24 Burst results for "Simon Sinek"

"simon sinek" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

06:27 min | 6 months ago

"simon sinek" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"Gold standard. They would rather have a medium performer with high trust, sometimes even a low performer with a high trust, over a high performer with low trust. You write quite extensively about the four primary chemicals in our body that contribute to all of our positive feelings. But I want to talk about the insidious nature of one of them, dopamine. It's highly highly addictive. Cocaine, nicotine, alcohol, gambling, and overeating, release dopamine. So it is texting, email, the number of likes we collect and what we refer to as the ding buzz or flesh of our phones that tell us we've got mail. Why does this provide a dopamine rush? I understand the cocaine nicotine alcohol, those all chemical components were putting into our body, but why did these interactions with gadgets do that as well? The comparison is best made to gambling, which is not a chemical report. The comparison is best made to gambling. So when you play a slot machine, we know what we're after, which is three 7s. Makes you rich, right? So you perform a behavior that gets you towards the thing that you want. You put a coin in the machine and you pull the handle. And you get one 7. That little. Like, oh my God, I nearly got it, right? That's dopamine. And so it makes hope. No. Okay. So what that does is it makes you repeat the behavior because you're getting close. You put another coin in the machine. And you get the bottom of one 7 on the top of another one. Or you get two 7s and a half of another 7. Oh, just missed it, right? And so what happens is you keep going, you keep going. Well, we all want to feel valued and we all want to feel loved. So when we get a ding, it's like, someone likes me, right? And that's what the texting does, that's what the likes do. That's what the buzz the beats. It's not the email per se. It's the inbox. You know, we all hate all the emails we get. What we love is the Bing, right? You can't help yourself. It's evidence. And we've all had it where if you're feeling a little depressed, you send out ten texts hoping to get one back, right? Because it makes feel good. But it's artificial, or at least a short term, it doesn't last. It's not artificial. It's real. It just doesn't last. It's very short term. Hedonistic treadmill. It is a bit of a hedonistic treadmill. Real, real relationships are based on trust and emotion and oxytocin and serotonin. The dopamine is just a short term hit, that's all it is. And so the problem is, is that there are too many things. It's not a bad thing. It's when it's out of balance. Like alcohol is fine, too much alcohol is bad, right? Gambling's fun, too much gambling is bad. Texting and social media, great. Too much of it can be destructive like any other addiction, like any addiction in time it will waste time waste resources and destroy. Relationships. There is a subconscious reaction when we put our phone on the table when we show up to meet someone for lunch or dinner. What it basically says is you're not the most important thing to me right now. And they can feel it. And turning your phone upside down is not more polite. No, it isn't. We've all had the experience where someone pulls out the phone when you're with them, and you either feel stupid or you pull out your phone. It's like an automatic response. Because it's horrible when we're with someone or my favorite is when you're talking to them and they're going and they say you're listening and they repeat back everything you said to them. That's not listening. Hearing the word that was spoken is not listening, listening is making someone feel heard. And that requires looking them in the eye and going, I hear you. Got it. Daydreaming isn't listening either if you're even if you're looking in their eye, right? So why do I especially with the digital natives now? Why are we behaving like this? So and this is one of the reasons it's contributing to the high rates of depression in young people. They're not practicing learning to make relationships because they're so include myself. We're so attached to the device. You see people walking holding their devices wherever they go, and now I start to see the younger kids, you can't see girls walk like this with their arms cocked and the phone right here. And guys walk like this. As if they're in the prone position ready to send a text. Not even at their side. It's like up and ready to go. But they drive with their phones in their hands. It drives with their friends on the hands, because again, it's an addiction. Now, let's go backwards. Almost all alcoholics discovered alcohol when they were teenagers. When we're very, very young, the only approval we need is the approval of our parents. And then when we go through adolescence, we change, we now start to need the approval of our friends and our peers. This is very, very important. Frustrating for our parents, but very, very important, because it allows us to acculturate outside our immediate families, and it doesn't change for the rest of our lives. It allows us to have friends outside our immediate families. And make relationships. It's a very tense and anxious, stressful time, adolescents. And some people quite by accident discover the numbing effects of dopamine in alcohol during this time. And it helps them overcome the stresses and strains of adolescents, and that becomes hardwired. And so for the rest of their lives, whenever they suffer financial career or social stress, they drink. Now let's look at social media and texting and all of these things. We don't recognize the addictive qualities. And so what we do is we allow people going through adolescence, free access to social media and texting, which is like opening up the liquor cabinet to our young teenagers and say, whatever you need whenever you want it. We limit the amount of alcohol people are allowed to consume because we know that they're addictive qualities and dangerous qualities. We restrict young people from having it because we know that, given their nature of their youth and how it works, it would get out of control very quickly. And so we try and manage it as best we can. But we have no restrictions or conditions or even recognition of the exact same problems with social media and texting. And so what you start to have now is an entire generation growing up addicts who associate their self worth with how many likes they get or how many followers they have. Where the ability to have difficult conversations is now gone. Forget about that people don't know how to date anymore. It's easy to get a date. You swipe right. But you know how to walk up to a stranger in a bar on the street and say you're very attractive. Do you come here often? What sign are you? It's hard. But the problem is it's a social skill. And this phenomenon of ghosting now. And it's not like you go in one date then you cut somebody out. There's too many stories of people who have been going out, dating for four or 5, 6, 7 months, and one of them decides they want to break up. They don't have a conversation and say, I don't think it's going to work. It's not you, it's me, or whatever line you want to use, they ghost the person. They stopped returning their texts. They stopped returning their calls. They blocked them on Facebook. They blocked the loans on social media, which for the person on the receiving end is like a death just happen..

depression cabinet Facebook
"simon sinek" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

06:44 min | 6 months ago

"simon sinek" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"Can manage a project, you can manage a company, but you lead people. You can't lead a company. You can run a company, you can only lead people. And you certainly can't lead from behind a desk and you certainly can't lead with email. It's a human enterprise. It's the same reason you can't parent just through texting. You can't do it. You can't be a coach of a baseball team with email. You gotta show up. You can't be texting while you. And the problem is leadership has become something that's done behind desks on spreadsheets. That's not leadership. Where are the leaders? You write in leaders eat less that you know of no case study in history that describes an organization that's been managed out of a crisis. And then you quote bob Chapman, CEO of Barry White Miller, who states no one wakes up in the morning to go to work with the hope that somebody will manage us. Every single one of them has been led. What are the fundamental differences between managing and leading? Because I think we are living in a culture now where they have almost become interchangeable. They unfortunately have become interchangeable. Just to repeat leadership as a human enterprise. It's not about being in charge. It's about taking care of those in your charge. It is the same responsibility as a parent or a teacher or a coach. They're all the same things. They're all leadership positions. Where you take responsibility that the people in your charge will learn confidence, gain a skill set, have the opportunity to try and fall and try again and discover that they are capable of more than they thought they were capable of. They can not do that without someone who says, I believe in you. They can not do that without someone says, I will teach you. They can not do that without someone who says, try again. It doesn't exist. And so that's what leaders are. And not everyone's cut out to be a leader, and that's okay. Leadership is very difficult, and it comes at great personal risk. That's why you have to the first criteria of being a leader is you have to want to be a leader. You can't just be promoted and taught your elite. No, that's not what it is. It's a responsibility. If you're going to speak out against injustice, if you're going to stand up to protect your people, if you're going to say no, there will not be any layoffs in my department if you need to save 10%. I'll save you year 10% but not at the expense of my people. You may lose your job. The risks are real. If you want to leave, you could get in trouble or the next or you may not get credit for the things you do. All of these things are real and the risks are real, and the time and energy that you're going to be asked to invest is real and you will not get that time or energy back once it is spent, it's gone. It's not like money. You know, you make money spend money you make more money, whatever. It's very hard work. Just like being a parent, the sacrifices that you will make for this child. For what? What's the reason we do that? Because the joy of seeing someone in your care. Do something beautiful, your 5 year old shares with your four year old. Your kid gets a graduate school, gets a job, gets promotion, gets married. All these performs on the show. All these little glimmers, and you sit back and you realize it was all worth it. Leadership is the same to see your team achieve more than you thought that then they thought they were capable of, that they will advance the organization further than you even imagine because they believe and they're grateful and they're inspired. It's all worth all the sacrifices. It always is. You write extensively about Charlie Kim, who's the CEO of a tech company in New York City called next jump. This is really quite moving to me. You describe how we ask if you had hard times in your family, which is why since you were talking about kids is reminded me of the part in the book. Would you ever consider playing off one of your children? And we wouldn't, Charlie implemented a policy at his company of lifetime employment at next jump. So if you get a job at next jump, you can not get fired for performance issues. In fact, if you have issues, they will coach you and they will give you support, just like we would with one of our children who happens to come home with a sea from school. And you challenge us to consider why we lay people off inside our organizations. But wouldn't a guarantee and this is just playing devil's advocate for a moment. It's not about firing your children. But when a guarantee of lifetime employment enable certain people to coast, isn't that why so many people have issues with tenure and academia? Let's be clear, it's not a charity, and they have responsibilities. And they have goals that they have to hit. If they don't achieve those goals, sometimes they move them around to get more coaching and get more. So there's still all of those things exist. And the reason Charlie implemented that was because they were coming close to their fiscal year and he noticed that the mood in the office had changed, that there was this weird tension and productivity went down. And when he pulled somebody aside and said, what's going on? And they said, well, they're afraid, because if they miss the numbers, they're afraid that some of them will get laid off. Because that's normal, right? And Charlie thought that was disgusting. And so the quickest way he thought to eliminate the fear was to eliminate the fear of the layoffs. Such an interesting he just announced that there will be no laughs. Now, the difference between next jump and most other companies, it is unbelievably hard to get a job at next jump. Because if you're going to give someone lifetime employment, you want to make sure that they are good fits for your culture. You want to make sure that the people who are going to work with them, like them. You're going to make sure that they're open to being coached that they're coachable, that they want to grow as human beings. It takes months and months and months to get a job at next jump, because they're really, really careful who they let in. Other companies because they lay off people so easily, you can have one or a couple interviews and two days later they offer you a job. Nobody knows each other. Nobody, they ask you a few questions, looked at your resume compared to your resume to someone else. Maybe I had a cup of coffee and you had a good day. Like, we don't know that they're good people. We just know that they're good interviewers. You know? And we're like, well, if it doesn't work out, we just let him go. No, no, no, no, because it's not an option. Next jump hire is very carefully. And so if all companies, let's say if it was against the law, to lay people off to save numbers. You'd see that the HR policies and the hiring policies the company's implemented would be drastically different. It would work just fine. Would people coast? Of course, people would coast. There's always there's always a couple, just like in the system that we have now that there are people who are politicians who will stab each other in the back or blame someone for something because they don't want to put themselves at risk for layoff. Which would you rather have? Somebody who coasts a little bit as long as they don't get in the way, or somebody who actively destroys your culture to save themselves. I mean toxicity, you know? And by the way, that's the definition of a toxic leader, a high performer with low trust. I learned that from a navy seal. Interesting. High performers with low trust are toxic leaders. The navy seals one of the top performing organizations in the world and what they do would rather have we all want high performance with high trust..

Barry White Miller bob Chapman Charlie Kim Charlie baseball New York City navy
"simon sinek" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

05:18 min | 6 months ago

"simon sinek" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"And so we were bringing wounded servicemen back from Germany back home. It was about 30 something who did warriors of which there was one marine and what they call seacat, which is critical care, and they have a team of doctors devoted to that one patient. I mustered up the courage to go back and talk to the docs. And he was in an artificial coma. His buddy stepped on an IED and was killed. He took the shrapnel he had two broken legs two broken arms, shrapnel and his chest punctured eyeball broken eye socket. I'm not seeing a body like that before. And the docs were amazing. They walked me through and told me about his wounds, and about all of the critical care innovation that was happening from these kinds of things. In other words, that we're making their way back to civilian hospitals. Even when they're injured, they're still giving back to us. The doctor happened to be a reservist out of Austin. He works in an ER in Austin. And having just gone what I had gone through the past 24 hours, I asked him a question. I don't think I ever would have asked him ever before, which is you're a good guy. You save lives every day for a living. I said, do you have a different sense of fulfillment on these missions than you do back home? And he said, there's no comparison. He said, back home, 90 to 95% of the people who come through the ER either drunks or idiots. That's what lands them in the ER in the first place. He says there's not a single drunk idiot here. He says the honor I have of taking care of these people does not compare. It changed me. It affected me. I became obsessed with trying to understand where that kind of deep sense of trust and love and loyalty and desire to take care of each other comes from. It's not like that in private sector. I mean, occasionally, you know, we call each other coworkers or colleagues. They call each other brother and sister. And it's not polite. It's how they view each other. It's not that they sacrifice. You know, we thank them at the air force. Thank you for your sacrifice. No. It's for their willingness to sacrifice. Thank them for their willingness to sacrifice, because we are not willing they are. We all have to make sacrifices sometimes and sometimes we're forced to, they choose to. None of us choose. Do you think I chose to go through depression to find the why? No way. They choose to put themselves at risk. They choose to leave their families. Their families choose to live this difficult life. Because they believe in something bigger than themselves. And so leaders eat last was born out of this experience. My desire to understand where trust and cooperation came from. Because I thought it was the people, and I learned that it's not. It's the environment. And if you get the environment right, that kind of intense trust and cooperation can exist in any organization anywhere in the world. And that's what I tempted to try and dissect. It's a remarkable book. I was astounded to read that only 20% of Americans love their jobs. That means 80% don't. Correct. And that also feels like an epidemic. Yeah, it is. And it's the responsibility of leaders. It's not the people's responsibility. It's the leader's responsibility. Leaders set the environment and people respond to the environment they're in. Fact, right? And that's why leaders matter because somebody has to create the environment. And the vast majority of business and corporate environments that exist today are very poorly led. We are living the side effects of decisions that were made in the 80s and 90s. These were boom years in the 80s and 90s, and the business techniques and strategies that they've developed were fine for those times and they were good for short term gains. Things like shareholder supremacy was a theory proposed in the late 1970s. The concept of using mass layoffs to balance the books. 1981. Okay. Only started in the early 80s. It did not exist prior, only under extreme circumstances, but it wasn't normal, and it wasn't used so quickly, well, we've had a bad year, so we're going to have to have layoffs. Think about that. You're going to send someone home to say, I can no longer provide for my family, but to the company missed its projections. What are you kidding me? But this is the world we live in. In other words, what we've done is all of the theories that Jack Welch pioneered in the 80s and 90s don't work in this environment. And by the way, GE needed a $300 billion bailout in 2008. That's called an unstable company. That company was built for short term gains, and that's what they got. And the problem is, is we are now living in a world in which those conditions are different. They are not boom years. We face external threats that are real, terrorism and the like, the world is different, the world has changed. Business has changed and those theories will not work and the problem is we're still using them. And we've created corporate and work environments, in which people do not feel safe, where trust is not the norm, where we're willing to sacrifice people to save the numbers, and as a result, people come to work and they feel uneasy, stress is high. People are always talking about work life balance. That has nothing to do with how much yoga you do. It has nothing to do with the free snacks that they give you. Work life imbalance means I feel safe at home and I don't feel safe at work. That's what it means. We need to change it, and it's the leaders who have to change the environment. We have to demand it. We have to demand that they lead properly that they no one wants to wake up to be managed we want to wake up to be led, and we need to demand that our leaders lead and stop managing. I actually want to talk to you about the difference between managing and leadership. Leadership is human, management is structural..

