36 Burst results for "Sinclair"

Fresh update on "sinclair" discussed on Epicenter

Epicenter

00:48 min | 14 hrs ago

Fresh update on "sinclair" discussed on Epicenter

"Of the protocol but if you if you are being standard by operators by the operator by by the concert in l. do you just not gonna use this service. It's not as bad. What the trade offs of of having a centralized service in perhaps a decentralized service to ensure like censorship resistant aspect allowed us to launch the education earlier. And we're guessing roof all the laws of progressive business. We start with the minimum viable product which is central at which does not rely on off or anyone for security so we read your him And it's just much faster to build to have full fledged consensus. Which would we are building and this is very important. We don't want you kissing to rely on any single party. Long-term or meter. We wanted to be decentralized protocol governed by the community at having multiple added that selected by the community. We also don't have any censorship potential to long-term. Actually we have some more ideas on how to self censorship and we will rely on even more diversity because even if you even in the theory with multiple minors. There is still a chance that the they will. It's not impossible that minors or violators will collude. Will prevent your mentioned transactions and. This is actually a one big attack. Vetter on optimistic crawl ups or on other protocols that rely on throat proves that the miners willingly or being i will just prevent the front groups from being mind on the theme or short time of one or two weeks and then the decker would be able to seize all farms from the optimistic craw. This has been a controversial book like a obviously easier maximum. And you can say i'm biased. Because of that and we we had some clashes with people from optimistic up proponents and they would argue that the community can always step in intervene and punish the viola davis. Who do you think and rely eventually on. Social consensus four restoring ultimate censorship resistance. But i disagree that you can. You should not be building protocols that rely on such week assumptions. This also might be very core. Once transitioned the stake like. Maybe there will be some like clearly written rules. Holly mutual behave and we get some signaling from everyone in the community that they actually gonna follow this rules and we have clear mechanisms how such can be cleared up without incurring a lot of mass. Imagine if that happens. And we have a lot of defy transactions. Going on that are all intertwined. You know like you put something into unions. But then other people put stuff in and the price moves in some other. Oracle's rely on this price on like it's going to be very very difficult to sort it out off. The fec need mechanisms to prevent censorship in in place before but that only work once. We have proof of stake with proof of work. There is no mitigation like usually minors decide docking optimistic. Crawl up they can do. It is very real and they can. They can collude. They can be bribed. There might be some automated bribery mechanisms through smart contracts. They distribute the rewards from this that and actually the closer. We come to the moment of transitional aboard to stay. The last proof of work miners have at stake less. They have to lose in the las base before transition. It's very very likely is the second happen. That's why in the long term. We want to rely on something more fundamental or preventing censorship such as for example damn look groups where users will be able to put their transactions in in some incredible envelopes and submit them to buy interest within the block before the Can learn what's inside. Yeah that makes total sense. So maybe that's do a walk through of how it works step by step because so far it's been pretty abstract so let's say i have. I have an address with one ito. Ondeo one how do i get it. Onto the zika sinclair to as with anywhere you will have to make a transaction on their one. The movements bombs from layer want to learn to alternatively you could just get the from someone who already has it To for example if your a normal user and you just want to move your glare do you probably just go to an exchange and withdrawal directly to from there. We're working on vacations. The address that they have under a to is exactly the same that i can also have one. So there's no confusion possible. Is that right in suggesting. This is how we designed it so it was very important to us to keep very very high degree of ability. And yes you have. The same editors in that sounds super nice because I mean as someone who builds sanchis projects and product. I mean we have obscene. How often it happens that people send funds to the same address on a different network via the test network day to obsolete so. That's super whether whether technology could challenges inherent to this. I will also say that indeed many do this. Many people would do transfers instead of withdrawals or deposits. they stand upon To the same at to the cetera and think for example we ever with accusers would sound fons inside succinct to some interest and expected to appear where one without knowing that they actually have to do withdrawal and sometimes they would send it to some address which cannot register insecure because smart quarter or it's just exchange address and they would get stock there so we had to develop a special mechanism force. The funds out four new addresses the have been used yet which where the owner cannot control it in their to two. We have a special in the just like withdrawal dramatically. it's enforced by the protocol. It's department of snark so it can always be done so you never our inner risk off losing any funds like no matter what you do like a less than the veterans bureau by any mistakes tolerated..

ONE Oracle Two Weeks TWO Second Four New Addresses Single Party Zika Sinclair Smart Quarter One Big Attack Once
Sinclaire Johnson Reflects on Her Running Journey

Ali on the Run Show

01:58 min | Last month

Sinclaire Johnson Reflects on Her Running Journey

"Tell us about little sinclair johnson. Running around what was she like. And when did running. Enter the picture for you. So i played lacrosse for about. I think like five years before. I decided to stop fulltime. Just run By i got into running because of lacrosse Kind of like how. Most most dissenters were like soccer players beforehand. It was just like a a way to stay in shape And then i eventually Just realized that. I had potential in the sport and And i think my parents. And i were just like maybe we should try. Distract thing and From there just kind of spiraled into Later like you know winning state championships and then getting a scholarship to run in college But yet by my peers were runners. So i feel like that's in my blood But it's yeah. It wasn't like a like they weren't they had never like ran In college or beyond anything So i think it was all very exciting to us like going through the process of like college recruiting and then even light when i mom and dad after nc. Double as when i was i think i can go pro right now and they were just like by like what is you know. What does that even mean so it was. It was a lot of fun. But i like a like really started to get serious with running probably like in college my sophomore junior year But yeah it's been it's crazy to think that like when i started running How awful. I was at it just like i couldn't make it a mile without stopping to like what i'm doing now has been a been a journey but obviously like just come a long ways and it's pretty cold look back on

Sinclair Johnson Lacrosse Soccer
"sinclair" Discussed on The Cincinnati and Dayton Sports Podcast

The Cincinnati and Dayton Sports Podcast

04:15 min | Last month

"sinclair" Discussed on The Cincinnati and Dayton Sports Podcast

"Thing about sinclair college. It is top to see another year of no sports at saint clair but at least the community college is taking care of those athletes. That are staying put to work on their degrees. So that's pretty much. the article. Again chris stewart for dayton daily news and the ever wine on the clarion is by richard footsie associate editor of the student paper. The mean again. What the athletics. website being offline. It's tough to see. You know some funny things about sinclair athletics history. What's pot of time. The teams were known as the satan's i am not making that up the sinclair. Satan's back i think this latest sixties but Yeah whatever whatever place you got to learn about sports like oh we used to be. Satan's like oh that's great it case. You're wondering what the first classes or the first look. Campus was native eighty seven there evening classes in a one room.

richard footsie chris stewart sinclair sinclair college one room first look eighty first classes saint clair dayton daily news sixties seven on the clarion
Auto Industry Insights With Mark Palavestra and John Sinclair

Talking Automotive

02:08 min | 2 months ago

Auto Industry Insights With Mark Palavestra and John Sinclair

"Aas pretty impressed with your figures you know. We did the recording last year. And you call the number and you put a stake in the ground. What you told the numbers will be handed out to t- also pretty impressed with that. So maybe can you describe the current state and what led into the arnstein away. Do you think the future is going to be absolutely junk. It's when you look at the catch sight hugest and prediction of a thing to look at the industry as to what the k. Metrics out but not from a traditional our in perspective. Normally you'll sits for many now in presentation and it's the same stuff that keeps getting regurgitated tonight. Wages kid cover off to some of the by six that most people might not be aware of several is nineteen point eight million cars on this train rides and when you look at the population we've got twenty five million people but there's actually detect the people under seventeen and over ninety. It's interesting that we have nineteen point. Three eight driving age people in australia. So there's a gap of city heights thousand units versus the number of chasm. We have pretty much account for every driving is person we know that there are some the drive and we know that there are those of multiple cameras so when you look at. We are in balance if you look at the average an number new cars over the previous three years. Tikey at the covid hiccup but it's been around about a million fifty cows if you got back to twenty thirteen. It was actually well. I have one point one million per year and then last year we dropped down to nine hundred sixteen thousand. It was a very much a imbalance locked to that supply and you look at the average age of the cows that are on the road have shit was giving attain point four years phrase him up to the us and dive kind that statistic that it's very much in line with what we have a ten year perspective cast come on we also have cast coming off and if you look at the information to what vehicles get the chandy scrap or dismantled. Its around that eight hundred thousand units is normally we have a situation where we have a net immigration surplus over three hundred thousand people.

Australia United States
Square to Buy Majority Stake in Jay-Z's Tidal Platform

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

00:28 sec | 3 months ago

Square to Buy Majority Stake in Jay-Z's Tidal Platform

"Cushion Cut Square Incorporated, says it plans to take a majority stake in streaming music service title. Square expects to pay $297 million in exchange for a significant majority ownership stake in title, which is affiliated with Jay Z. Signing the pandemic. The Sinclair Broadcast group says it will reduce its workforce by about 5%. Amounting to hundreds of layoffs across the company. The company employees 9211 Employees meeting at 5% Reduction would affect

Cushion Cut Square Incorporate Jay Z. Sinclair Broadcast Group
"sinclair" Discussed on SmartLess

