all their seats, they would then be given some. Because the. Doesn't want to have. Total control. It feels like it needs to have at least some opposition to hold in account in parliament. Otherwise it it ends up in the ridiculous, and this opposition seems to have gotten a little bit personal. Let me talk about this sort of the legacy and the. Family almost family firm that seems to be established. The way that Singapore runs its government, but the strange brother of the prime minister has actually but. Li Yang joined the opposition progress Singapore Party and has openly criticized the way that Lee. Long has handled the coronavirus pandemic also has said that there's a natural aristocracy inside the People's Action Party and it's not great when members of your family decide to. Wash your laundry and public. You're you're exactly right? Mrs Definitely in a case of airing your dirty laundry in public this this kind of family feud in Singapore's first family. The lease in this is this is all come about from after the death of their father I and how they they deal with his his bungalow. legally wanted it to be demolished but it's still standing. Could because the prime minister wants to keep it as as a kind of a almost like a shrine. And the brothers have fallen out, so the younger brother has thrown his support behind this new party. The progressing party is only form last year by a former member of the People's Action Party. So there's a you know a former heavyweight from the people's action. Party is fronting it and it's been supported by younger brother of the prime minister so very very embarrassing for the prime minister. But. It's not expected to have a major impact on the the number of votes that the prime minister and his party gets. It's not something that. You Singaporeans a used to seeing. But. One thing's for sure this isn't going to. This isn't going to bring about the end of of the PAP the the the one question I mentioned that we're all waiting to see just how big the majority is that they get finally It's the news broke overnight. about the death of souls map park won soon I, mean he? He had been tipped as a as a very viable candidate for the twenty twenty two presidential elections. Yes this this news. We're following in Asia last night very closely. and the the police were tipped off to his disappearance by his daughter, because she received quite cryptic message from him on her phone which she then shutoff now he was You know he's been married since two thousand eleven, and he's one of the the big heavyweights in the Democratic Party that the the President Moon jae-in belongs to, and so he was you know. One of the heavy favorites to. To run for to become the next president when Moon Jae steps down. In a few years time so this. Caused a you know a big shot. And Even, though the the circumstances. And the facts are all still up in the air. It is looking like it's It's related to these. Allegations of sexual harassment that was against him the day before by his secretary, and these these allegations are doing the rounds of of social media in in in career. I have seen them myself, but is best not to speak about them right now, but it does feel like, and it just looked like The two are linked. He was a new. He billed himself as a kind of a male feminist and he he did a lot to. Promote women's rights in Korea. So if this turns out to be the case, it's going to be a big. Full, from graceful for him and. It just highlights the the extent of this. Problem in career I, mean the metoo movement of started in the US and it has I guess being overshadowed recently by the black lives matter one, but I mean in in create is a huge issue and if a man like mad park is embroiled in this then it just shows the the extent of the problem and I do hope that it has. The same kind of effect as the black lives, matter. Movement has in getting people to finally kind of talk about this and address it James, chambers. Thank you very much indeed for joining us on monocle. Twenty four stay

Prime Minister Singapore People's Action Party Prime Minister Lisa Lomas Singapore Party Lee Kuan Yew James Chambers Asia Democratic Party Kovic Monaco Korea United States Editor President Trump Founder Mrs Definitely Long
The U.S. Coronavirus Numbers Are Shocking Compared to the E.U.

Vox's The Weeds

03:24 min | Last month

The U.S. Coronavirus Numbers Are Shocking Compared to the E.U.

"The pandemic is back in the United States in a big way, and as I was pointing out to me off line is some things are kind of different internationally? When you say it is shocking. Sometimes when we do the coronavirus podcasts I drop into this weird vocal register where I. Don't feel like I have the range to describe how bad what I'm describing is. But I want to try here because I think it's really important that people don't feel like what is happening. Here is simply a natural disaster, and it is understood the size of the policy failure. We're living through and how many people suffer and die because of it, so I think the simplest way to do a comparison years to look at the European Union because European Union is. Similar to our size, similar level of wealth has a governing institutions, which will not the same as ours are comparable in many ways. It experienced the virus, if anything a little bit earlier than we did. The outbreaks and say Italy came first so they've been dealing with longer. They started dealing with actually less information than we had their there. Good reasons to look comparable. If you go to our world and data. And you look at seventy rolling average of cases per million in the US in the you. I don't know how to describe. How wild charts so? They're currently a hundred and sixty cases per million people in the US every day on a rolling seven day, average, one hundred sixty, and of course we know the true numbers much higher than these are confirmed cases around testing. There are nine in the EU, nine nine. Yup? Nine. And the EU has more not like nine. The use a cup. Arizona alone. is seeing more cases per day than the EU there? This is not as far as we can tell testing issue if you look at like rates of testing positive the things you would look at to see if you're seeing something like that. That is not what we are seeing. So then I wanNA take this one step further. At Stat News which they've been doing great coverage throughout this entire crisis. If you're not falling, them should be stat news. Isaac Sabinas and James Sabinas her both at Harvard, did a piece looking at China answer the question. How many of the deaths that we have seen in the US? Reflect at least potentially bad policy. How many of them seem given the experiences of other places? Preventable, and the places choose to comparator Germany, South Korea Australia and Singapore, and that they choose US places in the bribery of reasons one the virus head the amount of the population lives in sort of urbanized areas, etc.. They calculate that somewhere between seven percent to ninety nine percent of the US fatalities from covid nineteen averted seventy ninety nine percent so most of them the vast majority of them. And just to go back to that EU US chart for one more second look at what is also just truly striking about it is its shape. In the EU this plateaued some time ago and it has gotten lower and estate staple and in the US. We are just going up. So it's all very disturbing, but what we are living through. Here's a failure, not an inevitability.