Austin coma Germany air force depression Jack Welch GE
"simon sinek" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

04:32 min | 6 months ago

"simon sinek" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"Then. And he went to the gym. Thinking I was asleep just because my eyes were closed, he turned off the light. And I lay in that bed, my mind racing. All I wanted to do was go home. I regretted being there. I regretted saying yes, I didn't want to be a part of it anymore. And I was completely helpless. I was completely paranoid. I was depressed. I was living a life compressed into 24 hours. And the strange thing is I had a great day. And I started to realize that this is what it means to live an unfulfilling life, where we confuse happiness with joy. We confuse excitement with fulfillment. We confuse winning a big business or getting a big salary or getting a promotion with actually being fulfilled in the work that we do. We can confuse those. Because I had an incredible day. I had an experience that most people will never have in their entire lives. It was amazing and exciting and fun and I didn't want to wake up and do it again the next day. I just didn't want to do it. I'm in the purpose business. And so I realized that one of the reasons I felt this way was because I didn't have a sense of purpose. I didn't have a reason to be there. So I started to invent one. You're here to tell their story and come back home. Lastly for like 5 minutes and then it would Peter out and I was paranoid and depressed and hated everything again. And so I gave up. I lay in that bed completely depressed, and I gave up. And I decided that if I'm going to be stuck here, I might as well make myself useful. And I decided that I would volunteer that if they wanted me to speak, I would speak anywhere as many times as they like. I'd met some amazing people while I was there, and I wanted to help them. So I decided that if I was going to get stuck there, I would volunteer to help. I would carry boxes. I would sweep floors. It didn't matter to me how menial the labor was. I wanted to serve those who served others. Upon this decision, I felt fine. This amazing calm came over me. I was even excited to stay. It was amazing. This is what purpose is. It's the desire to serve those who serve others. And that's what gave me this column. As if it were a movie, the timing was uncanny, hadn't having just come to this conclusion. The door flies open, major throck Morton walks in and says, I got us on a flight. There's been a flight that's been redirected. We can get on it if we leave now. We have to leave now if we don't leave now we'll leave with that as we got to go now, where's Matt? And I'm like, he's at the gym. So we run to the gym. We get mad after treadmill. We've run back there's no time frame to shower. He puts on his uniform, we grab all our stuff, and we literally run out of the door. We make our way to the flight line, and we can see the plane we're supposed to get on a big C 17 sitting in the middle of the tarmac as we're walking up to it the security comes down and we're not allowed out to the plane. Why? As it turns out, there was a full and soldier ceremony happening somewhere else on the base and out of respect. Everything stops while it happens. And so they wouldn't allow a flight operations to happen or anything to happen at this moment. And so we sat on the curb and we waited. And I told the guys what I went through in the bed just moments before. I cried like a baby as I relayed the story. And there's one thing a lot of people don't realize about the military, which is crying is just fine. Interesting, I did not know that. As soon as the security cordon went up, we walked out to our C 17. We would be the only three passengers aboard this empty aircraft and the crew of course. But we were the only three outsiders. The reason the flight was redirected is because we would be carrying home the soldier for whom they just had the ceremony. And so we stood on the plane and the soldiers brought on the flag draped casket. They placed it in the middle of the aircraft. We all stood at attention while those soldiers gave a slow 8 count salute. They turned off the aircraft and walked off, and we could see them hugging and crying as they walked out of sight. They are forced crew got to work in strapping down the casket to the aircraft. It was a 9 and a half hour flight back to ramstein. And I slept this far away, a few feet away. As soon as we got into the air, we all staked out a piece of real estate. So we could get some sleep laid out our sleeping bags on the floor of the aircraft. And I slept four or 5 feet away from this casket going back to Dover in a back to where we started. And on every other flight we talked we joked, barely a word was spoken on for 9 and a half hours. On every other flight I visited the cockpit and hung out with the crew. I didn't visit the cockpit once. And I'll tell you it was one of the proudest experiences of my life. Because having just had that experience that I had, I had the great honor of bringing someone home who understand service way better than I ever will. It affected me, you know? Our final mission home was what they call an AE mission, which is aeronautical evacuation. Which means flying the wounded home..

Morton Peter Matt ramstein Dover
"simon sinek" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

07:27 min | 6 months ago

"simon sinek" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"People treat you differently, it's a way of saying thank you. We admire you. You inspires you give us direction. Whatever it is. We line up millions of people with hundreds of thousands of people line up to see the Pope. It's gratitude that you would stand in those crowds for a glimpse. And so he comes out in waves to say thank you. But the Pope is a great example and you give a great example about how easy it would be for us as a culture to pay mother Theresa or Martin Luther King, the kinds of massive salaries that we pay some of the CEOs that ultimately ran our banking system into the ground. And so I guess what for me feels heartbreaking is that we seem to be so willing to bestow this rank on people whether or not they deserve it. Well, we've confused rank with leadership. Right. They are not the same thing. I know many people who are very senior in organizations who are not leaders. Right. We do as they tell us because they have authority, but we would not follow them. Right, and lots of people carry their bad. Exactly. And the problem is, is that all of the things that people give us are not free. They are gratitude for something we give them. And so when leaders forget that it's a balanced equation. That's when we start to become disillusioned. So as you said, the reason we have contempt, visceral contempt for some of the banking CEOs and other CEOs with their vastly disproportionate salaries and bonus structures has nothing to do with the money our anger is not about the money they receive. It's that they have violated their very anthropological responsibility as a leader, which is to take care of their people. We know that some of those leaders allowed some of their people to be fired or laid off, so they could keep their ridiculous salaries or bonuses or worse, they chose to sacrifice their people to keep their bonuses or salaries. There was a few years ago city bank announced record high layoffs, the exact same year they announced record high average bonuses. That's weird, you know? Or the companies who pay huge bonuses to the CEO when the company does badly. I thought they believe in pay for performance, you know? This is when we become angry or disillusioned or when they're strife. But when a leader upholds that responsibility, then we're totally fine. As you said, no one would have an objection to giving Martin Luther King a $150 million bonus, or Gandhi a $250 million bonus, a Mother Teresa, 200 million, we'd find with it, because we know that they lived their life in service to the people in their charge. People they cared for. Leadership is not about being in charge, leadership is about taking care of people in your charge. It goes back to the ceramic cup story, which is when you understand that the ceramic cup is being given to you out of gratitude for the service that you offer to the people in your care, then you can continue to enjoy the perks understanding that they are their expressions of gratitude, just that when someone gives you a birthday present, go ahead and enjoy it. Say thank you, be grateful and enjoy the new sweater. There's nothing wrong with enjoying the gifts that people give us. But we have to remember that they don't come for free. The perks of leadership are not free. They come at great personal sacrifice for the person who's in that leadership position. And the personal sacrifice is, I would willingly sacrifice my interests to take care of the lives of the people in my care. That's the deal. What motivated you to write leaders eat last why some teams pull together and others don't? I went as a guest to the United States Air Force to Afghanistan. I was doing some work with the mobility forces. Those ones who all the big heavy planes, anything that doesn't drop a bomb basically. So the tankers, the cargo planes, even Air Force One, they're all part of the mobility forces. And the general in charge said, you know, Simon, you've gotten to know is quite well. I'd be really honored if you would go and see our men and women perform their duties in theater. Would you be willing to go to Iraq or Afghanistan? So I said, sure. I didn't tell my parents because I didn't want them to worry. I told them I was going to Germany, true. I told them I was going away with the air force and would be out of touch for a while. True. I just didn't tell them I was going on to Afghanistan. And it was a very intense trip to say the least. I had no responsibilities there I was going as an observer. And they wanted me to fly on a bunch of different missions. And I went with two escorts, two officers who accompanied me. We left from Dover Air Force Base in Delaware and flew to ramstein, Germany, and then caught another plane and flew to Bagram Afghanistan. We landed, and we were on the ground for ten minutes. This was the middle of the night. And the base came on the rocket attack. While we were still on the plane, three rockets hit a hundred yards off my nose. I didn't know that. I heard one rocket come in, and we heard the sirens blaring and the instructions to go to a safe location. We were told to stay on the aircraft. None of us put our vests on our bulletproof vests because what would be the point we're in a plane filled gas. And I was strangely relaxed. I don't know why. Really? Yeah. If anybody who's ever been to a war zone will know that you have all of the emotions you would expect to have, you just don't have them at the right time. My panic came later. So we got off the plane, we're finally given the wall clear. We found an AirDrop mission that was leaving first thing in the morning, which is great. So we got about two and a half, three hours of sleep, and then we got a bright and early to go do this AirDrop, which was an amazing experience. We flew out on a big C 17 cargo plane about an hour and a half, two hours out to the middle of the country, dropped down to 2000 feet, the back door is opened and we watched all the cargo slide out the back and parachute down to resupply an army forward operating base. It was incredible. And then we flew back to base, and now we could leave the country. We've done our primary mission. The problem was, there were no planes leaving. We couldn't get on a flight. And it was only Saturday and the next plane that we could maybe get on because it's not a guarantee. Would be Tuesday. Every fiber of my body sank my breath sank my muscle sink. And that's when the panic and the paranoia started to come in. My parents would now not hear from me. What am I going to do? Call them and say, hey, my Afghanistan, I'll be home a little late, you know? And I became unbelievably self involved. I became obsessed with one thing and one thing only, my safety, my comfort, my security, and I didn't care who had to twist themselves and not to get me what I wanted. I remember the feeling. I remember talking to a public affairs officer. He said I can get you on a flag to Kyrgyz, but you don't have the right Visa. And I literally pointed my finger in his face and said, you get me on that plane. Now, I don't talk to people that way, and I could see myself. I could feel myself being that person that we've all worked for in our lives. The person who only cares about their promotion, and their advancement, and they don't care how many knives in our back that they have to climb. I was becoming that person and I could feel it. We went back to our quarters and I lay down and my head was racing. I became absolutely paranoid. I was convinced there was going to be another rocket attack, and I was convinced it was going to land on me. I mean, I was convinced of it. I was convinced that my parents would find out that I was in Afghanistan when an airman went and knocked on their door, convinced. I closed my eyes, but I couldn't sleep because my mind was racing. One of the officers I was with major throck Morton, he said, I'm going to see if I can find us another flight and he left. And the other guy was with lieutenant colonel Wyatt. He said, well, I'm going to go to the gym then. And he went to the gym. Thinking I was asleep just because my eyes were closed, he turned off the light. And I lay in that bed, my mind racing. All I wanted to do was go home..