SmartLess

08:14 min | 4 months ago

"sinclair" Discussed on SmartLess

"Now there's some new stuff which is blowing my mind and in my mind takes a lot to be blown. Because i've seen pretty much everything happen. But what realizes that atings into slow. -able it's actually reversible. And we do this in my spare easily. We can reverse the age of the i in amounts and make them see again these oldness we can make them run hundred. And fifty percent to present on a treadmill of to just a few weeks of treating. And so. we've these the wright brothers days right. Imagine in twenty thirty is we could have intercontinental. Air travel eventually go to the moon. Do you think that you guys could in a lab. Maybe regrows sean sense of humor like would that be piled like hotly valley atrophied and gone. Ucla working on that. It is true that you're able to change the instead of the gray hair on mice now they no longer have gray hair is that that's not true as well. Some people have done that. That is true. You can now reverse gray hair actually. There's a drug on the market for cancer that these patients suddenly the goes eleven team. Patients cut their hair color. Oh sean bell just parked up. What's it going to get to get cancer. I wait a minute. I this is fascinating to me because i think about it like no. You can't catch cancer or leukemia or so in other words it's all that stuff is in us and there are things that you can do in your life. That are not good things that actually turn those little toggle switches on and now all of a sudden you are on your way to getting cancer or leukemia or diabetes or any of the things. Speak a little bit of that because that really resonated with me. david will so what really is driving. All of these diseases is that bodies become lexa days and unable to fight these diseases. We're young if we're if a cancel pops up l. buddies destroy it or if as mis folded proteins for alzheimer's out destroy it but we lose that ability to defend ourselves against diseases and most people don't get that they think diseases are inevitable. No if you can stay young physically young you don't get them and what we figured out is only part of it is genetic i know i said the genes important but actually only twenty percent of our longevity and now health and old age is parents. The rest is how we live our life we when we eat How much we so eighty percent as far as like nature versus nurture it is it is nurture basically Eighty percent of how you live will dictate how you die. As opposed to hereditary and we know that because there are these twins in denmark that lived very different lives. And we'll you know them. Yeah oh yeah. Sorry david well we. We know that only part of it is genetic because the these twins in denmark if they lead very different lives and very different lifespans got it so basically one of the things. I remember saying that was sort of very common for us to kind of die at fifty. Maybe a hundred years ago or or further like nowadays it around eighty ninety hundred. Whatever you were saying maybe twenty or thirty years. People will look back at this time and say boy so weird that everybody was. Okay with dying at eighty. We're living to hundred and twenty because of you know not just with david sinclair todd us and uncovered but this whole sort of world of technology and science. What you guys are. Uncovering if sure and multiple technologies are advancing so we've got some of my technology which reverses the age of cells. You've got these wearables that are getting better and better their blood tests that we can do. I could take your blood. You guys tell you what's aware i know it. An edible is what's aware of just get stoned from certain certain desire forty bracelet. Wow it's just like. Thc based clothing happen. so what. what's a wearable david Well so it's one of those watches that will monitor your heartbeat. Getting better and better they can tell you blood sugar wearing a ring that tells me how will i slept and what else. I got up to not just found out about that. I was thinking of get one. Because i was doing the thing i was wearing that. Whoop the sleep Band i was wearing that and wearing the The apple watch. And i'd wake up in the morning. This is true. And i wake up in the morning. I'd look at how i slept. You know how many times. I woke up and stuff because i'm a big sleep guy right i go. I go to bed very early. And i wake up early but i believe in getting a lot of very unemployed unemployed sleep will make you live longer. That's for sure. Definitely well right. So sleep is really good so i mean. This is great for all the people who go to jason's movies and watch his shows because they get a lot asleep and if you're welcome you're welcome. Yeah a little naps here and there. What service you're doing. Sometimes it's thirty minutes sometimes. It's an hour an hour and a half full length movie. You know whatever you need. I got all walk away a huggy that that's the prescription from david given that. Listen david you know everybody's interested in reversing the aging process. I mean it's a topic that. I'm sure nobody's not interested in so tell us about exactly if unless i'm jumping way far ahead. Can you tell us what those are. And what exactly. How does that work in. Is it all food based like is it. Is it only have to do with what you eat or and what can we do on our own. Yeah there's a lot you can actually do. This isn't rocket science actually going to be easy to aging cancer in your daily life. What the kind of things that i do are eight less often Get your hot right up for at least ten minutes every day. So basically do what wielded. Today's a good start and the kind of foods people argue is at made. Is it not me. But essentially you don't want to overload your body with with protein having sometimes when you're lower on protein so plant based mediterranean. That's also very good. And we as a group of status people been saying you know all these plant based foods exercise and nobody really understood until recently why. That's good for you. It turns out these genes that we've discovered that control l. Longevity make our bodies fight aging and disease on triggered by these lifestyles so we can tone body's defenses. It's cold hormesis. Horses means what doesn't kill. You makes you stronger and really. It's putting your body into a state of defensive mode because if we just ate stoff And we're sitting around and we just watch jason's movies a bodies get tired and they don't react to the onslaught which facing everyday with chemicals dna damage and so we have ways to triggers by being hungry sometimes Alto specifics in a second. But but also what's interesting is we've we've now found some chemicals that also mimic diet and exercise and gives you the benefits or enhance a healthy lifestyle. Yeah because everybody's looking for a quick fix pill anything so they don't have to you know exercise or do the things you're saying they can eat anything you do. You have the. I just worked out for an hour pill yes we do. Well we we don't know if they work in humans but in my i can take an old mouse and make it a marathon runner. I'll take it how about. I just blasted my quads. Capsule whiskas farther. That you'll be really hoping super young thighs on will. So how'd you find out if you have these. You know jeans. That like the yeah. We'll have you guys done your genomes yet. What is done genomes. So there are companies right There's a famous one twenty three. Neither of those ancestry will do it. And they tell you what variations so we all pretty much the same genes for us. So we pretty much have the same jeans but the variations on those genes and how they controlled Depends on how we live but also what we were born with but we can read what we got from parents very easily. I could take dna in my lab tomorrow. Tell you what genome is that used to be a billion dollars now takes it's about one hundred bucks so.

denmark tomorrow david sinclair Eighty percent david fifty percent eighty percent thirty minutes jason twenty percent hundred an hour an hour and a half a hundred years ago Today forty bracelet twenty about one hundred bucks thirty years fifty billion dollars
"sinclair" Discussed on SmartLess

SmartLess

08:05 min | 4 months ago

"sinclair" Discussed on SmartLess

"Your sorry. I couldn't hear that you want chew it. Swallow it. i'm trying. You know you're working right now. Do you do chew while you're acting. This is this is this is serious scenery generalist. Regnery what is it what is it. What's the carbohydrate today. You know it might be less annoying than whatever you eating now. Just eating a banana and just making that sound that everybody loves that. I'm that kind of sound that try know what what is it. What what you have today today. I was just having a little bit about cookie. Oh las- did you earn it home. A huge workout in a hike. And what did you blast today. Was it tries to buys to me. Don't say blast. Yeah well this. Isn't that what you always say. Gross just i just blasted my causes. It's a word. I had a trainer. Come over and blast my quads and listener listener. He's wearing a white really stretched out. Nee to t shirt today routes henley same thing. It's almost looks like you're trying to make us believe that your muscles are breaking through the shirt when really sharp would fit fine if it was the normal size this extra large baby size a baby. That just got his cookie because he was good today. Could listen fellas gap you today. We're gonna we're gonna make a real dent in our smart lewis. Okay today. we have a scientist. Ooh i love it already. This is a phd. He is the co founder of several biotechnology companies. He's an inventor of thirty five patents. He is a co director at the harvard medical school and he has been named one of time magazine's one hundred most influential people. He is also a three time runner up of people magazine's sexiest man of the year. Not sure if that's why we're gonna have to ask him about that Sean will and listener. This is dr. David sinclair dr. Ooh wow now look now. That's a sexy man right there. Sexy right yeah. So the three time runner up to the did i just add that it was only two. It wasn't very just a two time for a quick shot at that beard on. I bet you you're gonna win it this year. It's nice david. Thank you very very much for joining us. Now guys. I i will tell you. I had the pleasure of listening to david. Speak at a At a small casual Sort of lecture issue thingy And at someone's house at someone's house and It really knocked out. Hollywood does it right don't they. They just bring people in what bring somebody smart over here and let them talk to us. David basically i know i couldn't get anyone else so invited and and he said some things that really straighten me out as far as my My my knowledge of general health and mortality He a specialist in aging. And and i'm gonna let him talk to you about some of the things that really knocked me out. I i'm gonna t you up here david. there is And please tell me how dumb. Am and how much. I did not remember All of us are just not just david okay. Qualified folks Basically the gist. I got And then i'd love to hear all the specifics again. Is that while there is a definite that we're all going to die. Science and technology has now Sort of giving us an opportunity to have a little bit more to say about how we die when we die the in which the end of our life can be enjoyed those are all my dumb words but it is that generally what you guys are are focused on a lot and hopefully you'll give us some some tips on how to How to improve that part of our life today. Yes i think he. I'm one hundred six hundred and six listener if you could see this guy. He doesn't look they over thirty. And it's it's pretty impressive. He and i didn't pay you to say that during kind of the same ages aren't we. I think i remember that day. Isn't that isn't that. I've always thought that. I looked fairly young for my age. Fifty one did you. David i mean come on the guy who always thought that. I have always thought that i haven't asked anybody to confirm that but When i look at myself every morning noon and night. I'm like oh look at you but david doesn't look old and thirty five does yeah. Why do you. Your skin is incredible. Actually well there's this thing on the software where using it's called the filter. Were really. Well you guys should use okay first of all. You know that jason's jason the same age. I know maybe you've already google but you have to guess my age and also sean. Oh come on. Come on well here. We'll qualify. i want you to. I want you to get their age and then tell us how will they actually look. I want you to guess it and then tell us what they actually look like I'm gonna regret this so bad. Start making faces. Well just look and don't be nice like if you think we're older already got whatever you wanna do. Just guess. well. I have the advantage of in watching all of you for a number of years so i kind of know when you come onto the only a couple of years for me because i just got started. I would say twenty six for well. Sure i think we're all crease orange. I don't know. I think maybe sean you're younger. But yeah i'd probably the rest of us have been around for awhile. Bad decade is that room. Truly your forty one sean. And forty one. Oh shit i also half a century. Old fifty. Wow thanks guys. Well so listen. So we're all okay turned fifty. Oh you did well but david in forty years will probably be not shocked if we die but based on your research and What you can perhaps share with us. Today we can make that decade more enjoyable and perhaps not our last decade. Is maybe accurate. How we go about doing that. Yeah so what kind of at the level of the wright brothers it's nineteen o two we figuring out how to glide but we do know it's possible to fly so we've my colleagues and i are about one hundred leaders in the world doing this. We call it aging research on jeopardy research. It's it's now fact that modern science is caught up with aging for while we ignore it. We thought it was natural acceptable. That's that's. bs is definitely not acceptable. It's the greatest poets of pain suffering on the planet. And if you think heart disease cancer and alzheimer's bad what do you think causes those right. Young people don't get those diseases. It's a thousand times aging and one time or twenty times all these other drivers of these disease so my point is if we can understand what causes aging slow and even reverse it and we'll get to that then. These diseases don't happen or you can take them away. And what. I was telling you jason truck. Now tell everybody. Listening is my field and my and my lab at harvard spent about twenty years figuring out what are the genes that control the aging process. And we've been very successful. We have a handful of genes. That seemed to regulate all iphones on a from trees to worms stephen humans and we could even. I could read your jeans and tell you. What the chances are you living a long time. But.