Stat News United States European Union Italy Arizona Preventable Isaac Sabinas Harvard Bribery Germany China James Sabinas
Jonathan Luff on Co-Founding an Incubator for Early-Stage Cybersecurity Companies in the U.K.

Recorded Future - Inside Threat Intelligence for Cyber Security

07:46 min | Last month

Jonathan Luff on Co-Founding an Incubator for Early-Stage Cybersecurity Companies in the U.K.

"I'm not by background attack person I come from a liberal arts background I studied politics in languages at university, and I was fascinated in international affairs I was always interested in history and politics. And that developed into a into a study of international relations, so I I studied. To universities in the UK Newcastle, which is in the north of England, and a Master's degree at Bristol University in the south and it was really. While? I was at Bristol that I developed. An interest in joining the foreign, Service Exams for the for the Foreign Service while I was at university there and I joined the British Foreign Office in in one, thousand, nine, hundred eight, and that took me on a fascinating professional journey, had the opportunity to study Arabic while I was in the Foreign Office and that took me to the Middle East. where I I had a couple of postings. Including some time spent his adviser to UK and US military forces during the war in two thousand and three, and over the course of my my government career over the course of my Foreign Office career I increasingly focused on national security issues. So you know things like counterproliferation, counterterrorism and Cybersecurity, and so that that really took me sort of further towards the the work that I now do but really my my leap into startup space, and and the work that we now do with with cybersecurity companies that was that was triggered towards the end of my government service, I spent a couple of years as an adviser. Downing, street a prime. Minister's Office that was two thousand ten eleven twelve, and around that time there were number of reviews taking place into UK national security, and that flowed some very interesting work around cybersecurity as a as a tier, one, a national security threat, and and you know I I was involved in some of that work. And after leaving, government decided to to make it one of the things that I would focus on. And so, what are you involved with today? What is your day to day like these days? Well since two thousand fifteen with my co-founder grace, cassie, who was another friend of mine from Foreign Service Days A. WE wanted to put in place. A way to support entrepreneurs. In the! Early days of establishing a cybersecurity company we had seen in our time. In government that the this was one of the most important. Challenges and opportunities of of the of the of the decade and we felt that weren't really any. Systems or structures in place to provide the support that was needed. This is fascinating complex area of technology and business, and while there were united some fantastic institutions in the UK there were already a number of significant companies operating this space. We couldn't see the number of innovative new companies emerging that we that we expected to say on the E. found in in somewhat more mature ecosystems like the US, and and to some extent Israel, so we started, Ceylon and Ceylon was A. In early days and experimental accelerator modeled to some extent on programs like Y combinator, but dedicated to Cybersecurity, so we initially Ranna three month program in London, and it's really grown from there and over the last five years we've. We've run ten programs in London and four programs in Singapore and we've had with one hundred companies come through those programs, and so we we spend our. We spend our day odd as in running those programs finding and supporting those entrepreneurs, and then, and then continuing that that support once they leave the program. Can you give us some insights on the state of Cybersecurity and entrepreneurship there in the UK? Yeah well I think it's developed. significantly certainly over the the ten years. That we've been really focusing on this and. Definitely we've seen that. Over the five years we've been running ceylon there really wasn't a a community of of of cybersecurity startups here in the UK back in in the first part of the last decade. We we've helped to capitalize that community here, and there is now a thriving startup ecosystem right across the range of technologies, but definitely in cybersecurity. And I think there are now there are some really quite successful companies that have been set up and developed here over the past five years, and it's now very much part of a a broader technology system here in the UK. And part part of the reason for that is that? The UK has a good reputation in this space, but it's also a a good place to to set up a business if you'll from somewhere else It's been a draw for talent. globally and we certainly saw that in in cybersecurity. We could see the talent. In cybersecurity was was very much distributed around the world. It wasn't just an isolated pockets, and and we found in. Many people wanted to come and. Join our program and get the business started in the UK, and as a result there now you know tens, if not hundreds of of interesting small companies in this field. Is there, even a geographic advantage of of being where you are. I'm thinking you're sort of you. Know equidistant to S- to some of the other important centers of cybersecurity. There's no question. I think you know. Greenwich Meantime has been a competitive advantage for the UK in many different areas of a of business and finance. Over the centuries I think it gives us a genuine advantages being as you say, in time term sort of equidistant between. The economies of the of the of the Americas and those of The Middle East Asia, and that definitely that definitely helps you know having the the economies of Europe on on our doorstep, and you know the last forty years at least strong connections to those economies has been helpful. London has been a melting pot for anybody trying to start a business seek finance and I. Think you know the world the world does come to London or at least it did until we were hit by the pandemic I. Think it will nonetheless emerge from the current crisis is one of the world's great global cities, and and so you know geography masters in Business and certainly been helpful to the development of the cyber ecosystem here.

UK British Foreign Office London Ceylon United States Foreign Service Bristol University Newcastle Greenwich Meantime Counterproliferation Co-Founder England Singapore Middle East Asia Europe Middle East. Israel Americas Grace
Singapore GE2020: Global concerns, national elections