Afghanistan Martin Luther King Theresa ramstein Gandhi Teresa United States Air Force Germany Dover Air Force Base Bagram Air Force Simon air force Delaware Iraq paranoia army
"simon sinek" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

07:51 min | 6 months ago

"simon sinek" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"Why how great leaders inspire everyone to take action, which became a New York Times Best Seller and you also gave a TEDx at puget sound that has ended up becoming the third, either the second or third. It was second. And the wonderful Amy Cuddy her talk is spectacular. Yeah. She's number two. And I love that. Becoming the third most popular TED Talk of all time. And you did this all without a publicist and initially you had very little press coverage. It really was very organic. It's continued that way. I mean, neither of my books have ever reviewed by any major newspaper. Why? I don't have a publicist. The publisher does some work, just that's what they are marketing. They do some marketing when the book first comes out. So I did do an interview on CBS this morning for leaders eat last. But my work spreads organically, people share books with people they want to share it with. I'm very proud of that. It's because these books are statements of what I stand for in their statements of visions that I have for the world we live in, and those who share this vision read the book and share it with people who they want to inspire. And I'm I like that. I only have one more question. I want to ask you about start with why, because I do want to talk quite a bit about leaders eat last. And gendy, yes. And start with why you talk about how we make decisions based on what we think we know. What's wrong with thinking like that? We all think we're experts, but we know so little information. And so we can only make decisions based on the information we have, but what if you only have a limited amount of information? This is why I like vision. And the concept of why and looking way, way, way far ahead, because what that does is it gives you a north star. It's like going hiking, and only making decisions based on the boulders and trees and terrain you see in front of you. You'll eventually walk in circles or go in some direction you don't want to go in. Where if you know you have to go north, you have to go north and the boulders and the trees are simply obstacles to move around. And so you definitely don't walk north. I mean, our careers don't go in straight lines. What does? Not exactly. Our careers don't go straight lines, but you have to have a sense of the direction. You have to have a sense of north of why. And that allows you to change course but come back to course. And so making decisions based simply on what you know is like hiking based on what you can see. It doesn't work. In the short term, you think you're making progress, but eventually you'll find yourself lost. Well, interesting metaphor you write about how leadership is an act of being a compass that leaders must base their actions, thoughts and words off of the organization's why, even if it comes down to the way you refer to the business. How so? You can tell when someone has a sense of purpose because it permeates out of every poor of their being every word that they speak. I'll just use myself as an example. I actually write the word inspire on my computer, and I have a picture of Martin Luther King on my desktop at home as the background and Star Wars. You know, I love the color orange. I talk about inspirational stories. It sort of like, you know what I stand for, even if I don't tell you what I stand for because it's everywhere. And I think people with a sense of purpose requires they can't help themselves. They dress that way. They act that way. They make friends that way. They like the movies that reflect that. They're like the books that reflect that. They're drawn to people who reflect that. And they tend not to go to people who just serve them, but rather people who can work together, you know? This is what authenticity means. The big joke of authenticity is that, again, going back to what I was saying before, you know, companies hire consultants to help them be more authentic. That's hilarious to me. You know? It's absurd. It's like asking your Friends, tell me how to be more like myself. Right. I don't know, just give yourself. The whole concept of authenticity is knowing who you are, being okay with who you are and taking pride in who you are. As is. I know. And letting who you are, show up everywhere possible whether you're a person or your company. It's the same thing. After the publication of your book and your first TED Talk, how did you manage the nearly global popularity and recognition? What a change. It's very humbling. When people would recognize me on the street and stop me and be like, what? And it was always amazing how people started to treat me differently. When your junior and you think differently, they think you're weird. When you are senior and you think differently, they think you're unique. I'm still the same idiot that I was. Nothing has changed. I'm exactly the same person. The difference is people stop calling me weird and started calling me unique. So you get the ceramic cups. Yeah. But I'm fully aware that I'm still a creative weirdo misfit. I'm fully aware of that. And so even now I'm intellectually aware that people know who I am, but my life hasn't changed. I'll be honest. It's the same. I'm filled with gratitude. And when anybody stops me or treats me differently, it actually makes me want to work harder because they're looking to me for something and I have to continue to serve. So quite frankly, any recognition or change in how I've been treated that I've gotten over the past few years has only reinforced and inspired me to work even harder towards the vision that I so believe in. Do you ever worry about losing this ramen cup? And if you could because it's a really extraordinary tell the story. About the former secretary general. It was an undersecretary of defenses. Sorry. Sorry. It was an undersecretary of defense who was speaking at a large conference about a thousand people. And he was standing on the stage giving his prepared remarks and he took a sip out of a cup of coffee that he had in a styrofoam cup. And he stopped and looked down at his cup and he looks out at the audience. He says, you know, last year, when I was still the undersecretary, I spoke here at this exact same conference. They flew me here business class. They had somebody to pick me up from the airport. They drove me to the hotel, someone had already checked me in and they walked me up to my room. I came down the next morning. There was someone waiting in the lobby to take me to the same venue. They took me through the back entrance, took me to the green room and offered me a cup of coffee in a beautiful ceramic cup. He says, I'm no longer the undersecretary and I flew here, coach. And I took a taxi from the airport to the hotel and I checked myself in. I came down to the lobby this morning and took another taxi to the venue. I walked in the front door, found my way to the backstage and asked someone if they had any coffee and he pointed to the coffee machine in the corner. And I poured myself a cup of coffee into this here, styrofoam cup. He said the lesson is the ceramic cup was never meant for me. It was meant for the position I held. And once I left the position, they'll give the ceramic cup to the person who fills the position. And I think it's the most profound leadership story, which is as you get more senior life does get easier and better. People give you gifts, they call you CERN mam, the whole door is open for you, you get upgrades, you get more money. People do the nice things and it's really good when we gain some sort of rank or celebrity or whatever form it takes. People are so nice and you get so much. But when you're out of the job, they'll give it to the next person. You deserve none of it. And I think it's really important for people to remember that all of the gifts and good will that people bestow on us is not meant for us. It's meant for the position we hold or the thing we stand for. It's something a little bit heartbreaking about that. No, I think it's absolutely beautiful, because what it does is it means we're all equal. And what it means is every single one of us has the capacity to serve and give and be treated in a way that people are expressing gratitude. That's what that is..

TED Talk Amy Cuddy puget New York Times CBS Martin Luther King CERN
"simon sinek" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

05:38 min | 6 months ago

"simon sinek" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"Way more competition. If you start a business in lean years, it's much harder to find clients, but there's no competition. Pick your poison. There's no difference. They both come with their advantages and their challenges. And the fact that I did it right after September 11th was part of it. I have to September 11th. I had trouble going back to work in advertising because I felt my job was stupid. Tragedies like that sort of force you to have a lot of perspective. And I really struggled to make ads to sell stuff I didn't care about. So when you started synap partners, what was your intention what kind of work did you want to do at that time? I cared much more AI cared much more about strategy. And even back then, my interest was internal inside the company. I never understood why when companies wanted to present their brand to the outside world, they would go as customers what they wanted. It never made sense to me. As a strategy guy, it made sense to me to go ask the employees who you were and what you stood for and what you believed and what you had in common and who you are when you're at your natural best and then share that with the outside world. And so I was very different in the way I approach brand strategy, which is I actually spent more time talking to employees and some customers rather than only customers and no employees. You know, it's really funny having this conversation, you start to see the pieces of the puzzle come together. It's fun. In 2009 or thereabouts, you really exploded via public speaking. Had you been doing quite a lot of public speaking prior to that? Had you been presenting to different groups organizations? How did you get to the place where you were invited to be a speaker at a TEDx conference? As a friend of mine said it takes a long time to become an overnight success. Right? Yeah. The 25 years. I don't remember who said that, but some vaudeville just said that. Yeah, I had been giving the golden circle the why speech for three years. I first articulated it in January of O 6. Oh my God, it's nearly ten years. And so I'd been invited people kept inviting me. It started off just the history is kind of beautiful, I think. It's very organic. It was never a commercial or academic exercise. I had lost my passion for what I was doing. I know you wrote in the preference. I'd like to share this with our listeners. Sure. He wrote in the new preface of the book that when you first discovered this thing called why, it came at a time in your life when you needed it. It wasn't motivated by an academic or intellectual pursuit. You had fallen out of love with your work and found yourself in a very dark place. Yeah, that's true. And superficially I should have been happy. You know, I had my own business. I had fantastic clients. We did fantastic work. I made a living, and superficial I should have been fine. I was living the American Dream, except for the fact that I didn't want to wake up and do it again. And so I kept that to myself because I was embarrassed. I was embarrassed complaining that, oh, I'm unhappy, you know? I'll let privilege. Exactly. And so I kept it to myself and I pretended that I was happier, more successful and more in control than I felt. And that is unbelievably stressful. Isn't that an epidemic, though? I think so. And I think that gen Y suffers even more than I did because of social media that we're constantly comparing our lives to the curated filtered lives that people put up on social media. And by the way, my Friends are never a good-looking. My vacations are never as great. My weekends are never as good as my food. And so we know there's good research on this that people who spend more time on Facebook, for example, suffer a higher rates of depression than people who spend less time on Facebook. Well, they're calling Generation Z now generation D standing for depression. Yeah. And so the pursuit of this thing called the Y started because a friend of mine came to me and said I'm worried about you. Really? And when you have someone who cares about you, offer you that safety net. It gives you courage to solve your problems. That gave me the courage to not only talk about and figure out what was going wrong with me. And would talk to her on a regular basis in private of the struggle. And that's when I discovered this thing called the why. And it completely restored my passion to levels I'd never experienced. And of course I did what anybody would do when you discover something beautiful you share it with the people you love. I shared it with my friends. And my friends would want to share it with the people they love. The way the speaking started, I would literally stand in someone's apartment in New York City. You know, the people would sit on the floor around the bed and I would talk about this thing called the Y and I would help people find their why on the side for a hundred bucks. That's how it all began. So for my listeners who might not have read start with why should they start with why? So every single organization on the planet even our own careers always function on the same three levels. What we do, how we do it and why we do it. It's based in the biology of human decision making, it's not my opinion, it's just the way it works. Every single one of us knows what we do. It's the products we make. It's the jobs we perform. It's the obvious stuff. Some of us know how we do it. It's the things we write in our resumes. It's the things that we think make us stand out from everybody else who does what we do. But very few people can clearly articulate why we do what we do. And by why I don't mean to make money or get a job, those are results. By why, I mean, what's your purpose? What's your cause? What's your belief? Why do you get out of bed this morning and why should anyone care? And those who not only are the most inspired, but have the ability to inspire those around them, all have clarity of why. This is what draws us to them. And so this is what I was able to do, fill in a missing piece of the puzzle. And you very quickly after that got a book deal. No, it wasn't quickly, it took three years. Okay. So in 2009, two big things happened. You published start with.

depression Facebook New York City
"simon sinek" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

06:59 min | 6 months ago

"simon sinek" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"Sinek, welcome to design manners. Thanks for having me. The first question I want to ask you is about your desk at work. Do you still have a Star Wars figurine on your desk to remind you of the importance of the rebel spirit? I do. So can you tell us a little bit more? Who is the figurine of? It's a little bust of boba Fett. And so why do you have that there? You know, he sort of marches to the beat of his own drum. Why not Yoda? Well, I don't relate to Yoda. I don't see myself as an elder statesman. I don't see myself as the wise one. I sort of see myself as more like Han Solo or boba Fett of these rebel spirits. Plus he's just cool. Are you excited for the upcoming release? It would be a lie to say no. I already have my tickets. Yeah. It's gonna be good. It's gonna be great. I cried at the I cried at the preview. At the review yeah, JJ Abrams and Star Wars. It could be a better combination. It's good. You were born in England. I was. But before you ended up in high school in New Jersey, you moved to South Africa, London and Hong Kong. What did you move around so much? It was my dad's job. What did he do? He worked in marketing for standard brands, which was later bought by nabisco. So shredded wheat and kiwi shoe polish that kind of stuff. Interesting combination of products. I mean, you know, packaged goods. So the family moved around, and it was a pretty great way to grow up. You know, lived on four continents by the age of ten years old. People always ask me, don't you wish you had roots somewhere? And I was like, I don't know. My childhood is my childhood. I have nothing to compare it to. So you have siblings? I have a younger sister. And we are very opposite in our personalities, but we're very much the same in the sense that you can plunk us in the middle of something different or unknown and we'll figure it out. That probably comes from the way we grew up. Do you think that all of those changes as you were growing up gave you a better perspective of the notion of change or uncertainty? I'd had to have. We are products of our upbringing. So my upbringing made me who I am. I'm very, very close with my family because we only had each other because we kept moving. Grandparents were people we saw a couple times a year. And our Friends would change every couple of years. So my sister and I are very, very close. And so I value things like close friendships. I value people that despite the change I have in my life that there are people I can confide in and go to. My family's still being some of them. When you were a kid and you were moving around so much did it impact how you saw the future of your life? Did you have different things that you wanted to be? What did you want to be when you grew up? I was a little kid like anybody else, you know, first I wanted to be an astronaut. Which I kind of still am. Yes, indeed. I was inspired by Steven Spielberg and the movies and I wanted to be in a special effects supervisor, though I didn't know what that meant. And I was pretty resourceful as a kid. Even as a teenager, as a young teenager, maybe 12 or 13 years old, 14 years old, I wanted to be the special effects supervisor, so I called up a special effects studio in New York City and asked them if I could come and visit and learn. And they said, sure, my parents drove me in one evening and they gave us a tour and they made special effects for commercials and I really never been asked this. I never thought about it. But I guess I was always impulsive, both good and bad. There's the impulsive side where Simon just focused on one thing. But there's also the side where if I wanted to do something, I just kind of went and did it. So that's a good example. You went to brandeis university and studied cultural anthropology. Do you want to be a professor at that point or a consultant or no? No, no, none of those things. I was actually trying to build my own major. And I took one class in anthropology, I think I was a sophomore. It was called culture and cognition. And the professor professor Murray, he had such a passion for the subject. And it really sucked me in completely. And I declared right after that class, I abandoned making my own major and declared myself an anthropology major. And my interest in anthropology wasn't digging up bones, which is physical anthropology, but cultural anthropology, which is the study of people culture. And where my colleagues were interested in things like the Bongo Bongo or some Amazonian tribe with 13 members left, my interest was much more urban western culture. I was interested in the world that I lived in. And so my own research was in student leadership, and I did some field work with the Massachusetts state police and I'm just interested in this. I would love going to bars and watching people and seeing how they would court each other and stuff like that. So I live as the anthropologist just living my life, I guess. But you then went to city university in London with the intention of becoming a lawyer, but you left law school to advertising. So both I have two questions. First, you want it to be a lawyer and a second you wanted to go into advertising? Yeah. So tell us about both of those. When you graduate with a degree in culture, anthropology, I didn't want to be an anthropologist, though ironically, that's sort of what I sort of what you are. Yeah. No, I decided I wanted to be a lawyer. And why, how do you wake up and decide today I'm going to decide it wasn't that sudden? I believe in truth and justice and good and bad and I wanted to be a criminal prosecutor because I wanted to put bad people behind bars. Really, very simple for me. It was, I guess it was an ideological thing. And I graduated college on the heels of this little age me. O. J. Simpson. And I really became very disillusioned with the law in America where it was about winning and losing. It wasn't about truth and justice. So I went back to the UK where I think the legal system there, the criminal legal system is still much more about truth and justice. Okay. The problem was I just didn't fit the culture. If you didn't wear a pin stripe suit to your interview, that could prevent you from getting a job, and I'm just not a pinstripe suit kind of guy. So I dropped out of law school and I had this is how careers go. Our careers are accidents. I happen to be dating a girl who is studying advertising. She went to Syracuse and was an advertising major. So she sort of inspired me to get on that kick. And I dropped out of law school, came back to America and went straight into advertising. So you went to work at Euro RSCG and then ogilvy and me there. And then back to hero. What was your role at those agencies and did you enjoy it? Yeah, I had a good career in advertising. It was a short but good career. I went up the ranks pretty quickly, which was fun. I was an account guy, but really a strategy guy. And strategy and planning is a amorphous category in the business in some agencies. It's literally a strategy person and other agencies. It's a research person. I always worked on relatively small accounts, which gave me a lot of freedom to kind of do more than my role as an account guy, which was great. I loved working and continue to love working with creative people. I consider myself a creative person. And enjoyed it. And quit to start my own little business at 28 years old. And you started your business in 2002, quite an interesting time to start a business. Well, I mean, people say that. There's no right time or wrong time to start a business. If you start a business in boom years, sure, it's easier to find clients, but you have.