David jason one hundred thirty five patents three time forty years david twenty times today Sean Hollywood Fifty one thirty five dr. forty one two time one time David sinclair about twenty years twenty six
Bourbon, Banter, and the Best of 2020!! - burst 02

The Broken Cork

05:46 min | 4 months ago

Bourbon, Banter, and the Best of 2020!! - burst 02

"Welcome back everyone to the broken court. Podcast episode to who. I'm dan aaron jake and right. Now i'm gonna throw it over to my man aaron for our toast since it's real close to valentine's day. I thought i would give a valentine's toast one of those cheesy almost greeting card. Esque toast hallmark. Here's here's to you. So roses are red violets are blue. Don't get me flowers bourbon. Will do cheers. cheers everyone. Damn let's get stuff so right now. World bourbon news. Going around out of new rift still company out of newport kentucky. Something that's kind of Near and dear to my heart. Since i do work in the world fast food. They're doing something really cool for all of us New riff is putting out a fifteen year. Straight bourbon whiskey. they're calling. i believe it's called. Relief is bottled in bond. Just like all of their other products. Distilled in indiana. By what what we can only think is mvp. Because they're the only ones. I think are going to have the stocks that are up there in fifteen years and i think it is. Gp wouldn't surprise me. The barrels were purchased out of mvp and again that's all speculative but they were stored at their warehouse with the remainder of their time and this run is limited to just nine hundred if not less only to be distributed out of their distillery for the price of two hundred dollars. I think i tweeted about that. Too on the burkan broken corker twitter page to if you wanna if you wanna get in more in depth about it. I believe he did. But that two hundred dollars is going to go to benefit Restaurant workers around the ohio and kentucky area. I believe that release is going to benefit. Both the ohio restaurant employee relief fund and the northern kentucky chamber of commerce who's in charge of distributing the funds to people who need it the most for more on that you can check us out on facebook at the broken court crew is our facebook group or you can follow new riff on all of their social media for more information on that release. And i'm sure it's going to be amazing man. I think you know what a great especially this time of year. What a great a cinnamon for them to do. I mean cove is really hit. That service industry pretty hard. It's ruined a lot of people and you don't see a lot of people talking about i. Understand nurses and doctors are at the forefront of all of this kovin but they don't talk a lot about like like your fast food workers who have been working throughout the entire thing. I mean i've been fast food. I have not stopped working since covert started. Yeah and i mean. God bless all the frontline workers as far as medical is concerned because they are. They're in close contact. All that like i said are the forefront of all of this but you rarely hear about anyone else you know. Keeping america fed keeping america clothed. Everything like that. So big shout out to all our healthcare workers and big shoutout to all our fast food workers. Anyone who's working retail right now and all of our truckers keeping everyone delivered to and everyone stocked up so we can get through this together. Definitely a big shout to the truckers. So we have a new segment on the show. And i want mr jake over there to take it over. Oh yeah this is our new segment. It's called what's cracking so basically what it is. We give a shoutout to whatever we've had since last podcast. Something's good something you drink and right now something you wanna tell everybody about to me. It was new roof winter whiskey. I tried that a good friend at a bar. Bought that around for actually me and dan and you talk about unbelievable. That's one of the best new products i've had. It really really is. I haven't had very many and of what i've had it. It's up there. I really so good. It opened my eyes to new roof and made me wanna do a little bit more research into their products. And then i mean on top of all of that. We found out about this thing that you just talked about the fifteen year. Oh yeah what's cracking for you. So what's cracking for me. I've had a couple of new bottles. I'm gonna give a couple of honorable. Mentions i never had seventeen ninety. Two bottle in bonn. I know very very strange. But i had that and it's delicious. If you can get your hands on bottle relatively cheap. I paid forty five ninety nine for man. I think that's right around retail so also from french. Lick indiana lead w sinclair four grain. It's called the iconoclast It's a four product from them. What happened long story short. They had three barrels. That were of the league w sinclair that. We're just a little off. They didn't say whether it was a good offer a bad off. They just said it was often. So they mix those three bottles together and made the iconoclasts. But the one. I really really wanna talk about is the o. H ingram whiskey It is from brown water. Bourbon company out of nashville. Where the whisky comes from. What happens with it. It's really cool. They on the mississippi river in an o o h ingram. Born and so really. Yeah so they have Redone this barge completely rick house out of it and so what

Dan Aaron Valentine Ohio Restaurant Employee Relie Northern Kentucky Chamber Of C Kentucky Jake Aaron Newport Facebook Mr Jake Indiana America Ohio Twitter DAN Bonn Ingram Whiskey
What Is Your Back Catalogue Worth?

You Are The Media

08:33 min | 4 months ago

What Is Your Back Catalogue Worth?

"What's asiapac. A low worth has an intrinsic value to you as well as the audience. You're creating for go back catalogue is when you create work. This not just focus on what's current but takes account of the longer term. It's content that pertains fairly because there's something universal and perennial about it in this way. Not only is it valuable to others. It also helps manual position in the marketplace. Currently there's a flurry of music. Artists alina back catalogs. The lives of bob dylan new young secure of done it even dolly parton thinking about pissing beat to be head so if you build an audience share content defines. Its home of your audience. Your back catalogue can also become something. That's desirable catholic. A work is your audience can always access. It's worth the grows and evolves alongside your audience. You can become a self replenishing goldman in times of new clients have improved that you'll someone who does the work and potential clients getting comfortable with your approach. A website that shares one or two articles every now and then feta video and if you four-page e books does not come across as high value however one of the back catalogue of regla audio writing and video content posted over a period of time suggests is a place of value to us on a u. at the media online in two thousand and twenty joe pelosi said to everyone but anyone michelle content if it went tomorrow. If not your content you have a problem a back cutler means you invite days that you share today but also track record that shows. You're someone who keeps and has kept on giving me never become irrelevant by choosing to rest for used in the past with touring on home to the ever-growing increase in streaming. We're seeing a trend for music. Artists selling the rights at back. Catalogues artists unrealized by a cashing. In on the value of songs they produce david as uk based rotea fund. Hypnosis is obtaining the rights to artists from blondie to mark ronson in the sky article musical journalist. David sinclair said. If you're talking with the idea if you're a rockstar. If you bob dylan you're thinking to yourself. This might be time. He's getting twenty using comp one year right that in a lump sum in sakir who sold the rights to one hundred. Thirty five songs to hypnosis. I'm humbled that songwriting. And given me the privilege of communicating with others being a part of something bigger than myself autism now handing over the word ridden and shed over the years for fake off certainly does not mean tied in this context. This story of selling bank catholics chimes with how we in the beats a bass bass produce work for an audience. It proves that when you work is relevant to others this more reason to keep going the blog articles you produced back in two thousand nine nineteen. Maybe didn't get many views when they were first published. But that doesn't mean the not value sitting within your overall bank of work similar to music artists. Your job is to keep plane so that you keep developing your audience when people find you they can then join the dots and get a more complete picture of y you share is relevant to them. Those articles that received little traffic into nineteen are important in the context of your overall efforts. A moment in time should not be your only anka booting up a back catalog of which shows in your work over time making it easier for people to make a decision on whether to buy or subscribe. Starting the a space that people can visit but also record of how you've developed in the music industry return longevity. What about you. How will you know wherever you're back catalogue is where something it won't be. The same. ballpark is bob. Dylan's three hundred million pounds. When he sold his six hundred songs universal music for how we find out. If what you share has worth you would. Immediate has been around every week apart from some short breaks since october. Two thousand thirteen almost eight years. Now here's why building a back. Catalog of content provides vani in both the short and long after the first one. Is this over time. People see the value provide be prepared to play. The long game is so important. I wonder where ought be now if i hadn't been producing content every week for you at the median. I reckon it would be somewhere where i am today when people recognize. Your work is something that they can get behind you have a license to develop momentum secondly it can support your wider efforts. Your back catalog makes it easier to introduce for new initiatives. The one thing that has remained constant from me has been my writing. This was the tree. I planted back in twenty thirteen and new branches of grown. It made introducing in person and then online live events easier. Don't think of the word you produce in isolation look at it as a way to connect your intentions and third lake is greater use beyond the immediate space producing a back. Catalog extend your scope by this. I mean what stance a piece of work in one channel can extend into other formats. For instance blogs have become talked topics for other people's podcast. One single article became a webinar in april. Twenty twenty on your first ten email subscribers the next point is that it becomes and it brings people closer or from people. The proof of the work. You've already done helps you by helping them. Make a decision go back catalogue in contrast to say tha that competitors whose output may be more sporadic demonstrates perseverance. Next point is that it contributes to sales while message of this. You the media online. That i'm talking to you now is not around selling your business based on your content. Your work can be indirectly related to revenue for instance. The world you produce can also present a way to sell products and services but in a way that isn't merely emphasizing for instance being a trusted business increases the impact. You can make and this links to one of the aspects of what the month of learning represents a recent podcast looked at the impact of trust. Next is your were becomes a reference and search to your back catalogue can become a place for us to take from an somewhere. Search engines recognize websites. We've over three hundred and eleven index pieces of work c. Two hundred and thirty six percent more traffic than no sign of not too many pages and this is ups ball. What this means. Is that the better. Your ongoing work is indexed. There is more for a search engine to look through and support your search rankings ultimately ultimately want visit us to stick around on your site for that you need to offer work they will enjoy and lastly grow from it. The more you practice delivering something the better you become by learning. How the audio space works. I've become a better speaker by sharing a short video every week for the of the media weekly email. I think become a better presenter by writing every week. I've become a stronger writer. Whilst as an emphasis on creating roughness never forget this contributes to your own personal development. Let's roundup similar to writing and sherry music. You just put all your effort into a once a year christmas. Oh you have to keep introducing new material. That can stand the test of time all comes down to having that ability to keep going is what you're creating talking to be worth. Something is what you're producing contributing to your overall message actions in commercial delivery to give you the freedom to play an experiment. Why if your entire back catalogue disappear tomorrow but people let you know what they show concern. You're back catalogue is your commercial worth directly and indirectly and it's important to keep on playing for the audience as you show up to it

Joe Pelosi Bob Dylan Rotea Fund Sakir Alina Dolly Parton David Sinclair Mark Ronson Goldman Cutler Blondie Michelle Autism Dylan David UK BOB
Integrating Omni Channel In Automotive

Talking Automotive

05:55 min | 5 months ago

Integrating Omni Channel In Automotive

"Hi everybody welcome to Talking Automotive my and name John is my co-host Sinclair Mark Palvestra . Thanks John. Today we've got Michelle de Novian the chief marketing officer from rhode. Stay in the us at right. Sta are omni channel digital platform for the auto industry dealerships and michelle. Hsieh's some very powerful information with the insights that have that she saying from the covid situation change and move to more digital transactions of more importantly h transaction is different sets not just a pure one hundred percent digital plight it is interacting digital with the dealership experience and actually improving efficiencies with the sales put units unit sold per south consultant has moved from ten units units and customer satisfaction has increased significantly some very powerful information that she shares all support bossom. Very strong data is fascinating for me. Is that the sales price as Longer linear where thousand works with one. Customer from beginning to end delivers a vehicle. He's not working with multiple customers at different touch points. And it's happening in the customers on tomek when the dealerships close very exciting think. This is the way things are going to and such. It's a really with listen for this jump into talking automatic analysis identification and implementation of profit opportunities for the automotive ak system with thirty years experience in logistics and started the out locations in five major shrines. Cities breakout fleet services is an independent. Division of prayer services offering specialty flake. That's for commercial applications ranging from simple try and taiba statements to fully bespoke service body and accessory installation with quality issued safety compliance and standardization of vehicle builds. Breakout fleet. services are a premia in one solutions provider for commercial vehicle fleet operators leasing companies and original equipment manufacturers for further information on. How breakout fleet. Services can assist in solving your commercial vehicle fit aetna aids. Please visit pre-cut dot com dadu and click on the link to flight services. John talked about Just yesterday assist really powerful stuff that really raise the as the way we way we need to go as a as a as an industry in. That's what you guys in the adoption in the. Us is much faster than bank. This is us. He still thinking that online listings. For years cazes a good thing in a net cutting edge raisin haram do you to have the omni channel and what is on the channel that main the word is out there but that really comprehend. What does that make I was having a conversation with a Dealer here in the states earlier today. We're doing some research on sort of their they're buying journey for digital retailing. And it's interesting to hear how the progressive dealers have been all about. You know how do i. How do i modernize customer experience. And that seems to be where a lot of people were leading the conversation in their own organizations until covid. And then everybody's like oh wait this could be really great for productivity to hours talking hats. Never like that immediate hurt. You know that we're all responding to but it's that moment that's sort of what the omni channel steph. I think brings Beaches what we've what would they added. That way would be spending a lot of time. Educating not to seal us but even just people who worked within the ends that would be countless thomas guys for different organizations and you'd have to read trying not retrying but just get people up to speed. This is how dealer works. You'd get inflexible. A williams were really good at bringing. Fm cj to into the auto industry but then the deal is wouldn't were liked to the principal's side. We found that we would spend all his time. Just got through. This is had the business thinks this is how consumers upright at mrs Comes but just a reeducate but then the downside also is that there were people now games. That are so blinking into thinking. This is just how estimate and something new comes in nightcap. adjust to it with a whether it's a pivot or even just a mind move The thought patented by should go down that road because now we've always done so therefore we must do it this way. So you Al mission if you like without series is to it's one of enlightenment But this one. Also you'll come as i should with with david that was an autograph mesa. Yes gotta get shell on on the shire to give your insights and your expertise because the journey that use shea is the journey that many needs to be undertaking Oh actually i should have been undertaking five years ago. But if you're not on that right now you hear it's yeah it's it's tough. I think that. I know we talked to mike. About how the pandemic has been a bit shorter of a time period for you guys than it is here at this in the states but i think it was a forcing function for the future so that was a big wake up call. Thank for even dealers here. I don't think it's just internationally. I think in general change is hard and it's hard to contemplate in until after requirement. You know there's a lot of people that will just sort of sit