Bloomberg Daybreak Weekend

05:01 min | Last month

Singapore GE2020: Global concerns, national elections

"One of the things we're gonna be covering is the Singapore elections coming up July 10th and for a closer look at what's happening and why it's so important. For that we go to Bloomberg. Daybreak Asia host Brian Curtis in Hong Kong and his colleague Doug Prisoner. Thank you. Now, one of the exciting possibilities for the pole is no more. The estranged brother of Singapore's prime minister will not stand. Lisa and Young said he decided to step aside because quote Singapore. It does not need another league. Well, that said Brian Singapore will surely get another early Prime Minister Lee Shin loans People's Action Party has won every election since independence back in 1965 and that is not likely to change this year. It's going to be very interesting and one point Whether or not these results will reflect the P a piece handling of the covert 19 crisis to get some insight. Brian and I asked Bloomberg's the bureau chief in Singapore, Joyce Co. To join us. Thanks so much for being with us, Joyce. I guess. Let's pick up on that issue of the fact that there is unlikely to be any surprise outcome in the election. But the question is whether or not this is going to reflect in anyway. Voter sentiment on the prime minister's Handling of the crisis. What do you think? Hi. Hi, guys. Yeah, that's right. Reading something awful way election has kicked off into losing so long has Put the nation that this will be election like no other And that's because this is happening in the midst of the pandemic, and he's asked for the elections to be be called because he wants a fresh slate. He thinks that things have stabilized and it's a good time, too. To get to hold this post to get a good men date for the ruling party we've seen over the last few months and sing upon the government has really tried to get control of the crisis. I's been interesting journey is a lot of ups and downs to sing off over here. So we set it up. Well, we We held out the model of how to contain the virus, but against like many other countries who cut also by how contagious and asymptomatic the virus who are still Somewhere in April with various cases such in a foreign worker Dhamma trees with a lot of these farm workers stay and live in close quarters, and that has actually pushed the surgeon does that. Our workers has actually pushed all virus told the various cases in Singapore to more than 40,000 which is one of the highest in Asia, the government has said. Repeatedly that, um the cases have been so high because they're doing a lot of testing, and a lot of these people have been asymptomatic. If you look at the total cases, actually. About 0.5% of the people actually in hospitals, and we have one of the lowest fatality rate in the world. I think a lot of people really admire Singapore. It's it's AH, It's a place where Have a first rate health care system. It's one of the richest countries in the world, great schools and all that. And a pretty good social safety. That too, so other than the handling of the Corona virus outbreak. What are some of the key issues that really move the populace? I think the main thing for a lot of people would be the economic fallout and how the government would be dealing of it. We've heard a lot of about this being said during the during the run up to the election. Something about facing a contraction of as much as 7% this year, and this would be the list contractions since our independence in 1965. So it's AH It's a big blow to the economy for people for us, so I used to be a success and be thankful girl continuously every year. It is a quite scary dudes that the economy would be contracting so much. If the government off their shows have won that more businesses local Glenda that unemployment rate in Singapore could could hit a record this year. So the grim picture actually off the economics in Singapore, some of the economic analysis that has been done surrounding the economic fall out of the crisis. Comes away with a conclusion that is essentially created a greater wealth gap. And I'm wondering how that's playing out in Singapore. I was reading that over 80% of the population live. In public housing, and I'm wondering about how this may may figure into this election. Well, we've had for stimulus budget in about 100 days in Singapore this year and the Singapore Sending about Singapore dollars 100 billion almost 100 million to to try to prop up the economy and still for a lot of people who find themselves other jobs or businesses who are ah Facing lots of troubles. We're seeing the government giving up the direct cash handouts, which is pretty rare onto people. So blessing apartments like me. We get $600 count. India had 303 $100.

Singapore Brian Singapore Prime Minister Asia Bloomberg Brian Prime Minister Lee Shin Asymptomatic Brian Curtis Hong Kong Joyce Co Doug Prisoner Lisa India Bureau Chief Glenda Young
"singapore" Discussed on Mixergy

Mixergy

03:21 min | 1 year ago

"singapore" Discussed on Mixergy

"It so it was the same thing so that's kind of stockton and the idea was something that i would want as a consumer just as i'm getting better service and so many other things so the problem that you had there was wanting to buy device and you couldn't buy it device and the service so actually the other part of the study is gordon trying to the cuban they had like seven different kinds of price plans and then they had i think five pages of find next acid acid look what does buying this plan mean. All you have to read through this doesn't happen if you bake a contracting four months eighteen months as it how long contract pretty four months and i was changing my if one every twelve months because he wanted to nate yes on right and then you know vietnam war where people change their boyfriends or gopher and every six months and you're asking me to be in a longer relationship than that of the tanko just gives me a lousy service. It made zero sense so anyway. I walked out really unhappy and just remember we doing cool founders at that point and say look this has to change. What is your background like what i'm trying to see like. What did you aspire to be as a kid. You went to well so i'll i'll tell you what i grew up in india till the age of fourteen fifteen and coming from a middle class family in india the only gene fourteen-year-old we'll have back then was to debate you really yes go where where did you go to the developer and who something and because land of opportunity and it may sound counter-intuitive now now that it is growing at the shit is now we're back in the day you're stuck in the country with the no opportunities and the idea was to leave and do something and i was lucky enough that that singapore government sponsored me my education and the idea was that i'll be working here for a long long time to work one of the reasons i'm here. Is i keep hearing the singapore. Poor government is encouraging entrepreneurship in urging people like meat even come here and experience. What does it mean for you that they were sponsoring. What were they trying to do. A headed work yeah awesome. This was off the great ten and you know just before university so the idea was thumper. Singapore will pay for everything. We'd make sure you're studying the best school that's <unk> has and singapore does have some good schools <hes> visas scores for <hes> for education singapore stack number one behind israel so wait what one of the things that they do is. They say who smart in the world. How do we bring them toy university otwock university to the pre-university university and let them spend some time in singapore the lumberton after did want to stay here longer and why is the u._s. Not doing that. I guess the okay so and i know they're not going to get this whole other issue going on now with immigration which means that they're missing out so they said you were smart. You apply got their return on their investment. We're we're going to bring you here. Turn your nothing. Just be just be here. Just be here. You're gonna pay for education. We're going to if you want to go overseas for education after that happy might even sponsor that and you know you're not obligated to come back to singapore. I think there are some obligation but the place the people to see what is the obligation the well be be here for the next. If you dig the university scholarship then you have an obligation. If you don't have the discussion <unk> allegation you stay for six years after that six years and you weren't scared scared of that because he wanted to get out of india yes and also you could technically paid off or something like that which i never wanted to get out of the contract with the phone company..