Sinek JJ Abrams standard brands boba Fett Han Solo nabisco Bongo Bongo London Steven Spielberg Hong Kong South Africa New Jersey brandeis university England Massachusetts state police New York City Simon Murray city university O. J. Simpson
"simon sinek" Discussed on Reinvention Radio

Reinvention Radio

08:17 min | 11 months ago

"simon sinek" Discussed on Reinvention Radio

"We have a public speaking course now that we just launched We have a partnership with e y winston young. We're there now. A lot of the ip develop product for entrepreneurs and big companies alike Both digital product and physical product insulting product like. We're doing all kinds of things and for me it's partnerships. It's my own team and people who believe in us political even message. You want to put their money where their matters commit. Help us building. I mean it's it's folks out there working with us and informally with us. Yeah yeah and if you guys are just joining us here on on on blab live. Now is the time to ask your questions. So just go ahead and type them in there in the In the senate message box or you can do the ford slash q capital q. There on the left. You'll see that underneath the questions and we'll try to get to as many of the questions as possible here One one of the questions. That just came up. And maybe you saw it here. And i believe lower actually had an interview with you awhile back because she said Something of it's great to see that you still got that same fire since your interview with her in two thousand nine Her question was how large is your core team at this point dozen people. Well well so you build a hell of a machine man. I mean that is an actual machine now. Did you ever want to get to that point of having a dozen people that really. I mean these all folks who look to you for a weekly paycheck or are these independent contractors are commission. -able only how how far be taken things. So only two people report to me. and so my my team that makes me work helps me is a very small and then we have sort of a separate division that came harrison. Run that is everything. I'm not involved and and some of them fulltime and some of them are part time But there's a dozen people that make it work and it's it's she's the genius behind all this. I'm just the dancing. Rick wants to know if if the y. Is similar to joseph campbell's follow your bliss. I mean i have a feeling it's at semantical. Sort of answer there but Any thoughts on that curve. My ideas are. I don't believe that the idea is new. It's thousands of years old I think the coup if there is one is that i found a language that made those who need to listen. It's grounded in biology. And so when you hear things like you know follow. Your bliss is true is it may be. That's off putting a lot of you know you know. How can you go into the sea of fortune. One thousand company be like so what you need to do is build your company based on your bliss. You know it's true. Yeah and but But it's it's but but words matter words matter you know and and very often you find that we choose words converted and we think we're doing well because people who already agree with us tell us where amazing and it's great so right the real trick is if you can go into a room and preach your message and somebody comes up to you after to be like you know. I think the stuff is usually hokey and stupid. And i'm and i was really cynical coming in here and let me tell you. This is good stuff. Those are the people those people let you know that you're onto something and those people. I'm always grateful for the believers when i get when i get one of the skeptic's i know that i'm on the right path in so at this juncture. I mean again. I'm sure evolves to some extent over time and organic process but at this juncture. How how would you define your y when somebody asked what what yours is to inspire people to do what inspires them. Hasn't changed since then i discovered just shared with. Yeah yeah simple. Enough and one of the things that You know senate kinda keeps coming up here and And rightly so. I mean lots of people have You know some various questions here but seems to be a theme one of the questions that That i had for that Gerald has here as well as is talking about legacy when you think about your legacy. What what is that legacy that you want to leave behind you know. I hope you know my vision. That i have the world i i do not believe will be accomplished in my lifetime And so the question is how will. I know that i'm successful. And the answer is if i've created enough momentum that other people will choose to carry it beyond me and so for me. Legacy is the standard. If you look at second term presidents second term presidents tend to be better than i presidents because they. They're no longer thinking about their reelection. Which has selfish. And not thinking about their legacy. Which strangely enough is more is more about what they'll be remembered for in other words what they did for others right. Not just what they did for themselves. Advice for old man and old women has always been tastic because they don't give that fights. It's the best advice so all of that is elect department. The question is why. Why do we have to wait until we're old or an twilight years to start. Considering i will be remembered a what work work will survivor. If you can get working on that younger give more years unless panicked. Yup i mean. Nobody wants lack number in their bank account. Credit on their on their you know he gave she loved he cared in. Oh she remembered. We wanna be remembered but what we did other. That's what we want on our stuff. Yeah live that life and we all have things that we've heard over time just kind of stuck with us and really kind of i guess if you will force us into the person that we are today someone say something to you over the years man that you remember that conversation like it was yesterday that really just kind of keeps you on point to this day. I mean. I've been given a lot of good advice over the years and i try and share it because it worked for me and my brothers. There's one of my mentors a guy by the name of ron brooders. Amazing guy and he i. I got good at asking him for help. But by the way trust is not built when we offer people health trust is built we ask people for help and And run gave me some advice over the years. That saved me a lot of money. In that i would have made bad decisions and bad partnerships and so i wrote them down i call them the brutal principles and i put them on my blog. I mean you can go read them. It's just go to signing dot com and have been bruder principles no come up and we use those obsessively in my company like we will not go into a partnership we will not make a decision without running through the bruder principles ever and they have made all of our partnership so much stronger in so much better. It really simple. Do you do a background check due diligence. Even if it's just a google check if you're going to be working with somebody like do little background check right background. Check on somebody and i found out that they've gone through bankruptcy a couple time bull may not be a bad thing. I just want to know about it. I want to be able to ask them about it. Like what happened. you know. Yeah yeah no. I totally get that man. What don't know what i was saying is so what. Obviously you've done quite a bit and when people look at where you're at they're gonna go us what what else with this guy needs to do. I mean he's done so much so what what is next. I mean what still got you then really fired up anything anything new on the horizon. Anything that does something we need to look for in two thousand sixteen full. Like i said. I've been out there preaching for the better half a decade right reaching preaching preaching and. I think there is knowledge and demand for the message that i have but now we have to help people Wanted to build it you know. And that's why i'm i'm. I'm i love my team. And that's why we're focused now building product and service and all of those things so that those who need it or want it can have it. That's the absolute focus for. Yeah that's awesome man. Well i i will ask one last time here if there are any other questions that folks want To drop in and then otherwise we're gonna honnor Simon's time here and let him jump. But actually That does have a question. You mentioned a new book What can we look forward to. What is it.

winston young senate joseph campbell harrison ford ron brooders Rick Gerald bruder google honnor Simon
"simon sinek" Discussed on Reinvention Radio

Reinvention Radio

02:08 min | 11 months ago

"simon sinek" Discussed on Reinvention Radio

"And it still made it to number two on ted dot com so fine. The the mets matters. Yeah you know it's interesting too because one of One of my favorite expressions partner mine has he says that version one. It's always gonna be better better than version. None you know. And i think a lot of people get kinda hung up in that whole world of perfectionism as you look back on sort of things that you've done i mean From a career perspective should always been kind of when you just jump in to the mix of whatever it is and kind of forget about the need for the safety net that the magic has truly happened for you. I've been talked a little bit about the connection between when you think about the outcome versus just simply doing it for the sake of doing it. I mean look. There's a difference between jumping onto the plane with a parachute jumping out of a plane. Right so i i. I don't believe that jump I do believe that you have the confidence that when you jump something will happen. There's no guarantee and the risk is still huge. You still have to jump out of a perfectly good airplane But if you sort of if you believe in your vision and other people believe in your vision and and there there is and there are people who are willing to make sacrifices with you to see your. Your vision comes to life then jump. But i don't believe in in in blind risk. I think you know that's ridiculous. And the daredevil nece sometimes dare do have success but eventually they die you know or they die. Young don't live very long. so i i. It's not that. I believe in analysis prowess at all the point that you have to. You have to ship as seth godin says. You know you're gonna put up or shut up Yeah would you have to have a deep belief in what you're doing it like your gut is telling you do this. Do this do this. You know and the fear comes from the rational side if the if the fears in your gut you shouldn't be doing. It appears to be rational. The fear to be well like who's on my money..

How to Discover Your "Why" in Difficult Times

TED Talks Daily

01:47 min | 1 year ago

How to Discover Your "Why" in Difficult Times

"Some are start us off by by saying here. We all look after a year of the pandemic probably one of the most extraordinary experiences. Any of us have had. What do you think a day unexpected psychological carryovers might be i mean. Do you think we've kind of of me. Thinks people got more franchise that we've it's almost like a sort of learned timidity it have you have you seen any evidence of that or how would you characterize it. I think we've definitely all become much more aware of mental health. And that it's a real thing and that Mental health effects strong and healthy people We all suffered trauma during covid. Some of this dealt with it earlier. Some of us with later some of this is still doing with it but nobody escapes it. When covid i started you know. Many of us had to pivot our organizations that the pivot our businesses very quickly. And so i like many others. We went into mission mode and i called a friend of mine who is active duty military and i asked him a very simple question. How do i compartmentalize my emotions. So that i can stay focused on the mission. And he gave me a very stern warning. He said you can't. He said we can compartmentalize emotions for only a short period of time. But no one. No one escapes the trauma of combat. And he said you may not even experience the trauma while you're in it. You may not experience it when you first come home. You may experience. At months later. As i experienced at four or five months after i get home so i hung up the phone and called all my personality friends and said okay. We think we're good but we're going to get hit by this at some point and we made a deal that when we started to feel off our game we would call each other Safe space and we made another deal that there would be no crying alone

A Masterclass on Leadership With Simon Sinek

The Business of Fashion Podcast

02:10 min | 1 year ago

A Masterclass on Leadership With Simon Sinek

"Are. Industry has on from a leadership. Standpoint often been driven by a culture of fear a culture of an. I listened to some of your podcast with marco. Bit sorry recently and you could really get the sense. Of the way marco was trying to shift the culture gucci. Removing all the frames of all of the you know the legacy celebrity black and white photos and really trying to give signals that there is a change coming but not every leader in industry is like margot there are you know. This has traditionally been an industry where people are driven and motivated for fear of failing or for fear of disappointing elite. Or for you know how do how do we as an industry. Or how do we as leaders shift from a culture fear to one. That's coming for more of a a real sense of progress. Well the answer may surprise simple. It is but it's education it's it's you know we don't teach people how to lead when someone's junior in their job. We give them tons of training how to do their job. Some people even get degrees. Whatever that thing is so that they'll be good at their job and we let them shadow more experienced people. You know so. That'll be good at their job. And we give the mentors and all of this training so that they'll be good at their job and if they're really good at their job will promote them and eventually we promote them to a position where they're now responsible responsible for the people who do the job they used to do but we don't teach them how to do that and so we just expect people to know how to lead because they're good at the job that they no longer do which doesn't even make sense and in the case of marco because you brought him up marco's a student of leadership in a senior as he is an accomplished as he is. He reads books about the subject. He articles about the subject talks about the subject. He's a student of leadership. He's constantly trying to improve his own ability to lead and the result is heat learned leadership so he's a very effective and good leader and in the fashion industry in particular. Especially when you're talking about creative minds If we go down that road you have somebody who may have a creativity and they find themselves in a position of leadership through choice of their own. It's because they're the creative genius. We call

Marco Margot
Guest Teacher Janel Dyan on How to Invest in Womens Leadership in Your Company