Sinclair Mark Palvestra Michelle De Novian Tomek Division Of Prayer Services John Hsieh Rhode Michelle United States Aids Al Mission Williams Mesa Shea David Mike
'The Great Gatsby,' 'Mrs. Dalloway' And Other 1925 Works Enter The Public Domain

Houston Public Media Local Newscasts

00:57 sec | 5 months ago

'The Great Gatsby,' 'Mrs. Dalloway' And Other 1925 Works Enter The Public Domain

"Today is public domain day. As of january first thousands of books movies songs and other material from nineteen twenty five are no longer under copyright protection including the great gatsby. Npr's neda ulaby has more besides the f. scott fitzgerald masterpiece books entering the public domain now. Include mrs dalloway by virginia woolf and classics by sinclair lewis franz kafka ernest hemingway and agatha christie so are other works from nineteen twenty five like buster. Keaton silent film go west and the songs week toward brown now community. Orchestras can play music in the public domain for free scholars will not have to get permission to study. This material and books on the public domain can appear online without charge all part of living cultural conversation that anyone can join netto lippi. Npr news both

Neda Ulaby Mrs Dalloway Scott Fitzgerald Sinclair Lewis NPR Virginia Woolf Franz Kafka Ernest Hemingway Agatha Christie Keaton Netto Lippi Npr News
The Great Commission with Tyler St. Clair

The Bible Says What!?

05:27 min | 6 months ago

The Great Commission with Tyler St. Clair

"Special guest is the lead pastor at the cornerstone church in detroit. Scho- tyler sinclair. Hey how you guys doing. Glad to have yawn man. Thanks for taking time out of your busy schedule in having the conversation appreciate it. My pleasure. Mock leisure well today. We decided to discuss the great commission. But i like to get to know a little bit more about you. Tell us a little bit about your scherf. I'm gonna give you the long and short of my journey. Yeah i'm born born and raised in detroit michigan. I grew up Grew up at a situation that we It's pretty common Single parents and the In the city and struggled and ran the streets and the very similar story a lot of people That are ministry six to reach In the city of detroit but I born and raised in church. But i decided at the age of eighteen and my infinite wisdom that i was done with god. Donald church didn't want when have anything to do with this Beings that i thought was irrelevant in my life and Yeah whitten On my birthday when got got got a tattoo and decided that I'm done One one year later one year later. I'm asking jesus To say before for my fans and surrender my life to the lord. Jesus so what. A difference. A year year makes so they age of nineteen. I surrendered to christ and What what struck me was My church experience was Church with the destination church. Which is the place that people came. I thought it was just a social thing. I thought it was just something that people came and did and got their religious goods and services and when i began to read scripture sure I saw that there was. There should be an urgency behind the church that there should be a zeal and the desire to see people come to know and follow jesus and to see people From the wrath. Adjustment of god. So i think i for this is this is different. What i'm when i'm reading a scripture is different from what i'm seeing and what i'm experiencing and So i i got saved In september of two thousand and one in december just a few months. Later i was telling my pastor that i feel called to ministry they nineteen years old and everyone thought i was insane And i felt insane. But i knew that This burden at the lower had put on my heart with something. I couldn't took away until i got older Like i experienced Life transformation through the gospel. Jesus and i wanted that for everyone that i came in contact with since since nineteen. I have been Like old thanks for say running for jesus and it's been a wild ride and i've just seen so much of the lord's grace In the last twenty something years of kind of know about this tattoo was it. Like i'm done with you. Got a tattoo like it was it was it was. It was just my my my Rebellion me sticking my flag in the ground. I i gotta i gotta t and then. After i became a christian. I change the ten talk cross. Of course so how convenience. It was just This was hey I'm outwardly a rebellion. I'm choosing a life without you And that was a sign of that but Thank god his grace. He's gracious in carnegie and he caught me to himself and save me from myself so college. The tuesday curious the great commission. Let's let's start that matthew twenty eight we've got the great commission eighteen through twenty Mark fifteen sixteen says the same thing. the message basically is go out and preach my work Why do you think it is that you're the one that's supposed to do this. So i love the great commission. And it's been a passes that i've referred to when and and and and basically human oriented my life around this great commission and the part that i think we often overlook is The beginning part. Before right before get right. Before jesus gives the great commission inverse eighteen Verse eighteen matthew twenty aching and jesus Came and said to them. All authority in heaven and earth has been given to me so jesus is making. That's a very big weighty statement. All of the all authority in the entire universe has been given to me

Detroit Tyler Sinclair Donald Church Cornerstone Church Whitten Michigan Carnegie Matthew
"sinclair" Discussed on The Dentalpreneur Podcast with Dr. Mark Costes

The Dentalpreneur Podcast with Dr. Mark Costes

05:39 min | 8 months ago

"sinclair" Discussed on The Dentalpreneur Podcast with Dr. Mark Costes

"Dr Marcus Hey guys. Oh Jeez were we lucky to snag this Guy Dr David? Sinclair is the New York Times bestselling author of lifespan why we age and why we don't have to if he has no me and you are a member of DSM. Or if you followed this podcast for any length of time, you know that I'm obsessed with biohacking with. Exploring human potential and longevity those sorts of things. Dr. David Sinclair is a tenured professor at the Harvard Medical School and he is considered the foremost expert in longevity science and He is the godfather of biohacking and he is just generally the most well respected person in this entire field and I feel so so blessed to have gotten him on the podcast. He was an incredible interview, Super Humble Very, very nice guy and I think you guys are GonNa get a lot out of this interview. It was longer interview. So we broke it up into two parts. This is part one. It speaks for itself. I'm not going to go too much into what we talked about make sure you listened to it in its entirety and make sure you tune in tomorrow for part two. Okay. Guys I. Hope you enjoy. This episode is brought being brought to you by the Dental Success Network Demo success network dot com slash free forty-five. We'll get you forty five days free to the most positive and educational. Network in all of dentistry including. As one of the divisions of Diaz, N is one of the largest bind groups. In all of dentistry, we have over one point, two, billion dollars of collective re revenue with the nine hundred plus dentists that we have in the network. So we have a lot of leverage with vendors. Additionally, we have an incredible continuing education library. So make sure make sure you go over to Donald Success Network. Ford, slash free forty five for forty five day test drive hope to the network enjoy this episode and we'll talk to you guys soon. Okay everybody well, I just have to welcome. An extremely esteemed guests. I'm a huge fan of this gentleman here It's a little surreal that I'm actually speaking to him today but for those of you that don't know specifically exactly what Dr Sinclair is all about I'm going to read a little bit of his bio. Dr Sinclair Dr David Sinclair has a PhD in molecular. Genetics. He's a tenured professor of genetics at Harvard Medical School. He has published over two hundred scientific papers is the CO inventor on over fifty patents and patent applications. He has cofounded a dozen biotech companies is in New York Times bestselling author of this book right here. Read it twice now Lifespan why we age why we don't have to He has been named on Time Magazine's list of one hundred most influential people and top fifty people in healthcare. So welcome to the Webinar Dr Sinclair. Thank you so much for being here I. Know How busy you are. Going to be thankful. Yes. Of course. So first of all, I want WanNa acknowledge you for making science cool and for bringing your topic to the masses you know of getting out there i. know it's very difficult to manage schedules and getting out there and being on big podcast like Joe Rogan's and you've been on my good friend Louis Houses podcast a couple of times. We have some mutual funds and Peter Tia and Louis and and everybody thinks the world of you and and everybody says that this persona that you present on these podcasts is just really who you are as well. So, I wanNA acknowledge you for. For making science, cool and bringing in bringing this really important stuff to the masses in this world of Click. Bayden and stuff. That's not really important that people said tend to to focus on is a really refreshing to have something like in the world. Thank you say that yes, of course. So I've heard, you mentioned for a long time that you are interested in longevity in the science of longevity from time you're just a child what got you interested in in in this bridge science from the beginning. Well, I think I'm pretty normal most kids including me. Around the age of four or five, get a huge shock that the older people they love. And the pets they love ah going to be gone. Sooner than later and It was a real shock to me. I can remember being told this. Brutal fact by my grandma. Who held my punches and? She said I'm going to die GONNA die you're GonNa die and then you're GonNa die. That's how things are shaping up through world. War Two. And the aftermath in Europe and to her that was just a fact it wasn't anything to be afraid of. but to a four year old, it's shock and so I think that probably a stuck in my mind. I've always thought about trying to help humanity. With my life devoted to making the world, a better place that's really were always wanted to do. And now in high school and more in college I realize that. We aren't really talking about the real cause of sickness and disability on the planet a way we're trading vigil diseases but. Kids don't get typically don't get dementia or heart disease and. I wanted to figure out why at an and we know really the aging but what we didn't understand and still. Don't fully understand. What is causing aging, and then why does it end up with these various diseases?.

Dr Sinclair Dr David Sinclair Dr. David Sinclair Harvard Medical School New York Times Dr David Dr Marcus Donald Success Network Time Magazine professor of genetics Louis Houses Joe Rogan DSM professor Diaz Europe Ford Bayden Peter Tia
Sinclair Pulls Controversial Show About Coronavirus

Pivot

00:33 sec | 11 months ago

Sinclair Pulls Controversial Show About Coronavirus

"Might. Fail was of course sinclair broadcasting the owner of three hundred plus local TV stations. was up planning era segment on Sunday. Pushing the false in had a conspiracy theory in plan damage, which suggests that Anthony Fauci helped create the could earn a virus. They pulled at the last minute and says the rework at at just. Sinclair is a dangerous. There's other there's other local TV stations like gray and others that are trying to do news things like that, but this is just really it shows you the power of local television So that is my my fail.