singapore singapore government india university otwock university stockton nate gordon developer israel lumberton four months six years eighteen months fourteen-year twelve months six months
"singapore" Discussed on Elvis Duran and the Morning Show

Elvis Duran and the Morning Show

04:10 min | 1 year ago

"singapore" Discussed on Elvis Duran and the Morning Show

"Every morning. I love listening to Elvis if it's just the great every single one of you that scream out Our Lady. Elvis Duran in the morning show. Well, well, well, look what the cat dragged in. How's it feeling after a week out nights and rested? Now, you'll amazing. I know it's really funny how we all took a week off. And now, we're back. Yeah. And we all have jobs. Thank goodness. But today's young. Scary. Give me something appropriate to start to show with. Let's get your back home because we're black gym class. Heros, absolutely. It makes sense back home. We're back. But he made it back alive. Right. Yeah. I'm looking and everyone looks good good. Danielle was on a cruise. I've was Gandhi was in Singapore. It was amazing Nate what did you do anything really a whole lot of nothing. Okay. Well, the best. Okay. Hold on enough. I was go to line three talk to Kim. And I believe it's Kim in Connor. Hello guys. Welcome to Monday. How are you? Okay. Which one of you is Kim which one of us Connor. I'm Cam on the mom. How old are you? Connor. Nine nine, you know where mommy keeps your money. Sydney. Somebody look. Well. Welcome back from your weekend. You have a nice weekend. Yes. That doesn't sound very. Early early off to school, right? Look, you're our first caller of the day. We're gonna send you both Elvis Duran morning show shirt. Okay. You listen everything morning. We love you guys. I love listening to us. Hold on one second. Okay. All right. There you go. First caller is the day around the room Danielle will start with you, what's on your mind. So we went under Norwegian cruise on the getaway. It was amazing. Everybody on Norwegian is so fantastic. We're just so lucky to be part of that family. But I found a place called boom, bow moral island is a place in the Bahamas that a lot of people may not know about you. We went to Atlanta's we had a great time. But this is like a little hidden gem. It's a smaller island you take a ferry there. And it's honestly like paradise. Also, if you are on like a Norwegian cruise or another Chris whatever find out about Balmoral island it Orel in bellmore. I did they it is awesome. And it's the scope, relaxing and the water. Oh my gosh. How about you Gandhi? How is Singapore? Oh my gosh. Singapore. There are too many words to describe how amazing it was. It was beautiful. It was awesome. I jumped off of a platform. I bungee jump down. Crazy. But I got to do something else on my bucket list, which I didn't expect to come from this trip, and that is travel all the way around the world because when we left we flew from New York to Singapore, we flew east, and when we came home we continued east. So we went the other way, and we literally circle the entire globe. And I'm really excited that we got to do that. Cool something really great about being on a plane for a lot of hours people are afraid to do it. And they're afraid they're going to get bored, or whatever I love it because you can shut off the world and cocktails. My internet wasn't working. I watched a million movies. It was very well. Welcome back is froggy. Froggy what's on your mind today? And where were you over the holiday what I just kind of chilled out hung out and learn new area that I live in and that's my around the room. So I'm married to a woman who refuses to use technology the other day. She calls a member we all live in a new area. She calls me and says, I'm at such and such a place. Can you help get me home? I'm like, yeah. You have a ways that that'll get you right back here. He's like, no. I don't wanna use that. I want you to tell me what roads to take. I don't have a clue how to get around. I don't know. I use ways. Why can't he? Check her horoscopes..

Elvis Duran Singapore Connor Kim Danielle Gandhi Bahamas Nate Balmoral island bellmore Sydney Atlanta Chris New York one second
"singapore" Discussed on CRYPTO 101

CRYPTO 101

02:04 min | 1 year ago

"singapore" Discussed on CRYPTO 101

"There's a lot of things that go into maintain company. Here. What are the benefits to this cost ratio? I think having access to the eco-system is good like if you want to talk to a lawyer that knows this stuff that could advise you on what to do to put you and not violate the role. Then I think it's good download like quit law firms here. There are a lot of several top school in Asia. Here anywhere is among the top twenty school in terms of compliance science and things, and we also have NT you and SMU is a great business school here as well in Singapore. So you can highlight the top talent in Asia in Singapore. So I think that's the great benefit of setting up something here in Singapore. Last time we spoke Khyber was on the road to go into Korea. We're talking about atomic swapping on the Tiber network being ATM's doing all these different things. What has happened in the time since we spoke last so we are growing ecosystem overall. So for suppo-. It's been ten months since we talked in the podcast, right? We have been spending our prison in I think more than twenty different crypto wallets, including the major ones. Like, I am token mitre wallet Kobe's, basically automation when you name it. And then we also like trying to have more integration with other financial political or the finance adapt like melon port is one example. So they do us less and decentralize fund management platform. So with the integration with the fund manager could liquidate their portfolio fully on chain despite sending the gender the smart controlled we tell like trusting any middleman or like sending the fun to any centralized in. This do that we all solid joined to push for the token payments if space as well. So here's the now because everyone is trying to use. Right. So if you want to use some different up, you may have to acquire the two can beforehand, you know, to to us, but it's not going to happen. If you want to use one hundred different apps, right drums, so the idea is that could foresee late it the payment the.