The $100 MBA Show

07:07 min | 1 year ago

Guest Teacher Janel Dyan on How to Invest in Womens Leadership in Your Company

"Today. We'll be talking about why in these unprecedented times. Women in leadership are essential to your company. Short-term growth and long term survival gender and racial equality are certainly hot topics of conversation right now but there are some organizations that are ahead of the curve and like me have been focusing on the equality of women and women of color for years and these are my clients women in leadership women on the rise women entrepreneurs and women at the helm of fortune five hundred companies today such so what lincoln and ford motor company and helping them grow as leaders. What i do best over the past seven years. I've worked with females of all colors and varied backgrounds from the bay area to new york. They are not only having a huge impact today but they are paving the way for all future female leaders industries historically dominated by men. And here's what i see. The companies who have made it a part of their core tenants to support an invest in diversity programs for the leadership development of women are the companies who are now today's industry leaders and it's not only for the products and services they provide but more importantly as a brand that people want to work for by from remained loyal to the shifted their measurable for success to include strong corporate culture of innovation employed growth customer loyalty and diverse leadership team who focus on purpose. And not just on the bottom line. They understand that their greatest assets are their employees and they have dedicated their efforts to be a brand that is people focused and purpose driven during our time together. Today we will focus on three lessons. You can walk away with first because women are. Today's largest and fastest growing global consumer companies need to shift their brand strategy to recognize the powerful role that women in leadership play driving economic growth. Next we'll take a look at why the greatest leaders are master storytellers and how powerful story can be and finally will cover some tips for building a culture with equality in its foundation including ways to establish promote an invest in fema leadership. So let's get started less than one. Women are the fastest growing global consumer and it's imperative that companies adjust according to. Brigitte brennan author. Why she buys and winning her business. Women make or heavily influence. Seventy to eighty percent of all purchases across all industries which means women are every company's largest target customer to truly capitalize on this customer trend companies. Must do a better job creating products and services with female buyers in mind. Companies must create a brand that women will buy from advocate foreign remain loyal to the companies who are most equipped to connect with women are led by other women and their leadership results have a positive impact. On company performance. The profits higher margins add more returns for investors leaders such as saffir cats of oracle and mary barra of general motors. it seems like commonsense. But it's actually not common practice. Facts are that only. Eighteen percent of global firms are led by women and according to this year's forbes annual report the number of women. Ceo's running fortune five hundred companies since it just seven point four percent so clearly. There are strong logical ethical and financial reasons to put more women at the helm according to study by mackenzie if we can close the gender gap by twenty twenty five twenty. Eight trillion dollars would be added to the global economy and to put that in perspective that is the size of the economies of the united states in china combined. Right now during covid and racial injustices at the forefront we find ourselves in a global economy with the future unknown. These challenges are now calling for new leadership no longer one of command and control but one of collaboration community one of the biggest actions that any leader can do right now is be transparent and empathetic to their team members and customers because anxiety and uncertainty are heightened during this time of crisis emotional connection on a basic human level between the leader and employee has never been more important than right now a recent study done in two thousand nineteen by mit sought to determine the makeup of the most effective leadership teams and those are the teams with the most women especially women of color as they are leaders who bring a deeper understanding of resilience. Women are also more likely to have empathy for those struggling to deal with change or lack of inclusion become role models for the change that they seek and are willing to share inspirational stories to motivate to embrace change they are in general more inclusive and collaborative making in leadership style which is a combination that continues to prove to be effective in getting companies to move faster in times of change lesson to the power of story. Why greatest leaders are master storytellers. We all love stories. In fact stories are what differentiates us as human beings. It is highly forged connections among each other and they'll trust as a community each stories an emotional journey that reinforces shared beliefs values and vision that we can all relate to from drawings on the walls of cave with stories of heroism folktales. That are full of more lessons to generational family tales. That remind us of our roots. Human beings need to feel that we are part of something greater than ourselves stories. Reminders that through tough times we will come out to the other side stronger wiser and more unified than ever stories. Bring us back to the beginning and remind us of who we are and what we do in stories creek clarity in our purpose and vision to get their. The greatest leaders are master storytellers. Simon sinek author of the power of y in infinite game says beautifully leaders aren't responsible for the results. Leaders are responsible for the people who are responsible for the results. It is during these times of crisis that provide an excellent opportunity for leaders to communicate stories of incredible vision for the future showing empathy advising with humility and providing optimism. For what lies ahead. They also understand marketing at its core is simply about storytelling. and it is the stories. They choose to tell that can differentiate brand as an industry leader communicating the values of the brand with the product and services they sell. I mean who wasn't choked up watching google's tearjerking super bowl ad of a love story that began with a simple question how not to forget. So tying back to what we learn in less than one about women being the largest and fastest growing global consumer with the understanding that stories have power companies must give their products and services a story that women now can relate to and what better way to do that than with women at the helm leading the way finally lesson three building corporate culture with gender equality in its foundation companies with strong female leadership such as new york stock exchange. Pwg and google are continuing to create more equitable inclusive and fulfilling workplaces for all women and the investments are already proving to return tenfold to their bottom line.

Ford Motor Brigitte Brennan Mary Barra Bay Area Lincoln Fema General Motors New York Mackenzie Oracle CEO MIT China United States Simon Sinek Google
Mark Toft  How to Build an Authentic Brand in an Insincere Age

The $100 MBA Show

09:59 min | 2 years ago

Mark Toft How to Build an Authentic Brand in an Insincere Age

"Guests. Teacher is mark. Toft and marked off is going to be teaching you how to build an authentic brand in an insincere age. Everybody is trying to project their brand on social media on Youtube with Webinars, beating their chests with bravado, and it's just falling on deaf ears how you stand out when everybody's trying to brand themselves and. Look like they're winning will that's why we brought on Mark Toft to teach you how to build a branding strategy. The actually works that's real and Authentic Marta is a chief strategy officer and Co founder of the narrator group and he's an absolute branding expert. He was the lead digital writer on the staples easy and project. He has over twenty five years of experience in business and branding, and he wants to give you a gift today a great lesson on how to focus and craft a brand that matters into these noisy world. We got a lot to cover in today's guest lessons. So let's get into it. Let's get down to business. This message is brought to you by windows and HP everyone has a different way to work whether it's typing on a computer sketching out notes with a pen or accessing all your stuff on your phone with windows HP. You'll have all the tools you need to work the way you want. So whatever you do, make it you with windows and HP see how windows dot com slash HP. We brought on Mark Toft today to teach you a great lesson on building an authentic brand a brand that stands out brand people talk about a brand that really has a message and resonates with people they say brand or your brand is what other people say about you when you're not around, let's make sure they say, well, we want them to say it's your job to craft that narrative. So GonNA, hinder over a mark to t shoe his guests lesson on doing just that. Back, to rally the lesson, give my takeaways but for now, take it away mark. Hello everyone. This is mark talked I'm grateful join me today I'll be teaching you about why brand authenticity is critical to success and three things that all authentic brands do. So let's get down to business. Before we dive in. Let's pause on that word branding a lot of businesses get knotted up by especially start-ups. Here's a helpful and pragmatic way to think about it. If you pulled five people aside at your company and ask them what you do and why you. Would you get five different answers? This. Is the kind of challenge branding solve. But the truth is at a lot of what passes for branding materials and consultation are thickening agents meant to make businesses feel they've paid for something substantial complex defying an order to profit Tim Ferriss has called it. But branding is in fact, very simple. You don't need pages of charts and graphs to define it just a few words or a sentence. Branding. Is what you stand for and what people experience from your products and services. It's not what you claim to be. It's what you are. Your brand is your purpose advertising takes that purpose and assembles it into compelling story. That's twenty five years of frontline branding and advertising experience packed into a few words. But why is authenticity important to branding? Because the temptation to tweet or share things on social media in order to be accepted has never been greater. In a sense, we're all performing for each other like never before. Judging by our music or movies social media, not to mention her branding and advertising being true to ourselves. As novel we're after we want to seem to be true to ourselves want the appearance of authenticity. Than the fact. The wise words of Simon Sinek provide good corrective branding is an exercise and trust building. He says when we fake our way to trust that trust will eventually collapse. One level of brand authenticity relates facts. Is that cookie made with natural ingredients is that watch rolex a knockoff? Now this kind of authenticity isn't unimportant. But it's only a starting point. It's like telling people your height or your eye color. These details don't penetrate to who you are were to who your brand really is. It's easy for companies to get hung up and telling the history of their founding. In exacting detail they feel they have to recite information about their origins founded in this year by these two people humble beginnings in a garage or basement. I'm not saying these things should be hidden, but they frequently don't matter. When you think of authenticity branding, think of it, this way brand authenticity is believing in and delivering on what you claim about yourself and your products and services. It's your brand's essence not it's facts or its features. And this gets us to the first thing that all authentic brands do they're built on a clear purpose. In the movie office space and Unhappy Employees named Peter Gibbons, guts, sufficient his cubicle and fights the desire to throttle the CO worker who tells him must be having a case of the Mondays. It's funny because many of us have had jobs like peters bad jobs jobs that seem to have no function other than to make us move paper around in dream of the day will quit. Meaninglessness is deadly for brands because humans are wired for purpose, employees leave jobs when they don't find sufficient meaning pay and benefits are rarely the cause. You can't capture your purpose with long mission statement and pages of brand strategy employees and customers need something clear simple and true. They can go back to again and again. My partners and I call it the hill you defend it's the first and the final ground on which you stake the life your business. Their other popular ways to describe the same basic idea. Jim Collins argues that all successful companies adhere to a hedgehog concept. They succeed by finding and focusing on one thing that they do really well. Simon Sinek talks about the golden circle and starting with why The center of the Golden Circle is a brands reason for being it's why. Don't be afraid to embrace a seemingly humble purpose that you can actually live out rather than a high falutin purpose that has little relation to the products or services you provide. One Young Entrepreneur I met was launching a firm dedicated to sustainable architecture, her passion and her intelligence. Clear. Although. Her purpose was staring right in the face building better buildings that is buildings that are more affordable and more beautiful and friendlier to the environment. She was clinging to a phrase that she had fallen in love with. We're going to change the vernacular architecture. She told me do you know what that means? Neither do I. Should be more likely to find her company's authentic purpose by thinking of it this way. Could someone call her office and say? Hello I'd like to buy a change in architectural vernacular please. nope. But they could call and say I like to commission a building that's better and more efficiently designed. A strong purpose answers a lot of questions and even help inform business decisions. Why should we design packages this way? Why are we expanding into these markets or reaching out to these customers? Why are we aging our cheese like this? Or for employees, why do they perform their work this way or not another way? Because that's what a company dedicated to. This purpose would do. Think of Fedex with their purpose of guaranteed on time delivery. United. Airlines being the friendlier line. Now they've lost their way it seems in recent years but that purpose at one time catapulted them to being the number one carrier in the world. The second thing that all authentic brands do is they seek conflict. As. Social creatures most of us try to avoid or minimise conflict that's perfectly rational but conflict is at the heart of good stories and it's also at the heart of effective branding and advertising. Most products and companies are created out of conflict. To take a prosaic example, a busy parent is confronted by an unhappy teenager whose favourite redshirt is fading in the wash. It's a problem that needs to be solved. Tied Color Guard offers a solution, a detergent that doesn't fade reds and other bright colors even after multiple loads of laundry. The importance of conflict and branding and advertising is often overlooked. Ultimately, address in resolving conflict is why people will pay for your products or services. Conflict interestingly can help you locate and focus your brand purpose if you're struggling to pinpoint. If you're not sure how to express your brands purpose think of the conflict or the problem solve for customers. Finally the third thing that authentic brands do is they cause with caution. Not long ago people greeted with this news KFC announces buckets for. The Cure. You don't really need to learn more details to sense the approaching doom. Kentucky Fried Chicken Partner with Susan G Komen to donate fifty cents to cancer research for every bucket of chicken ordered. Funding, breast cancer research is, of course a noble cause. KFC simply wasn't the brand to do it at least not in this way. Maybe they could have donated money directly without making it depends on the consumption of fried chicken. The campaign was met with House of disapproval and was quickly withdrawn. The public is onto brands looking for cheap grace. Your customers. Dishonesty sensors are set to high. They're quick to see self interest masquerading as selflessness, and they're ready to pounce on publicize instances of inauthentic.

Mark Toft HP Simon Sinek KFC Toft Youtube Chief Strategy Officer Writer Tim Ferriss Jim Collins Fedex Co Founder Peter Gibbons Kentucky Peters House Susan G Komen
Stop Stepping To Your Vision