Sinclair Anthony Fauci Gray
Sinclair says it won't air Dr Fauci conspiracy theory segment

Afternoon News with Tom Glasgow and Elisa Jaffe

00:36 sec | 11 months ago

Sinclair says it won't air Dr Fauci conspiracy theory segment

"Broadcast group, the owners of Co. Moh TV and Kummel radio, dropping a segment suggesting Dr Anthony Fauci was responsible for the creation of the Corona virus. Over the weekend. The company said it would postpone and rework the segment featuring planned Emmick researcher Judy Michael Bits. It was set to air during the Eric Boy Bowling hosted America. This week. However, today the company decided to pull the conspiracy theory with the discredited researcher altogether, they said, despite having an expert to dispute my covets his claims they felt it was not appropriate to air the interview.

Researcher Dr Anthony Fauci Judy Michael Bits CO America
Sinclair pulls show where Fauci conspiracy theory is aired

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:22 sec | 11 months ago

Sinclair pulls show where Fauci conspiracy theory is aired

"sinclair" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

05:39 min | 11 months ago

"sinclair" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"Why would you get charged ten times as much for not having insurance well, the price, probably the whole thing. It's a racket right now. It's almost like healthcare has gotten to the point that the derivative market in the stock market is like where there's only three or four people who can explain the product that they sell or truly understand the product that they sell their so abstract. Yeah, yeah I know okay, so he said the age of the sperm has impact among Javadi for the offspring. Not Find any backup on that so just. That's why I cannot be. If that's true I, think we could immediately propose a theory that your way better off. If your parents were young when they had you well. Yeah, because when you're younger, you're you're either fucking or jerking off every day. You're not going like this old man who might go week and a half the. Last? I don't know, but I'm a great person to test it on. I think my kids. They got me at a point when I would you know maybe once a week, so? These kids could have been made from 6-day-old sperm. Good or bad parable Oh, if I had them in my twenty s, they would have had to our right right right right right right, but those old sperm die. He's old is only can only be whatever ten. That's what I'm saying I. Wonder What the actual length that they can live is okay. It says most men make millions of new sperm every day, but men older than forty have fewer healthy sperm than younger men. The amount of semen. And Sperm motilal eighty decrease continually between the ages of twenty and eighty. Okay. Okay, he said no man has ever died in childbirth. That is true from what I could find. There have been some trans men move had babies, but I'm going to propose also that a man has certainly died in childbirth PGA tack. Watching it and then news over guys. That's what I was trying to look for I. Truly could not find any stories about that, but I'm sure it's happened a stroke a heart attack. Actually I. Don't think this was childbirth, but I do have this horrible horrible story. My friends sister's friend. You call one of those sisters. How? True. So the mom I think was in the hospital or something. Maybe I WANNA say having a baby because it's pertinent to this, but I don't really know why. She was in the hospital, but the dad like rushed to the hospital. She was a doctor. You fucking massage, wouldn't that? She was not a doctor, she she could be issues. He's in a hospital and she's a woman. The woman was in hospital for a reason. And then the dad rushed to the hospital and then got run over in the parking lot of. Yeah, the husband because he was, he was not paying it because I think something horrible was happening with his wife or whoever we'd have to agree, it's the most ironic. But. It's the status. Yes, but and also if the MOM died. I kinda think that happened. Wait now you think the mother. I think the person that was in the hardest thing. Also just I just want to point out that you think the only way a woman could be in the hospital.

Javadi PGA
"sinclair" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

05:38 min | 11 months ago

"sinclair" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

"Why would you get charged ten times as much for not having insurance well, the price problem the whole thing. It's a racket right now. It's almost like healthcare has gotten to the point that the derivative market in the stock market is like where there's only three or four people who can explain the product that they sell or truly understand the product that they sell their so abstract. Yeah yeah I know okay, so he said the age of the sperm has an impact among Javadi for the offspring and. I could not find any backup on that so just. That's why I cannot be if that's true I. Think we could immediately propose a theory that your way better off. If your parents were young when they had you well. Yeah, because when you're younger, you're you're either fucking or jerking off every day. You're not going like this old man who might go week and a half the. Last. I don't know, but I'm a great person to test it on I think my kids. They got me at a point when I. Would you know maybe once a week so? These kids could have been made from six-day-old Sperm Good or bad? Oh, if I had them in my twenty s, they would have had to our right right right right right right, but those old sperm die. He's old is only can only be whatever ten. That's what I'm saying. I wonder what the actual length that they can live is okay. It says most men make millions of new sperm every day, but men older than forty have fewer healthy sperm than younger men. The amount of semen. And Sperm motilal eighty decrease continually between the ages of twenty and eighty. Okay Okay he said no man has ever died in childbirth. That is true from what I could find. There have been some trans men move had babies, but I'm going to propose also that a man has certainly died in childbirth. Tack. Watching it and then news over guys. That's what I was trying to look for. I truly could not find any stories about that, but I'm sure it's happened a stroke a heart attack actually I. Don't think this was childbirth but I. do have this horrible horrible story. My friends sister's friend. You call one of those sisters. True. So the mom I think was in the hospital or something maybe I wanna say having a baby, because it's pertinent to this, but I don't really know why. She was in the hospital, but the dad like rushed to the hospital. She was a doctor. You fucking massage, wouldn't that? She was not a doctor, she she could be issues. He's in a hospital and she's a woman. The woman was in hospital for a reason, and then the dad rushed to the hospital, and then got run over in the parking lot of. Yeah the husband because he was, he was not paying it because I think something horrible was happening with his wife or whoever we'd have to agree, it's the most ironic. But it's the status, yes, but and also if the mom died, I kinda think that happened. Wait now you think the mother I think the person that was in the hardest thing also just I just want to point out that you think the only way a woman could be in the hospital would be to be ill, and what I'm saying is that women are there as SA?.

Javadi
"sinclair" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

02:55 min | 11 months ago

"sinclair" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

"That's what we're paid to do as scientists, so you know sometimes you take it personally, but as I've gotten older, I've realized personal. It's just business. Yeah, yeah, that's an underpinning of peer. Review Right. You're not doing your job. If you're not critical of everyone, else's research and claims and yet, but it's tough career especially when you're young, no similar to your career as a young scientist. You don't know if you're GONNA. Make it and at a place like Harvard, your chances of staying are. Probably less than thirty percent, and you have to be the best at what you do and every time somebody writes all sinclair's full of it or whatever it. It really hurts because you could lose your job. Lose the city you live in. You have to move, but once you get tenure, which means you cannot be dismissed. That's a wonderful thing. Because all of that fear of getting kicked out goes away, and then you can just dream up this crazy stuff. And Actually George Church gave me the best advice of my career. He said once you get tenure. Just do the stuff you WANNA do. Do the do it, and that's what has led me here. I'm just doing what I WANNA do rather than what I think I should be doing. Yeah, well, I am so grateful. You're doing it now. A have I not thought of immoral conundrum that you want to bring up. Is there one that vexes you like I? Don't have a great response to that problem. It'll create. A. I'm hull kind of guy and I think humanity can solve any problem. It puts its mind to whether it's social or economical medical. I think the biggest one is that people may become more politically one direction of the older they get. Well it will look disheartening covid was it only had about a two week window where it was a political, and then it just everyone lined up, which was so discouraging. It is so so I'm I'm thinking how I'm going to do an experiment to test whether a mouse? Becomes more right wing left wing and then reversed the as I. Ask it to vote again. I have to imagine people are more liberal in their youth. Come more conservative right Faye are so a world with lot of older people, maybe more conservative, but then again. If you have your brain reset, who knows yeah, and if you're if you're journeys, not over. If there's things that are ahead of you, that alters all the things, well, he he's one. One of the benefits, which is if the politicians today we're going to see the twenty second century, I think they pay more attention to collaborate change. Yeah, exactly yeah, I totally agree now the question you hate the most got ask it. It's my responsibility. What is the window of this happening? If you had to say? How many years out is this? Is something I'm going to be able to do in my fifties or am I going to be doing it my seventies? Where will I be at right well? You're in your twenties right now. instead. forty-five. You're doing great, so it's always dangerous. Making these predictions because drug development is so hard and things fail, and the FDA makes things really.

George Church scientist sinclair Harvard FDA Faye
"sinclair" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

05:03 min | 11 months ago

"sinclair" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"Cell Treatments in that it was like so I was on one for arthritis. It's kind of your carpet bombing. The immune system right so then you're opening yourself up to infection on all these different things, but they've. They've slowly started kind of pinpointing which t cells they WANNA. Turn off, and it's getting narrower their focus and it feels like that's similar to this where it's like just honing in on exactly what we want to be activated and not yet well, they'll those a lot of luck involved. Right didn't have to work, but I'm talking to someone WHO's I want? Want I don't namedrop, but this is someone who you know, a wealthy individual a speaking to him the other day, and he said. How is it possible that there are these three genes? This is like a wormhole discovery. It shouldn't be possible for humans to do this. Why is it possible and my explanation to him? Was that I think a lot of species still have this system you chop off. A tale of a lizard grows back. You Chop off the limb of Salamander. It grows back I think that life has had the ability to regenerate, but we've lost that ability, and now we're rediscovering how to use. Oh my God. It's crazy. It's so fascinating, can you? Can you be very precise into how far back you go like at one point as we can be like I just want to be twenty-five looking for the rest of my life. Is that on the horizon? Can I pick my age I? Don't see why not leap built the system that we've used in mice at least and hopefully in the next two years will put into patients who have eye-disease. We built a system, so it's you can turn it on and off very easily, so in theory you could go back as far as you want. And then stop, and then age out ten years and go back another ten. Keep repeating. Ask How that actually happens process wise, are you taking some sells out and then adding some stuff like Chris? Bury type stuff and then putting it back in the body, and then that selling itself replicates and starts taking over. What are the mechanics of it? That's been done, but that's way too complicated. What we do is very simple. we, we have a domesticated virus, cold, an AV which is used in patients in the I in others. It's very safe virus, and it's a it's a delivery vehicle for jeans and that's. That's how crisper is being delivered into people? Now we use crisper. What we're doing is adding those three embryonic genes They have three names short for O. S. K., and.