Singapore Asia SMU fund manager Korea Kobe ten months
"singapore" Discussed on CRYPTO 101

CRYPTO 101

04:15 min | 1 year ago

"singapore" Discussed on CRYPTO 101

"You'll what's up everyone. The epic about the here was recorded at the theorem heck Afon in Singapore. Now super lucky to meet face to face some of the people we had on the show. So enjoy these mini episodes, and we'll see in the next episode of crypto and one. Mister sinister dome method of thank you. How are you doing, sir? I'm doing doing well excellent. Excellent. It's awesome. To see you in person me too. I think the first time that we spoke was you look at still doing their ICO. And it was back in February January in well, look has been doing quite a lot since then you have an amazing officer. I can't wait to you. Stop talking here and go take some pictures and meet everybody and see what's going on in the office because there's a lot of stuff going on here. But I how you been. I mean, how Zilkha been doing house SINGAPORE Singapore's great. Blockchain hobbies. I'm says the government is pushing very harmful adoption blockchain rolling on different programs in recently, we've got a warrior with one of the programs and those guys being super busy being on very crazy year. We grew from a bunch of people now to over twenty in this office, we have about Hyundai, but we have other people across the globe. It's just a little word this year. You have to develop the protocol. You have to deliver Tesna won't after another to testings auditing, just a very busy. You know? I was talking to other people have companies here in Singapore. The Amish and the same thing the government is very supportive. What does that mean? Why how are they more supportive than say moving to? I don't know Toronto or San Francisco or multo or Puerto Rico. I think has a syncopal gunman needs. He's sort of looking at the potential future technologies in a sense. So it's not like the just love blockchain, but nothing else. The like many of the new technologies in green blockchain grueling plow, including including cybersecurity privacy preserving this level of these new technologies because the Singapore has a very small country with limited population with limited resources. So if you can tap into the next week for the technical evolution, you can create a huge value. So Blockchain's one of them. And they do understand that, you know, with blockchain providing almost, you know, the best transparency and translates set up you can't do many of the things that were not possible before. So for example, there's this project will be led by one of the government agencies. They're looking at different ways to use a blockchain for Kersey and other financial services. Eight forcing Oppal, of course, he's, you know, these, etc. Exploratory stage, but many exciting things coming out of that. And in general as as a blockchain companies single, we just feel like we are welcome well-supported. It is supported by just say welcoming to new technologies into Singapore, or is there tax incentives, or are they really working to help people set up here 'cause I just talking to Jason shoe of the congressman from Taiwan and Taiwan saying fun to help people watching companies here. What is like here, we have fun programs for sure and with very nice dumps, and you can feel that the government agencies and bodies. Yeah. Just very helpful. Sometimes we don't even say, a clear reason, why would we help you? But these just feel you on your new company, you're doing something. Very cool. Definitely have new challenges in terms of hiring people in terms of getting connected to other industry players just happily making structures, for example. And is not just with one agencies is many. So you guys are here. Why do you choose to you said the government? But why is it that you choose to stay here? You could go anywhere. I mean, it's operate in Singapore. It's not cheap. Why singapore? I think we've started here, you know. Many people causing a home. I think that's the fundamental reason. We just get want to move anywhere, drew. But of course, in the meanwhile, we're trying to expand like we have office in London. We have some researchers and engineers in Europe India or things like that. So naturally, you just have the whole team here because you just want the best Helen's across the globe but down here, and I think Singapore's great..

SINGAPORE Singapore singapore Blockchain Tesna Hyundai Zilkha London officer Oppal Europe Toronto Kersey Helen Taiwan India Jason shoe congressman San Francisco Puerto Rico
"singapore" Discussed on GSMC Social Media News Podcast

GSMC Social Media News Podcast

02:17 min | 1 year ago

"singapore" Discussed on GSMC Social Media News Podcast

"With zucchini. I was like, oh lobster. Yeah, I wonder how much these tickets are though, like these seats. Yeah, that's got to be really expensive. Yeah, because let's not like Singapore New York or inexpensive places to go to Backley. Exactly. And it was like a two cycle. One stop things to fly somewhere and then go to Singapore. I think before the large, the longest flight was I think, like sixteen hours from Australia to LA or something like that. Okay. But that the plane looks. The plane looks amazing. This seating or the however you wanna call it sitting lane, whatever you choose to do is kind of like you have a back rest and then. It extends out like until your legs can be like fully extended? No, it looked like one of those full doubt beds. So we kind of like a futons sort of a day bed. Yeah. So that's pretty cool because then you have like the split in the middle, so like, oh, wallow most from your neighbor? Oh, like the center would be two beds, but it's divided by a wall. And then on the other side on each side of the plane where the windows are is another section. Big planes like a little cubby. So it was like, this is pretty cool. They do have like the TV's on like that. I was like, I want to try this one day when I get rich, right? Yeah, for that, right. I can have good. Yeah, nice. Nice trip to Singapore back to New York. Wow, that's cool. I thought it was pretty cool. Yeah. When I get rich, I'll probably try there. Yeah. And then tell me about it. Could come with. We'll cast and Singapore. Why not? I don't know what Singapore's likes. Yeah. Don't know. It's probably pretty nice. They have a nineteen hour flight with really nice beds and everything, so they're probably pretty cool the flight there is worth it. Yeah. Oh, yeah. And then we can even just stay on the plane and then just fly back. This is what we came for. We came for the flight. We'll do a podcast on the plane. Yeah. Oh, yeah. Perfect. Podcasts, nineteen. What we see. That'd be awesome. We're gonna take a quick break and be back right after this. Tired of searching the vast.

Singapore Singapore New York Backley Australia LA nineteen hour sixteen hours one day
"singapore" Discussed on Shift+F1