Marketing Secrets

06:40 min | 2 years ago

Stop Stepping To Your Vision

"Right but so. Most you know Rachel Pearson spoke at the last two hacking lives and she's made. She's also the Queen of Tiktok, and my daughter is her biggest fan, and anyway she's actually going to boise and my daughter so excited to talk with her, which is going to be so fun anyway, she. She, she walks me over a really cool question about you know taking things once airtime, and how you create your vision, and how you bypass things in all kind of stuff so I'm GonNa play her her part of Oxford right here, senior the question and then I'm GonNa. Come back, answer if someone called me out today, and and they were very spot on. They said I feel like you are taking the stairs. One step at a time when you are destined for greatness, so my question to you is. How did you create a vision? Did it fall into your lap? Did you read a book how you create a vision for your life in Your Business that? Keeps everything going. You know like the infinite game from Simon Sinek. Thank you so so so much. Okay, so I think it's a really good question, and it's interesting because. I think a lot of us. We get into this game and we don't really know what's possible where we're going or any of those things you know like. I didn't I didn't know what was happening. Today was possible by any stretch of the machinations. So I think sometimes you bypass your vision. In fact, it was kind of a really cool. What a really cool experience I was Remember we did. The final startup story was with mixer at this. In Utah called the drive, our comedy club and had JP sears. Come into roast me for an hour before we. We did the interview and it was so funny, but anyway at dinner I asked JP makes what's next few. What's what's the next plan? And he has smiled at me. He looks so content something that I've never been my wife and he was like It's like you know what he's like so far. Everything that's happened me surpassed wherever possible select some China just enjoy, and just like enjoy things as they. They. Come and be grateful for them. And I was like Oh my gosh. That is amazing like I need to learn that, so there's that piece of it right and he gets entrepreneur struggle with us, because because We're always looking, you know come back to my my last podcast, so talking about We're so tied into achievement achievement. She moved. Forget about the fulfillment side, so there's an apartment, the other side which I understand Moore's this goal of achieving and trying to take over the world and stuff like that and You Know I. Remember A- At the very I live in ever went to I remember I one thousand dollars to go to which is like the first step for me, my call so much money like stressed out and the speakers talking up people selling different things and and I remember. I can never Ford this thing for two grander, five, ten, grand, or all these different things kind of being like bummed out about it right and I. Remember Admits Kid and the kid was. Maybe a year, older Mir, maybe same age. I was like I was twenty two at the time he been twenty three or something but we are about the same age and and I saw the the presenters Solas Mash grouping route three signed up for it and I was like how did you? How are you for that like I can I can figure it out for that and he's like. Oh, he's like well. There's two ways to get. Get the top you can work your way, and you can buy your insights by my way I'm like well for sounds like this leap in thought I'd never have crossed my mind before my okay, it's pretty cool and then then it's more questions like well. How'd you four for this and he's like I'm actually in twelve masterminds. This time I was like what how did you do that? And he came back and said well what I did is that. What and He's like I. wanted to go these things, but I couldn't afford us as they found. People who kind of trained toss of to so I wanna go is mastermind. Groups obviously can be expensive for everyone to pay. For you for you know if you guys want to go, all this is going to be really expensive so if you're interested. I think if you pay me ten grand and I get. I don't know twenty people. Two hundred thousand dollars Algo. Join all of them and I'll come back until you cool stuff I learned and he got all these people are paying twenty grand. And he took the money, or whatever it was I don't know. And he joined all these mastermind groups, and he bought his way in, and he got up, and he built his company very very very very quickly and I thought that was just a strategic thing. You know I remember celebrity apprentice. Few Watch delivery apprentice in the past I three or four episodes, people do things that was like fundraisers. It was like Corey's money sleep while on the street and they're try. Lemonade always seems raise. Money wasn't tough. I don't know two or three seasons in when the dude from kiss. that. Yeah. Kiss Gene Simmons. GM's was on it and They do fundraising things out there trying to raise money that hustling and he just sat, there picked up his phone made a phone call and got a check from his buddies for half million dollars, and you destroyed everybody else out of the Moore. Looking at thinking, he's thinking in a different level and everybody else says the thought difference, right? Everyone's like like here's the task must do the thing. And they jumped up him. Trump except step-by-step. Whereas Gene Simmons came back and said Look I can do that or I. Can just do this and we'll jump you know a thousand steps past everyone else. And I think I remember watching have now and just like okay. I got started thinking more strategically. US think tactically which tactics are so important is how we get the thing done, but it takes stopping stepping back and looking at things more strategically of okay. Here's next step next up. You want to jump five or ten or twenty tears is not going to happen by you. Doing the next step is to stepping back and saying what's the next thing like what's the? What's the big the big domino? The next I don't know there's ways to phrase. It I'm not sure the best way but conceptually it's it stopping the tactics instead back strategically and thinking different right. Click funnels I'd so many amazing strategic conversations with friends and people The worldwide software company right, if you, if you at the expert, secrets book like we talked about movement and finding a future base 'cause and like all these things that weren't. They weren't tactically like. Here's the next step it. It's like how do we? How do we? We've these things into our culture right? How do we? H-. How do you do these things? They caused these incremental big shifts as opposed to just increasing your your your ads by ten, or you're just created another friend and offer it's like. Have you create things that have mass shifts? Mass changes things like that. I think it really comes back stepping back away from the tactical, which means getting out of the day today, which means taking a vacation, which is hard for us right or or doing strategy your team, and just they look for three days, and we're GONNA work. We're talking about like what's possible. It's a future. Where could we go you know not not with Nextstep, but like if what if we just destroyed these steps and had a whole new thing like what would that look like? And how do we get there and you pull it? Poor Gene Simmons instead of fundraising. You just pull out A. Just, you know, put your phone and call buddy in and get five hundred thousand dollars in five seconds. That's that's the power of it so I. Hope it helps the no, it's not a full answer. Hopefully gets the Wilson head-spinning. Everyone else's listening help that helps as well

Gene Simmons Moore Jp Sears Rachel Pearson Simon Sinek Oxford Tiktok Boise China Utah Ford GM Corey Donald Trump
"simon sinek" Discussed on Coaching for Leaders

Coaching for Leaders

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"simon sinek" Discussed on Coaching for Leaders

"Check that out as <Speech_Male> well all <Speech_Music_Male> of those episodes plus <Speech_Music_Male> tons more <Speech_Male> are on the coaching <Speech_Male> for leaders dot com <Speech_Male> website, the very <Speech_Male> best way <Speech_Male> to explore the website <Speech_Music_Male> is to set up your free <Speech_Male> membership when <Speech_Male> you do, you're going to get access <Speech_Male> to the entire <Speech_Male> episode library <Speech_Male> since two thousand <Speech_Male> eleven searchable <Speech_Male> by topic <Speech_Male> and that. That way you <Speech_Male> can dive in on <Speech_Male> the areas that are most <Speech_Male> important <Speech_Male> for you. One of the <Speech_Male> areas that this conversation <Speech_Male> will be filed <Speech_Male> under his strategy <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> also customer service <Speech_Male> and influence <Speech_Male> many other <Speech_Male> conversations. We've <Speech_Male> had over the years related <Speech_Male> to those all <Speech_Male> of that. You can find on <Speech_Male> the coaching. LEADERS DOT <Speech_Male> COM website. When <Speech_Male> you set up your free membership, <Speech_Male> we'll give you access <Speech_Male> to search everything. <Speech_Male> In addition, it's also <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> gonNA give you. You access <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to search <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> my entire <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> episode library, <Speech_Music_Male> and <Speech_Music_Male> the member casts <Speech_Music_Male> and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> also the <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> weekly leadership diets <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> that come out <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> every Wednesday. They'll <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> begin receiving those <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> in your inbox <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> with links and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> resources, that I <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> think will help support <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> you in your leadership <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> development plus <Speech_Music_Male> the key links <Speech_Music_Male> from every <Speech_Music_Male> episode that we <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> air in <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> addition <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> access to <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> my booknotes I've <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> highlighted some of <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the key elements from Simon's <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> book as I <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> have for many <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> of the guests. Guests have <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> appeared on the show. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> All of those are available <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> in the weekly <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> leadership guides <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and inside <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the free membership <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Ford <SpeakerChange> check <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> those out next <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> week. I'm glad <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to welcome back to the <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> show. Stacey Bar <Speech_Music_Male> sees going to be <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> teaching us <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> on what <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to hold people <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> accountable for <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> we talk recently <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> about accountability <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> with Jonathan Raymond, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> but what he actually <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> hold people accountable <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> for that <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> conversation coming <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> up next <Speech_Music_Male> Monday have <SpeakerChange> a great week. Everyone <Speech_Music_Male> take care.

"simon sinek" Discussed on Coaching for Leaders

Coaching for Leaders

07:51 min | 2 years ago

"simon sinek" Discussed on Coaching for Leaders

"That that distinction is lost in a lot of. Ones what's different about the organizations that truly have resiliency. Resiliency is defining yourself by your cause. Not your product in your product is the means to an end, so for example. Let's take my work like I give a lot of public speeches will not anymore. So you know if I just double down on my old business model I can I can scrimp and save and try and get by with the hope that there can give public speeches when this is all over or worse, I can double down my old business model, and just try and give online speeches, but what I really WanNa do is advance my own cause, which is to create a world in which the vast majority of people wake up every single. Single morning inspired feel safe. Wherever they are and end the day fulfilled. Well. I don't have to give speeches to do that, and so we're looking for entirely new ways to advance that caused doing things that we've never done before. Where developing online training that we've never had before because we're looking for new ways, we're GONNA come out of this an entirely different company in other words, we never define ourselves by our product. We find ourselves by our 'cause we. We allowed the products to adapt based on time. Culture technology compare that to taxi companies you know Uber didn't put taxi companies out of business. A hailing APP is not what did it and he taxi can have an APP that calls a taxi. It's because they got complacent and when Uber showed up, they didn't improve their product. This is what it means to adapt it. If you define yourself by your product, you're probably dead in the water and you said. said that in the video of the team huddle you did several weeks ago of matching the point to your team, we will change. We GonNA come out of this different organization than we are today I'm have to yeah indeed and yet I think most organizations. Most leaders don't think to go there quickly, or they're forced to go there over time, and there are organizations that are struggling with that right now for the person who is not immediately thinking about resiliency. What is it that helps them to get there faster? Will crisis definitely helps. Yeah, this is not the slow boiling frog hair where the Internet was the slow boiling frog. Where you sort of this, this incremental change starts to show up and you know showed up in the seventies, and it started to creep in, and it slowly grew and grew and companies that did nothing of the course of those years, when out of business or are still struggling to adapt to an internet world. This is throwing a frog into boiling water. It's GonNa. Jump right out. So this is about the ability to to adapt quickly and say what can we do I mean? There's two to remarkable examples I've heard about. Both restaurants and restaurants are good examples because they. They were forced to. Should clus closed their doors? I mean in what circumstances is literally is a business forced to close its doors. There's one company in New York. It's a fine dining restaurant and Italian food. And when they were forced to close their doors, they instead of firing, everybody in laying everybody off, they changed everybody's jobs, and now they're doing a robust delivery business. They changed everybody's job, so they didn't need waiters and waitresses anymore. Now those people are helping packaging food, and and sorting out sorting everything out, which is really really fantastic as pizza place I just read about in Chicago that had this pizza oven. That of course, they seventy percent of their business. Business was doing pizza slices, but they found out that they can take a industrial grade plastic, and they can melt very easily. They can bend it very easily. He'd very easily in their pizza ovens, so they started making face masks for hospitals by using their oven. I mean so you can see this tremendous adaptability, both inside their own industry, and going outside of their industry, because they have a vision, and they have a goal, and they want to continue work and they. They're looking for creative ways to use the assets they have. I think that's brilliant. The final standard is being idealistic, a big bold and ultimately something unachievable, and and that were was curious to me. Me Because I think the tendency for a lot of us as leaders is. We want to paint a picture of something that the organization can achieve you say unachievable. Tell me more about that, so a true vision is an idealized vision of the future That's what just causes. It's an idealized vision of the future for all intents and purposes unachievable, so for example when our founding fathers, the United States laid out are just 'cause that all men are created equal. It's an idealized vision of the future of this of this country. Clearly, we will never get to a place where every person in this country is is equal in. That were that we don't all get. Life Liberty and the pursuit of happiness equal amounts, but will die trying that's the point and you can see our nation's struggling to advance that with the of Slavery Women's suffrage civil rights, all of which imperfect in their own right and still ongoing, but you can see it's a nation struggling to advance an ideal that's what gives our lives purpose, but gives our lives, purpose and meaning is that we're working to advance something bigger than ourselves, and will look back and say yes. We move the needle. We are closer to that vision than where we was that where we started, but full intents and purposes, a truly great vision is practically unachievable. A question I ask often of our gas is would have you changed your mind on recently, and I'm curious actually about Your Business and what you said earlier of your business changing because of the nature of what you do and what I'm wondering about is. How is your mind changing right now? I was my mind changing I mean empathy is something we preach inside our company and trying to meet people where they are, but in times of crisis. It's an entirely different thing that you. You because people react to stress in different ways. Some of the folks our team are in go mode, and they're just sort of Gogo. And some people are sort of hunkering down in fear, and it's there's no right or wrong, and so to meet people where they are and be empathetic and make sure that they that they know someone there, and who's willing to listen is the best way to be there for people right now, so what I'm really like when you say change your. Your mind, I don't anything's changing my mind. I think what's happening. Is I'm realizing the value of all of those things that have learned when there wasn't a crisis? How important they are in crisis in Oh. We Build Trust during the good times it should. We can't start to build trust. During the hard times we developed the skill of empathy and the muscle of empathy during during the good times during the easy times. It doesn't suddenly show up. These are all skills need to be. Be practiced listening skills when somebody's having a hard time, and we don't know how to listen learning on the job during crisis makes it. It adds a new dimension so I think. I changed my mind. I think of anything I've had certain things reinforced that those tenets of leadership or so valuable, and even more valuable in a crisis Simon Sinek is the author of the infinite game and so many other bestselling books Simon. Thanks so much for your time thanks Dave. Thanks for your help. Related episodes to this conversation include episode to twenty three, when Simon was last on talking about starting with why that is the title of his book as well and a great complement to this conversation, because that is the the who you are as an organization, we touched on it a bit today, but for a lot more detail, go check out episode to twenty. Three at goes very well with this conversation also recommended if he'd like to. To dive in a bit more on the tactical detail of how to actually write a vision, and the next steps beyond that I'd recommend episode three, forty, five, how to create a vivid vision with Cameron herold we talked through that process, and how leaders can begin that process of creating the vision in it on paper, and then the next steps beyond that also recommended his episode, Four Thirty Five Thai leadership development to business results with. With Mark Allen we talked about the three types of learning experiential learning, coaching mentoring, and then director classroom instruction in that conversation, and as you heard elements of this conversation, the importance of.