Chris O. S. K.
"sinclair" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

01:52 min | 11 months ago

"sinclair" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"Armchair expert experts on expert. On Dan Shepard. I'm joined by what your new name. We just came up with last night two nights ago. Already pants. No, no, no, NO PLAN MONICA! Monica Monica Oh that's. Monica. Trying to say that three times a Mon-. Monica Monica. Monica Monica Monica macher Monica monocle. Hard. Oh, right? We have a show to do. We have a glorious expert today by the Name of David Sinclair. He is an Australian biologist and professor of genetics best known for his research on Aging and longevity mechanisms now gang I got interested in this off of a sixty minutes episode. You can't stop talking about it if I'm going to be honest well, the stakes are high. We're talking about living forever I can't think of a topic more interested in men living forever I'd. I'd really like to me to. Also. He has a PhD from the University of New South Wales Sydney and received the Australian Commonwealth prize he was hired at Harvard Medical School in Nineteen Ninety. Nine and he has a great book called Life Span, why we age, and why we don't have to, and he has a new book coming this year called just in time, the discovery of Serotonin, and how it will change everything. Do you ever when you were a kid Artemije? Smell well. We all do that just in time, just Justin. First Name Oh time second no. Future husband can't wait. Please enjoy. Mr David Sinclair. Supported by Mohan these days. There's no shortage of stressors that is for certain. We just found out today. The LA USD is saying no school in the fall. So you WANNA? Talk about stress pegged Max another half year of home schooling I can't do it well..

Monica Monica Monica Monica Monica David Sinclair Monica monocle Dan Shepard Australian Commonwealth Mon University of New South Wales professor of genetics Harvard Medical School Mohan Justin Sydney
"sinclair" Discussed on The My Future Business™ Show

The My Future Business™ Show

05:59 min | 1 year ago

"sinclair" Discussed on The My Future Business™ Show

"Inside. I'm sure he's going to steal this wonderful. It's Gary's. He's taken ownership. Now. I wonder given that you've talked about being a healthy individual. What is a typical day? Look like for you. Well, yeah, I I. Don't know if I, haven't. I can't even remember what day it is anymore. No, when you. Were part of the you know. The Corona thing didn't help us right because I had all and we didn't have our markers. For Oh this is Wednesday on Wednesday I do that. No, so that didn't help, but. but I try. I try to Exercise trying to be in shape I. You know I Still WanNa? Do I've done nine of these big mountains and I WANNA get to the tenth one and I don't know. It's getting more challenging, but that keeps me motivated to at least day in shape a little bit. This is more of a weekly thing, but my wife and I if anybody's listening, thinking about you know their marriage People always ask me what's what's kept. You guys going for forty four years know and. It's certainly not been perfect, but. You know or as I like to joke. They've been thirty eight of the happiest years of my life. But you know what keeps you going and I always say I'll tell you the number one thing for us. It doesn't mean as for everybody the number one thing for us is. We have made time for each other every week every week. Now that you can do that in a lot of little ways, and you should, but we have one day a week some years. It was a half day. It was all we could swing. Are All we could afford but right now. It's Thursday I can just take every Thursday. Announced Earned Times that I'm out of town or something comes up, but we always know that Thursday next long. Whatever's Day of the weakness case, Thursday yet. We're going to be of high can. We're going to be together. We might be running errands, but it's our day. Always have lunch. We always look each other in the eye and you know it's. It's not heavy. Heavy every time it might be You know one week, but it's. It's just good in it. We just kind of had sent this message. You're important enough that I will give you. We will give each other that time and we've had some of the coolest times you know in bad weather. It's museums and other weeks. It's a movie and sometimes it's A. Shopping trip and other times it's tightening trail and It's that's just been so essential, and that's what that's in our day our week at least on all right the basis. We're We're both big safe people we aren't. We Star faith. Our God a lot and so.

Gary
"sinclair" Discussed on The My Future Business™ Show

The My Future Business™ Show

04:09 min | 1 year ago

"sinclair" Discussed on The My Future Business™ Show

"Your words, they in business, they in marriages talk appointments. Almost! It's a great. It's a great question I. Will I do a number of these things I? A climbing show actually in Colorado that was kind of where they talked to climbers, and so you know that we could that really resonated, but yeah a lot of times might speaking deal I do in business and it's. It's leadership training, but what they asked me to do, is they talk about this? Because we got people who worked for us? Who are a mess and they've got? Finances are relationship struggles, or whatever and they don't know what to do with that, and they'll be better workers if they could get a hold of some of this kind of thing so. Some of what I do. That's part of my audience. A some of it is in the church faith community. Some of it's an education. I've been going to some rotary clumps of light. Social Groups and and and libraries I did a whole library team thing, and and you know, but they wanted to hear about this so. It's. It's Kinda where I'm at in this journey and you know you you. Things with helping people in business I don't know if this will be business or not. I try to you know, make a little money from it and We're we're trying to do. We're doing some other. got another consultant helped me on things, but yeah. They're all over the place and some of it's just individual. I, mean I'll be sitting in a waiting room somewhere and you just get talking to the person next to you and. All of a sudden they go here we are. We stop and think about what businesses in at its court about service and You are providing something that serves others so absolutely think there's an opportunity to I guess convert that value into a money exchange, or some sort of other value propositions, or and I think one of the missing links in a lot of leadership..

Colorado consultant
"sinclair" Discussed on The My Future Business™ Show

The My Future Business™ Show

05:40 min | 1 year ago

"sinclair" Discussed on The My Future Business™ Show

"Walk your journey a little bit. It's not GonNa sign an easy answer, but it might be helped so so yeah, it's somewhere down the road. We just finally said I to write this down. And? It was the easiest book in the world to right because it was in our soul, he's always just mentioned it. Yeah, yeah, we lived at we. You know I mean I could almost written the whole thing without any notes, and so it was fun. You know this whole analogy of climbing this mountain. It's just so helpful because you know we all know without doing just inherently that climbing amount is not an easy thing to do so using that idea, and and helping others I'm sure there have been so many people that have come back and get giving you fate back on just how wonderful and useful and practical the concepts in this book tell me. How did you feel? When you first out to receive accolades for this book. It was so great. I have a little blue respond that I've made up. It's a little narrow. One and people seem to like it, but it's on one side is. Climbing on the other little silences, the view from the top is worth it. And and I have hundreds of them and I give them away. I gave some this weekend and it's so fun because I was driving for lift for a while I was doing a number of things, and I would have almost every day. Somebody in my car, an interest start talking I didn't bring it up. You know like their bartender or I listen. They just start telling me stuff and I say well. I can't fix that, but here's a little something I learned I. Say present for you. Do what you want with it and I. Mean some of them literally are sobbing in the back of the car because they're going. You don't know how much I needed this today. Wow. That is worth the world I mean. If you're having a bad day that changes, you know that changes everything. I Gary with your wonderful wife. Harris this affected him on set to life. Yeah well the thing. Is that One? She is helped particularly a lot of women who are going through. You know a cancer a similar kind of thing. He's on the phone with them. You know she's sharing what what kind of chemo our? Stuff I, can't you know address potatoes and she says I've been there, you know hey I've been up that mountain. And so she's she's as big a helper as I am, and though she didn't write the book she's. She's often goes with me as she. We shares her side of the story, or she's just doing at one on one. That just been the lady I talked to across the street. We did not know. She. Illnesses, and Jackie's great help in that sign of Assay, so she's she's as much part of it as I am, and it's really that's so fun, but we do it together. We s wonderful. Thank you very much sharing a third. The saying a problem shade is a problem have defined that. Having somebody there beside you as a as a team as a partnership is has helped, you walk this difficult grote. It is and one of the principals, if I could share one and their couple that I put right at the top, and this is one of you. Don't climb alone. You know your your fool to climb a mountain by yourself and some do it. Well that's a great principle when you're going through a personal mountain and so yeah, Jackie I was her helper and she was mind, but you know other people you know we've. We've told them look. Don't climb by yourself. You don't have to have a hundred people know. Pick your people carefully. My wife had had a gal that would take her to some of her chemo..

Jackie I chemo Harris Gary Jackie
"sinclair" Discussed on The My Future Business™ Show

The My Future Business™ Show

03:14 min | 1 year ago

"sinclair" Discussed on The My Future Business™ Show

"About. Your book never quit climbing because it struck me as a very live driven experience, the timing was very interesting. Yeah. Let's talk about that. Sure, you bet well. I've I've I've a mountain guy I'm not a pro. I'm not an an Alex Ronald. You know I've never claimed L. Cap, but but I love the mountains since I was kid I tell that story in the book, and so we got Sir doing stuff with our kids I made one of my goals to talk about. Goals was to climb three fourteen thousand foot I wasn't that'd be three four thousand meter peaks. Before my son got out of high school. I WANNA. Do something as a dad with my son and we did that and we actually did a fourth one I did three with my daughter same idea, and then I did one with my wife, which was just for the whole cancer diagnosis, but I've had this phrase never quit climbing for a while, but But boy, it came alive when she got cancer that three months diagnosis after she did her first fourteen, or as they're called and we saw, so we started learning as we went through that and I'd love to say. We learned it right away, we didn't we? We learned as we went. Hey, we have to climb this cancer Malcolm because he was. was like Mount. Everest to us. We have to climb this cancer mountain same way we climb a regular mountain, and all of a sudden that started to be helpful. It didn't take the mountain away, but in the book. What I do is I start going through. What are the eight or ten principles that we learned from the real big mountains that we learned? Learned to to get through not just cancer, it could be finances. It could be relationships that could be grief What are some things that will help you because we've been up that mountain? What can we show you? That might be of help, and so you know we can talk about some of those, but that's the gist of the book. Yeah, that's wonderful. Again. Life is the biggest teacher I wonder. If we can I, guess jump to the middle, and and look at you and your wife on your journey, you have ascended and met that summit. You arrived at the top of this this journey At what point did you realize that? You know this was all going to be useful for you to put into a book. Yeah? Probably after the fact, you know, we we. We told the story and. Most of my books I have written because I've found myself saying the same things over and over to a lot of different people you know, and I thought well, if I speak on, it s great, but I can't cover the whole topic, so let me put this in a book or My neighbor just tonight about an hour ago. I was sitting out front, and he was telling me his story and I said you know. You guys readers. You know just WanNa. Make sure they'd like to read and I said I got a book for you. It's free given to here you go, and I signed it for them. Joke that they could sell it on Ebay, tonight. But. That was so fun to have that to say here. Here's something that just might help you..

cancer Ebay Alex Ronald L. Cap WanNa Malcolm Mount
"sinclair" Discussed on The My Future Business™ Show

The My Future Business™ Show

05:32 min | 1 year ago

"sinclair" Discussed on The My Future Business™ Show

"And welcome back to the my future business show today I'm on the line with mistake Gerri Sinclair and Gary No I. WE'RE GONNA. Be Talking about. He's journey with his wife and himself has mountain climbers, and in addressing some challenges that they've both vice throughout they live so with that being said we're going to the share Gary. Thank you so much. It's great to talk with you I love the idea of your show. Thank you so very much. Yes, it's a passion of mine, and you know talking about passions of saints through your your writing. That something very important. came out in your lives. which we can date diving to now for everybody's on the show today. Gary is a ladyship trying. He's a coach and. And motivational speaker, but our primary focus, which we can talk about leadership, and and those sorts of things later on in the coal, but today's primary focuses about his book. Never? quit climbing, but before we do that. Gary left to learn a little bit more about yourself where you're located. What you like to do in your time in those types of things, you bet well, we currently live in Indianapolis Indiana home. The indy five hundred race, and we have been grew up in the mid west and lived eight wonderful years in Austin Texas. Are Sabbatical from the snow as we like to call it. We have been married for forty four years later this month, We have two grown children A girl. Our son is in radio and public address. Announcing a daughter the mom, but does some photography and graphics, and we have six grand boys and land. There! And so yeah, so we're. We're candidate. That retirement stage of life, but we're not ready to do that. We've of committed ourselves to help people and. Some of that is the whole overcoming piece that I'm sure we'll talk about, but it's just A. It's stage of life. We're we're. Kinda got some freedom to do that. And so we're kind of seeing where it goes. Yes, thank you very much for the inside now. One of the things that just popped to mind areas when you were talking about retirement is. Humans need to be go set is what sort of goes I setting for yourself at this stage? Yeah I think one loss. Stay healthy, and of course everybody in the world has. Wrestling without one. We Yeah we you know our world has been education. Faith journeys faith. Jobs in leadership training and all that. And, but we've decided that at this stage of life we'd love to be able to have a little more freedom to just help other people whether it's overcoming. A mountain which we can talk about, but some of it is just dealing with life dealing with your marriage You know given some money away. We're not rich, but you know we want to share with what we have, so it's we're still figuring it out, and and we think that maybe what's going to happen is we're GONNA be sugaring it out until the day we die, and we're going to have a lot of fun doing it and.