Shift+F1

03:13 min | 2 years ago

"singapore" Discussed on Shift+F1

"There's no cops. So the can't come up behind you pull you over like road rush. Worth also noting that the outfit that he was racing with is called the Marinelli snipers, which is a pretty cool name for racing team. And finally in the dumb section of news. Here's a picture from read it. Of Reichen at sour with an Eric Sohn. And he's holding cell phone made by made by Rex a way that isn't old ask photo. Yeah. Look at it. I didn't even. God damn, okay. I laughed but that is it for Monza and the news around it. Let's move now to the future and talk about the Singapore grill, pre rubs acne. Marina bay. Is a street circuit very bumpy. And you know, what street circuits go, this is maybe well, I guess Monaco's street circuit. But this one doesn't look like one of the things that I kind of don't like about formula e is that it's cool that they're street circuits. But they're all like, it's like someone drew them on graph paper. You know, they're all like ninety returns stuff. Singapore doesn't look like that. And that's one of the reasons I like it. I also like it because it's a night race. And that's cool is a gorgeous race. Yeah. Like every from every angle, it's really pretty, but it is also. A pressure cooker for chaos. Like, I don't know Singapore. I don't have a great feel for how the racing is at Singapore. Because my overriding images of Singapore are of people like. Over cooking turn going into the wall on the safety car coming out like that it's sort of my enduring image of. Singapore is it is a very it's a very difficult rates race to stay out of trouble at. And there are twenty three turns. Yeah. In three point two miles or five point one kilometers. So there's there's a lot there's a lot going on. So it's really, humid. Yeah. F one dot com has pretty good stats here. Hamilton is one three times fellows when four times. Three of those four were any red bull. Danny Rick has finished on the podium at Singapore in all four of his previous visits with red. Both the only circuit on which he has achieved this although he has never one at marina bay. And he's the only he's only ever led one lap there the safety car as you mentioned rob has appeared in every marina bay f one race ever held since two thousand eight with twelve laps of safety car running last season more than twenty percent of the entire race. Furthermore,.

Singapore Marina bay Danny Rick Marinelli Eric Sohn Rex Hamilton rob one kilometers twenty percent
"singapore" Discussed on Global News Podcast

Global News Podcast

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"singapore" Discussed on Global News Podcast

"During this high profile sammy well how do you go to cure from the south korean community in singapore though that's been money wellspent daniel kim has been living in singapore for at least a decade i met him one evening while he and his friends put up posters and banners for the upcoming summit the hoping that it will bring some peace for their homeland week citing really really as so opinions for actually but nobody knows if he didn't know what have we got to hope we hope fast of the best week so next to me eighteen he davies a sense of anxiety about this summit concern that maybe everything won't go to plan which is why for many here the high costs of hosting the event may well be worth a shot at peace kirsch move swannee reporting from singapore will president trump has had a busy morning firing off a volley of tweets criticizing his g seven partners after a bitter end the summit in canada over the weekend the withdrawal of his support for the final communique left us allies distinctly nonplussed today he took aim again at canada tweeting that the canadians bragged of making nearly one hundred billion dollars in trade with the us economics correspondent andrew walker on pick the figures i'm slightly puzzled by that figure all one hundred billion dollars but it certainly true if you look specifically at trade in goods an ad up the deficit the united states does have with canada over a period of many years you do come to a figure in the hunt.

sammy singapore daniel kim kirsch trump canada united states davies president andrew walker one hundred billion dollars
"singapore" Discussed on The Ben Shapiro Show

The Ben Shapiro Show

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"singapore" Discussed on The Ben Shapiro Show

"In singapore we were informed the meeting was requested by north korea but that to us is totally irrelevant i was very much looking forward to being there with you sadly based on the tremendous anger and open hostility displayed in your most recent statement i feel it is inappropriate at this time tab this long planned meeting therefore please let this letter served to represent that the singapore summit for the good of both parties but to the detriment of the world will not take place you talk about your nuclear capabilities but ours are so massive and powerful that i prayed to god they will never have to be used that last sentence is so trump it's so trump and it's so great i mean it's like donald trump brags about his genitals and his nuclear capabilities in exactly the same one they're so massive and powerful i pray to god they would never have to be spectacular it's so good is it is the president of the united states telling north koreans guys like let's be real here you're pretending that this is a partnership of coequals that we're going to sit down across the table and we're gonna pretend like north korea's a real entry and not crazy to ship where you imprison in gulag hundreds of thousands of people and then tester crappy level nuclear weapons like we're gonna pretend that but let's be real we're massive were utah you might say and then he continues i felt a wonderful dialogue was building up between you and me and ultimately it is only that dialogue that matters some day look very much forward to meeting you in the meantime i wanna thank you for the release of the hostages where now home with their families that was a beautiful gesture and was very much appreciated which is him reminding them you guys already make concessions tomato ha ha ha you idiots you let out the hostages and now we're.

singapore north korea donald trump president united states utah
"singapore" Discussed on Epicenter Bitcoin

Epicenter Bitcoin

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"singapore" Discussed on Epicenter Bitcoin

"So in terms of be compared to other central banks yes the fear he it doesn't set in quickly did not fearful of change uh they just want to make sure that when there's new systems on new innovation that comes in wants to becomes very big that they want to make it more orderly but if this the people trying a new things they're very heavy for people to try things out as long as it follows the freeing what that what singapore wants to uh wants to do you have any ah insights like in the sort of a coming from europe that's a that's a very interesting standpoint ray like from the european perspective um can you talk about maybe what economic or cultural reasons are behind this sort of approach yes so um if you think about it singapore was uh uh basically food though the history just in short was sort of like a breakaway from malaysia back in the 1960s so simple does not have any natural resources the only thing that the head was nearly less than three million people so people were the only resources so how the founder of the country mr mr liquan you founded it was trying to make sure that people do well we're todd protect the country uh be to find new ways of attracting more capital so now that i found that has just out of the country is this pasta winced dozen fifteen now with the new leaders of this country are trying to push it to the next level by saying what can we do that is different so the singapore is doing things not on the for perspective because they want to take advantage of it it's more like they have no choice choice what i mean by that is they have to.

singapore europe malaysia founder todd
"singapore" Discussed on Let's Talk Bitcoin!

Let's Talk Bitcoin!

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"singapore" Discussed on Let's Talk Bitcoin!