Simon Sinek United States Chicago Cameron herold Gogo New York Dave Mark Allen director Oh
"simon sinek" Discussed on Coaching for Leaders

Coaching for Leaders

06:53 min | 2 years ago

"simon sinek" Discussed on Coaching for Leaders

"The folks who continues to inspire me in my work, and helps all of us to embrace adjust 'cause. I'm so glad to welcome back to the show. Simon Sinek, he is an unshakable optimist, who's devoted his professional life to help advance a vision of the world that does not yet exist a world which the vast majority of people. People wake up every morning. Inspired feel safe at work and return home fulfilled at the end of the day. You may know him best for popularizing the concept of UAE which he described in his first tedtalk in two thousand nine, that talked went on to become the second most watched Ted talk of all time today, surpassing fifty million views, his interview on millennials in the workplace, propelled his name to be the fifth most search term on youtube in two thousand seventeen. He is the author of five bestselling books including start with why leaders eat last and. And his newest book, the Infinite Game Simon Glad to have you back on the show. Thanks for having me I wanted to ask you about something that you posted on Lincoln in the last couple of weeks when everything happened with covert nineteen, you were very kind to record a meeting. You had a team Huddle with your staff about twenty people and posted online for everyone, and you made the point that despite everyone, Sane that the are unprecedented times we are in, you, said these are not unprecedented times. What got you think in that way I mean? Mean if we lived for thousand years as opposed to seventy or eighty years that we live for now, this would definitely not be a new thing, and it's unprecedented in the sense that it sudden and most of us have never lived through global pandemic before they've been epidemics in certain nations before, but I think the thing that's most important to remember. Is that facing sudden change or change in culture, changing technology or changing things that force us to reevaluate the way we build our businesses for example is not unprecedented. The Internet completely turned things upside down. The. iphone completely turned things upside down and forced a companies to reevaluate how they conducted their businesses and created entirely new companies, entirely new industries. Yes, cove is more sudden. Yes, it's more jarring than the change that a new technology produces, but being forced to change because of the changing times is not unprecedented in business. It's a really interesting entry. Point four the infinite game. Of course he wrote this book before the endemic and yet reading through it about it through that Lens is really brings a whole new level of your thinking to this for those who aren't familiar with the concept you make a distinction in the book between a finite game. Game an infinite game. What's the distinction? So this goes back to the nineteen eighty S, a philosopher by the name of James Carse articulated. Two Times of two types of games find games an infinite games. A finite game is defined as known players fixed rules, and at agreed upon objective baseball football, and there's always a beginning middle and end, and if there's a winner, there has to be a loser. Then you have infinite games. Infinite Games are defined as known and then players, which means any player conjoined at anytime. The rules are changeable, which means you can play you want, and the objective is to perpetuate the game to stay in the game. Game as long as possible. We are players and infinite games every day of our lives. There's no such thing as being number one in your marriage. For example, there's no such win no such thing as winning education or winning careers this definitely no such thing as winning business, nobody's declared the winner of business, and yet we listen to the language of so many leaders they talk about being number one being the best or beating their competition based on what based upon what agreed upon objectives, timeframes or metrics that doesn't exist, and the problem is when we play with a finite mindset in an infinite game when we played a win in a game. Game, that has no finish line. There are some predictable and consistent outcomes, the decline of trust, the decline of corporation and the decline of innovation. What's the mistake that organizations make in not looking at things like an infinite game? Will they think of like I said they try to win or be number one or be the best when there is literally no such thing, and so they pick arbitrary competitors to compete against, and then miss new entrance into the into the marketplace in my space had no idea that facebook even existed. They weren't even looking for them. But when you play with finite mindset, an infinite game, you pick arbitrary dates. You pick arbitrary metrics and yet the company could be could be failing. Look at General Motors. A general. Motors decided that market share was was king, and so every decision that made and every bonus issued to its employees was all about growing market share except they were bleeding money they weren't. We're losing prophets, so you can't sustain a business with no one market share if you have no prophet, but that's the problem. They were trying to be number one in a game that there was no such thing as being number one like you said we hear the number. One used a lot or some version of that by a lot of leaders and organizations for organizations that are thinking about things through the Lens of an infinite game. How does that sound different? So the infinite game when you play with an infant mindset, it's predominantly game self-improvement, constant improvement, which is never think you're the best, but you always think you can be better and your biggest competitor is yourself, and absolutely you. You look to your to the other players in the game, other companies, other leaders for comparison, but not to outdo them, but rather you looked them to reveal the weaknesses that your company may be experiencing because somebody else has. has better than you and you work to improve your company. It's basically a game of constant improvement and constant growth. People know you a lot for your call, an invitation to us to start with Y and one of the phrases that just leaps out to me in the infinite game is the principle of a just cause I'm wondering if you could tell us about the distinction between a Y and adjust 'cause sure a a wide comes from. From the past it is where it is an origin story. It is the sum total of how we were raised. The way are the lessons. Our parents taught us things like that. It's same for companies, allies and origin story. It's the reason why the company was founded in the first place. It's IT'S A it's an origin story and its objective, and it never changes for individual shore adjust causes about the future. It's a vision of the future. Future that we want to build its where we're looking to go, so think of the why the foundation of a house it's not necessarily seen the whole time, but it provides structure in shape, and it never changes ever and think of the just cause as the kind of house you want to build, and as you're building it, you might make changes and additions, but it's GonNa. It's GonNa. Follow the Basic Foundation that. The House is built upon. Is. It overly simplistic to say that the why is the who we are and the.

Simon Sinek UAE James Carse General Motors Ted facebook Basic Foundation Lincoln football Motors
"simon sinek" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

12:10 min | 2 years ago

"simon sinek" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

"How leaders and organizations can change the world and continues to write on patterns of thinking acting in communicating in the most successful ways in this interview. Simon talks at length about his book. The infinite game explaining what the differences between finite and infinite games and what factors are most important in the latter. Simon warns that the dangers of playing infinite games with a finite mindset hurts trust cooperation and innovation he also shares that. There's no such thing as a natural born leader as well as the importance of having empathy in leadership he also explains how he became obsessed with the idea of why the topic of his most famous. Ted Talk in a variety of other topics. Simon sinek welcome to the podcast. Great to speak with you today. Thanks for having me Simon. You're the author of several bestselling books most recently the infinite game which is a terrific read. Congratulations on it. Draw the distinction of finite versus Infinite Games. And you know in the book that there is a lot of confusion of people playing infinite games but believing there in finite games Can you take a moment to elaborate? On the contrast between the two and some of the learnings. You've had in your investigation of them. Yeah My my view of how the world works especially how the business world works really shifted when I discovered James Coursework James Carson philosopher in nineteen eighty six. He wrote a little book called Finite the Internet Games where he defines these two kinds of games as you articulated. The final game is known. Players fixed. Rules ended agreed upon objective. There's always a beginning middle and end and into the game is known and unknown players. The rules are changeable which means you can play however you want and the objective is to perpetuate the game to stay in the game as long as possible and we are players in the every day of our lives. games that have no finish line For example there's no such thing as being number one in friendship or being number one in your marriage There's no such thing as winning global politics winning career. There's no such thing as winning learning and there's definitely no such thing as winning business. No one is ever declared the winner of and yet I find it so interesting and we listened to languages so many leaders especially business leaders. They talk about being number one being the best or beating their competition based on what based on what it'd be the punt checkers based on what agreed upon time frames based upon what agreed upon metrics based You know a in other words there is no finish line. And so what I've learned. Is that when we play in an infinite game like business with a finite mindset playing to win or thinking we can be number one What had ends up happening is we actually hurt. Trust her cooperation and hurt innovation. All of which we the organization and eventually Contribute to its eventual designed Simon. You highly a few different factors. That are key. Infinite game you talk about. Just 'cause courageous leadership trusting teens worthy rival and existential flexibility of. Can you take a moment and describe each of these with an example for each? Yeah I can run through those so adjust because is it costs so just that we would be willing to sacrifice our interests in order to advance that So when my favorite examples of declaration of independence but timing the United States wrote down an idealized vision of the future. A future state that does did not exist and still does not exist in which all people are created equal critical equal in dad with unalienable rights amongst which include life liberty and the pursuit of happiness. So that's what vision is. It's an idealized statement of the future that we commit our efforts and our products and our company to advance towards that ideal state The winning of the Revolutionary War was just the first step on this long journey and we've seen milestones along the way the abolition of Slavery Women's suffrage civil rights gay rights all of which are milestones all of which are incomplete into themselves but marching towards. This idealized vision just caused that America is Is trying to to advance We'll never actually get there but will die trying. And that's the point and organizations including businesses can have a just cause a statement of of the future So just that there are. People would be willing to sacrifice in order to advance it. So for example turning down a better paying job offer the willingness to go on frequent business trips work late. Even though we may not like these things they feel worth it because we feel like our work has meaning like we're contributing to something beyond the products we sell or the money we make And if we don't get our people a sense of just cause something to advance. It's bigger than the company bigger than the products we make it and sell Then then the relationships become much more transactional. The organization is Starts Operating they're much more finite way Really just interested in short-term game So you know it really have to have a just cause in this in this game The second thing is building trusting teams We all know what it's like to work on a trusting team. It means we can come to work and Feel secure to say I made a mistake or I'm having stress at home. It's affecting my work or I've been promoted to a position where I don't understand the job. I need some more training or am scared or I need help without any feel fear humiliation retribution. In fact what ends up happening is we do these things and say these things with total confidence that our buses or appears Russian to support us. If we don't have trusting teams what we have is a group of people who show up to work every day. Lying and faking. They're hiding mistakes. They're not admitting that they don't know what they're doing and They're never going to ask for help for fear that It puts them some shortlist at the next round of layoffs or that it'll prevent them from getting promoted or something like that But the problem with that is if we're hiding mistakes and people are pretending that they know everything that they have to do or can do eventually these things compound and we can do organization So it's a truly last On the Internet game of business we have to commit to building trusting teams. And what's required to do that is good old fashioned leadership. Good leadership is what produces trusting teams And they're absolutely essential. The next one is Worthy rivalry where in finite games we have competitors competitor there to be There's a winner. There's a loser in China game and the infant again. There's no such thing as winning or losing. There's only ahead behind. You could be number one and whatever metric you choose or timeframe you want but you know for now you're number one for now And so Instead of viewing the other players in the games competitors it's much healthier in the infinite game to view them as worthy rivals and A worthy rival is another player whose strength reveals to you. Your weaknesses There are other companies out there who they're better marketers. Their products are better Their leadership is better. Their culture is stronger. Their vision is clearer and instead of being comfortable when their name comes up trying very hard to undermine and simply be ahead in the metrics. It's better to take all that energy and that competitive energy and take a hard look at yourself and see where you have room to improve and ultimately that's the value avoid rivals. They point out our weaknesses. So that we need we become stronger. Better players in the game again. Remember the game is not to beat the competition. Gaullist outlasted And then finally Not Finally The existential flexibility is the willingness to make a profound strategic shift In order to better advance your cause. This is not the daily flexibility required in business This is the willingness to walk away from money spent or invested or even time spent in. Or because you find a better way to because I think the best example. This is when Steve Jobs and some of the senior executives visited Xerox in nineteen. Seventy nine apple was already a big company. It already had success in the apple to Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak. Kinda just 'cause which was to empower the individual to stand up to big brother Which is why they were so honored by the personal computer because It gave people gave individuals power to compete against corporations even And when Steve Jobs in his executive visit Xerox Xerox showed them a new invention that they'd come up with called the graphic user interface which allowed people to use computers not by having to learn a computer language but by clicking on a mouse and moving a cursor on the screen to move around icons and folders and a desktop and jobs saw this technology leapfrog to help them to do that. It's towards cause of empowering individuals even more individuals To be able to stand up to big brother and take advantage of this personal computer technology and so when they left Xerox see sensors executives. We have to invest in graphic user interface. Thing and one of the executive said Steve. We can't we've already invested millions of dollars and countless man hours and something else If we if we invest in this will blow up our own company to which jobs actually said better we should blow up else That decision led to the Macintosh computer platform so profound that That literally changed the way we use computers today The entire software windows designed to act like a Macintosh diets. Existential Flexibility And then And then the courage to lead in the final one because all of the things. I've just run through actually really difficult Being short term focused easier trying to exert control over numbers. is easier and hiring and firing people. Willy Nilly is easier than the hard. The hard work of of the Good leadership And ultimately so many of the pressures upon us are forcing us to play the finite game incentive structures forces to focus down If you work for a public company the pressures from Wall Street in the public markets are all forcing US between shorter and shorter term so takes tremendous courage to stand up and take an entirely different point of view and and our building our businesses. You also I lifted that you need to think of yourself as the competitor in this includes having the courage to cannibalize their own offering to rethink elements. The canceled projects developed a new product. That competes with your own. Take a moment to elaborate on this a bit and again the only chief competitors yourself Where the goal is to to make our products better this year than they were last year to make. Our culture is stronger this year than it was last year To make our products are leaders. Better leaders this year than they were last year. That the that's the only you know. We're trying to outdo any anyone that should be to try not do ourselves. Yes that's true and we we still pay attention to the players in the market Because we have to know what they're doing as I said before because things they're doing may challenge US remember when Microsoft's had this finite view of the world back in the day And Apple had this infinite. You Apple is trying to advance a cause and and and and Microsoft. You was trying to beat apple and so in the days of the ipod Microsoft with kept coming out with new and more and more improved Zunes which was there. Mp3 player and their express purpose was they. Were trying to beat. Apple's Steve Bomber was very open about it..