Gary Gerri Sinclair Austin Texas Indianapolis Wrestling Indiana
I Predate the Home Computer with James Thomson

Mac Power Users

05:55 min | 1 year ago

I Predate the Home Computer with James Thomson

"I'm excited for. Today's show got an interesting guest we do. It's going to be so much fun. I was looking back to the archives were planning guests and I was like wait. This person hasn't been on. We should fix this, and so we we are joined by. The friend of the Internet I think I'M GONNA. Give Him that title Mr James Thompson. Oh thank you. It's a pleasure to be here. I was I was looking at? It's like yeah has taken five hundred thirty eight episodes. Feed to motors. I'm here and I I feel now. I feel really bad I just want I've joking that sounds like I've got a massive ego. I do have a massive. Massive Ego, but the funny thing is. We've talked about a on the show. I mean back. This shows I did with Katie. We should talk about you. I don't know. Maybe we just felt like you were unaccessible. You were like one of those people at the top with like two or three assistance, and we'd never get through to you. I I. Think I could not be further from the truth. Well James is the developer of CALC. And You've done of stuff with apple, and as an infant developed over the years and James. I'm really looking forward to talking today about some of your experiences. All I am hopefully. I've got something interesting to say so I. Know You do I. Know You do the question is? Will we get you to say it? Look I left Apple Twenty years ago I'm I feel like the statue of limitations has passed on? So I like that, too. So James I feel like we've known each other a long time. We have a shared interest in. Technology history, we have a shared interest in Lego if a shared interest in. Nerdy things for nerdy things sake. I feel like we are very much. Cut from the same cloth, but we want our listeners to get to know you a little bit, so give us a little bit of your background. Maybe how you made it to be the full-time developer that you are now I mean I guess. This sort of wettest star is right to the beginning I mean. It's like I'm old enough that I said of predate the home computer and My first sort of real computer experiences were had an extra neighbor who was at American from California, and he had an apple two, and this would probably be very early eighties, probably eight, hundred, eighty-one or something, and I would go round there and I play on the Apple. Two and I play all these. There was a game that I took took me about ten years to work out what it actually was, but it was getting Kobe mosque the son. Of. Text Adventure. Go North pickup. Thing type and That was really sort of my fomative computer experience but then in eighty three. I got my own home computer to as a commodore sixty four, and in the UK through a two rivals, there was the commodore sixty four and the sinclair spectrum. There were really other computers, but they didn't count. It was those two, and I chose the commodore sixty four, not really knowing anything between British American or anything, but I chose a commodore sixty four, because it seemed to have a slightly better version of Pacman, I mean this was like at the height of fever, and I think actually made the right choice. Because the Commodore had really Nice Graphics and signed. I mean really nice graphics in Nineteen eighty-three, but it did have this thing co compunet. which was UK only sort of. Proprietary E. A. O. L. Like online service. This was around eight, thousand, five or something, and it had mud's which are multi multi user dungeon, so basically multiply at text adventures, and it had a software uploads and downloads. US Demo Seen Aranda and there were a lot of game developers that I'd become aware of it to me a while to work out. All these things are actually created by people and There was a one developer cold Jeff Minter. Who wrote Oldies Games in the UK and is still right two games and He's the reason basically the island code because I wanted to write games like he wrote and. That was kind of like the stop, and then things rolled over time, and it was like that our school was the first school in Scotland to get a computer like one computer a half, and this was in one, thousand, nine, hundred, three, and this was. An ACORN BBC. Model B computer another British specialty, and when it arrived in the school, the teachers had no idea what to do with it. Because none of them I think had used a computer, so they put a call to the students and said and this was. I would be probably What's the three? It'd be about ten of the time and they said you know. Does anyone have a computer news anything to do this thing nor four of us that perhaps hand said yes. We are clearly the experts here. So we were brought in and we ended up teaching the teachers high to use this computer, and then teaching some of the kids in the lower years before school started, we had these computer lessons that we ran and we actually ended up having an office like four of us. A nice waiting like school kids in and we had an office in the school. Would sit in there and we had learned to program. We would listen to music and we would play. Video Games and. That was pretty much the entirety of my lost primary school year. This primary seven I know his whole different to your your times, but it was basically the seventh year of my school.

Mr James Thompson Apple Developer UK Kobe Mosque Acorn Katie United States Jeff Minter Scotland Aranda California E. A. O. L.
Nordstrom at Freehold Raceway Mall to Close Permanently

Fat Mascara

03:27 min | 1 year ago

Nordstrom at Freehold Raceway Mall to Close Permanently

"Is not earth shattering news but something happened last week. Like for. Some reason is really sticking with me the Nordstrom. We didn't report on this news last week but Nordstrom announced they were shuttering. I believe sixteen stores in the US because obviously we know a lot of companies are going through hard times Marcus filed for bankruptcy. J. Crew filed for bankruptcy retail is taking a huge hit but the NORDSTROM. I grew up going to every weekend at least every weekend really closed. Yes the Jersey Nordstrom the freehold raceway Raceway Mall Nordstrom. Now for anyone listening. That is like wow okay. Upscale retail store were closing. You spent your childhood in a in a Nordstrom. This is not exactly. You know wholesome consumerist. Here's what I have to say these. Are we all have memories like different places? This is where my mother and I could forget our cares for an hour or two on a weekend. Go to the clinic counter. Get OUR FREE GIFT with purchase. This is where I really forge. She know my interest in beauty. You know what I mean. Yeah like I would go with my mom. And then when I had my driver's license I would like go by myself and like hanging out with the Matt counter. I even took like a Nordstrom. Had like a Mac masterclass one day and it was on the top floor and the private room and I would leave talked about that. I've heard you talk about that class. I never knew where it happened. I thought it was like a the IDC at the plaza like being served like tea-and-crumpets. Like no it's where you got your view of beauty and the glamour that comes with completely and like I really just thought it was another world. You know you laugh because it's like okay. It was like a Jersey Mall unlike route nine like combat but like to know that this place is closing. All of these people are losing their jobs. Yes is so sentimental sentimental for me and it's like the end of an era but it's like I was texting my friends salary who is from Marlboro and like which the neighboring town to the free old at I was like I don't know why this is hitting me so hard. And she just said it really sinclair. She's not like a beauty crazy person like I am she goes. I'm really upset to she goes. I think it's like I'm just not ready for all of this negative change and it's the negative change from Cova. It's also you've talked about how you've been watching commercials from your childhood just for that feeling of nostalgia yes. This is a piece of childhood in a way that is just never. You can't get that back and whatever I have that feeling. It's like this weird existential feeling of like okay. No turning back now like moving forward things are different. Your mom now like it's an I get it I get it. It's not about the store and like the shopping experience. It's it's about the memories. I think yeah I was thinking like. Is anyone going to sympathize with me? Who doesn't have food in the fridge? She's husband are themselves. Those lost their job like nordstroms. Close No it's not about like where am I going to go? It's like when a piece your childhood and innocence disappears. I think for a lot of people in the last couple of months like that. Innocence disappeared for a lot of

Nordstrom Freehold Raceway Raceway Mall United States Jersey Mall Marcus Cova Marlboro
Sinclair Broadcasting Agrees to Pay Record Penalty to End FCC Probes

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:31 sec | 1 year ago

Sinclair Broadcasting Agrees to Pay Record Penalty to End FCC Probes

"One Sinclair broadcasting is paying the largest civil penalty involving a broadcaster in the federal communication commission's history the SEC says Sinclair agreed to pay forty eight million dollars and comply with efforts to close three open investigations involving its ill fated acquisition attempt of Tribune media stations in twenty eighteen Tribune media eventually terminated its merger agreement with Sinclair the largest owner of local TV stations around the country locally Sinclair owns WJAC V.

Sinclair Broadcasting SEC Sinclair
Sinclair Broadcasting Agrees to Pay Record Penalty to End FCC Probes

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:30 sec | 1 year ago

Sinclair Broadcasting Agrees to Pay Record Penalty to End FCC Probes

"Sinclair broadcasting will pay the largest civil penalty involving a broadcaster in the federal communication commission's history the FCC says Sinclair agreed to pay forty eight million dollars and comply with efforts to close three open investigations involving a feel fated acquisition attempt of Tribune media stations in twenty eighteen Tribune media eventually terminated its merger agreement with Sinclair which is the largest owner of local television stations in the country locally Sinclair owns WJW channel

Sinclair Broadcasting FCC Sinclair Wjw Channel
How do you prevent a coronavirus recession?

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

03:03 min | 1 year ago

How do you prevent a coronavirus recession?