"So in terms of be compared to other central banks yes the fear he it doesn't set in quickly did not fearful of change uh they just want to make sure that when there's new systems on new innovation that comes in wants to becomes very big that they want to make it more orderly but if this the people trying a new things they're very heavy for people to try things out as long as it follows the freeing what that what singapore wants to uh wants to do you have any ah insights like in the sort of a coming from europe that's a that's a very interesting standpoint ray like from the european perspective um can you talk about maybe what economic or cultural reasons are behind this sort of approach yes so um if you think about it singapore was uh uh basically food though the history just in short was sort of like a breakaway from malaysia back in the 1960s so simple does not have any natural resources the only thing that the head was nearly less than three million people so people were the only resources so how the founder of the country mr mr liquan you founded it was trying to make sure that people do well we're todd protect the country uh be to find new ways of attracting more capital so now that i found that has just out of the country is this pasta winced dozen fifteen now with the new leaders of this country are trying to push it to the next level by saying what can we do that is different so the singapore is doing things not on the for perspective because they want to take advantage of it it's more like they have no choice choice what i mean by that is they have to.

singapore europe malaysia founder todd
"singapore" Discussed on Let's Talk Bitcoin!

Let's Talk Bitcoin!

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"singapore" Discussed on Let's Talk Bitcoin!

"So being in computer science and also in a finance of bitcoin was just right at the intersection fa'afafine tech for me so from then on was uh a lot of work working um as a soda in working talking to the government engaging with the government it's being yeah it's been quite a while already at that time i guess you'd lived already in singapore was there anything going on for their activities so uh the start of activity was already brewing so uh i i at william originally from hong kong and love because my families here in singapore's we've moved over here uh but we will already comparing the different startup ecosystems because as a hedge fund a perspective uh we're seeing a lot of activity a lot of money going into startups instead of going into stocks especially back then we've oh the facebook's uh in order to google is raising all the funds i thought we should have a look into this space uh so we have seen that of the simple government has been really pushing for a lot of different grants of feces coming into singapore than even in two thousand thirteen before intake became big so um innovation was basically a the key of for the foreseeable whereas home call we i don't really see it only until recently how claes always been a hub where fund management a traditional companies gateway to china that was or the main marketing words but where singapore it's innovation beat the singapore to become a very different sort of singapore to the old generation that that was what i was marketed end it they do up the top here.

singapore hong kong facebook google claes china
"singapore" Discussed on Epicenter Bitcoin

Epicenter Bitcoin

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"singapore" Discussed on Epicenter Bitcoin

"So being in computer science and also in a finance of bitcoin was just right at the intersection fa'afafine tech for me so from then on was uh a lot of work working um as a soda in working talking to the government engaging with the government it's being yeah it's been quite a while already at that time i guess you'd lived already in singapore was there anything going on for their activities so uh the start of activity was already brewing so uh i i at william originally from hong kong and love because my families here in singapore's we've moved over here uh but we will already comparing the different startup ecosystems because as a hedge fund a perspective uh we're seeing a lot of activity a lot of money going into startups instead of going into stocks especially back then we've oh the facebook's uh in order to google is raising all the funds i thought we should have a look into this space uh so we have seen that of the simple government has been really pushing for a lot of different grants of feces coming into singapore than even in two thousand thirteen before intake became big so um innovation was basically a the key of for the foreseeable whereas home call we i don't really see it only until recently how claes always been a hub where fund management a traditional companies gateway to china that was or the main marketing words but where singapore it's innovation beat the singapore to become a very different sort of singapore to the old generation that that was what i was marketed end it they do up the top here.

singapore hong kong facebook google claes china
"singapore" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

03:19 min | 2 years ago

"singapore" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"We had a wonderful view of singapore edna singapore buried number line they have a thing called those singapore flyer which is which is a very very large off terrorist wheel uh and you can see out the ocean with hundreds of ships as you say waiting big go would you singapore singapore every year rags for the log was i think uh new york city has at rotterdam largest portland go ahead well they got something out i didn't even know existed dates they've got a river off uh goes right in the bank called the singapore river take you i take a i'll be upset both take care they by the british for exactly that word your bottom than you can pay get on this very pretty little welldeveloped uh uh a little river remind me a lot of a family tony huai river walk area and uh and so all at all that was a that was a big surprise and had a lovely uh a lovely first stop and i agree with you pierre that's where uh big corporations have there either of their world headquarters or at least their asian headquarters it's very progressive uh the the chinese malays make up the population pumps singapore are very progressive adaptable no food is making short of eight nine british and chinese seoul you you can enjoy some wonderful dining and they also have gray's hotels i mean it's the place not to be forgotten yeah go ahead he'll probably think of the rocco so tell us so as yes as as the prime hotel was it was under construction while we were there and they respect upset much that they actually covered the whole thing and in cloth while they did their construction so we went down to the second most famous hotel famous uh which is called the pillar to and it'sit's right on the river and guess what we had the door anchored singapore sick of we hangar belonging to blame slate i'll never wrong which which i learned to thinks number one pass at this very elegant beautiful low tell its twenty two dollars for a lousy craig and number two singapore saliger's basically g which of course pierre makes sense because it's a former british colony the prince love their gm uh and uh cherry i don't know that's why gets a threat color cherry cherry boring i'm not a much more hard which.

singapore edna singapore rotterdam portland singapore river rocco singapore slate craig singapore saliger pierre singapore singapore new york gray gm twenty two dollars
"singapore" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

02:51 min | 2 years ago

"singapore" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"We had a wonderful view of singapore edna singapore bay in the 'berliner they have a thing called the singapore flyer which is which is a theory very large terrorist wheel uh you could see out the ocean with hundreds of ships as you say uh waiting big go when you singapore singapore every year ranks log with i think uh new york city uh at rotterdam largest port indeed go ahead well they got something about so i didn't even know what existed they've got a rubber uh uh that goes right into the bay called the singapore river it you take a a dumb beware i'm boat uh the the british for exactly that word your bottom you can take it on this very pretty little well developed uh uh a little river remind me a lot of uh san antonio the river walk area and uh and so all in all that was uh that was a big surprise and at a lovely uh lovely first stop and i agree with you pierre that's where uh big corporations sat there uh either their world headquarters of released their asian headquarters it's very progressive uh the the chinese malays makeup population of singapore are very progressive adaptable and the food your nose up food is a mixture of aids and british and chinese seoul uh you can enjoy some wonderful dining and they also have great hotels i mean it's the place not to be forgotten and air travel go ahead you'll probably fake of does rocco so tell us as yes as the prime hotel while it was it was under construction well we were there and they respect it so much that they actually covers old fagan cloth while they did their construction so we went down to the second most famous hotel uh which is called the fullerton and it sits right on the river and guess what we had to drink in singapore we have got to blame slate i'll never forget one which which i learned to fix number one at at this very elegant beautiful those tell.

rotterdam singapore river rocco fullerton singapore slate singapore singapore new york san antonio pierre seoul fagan
"singapore" Discussed on Dots, Lines & Destinations

Dots, Lines & Destinations

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"singapore" Discussed on Dots, Lines & Destinations

"Takes eighteen hours in arrives in singapore two days later at like six in the morning and you that are gonna go full day in singapore that's what the old singapore iran alexa saint hunting manila's meet new york at the one for newark lifted like eleven pm or something got in early in the morning and it sounds great we realized that if you sleep at the front end of the flight you're sleeping on us time basically my time and then you wake up in your awake when it's nightime singapore so he landed is completely just nor do the result of at her what you do because the sleeping on a plane is not as good as the dealer in a better but it's i mean it's rough and in this southern was ana other latenight departures right out of the us i'm select dulles hong kong um that we have booked leaves at midnight who when flick one ten when fifteen it's time look the boston flight suit leaves one fifty the forty or what type as it waited hooker had something in the morning that is i mean that's ruthless to your body it is barambirwa these are timed against the business traveler schedule rachel this way they get a full day times if i was a business traveler though i would be completely useless his it makes sense i mean if that if you're gonna do that doesn't privately with three am from dole's or four it looks like them stupid so you get into hong kong three hours later i mean unless you need to be there for a meeting that morning but how many people are doing that who knows or is it off ron were connections it's probably a mix of both right yeah the three big spoke because you get a tom part of five you can still make the morning bank deepened asia yet and so we're talking about like the singapore sfo singapore flight sq flight and there's leaves san francisco in the morning at nine thirty am and gets into singapore a day later at likes is summary pia and why we like that or who knows if that's what singapore really wanted i mean it the venture they have now is which offset by by twelve are smart united does there because if they didn't evening flight they really have no advantage.

manila new york rachel dole hong kong ron asia san francisco singapore iran newark dulles hong boston eighteen hours three hours two days
"singapore" Discussed on Dots, Lines & Destinations

Dots, Lines & Destinations

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"singapore" Discussed on Dots, Lines & Destinations

"Using two dots lines and destinations travel podcast with host stephen t grapes fog moon and says no one all come to you from a singapore winced as in the room that i'm in at the wanderlust hotel it literally in little little italy little india all sleep deprived did you probably you more than me so far the buyer in singapore we wanted to fly the la singapore and then singapore san francisco route and so we did that and we are here the wanderlust mccall good things like all things it sounds like a good idea at the time yeah and in hindsight it was terrible but this hotel first of all is probably these strangest hotel i've ever i've ever stated you know i've learned to things on this trip what is this is definitely a very strange hotel the second is i cannot you make hotel choices well i chose this place because it's in little idiot in little india and it's close to lunch of subway stops in in a mrt stops rachel you've nipple of raid going on here meanwhile i have got the yellow submarine yeah yeah i i think we should explain with the rate is i think so my room i walk in and it's just like a rotating lights that shines off the ceiling and they're definitely like bright red green pink purple and it's just constant and turn it off but i at wife reflected this remote very confused it's like rate yet in your room is everything's y'all everything is bright yellow tile the bed is on a breeze platform next to the shower yes immediately next to charlotte you rule out of bed in your in the shower yes which by the way i'd learning that platform is dangerous at night rip blacklisting.

la singapore india stephen t singapore italy san francisco mccall charlotte
"singapore" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:21 min | 3 years ago

"singapore" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Questions lubert declined to comment any further and this one from the nikkei asian review that sharpen foxconn are said to be considering a us bigscreen plan this story says that the company's may spend more than eight hundred billion yen so about eight billion us dollars an or hour thereabouts on a plant that would ultimately make panels for the eight k tv's shark plans to introduce not next year but in two thousand eighteen the nikkei says the plan would feature technology to produce lcd panels for television screens of sixty five inches or more all right that's a quick look at some of the story as the tour uh tracking here in the media review david over to you yet briand just to get you guys up to date of course and breaking numbers out of japan to funnel gdp report and while what a mess this number is where we're we're looking for two point four percent growth clip therefore the economy in the first quarter while we got was basically one percent so that way short of the median estimate even way we should short of even the most bearish of forecast of one point nine percent to one percent growth rate out of japan of course it would be talking in depth about these numbers and the implications of martin schultz in the next hour so right not to something more lights right now let's talk travel shall we because scott done is an award winning luxury tour operator with a guess based increasing hearing asiapacific they've just announced an expansion into the region with the opening of a new regional headquarters here in singapore we're rejoin in fact here in singapore by andrew done founder scott them andrew thanks for coming on the program google only clinton having so i get before we get to the business of all the places to break ground in asian established your region homebased why singapore singapore we have the in in london and in a ten we needed unausa outclass but more importantly what we were finding it but we are seeing enquiries long uk who who without even calling them bought and unom not that was true word of now our epa would quite unusual in today could go in we insist on cooking without with guy great day when you go.

nikkei asian review foxconn david japan martin schultz scott google singapore singapore lubert andrew founder clinton london one percent sixty five inches four percent nine percent eight k unom