"One find oneself today in the uncomfortable position of having to explain a hypothetical the White House. Promise the president himself in fact promise that we would have details today on what is administration might have in mind by way of Corona virus economic stimulus on the not misbegotten assumption. That this virus will hit the wider economy and potentially hard. So what do we know today? We know there's talk of relief for American oil drillers. We also know that relief item number one seems to be a payroll tax cut The first thing to realize is what's a payroll tax that Sarah Sinclair. She's professor of economics at the George Washington University in the US an players are required to pay a proportion of each employee's salary in taxes. Six point two percent to fund social security one point four five percent for Medicare that's part of our taxes that we see coming out of our paycheck and pay roll according to the Tax Policy Center. We all paid one point one trillion dollars in payroll taxes in two thousand seventeen. So the idea behind a cut. That's pretty clear. Get a lot of money and a of people's pockets quickly and hopefully out of people's pockets just as quickly in the form of that all important consumer spending however come a lot of times. They don't even necessarily know. Notice that additional money because it's a relatively small proportion of their paycheck in two thousand eleven president Obama cut payroll taxes by two percent giving families in average of a thousand extra dollars to spend a year before that the w Bush administration sent straight up checks to taxpayers which averaged about a thousand dollars both designed to boost sluggish economies. Today though the big worries a little bit different Nicole. Kaeding is the vice president at the National Taxpayer's Union Foundation. People aren't going to restaurants and are cutting back on seeing movies and not going to. The bowling alley is often not because of financial constraints. It's a public health. One all that social distancing and canceled events. They met her economically. Those restaurants and Bowling Alleys and movie theaters are going to see a decrease in demand decrease in customers in the short run but economics and the economy are complicated. Ain't nothing that happens in isolation. So here's Tara Sinclair from GW. One more time if we all need to cut back in order to protect the health of our society then we do need to rely on some fiscal stimulus to make sure that our jobs are there when we come back. Here's the thing about a payroll tax cut though. That gives some people a little pause in order to get the benefits of a payroll tax. Cut You have to be getting a pay check and getting a little money over time as in a slightly bigger paycheck every couple of weeks tends not to be as stimulative as a relatively larger amount of money all at once so there is that more to come on the corona virus stimulus plan as soon as Congress and the White House. Figure OUT WHAT IT IS. GonNa

President Trump Sarah Sinclair White House Tax Policy Center Corona Bowling Alleys Vice President Tara Sinclair United States Professor Of Economics George Washington University National Taxpayer's Union Foun Barack Obama Nicole Congress Medicare
YouTube TV: drop all sports channels please

Talking Tech

02:13 min | 1 year ago

YouTube TV: drop all sports channels please

"We're here to talk pocketbook stuff today on talking tech that you've heard me say over the last few months how concerned I am with both the rising cost of cable and streaming youtube. Tv cost thirty five dollars monthly in twenty nineteen. Now it's fifty dollars monthly. The reason all those sports fees that. I don't WanNA participate in so I found it rather bittersweet this week when Youtube announced it was dumping some forty two regional teams from its network due to excess pricing demands from Sinclair Broadcast Group. Which owns the streaming rights to games from the New York Yankees in La Kings for example? Good Move Youtube. But where does this leave us? I got some ideas. I'm Jefferson Graham. And you're listening to talking Tech Youtube. Tv is one of a handful of cable. Tv alternatives aimed at streaming fans. Who want to pay less for fewer channels than cable. I'm a youtube subscriber and the last I look. I'm still paying fifty dollars monthly for the service which as good as it is is still drastically overpriced. I liked it. I get the broadcast networks and the news channels but there are so many channels. I will never watch from cozy and Smithsonian to TNT TBS and especially the sports channels. I don't know where they are. I've never turn them on. Don't kill me but there's some of us who just aren't interested in sports and happened. Feel strongly that they shouldn't have to pay for it if they don't watch that's why I like Filo td a streaming service aimed at non sports fans with sells for twenty dollars monthly. How do they do it? No sports fees. Well that's all well and good but there's no news channels either and I need that so scratch. Filo Youtube decision to stand firm against the rising costs of sports is a good one but because it didn't lower the monthly fee doesn't help me so. I have an idea. Get rid of all the sports all of it. Put It on a separate here for the fan. Who wants the programming? Let me subscribe to Youtube for what I want. I'll be happy and not subject to the endless contract battles which nine times out of ten seemed to involve sports fees. I know I'm dreaming here. But it's my dream and I'm entitled to

Filo Youtube Youtube Filo New York Yankees Sinclair Broadcast Group Jefferson Graham La Kings
Get Comfortable Being Uncomfortable

Daily Sales Tips

02:21 min | 1 year ago

Get Comfortable Being Uncomfortable

"Came up with this tip in the shower in a very cold shower. I recently finished listening to the book. Lifespan by David Sinclair. This book is Super Fascinating. It's all based on some pretty cutting edge. Research on aging and the basic point is that the author believes that aging is actually a disease that is potentially curable fascinating read and David shares a handful of strategies that have been proven at some level to prolong a healthy life span. Things like intermittent fasting and cold exposure. The cold exposure piece was particularly interesting because the underlying issue seems to be that. We've gotten too comfortable. We keep our environments Nice and cozy and we don't really create much adversity for our bodies especially when it comes to extreme temperatures both hot and cold in order for your body to grow and adapt. You've got to get out of your comfort zone. And I think this is totally true in sales as well and have been thinking about ways that I can train myself to get more comfortable. Being uncomfortable are the things we can do on a regular basis. That scare us one of the things. I've been experimenting with in the Mornings to get into this. Mindset is these extreme showers my processes this I turn the shower onto a temperature that is hotter than is comfortable but I get in right away so for the first minute or so while. I'm waiting for the water to warm up. It's cold then it ultimately gets to be too hot as I go about the business of Washing. And then when that's done I turn the water all the way back down to his cold as it will go for the last minute or so as I rinse off. It's more of a mental challenge than it is a physical challenge because you get used to it pretty quickly. I'm actually finding it. I really enjoy that closing cold. Bit as I get relief from the heat and then breathe into the cold after five minutes or so. I get out feeling like I've actually accomplished something. It helps me get my head right and more open to finding ways to get myself into productively uncomfortable situations during the workday. Give it a shot whether it's this shower thing or making a few phone calls to people who totally intimidate you. I think you'll be really glad that you did.

David Sinclair
"sinclair" Discussed on WSJ What's News

WSJ What's News

03:34 min | 3 years ago

"sinclair" Discussed on WSJ What's News

"Flint is media and entertainment reporter for the Wall Street Journal, and he joins us via Skype from Los Angeles, Joe, this was a deal that would have Sinclair purchase Tribune, but it could only get approved if Sinclair spun off TV stations in the process. Were there problems regarding how Sinclair was proceeding on this front? Yes, there were Sinclair was very reluctant to want to spin off any of the properties either there's or Tribune to comply with TV ownership -regulation and the filings that they did make. To spin off stations were pushed back on by the FCC. The FCC felt that sin Claire wasn't being entirely candid about their spin off plans. There were questions about whether Sinclair would still control the stations. It was spinning off through the deals it had made because some of the deals it made has been off stations where with business partners of Sinclair. So all those things proved very problematic to the FCC. And in the meantime, Tribune was sitting here trying to get this deal done in growing increasingly frustrated by what they felt was Sinclair's unnecessarily aggressive and protracted negotiations with regulators over this issue. Now you write that last month. FCC chairman Ajit pie said he had serious concerns about Sinclair submissions as part of the agency's review. And he sent it to an administrative law judge. And that's us. The death knell for an attempted a merger? Yes, that's that's pretty much the FCC's way of saying they are not going to approve this deal, and then they move it over to a to a law judge and they were going to be issues again into what Sinclair had been proposing. I don't wanna get too down in the weeds, but I think I good example of one of the transactions that was giving the FCC headaches was in Chicago Sinclair offered to spin off the Tribune station. They are WGN TV, but the party that they were spending it off to is a business colleague of the Sinclair chairman, David Smith and the purchase price for the station that they were going to sell with sixty million dollars, which was way below market value for that station in the nation's third largest market. And the fact that Sinclair would essentially be in business with this licensee in the FCC felt would have. Facto control of the station was a problem for them. They thought you're getting too cute for us and this isn't gonna fly. That sounds like a flat out conflict of interest in sort of. Yeah. I mean, Sinclair he's been around a long time and they built their company through very aggressive deal making and relationships, and I've covered them a long time. So I feel comfortable in saying they will take the rules to the limit of snapping to to grow and they've been very successful. But this time around such a big deal, such disdain for the regulatory process, at least according to the Tribune that the FCC and the department of Justice was getting increasingly frustrated in basically said, this isn't gonna fly. Joe briefly tell us about these companies. Tribune owns mostly major market TV stations Sinclair on smaller market properties? Yes. In care is a family run publicly held..

Sinclair FCC Tribune station Sinclair purchase Tribune Tribune Flint Joe chairman Wall Street Journal Los Angeles Ajit pie WGN Claire David Smith Chicago department of Justice sixty million dollars
"sinclair" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"sinclair" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Three television stations or and six hundred fourteen channels that's eighty nine us marcus so chances are wherever you are in the country one of the stations you're watching could very well be a sinclair station so you've heard some of the outrage over the past week that sinclair bra sinclair at the top level requires some of its local stations in its anchors to to make sure to to read from certain things to do certain scripts and to make sure that they have certain stories that they push and this case this was a promotional spot that was being everyone was has been talking about this notion that basically there was a script that said that there's a whole bunch of unfair news out there there's not fake news but imbalanced bias in else news stories and so our job at this station at your local station is to make sure to tell you what's true what's real well then deadspin went along and did a caught up of all of these anchors saying the same exact thing put them together and basically made it seem like it's mind control all the whole the media all of these hundreds of stations are controlled by sinclair so therefore this is all just propaganda protrump it is the sinclair is conservative by the way so now what's come of this and by the way remember every outlet wants to advertise how fair they are and how they're loyal to the news and how much they want to make sure that they can sort through the information correctly everybody does that got some question about this is is this was just a mash up basically of all the sinclair anchors reading the same thing that was just saying about how they're honest and trustworthy so it's basically a psa for their own station was an advertisement for sinclair saying that we're we're honest and trust worthy so it wasn't about a specific story it wasn't anything along those lines just a promotional promotional about their ethics.

sinclair
"sinclair" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:22 min | 3 years ago

"sinclair" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Sinclair trying to expand their and as you say you anchor you say your fellow anchors can't speak i've seen some articles saying that the sinclair has some very restrictive contracts that they will be financially punished if they speak out against unclear why do you think these anchors read out this message because some people have to take remember back in two thousand one when this first happened they had you know a silhouette little emoji of a gun pointed at somebody's head at it's certainly not a gun it's a secretive gun because they know that if they don't do this while they may not be fired right away but a very difficult time getting their contracts renewed i spoke to a former colleague just yesterday talking about this and she was telling me she worked for a station that sinclair took over for ten years ten years as reporter anchorage station and never had a write up never had an employment issue but then all of a sudden they were just every little nitpick details and their issues of people that that they feel that even if this clause in the contracts which i'm sure you've seen some of them already been all over the media hand twitter have been unenforceable it would be prohibitively cost expensive to defend us you're working against deep pockets company against somebody who's maybe making fifty or sixty thousand dollars working on television they consistently destroy that employees even if the employee one in court and this includes credit this is a company with a market capitalisation of only about three billion dollars that sounds like a lot of money but put that in some degree of perspective jennifer red rock resorts which is a local casino company here in las vegas that owns the stations properties a local las vegas casino company has a higher market capitalization than sin players so they're doing this with a tremendous amount of financing and with that financing what they want is to consolidate their message and lower the cost if you look around it sinclair stations across the nation you'll find it's you if any are number one in their markets they really don't care about having the number one station the market they care about the economics of scale and with that economics of scale even with the controversy like this at their ratings drop five ten fifty.

Sinclair twitter las vegas reporter ten years sixty thousand dollars three billion dollars