Simon sinek apple United States Steve Jobs Microsoft Ted Talk Xerox James Carson America executive Steve Bomber Xerox Xerox China Gaullist
"simon sinek" Discussed on Kwik Brain with Jim Kwik

Kwik Brain with Jim Kwik

11:25 min | 2 years ago

"simon sinek" Discussed on Kwik Brain with Jim Kwik

"Compare my grants to anybody since that We become very close friends and really supportive of each other's work And I recognize that a much more powerful working as a team. Because we actually care about advancing the same cause and It's allowed me to take a hard look at my weaknesses and work to become a better version of myself rather than just is trying to undermine and beat him so this concept of worthy rivalry and you can have already rivals as an organization who the other organizations that do a better the job than you do. Maybe they have better leaders or better marketing or their products are better to reflect Bhakti where you can improve or you can have individuals. I think it's a very dangerous inside. Organizations where leaders think is smart to create internal competition. No no no no no because they were gonNA undermine each other and hoard information instead of sharing information. That can't be good but it is totally healthy to have rivals internally. We've all had the experience where someone on our team got promoted and got angry. Think about that for except for a second got angry at someone else's good fortune. What is that telling us about ourselves right? What does that person reviewing in us? So it's absolutely fine have worthy rivals on our own team. We don't have to like them. We don't have to agree with them but we have to admit that they do certain things better than us that makes us insecure and it helps us working ourselves and it's inspiring to because happy as the heart rejoices and the joy and success of other people were saying but it but to actually come from that place. Yeah yeah and it's IT'S A it's a nicer way to show up in the world which is an attitude of self improvement rather than an attitude to try to beat everybody. Who Does what we do in a game that has no finish line? No Standard Metrics Standard Time frames right in other words. It's a fool's errand. Anybody can declare themselves number one. If you pick the metrics trucks you know the next one. The next practice is a capacity for existential flexibility. This one's a doozy. I call it a capacity city because there are some prerequisites. The existential flexibility is the is the ability to make a profound strategic addict. Shift in how. You're approaching something in order to advance your just 'cause so it's the willingness to walk away from significant investment because you find a better way to adjust to advance the just cause. This is not the daily flexibility. We need to do work. This is not even which is which could be important which is definitely important. This is even bigger this and it's not it's not Shiny Object Syndrome. It's so many entrepreneurs have the next labour next flavor the next shiny thing which drives people crazy infant Ex- extra flexibility the kind of thing that most people will ah may never have to do in their lives most do once twice at the absolute most. Just it's really rare and it doesn't happen but the question is do you have the capacity for it it and if you don't have to go through have prepared your organization your family. Whoever they could go through they needed to have you been doing the hard work for them? and and that hard work means establishing just 'cause and building trusting teams the just causes necessary because we're gonNA make strategic shift. Everybody has to understand why we're making making it and that this is the right reason even GonNa hurt and the trusting teams are because it's going to hurt and the short term pain. We want everybody to hunker down and say this is gonNA suck. But it's the right thing thing to do versus abandoned ship or say you're crazy or or or or go into a cocoon so it's not necessarily easy but this is something. Oh it's not easy at all. What would be an example? You've essential flexibility so the best example my favorite example. It's IT'S A it's a IT'S A. It's a known story. Steve Jobs and some of of his senior executives in nineteen seventy nine went to Xerox Parc. Now Apple has already had success from the apple one in the apple. Two apples already a big company. The jobs already a famous. CEO and jobs remember has a just cause a he and Steve Wozniak wanted to create a world in which individuals had were empowered power to stand up to two big brother they imagined a world in which individuals could actually compete with a corporation. Thanks to the personal computer. This is why they were drawn to the personal computer. They saw it as as an individual empowerment tool but that was always there there. Filter into the jewel empowerment and jobs goes with his senior executives Xerox Wchs and Xerox shows them. Something they invented called the graphic user interface. Now previous to that you use a computer. You have to learn a complex complicated computer. Language like dos this graphic user interface that xerox invented allowed people to move a mouse to move a cursor purser across a desktop to click on icons and folders to work a computer so job sees this recognizes the massive leap Ford that this technology provides individual empowerment and he says to his executives. We have to invest in this graphic user interface thing and one of the executives. The Voice of reason says Steve. We can't we can't simply walk away from what we've been doing. We've invested millions of dollars and countless man and hours if we simply change direction we're going to blow up our own company to which jobs actually said better we should blow it up than someone else. That decision led to the Macintosh computer operating system so profound that the entire software windows is designed to act Macintosh. The reason we all have a computer on our desks the reason computers become a household appliance. The reason that individuals today can actually compete with corporations is because the ubiquity computers in the power that a computer gives us because of this graphic user interface it was his willingness to make this profound strategic shift at great difficulty to the company not to mention walking away from money spent hours invested. Because it was the better thing to do to advance his cause to advance the cause that the whole company shared. That's existential flexibility. Not Easy and number five talking about courage courage to lead you know everything we talk about about embracing an infant mindset is really difficult. I don't believe this is an internal fortitude. I actually believe car extra you you know the reason you have the courage to jump out of an airplane is not because of some internal guts. It's because the parachute on your back like the parish on your back. Who gave you the courage to jump right a world famous trapeze artist would never try a brand new death defying act for the first time without a net? It's the net that Gave them the courage. And so it's the same the rest of us which is which is what gives us. Courage is is the people in our lives. It's our friends our colleagues. You know when when you doubt. We doubt ourselves when we're afraid we don't think we're strong enough. We want to give up when we do. Give up it's a person in our lives who says I'm here I got your back. They encourage high. Believe in you. Yeah and even if everything blows up. I'll still we'll be here. That's what gives us courage. Charges external cards comes from the relationships that we have. I know that I couldn't do most of what I do. If it weren't for the amazing people who believe in me because I want to give up I always. I often want to give up this hard. I could tell you a story of of that. I'm I think anybody who put themselves out there. Everybody thinks everything goes perfectly but what they're missing is that there's there's people in our lives who love US care about US desperately which is why we have the strength to do what we do. But that's not unique to us. That's everybody so it's essential that we take care of those around us. It's essential that we put ourselves out there and we are there for them. Because why would anyone be there for us. If they didn't think that we would be there for for them. The five five practices I practice. And it's really quick advantage. Just 'cause build trusting teams Study study you're worthy arrivals maintain capacity for existential flexibility and have the courage to lead amazing. Where can people get your book? They can buy it wherever they like the book and to buy books you can steal it from your friend who may have already bought it. I mean whatever whatever flowed through but we're actually gonNA gift away signed copy of the infinite game mm-hmm for someone who was actually watching this and to participate. I challenge you to take a screen shot of this video of this podcast and Tag Simon tag myself and share. I'm sure people have a story about these individual practices you you sparked something and so I would love to be able to share that story story and and we were. I will re post some of my favorites as always and then we will gift and send the copy of the infinite game to To one of our Dustin so thank you so much thank you always want to double your brain speed and memory power if you'd like to learn rapidly and get ahead faster astor. I'd like to give you my brand new quick brain accelerator program. You will discover exactly what I teach my clients to learn. Read and remember anything in in half the time. There is no charge as my gift to you. For being one of our subscribers that's K. W. K. rain dot com or simply. Text the word podcast. Two nine one six eight to two seventy two forty six and we'll send you a directly nine one six eighty two breath growing up struggling with learning challenges from childhood brain injury. It's been my life's mission. Help you have your very best brains. You could win more every single day. Now One workweek rain here are four ways to fast track the results and lock in which just learned into your long term memory. Remember Fast F. A. S. T. The F. stands for facebook. You're not alone on this journey. I invite you to join our free private online groups. Dairy could connect with me. Your fellow brain lovers links to resources his even submit your questions for me to answer in future episodes go to quick brain dot com. That's K. W. K. brain dot com. The A stands chance for apply hacked on what you learned. Today we're member. Knowledge is not power its potential power it only becomes power when you use it and so use what you just learn. The S stands for subscribe. Don't miss the next episode in other free trade and finally the t stands for teach. You WanNA learn faster now in keys to lock it in right away by teaching it to someone else when you teach something you get to learn at twice. Here's a simple way to do that. Leave a review on I lever review with your biggest takeaway from this episode. You could also post and share this podcast on your social media helps us spread our mission of building better brighter brains and a fourth tag us to our team could properly thank you hashtag. Quick Brain K. W. K.. Brain mine is at Jim. Quick K. W. View I K on Instagram facebook and twitter. So what does fast and for facebook apply subscribe teach coach. I'll see you in our next episode of quick brain until then remember you are faster and smarter than you think..

facebook Apple K. W. K. US Steve Jobs Xerox Parc K. W. K Steve Wozniak twitter Xerox Wchs CEO Xerox Steve Ford
"simon sinek" Discussed on Kwik Brain with Jim Kwik

Kwik Brain with Jim Kwik

11:25 min | 2 years ago

"simon sinek" Discussed on Kwik Brain with Jim Kwik

"Compare my grants to anybody since that We become very close friends and really supportive of each other's work And I recognize that a much more powerful working as a team. Because we actually care about advancing the same cause and It's allowed me to take a hard look at my weaknesses and work to become a better version of myself rather than just is trying to undermine and beat him so this concept of worthy rivalry and you can have already rivals as an organization who the other organizations that do a better the job than you do. Maybe they have better leaders or better marketing or their products are better to reflect Bhakti where you can improve or you can have individuals. I think it's a very dangerous inside. Organizations where leaders think is smart to create internal competition. No no no no no because they were gonNA undermine each other and hoard information instead of sharing information. That can't be good but it is totally healthy to have rivals internally. We've all had the experience where someone on our team got promoted and got angry. Think about that for except for a second got angry at someone else's good fortune. What is that telling us about ourselves right? What does that person reviewing in us? So it's absolutely fine have worthy rivals on our own team. We don't have to like them. We don't have to agree with them but we have to admit that they do certain things better than us that makes us insecure and it helps us working ourselves and it's inspiring to because happy as the heart rejoices and the joy and success of other people were saying but it but to actually come from that place. Yeah yeah and it's IT'S A it's a nicer way to show up in the world which is an attitude of self improvement rather than an attitude to try to beat everybody. Who Does what we do in a game that has no finish line? No Standard Metrics Standard Time frames right in other words. It's a fool's errand. Anybody can declare themselves number one. If you pick the metrics trucks you know the next one. The next practice is a capacity for existential flexibility. This one's a doozy. I call it a capacity city because there are some prerequisites. The existential flexibility is the is the ability to make a profound strategic addict. Shift in how. You're approaching something in order to advance your just 'cause so it's the willingness to walk away from significant investment because you find a better way to adjust to advance the just cause. This is not the daily flexibility. We need to do work. This is not even which is which could be important which is definitely important. This is even bigger this and it's not it's not Shiny Object Syndrome. It's so many entrepreneurs have the next labour next flavor the next shiny thing which drives people crazy infant Ex- extra flexibility the kind of thing that most people will ah may never have to do in their lives most do once twice at the absolute most. Just it's really rare and it doesn't happen but the question is do you have the capacity for it it and if you don't have to go through have prepared your organization your family. Whoever they could go through they needed to have you been doing the hard work for them? and and that hard work means establishing just 'cause and building trusting teams the just causes necessary because we're gonNA make strategic shift. Everybody has to understand why we're making making it and that this is the right reason even GonNa hurt and the trusting teams are because it's going to hurt and the short term pain. We want everybody to hunker down and say this is gonNA suck. But it's the right thing thing to do versus abandoned ship or say you're crazy or or or or go into a cocoon so it's not necessarily easy but this is something. Oh it's not easy at all. What would be an example? You've essential flexibility so the best example my favorite example. It's IT'S A it's a IT'S A. It's a known story. Steve Jobs and some of of his senior executives in nineteen seventy nine went to Xerox Parc. Now Apple has already had success from the apple one in the apple. Two apples already a big company. The jobs already a famous. CEO and jobs remember has a just cause a he and Steve Wozniak wanted to create a world in which individuals had were empowered power to stand up to two big brother they imagined a world in which individuals could actually compete with a corporation. Thanks to the personal computer. This is why they were drawn to the personal computer. They saw it as as an individual empowerment tool but that was always there there. Filter into the jewel empowerment and jobs goes with his senior executives Xerox Wchs and Xerox shows them. Something they invented called the graphic user interface. Now previous to that you use a computer. You have to learn a complex complicated computer. Language like dos this graphic user interface that xerox invented allowed people to move a mouse to move a cursor purser across a desktop to click on icons and folders to work a computer so job sees this recognizes the massive leap Ford that this technology provides individual empowerment and he says to his executives. We have to invest in this graphic user interface thing and one of the executives. The Voice of reason says Steve. We can't we can't simply walk away from what we've been doing. We've invested millions of dollars and countless man and hours if we simply change direction we're going to blow up our own company to which jobs actually said better we should blow it up than someone else. That decision led to the Macintosh computer operating system so profound that the entire software windows is designed to act Macintosh. The reason we all have a computer on our desks the reason computers become a household appliance. The reason that individuals today can actually compete with corporations is because the ubiquity computers in the power that a computer gives us because of this graphic user interface it was his willingness to make this profound strategic shift at great difficulty to the company not to mention walking away from money spent hours invested. Because it was the better thing to do to advance his cause to advance the cause that the whole company shared. That's existential flexibility. Not Easy and number five talking about courage courage to lead you know everything we talk about about embracing an infant mindset is really difficult. I don't believe this is an internal fortitude. I actually believe car extra you you know the reason you have the courage to jump out of an airplane is not because of some internal guts. It's because the parachute on your back like the parish on your back. Who gave you the courage to jump right a world famous trapeze artist would never try a brand new death defying act for the first time without a net? It's the net that Gave them the courage. And so it's the same the rest of us which is which is what gives us. Courage is is the people in our lives. It's our friends our colleagues. You know when when you doubt. We doubt ourselves when we're afraid we don't think we're strong enough. We want to give up when we do. Give up it's a person in our lives who says I'm here I got your back. They encourage high. Believe in you. Yeah and even if everything blows up. I'll still we'll be here. That's what gives us courage. Charges external cards comes from the relationships that we have. I know that I couldn't do most of what I do. If it weren't for the amazing people who believe in me because I want to give up I always. I often want to give up this hard. I could tell you a story of of that. I'm I think anybody who put themselves out there. Everybody thinks everything goes perfectly but what they're missing is that there's there's people in our lives who love US care about US desperately which is why we have the strength to do what we do. But that's not unique to us. That's everybody so it's essential that we take care of those around us. It's essential that we put ourselves out there and we are there for them. Because why would anyone be there for us. If they didn't think that we would be there for for them. The five five practices I practice. And it's really quick advantage. Just 'cause build trusting teams Study study you're worthy arrivals maintain capacity for existential flexibility and have the courage to lead amazing. Where can people get your book? They can buy it wherever they like the book and to buy books you can steal it from your friend who may have already bought it. I mean whatever whatever flowed through but we're actually gonNA gift away signed copy of the infinite game mm-hmm for someone who was actually watching this and to participate. I challenge you to take a screen shot of this video of this podcast and Tag Simon tag myself and share. I'm sure people have a story about these individual practices you you sparked something and so I would love to be able to share that story story and and we were. I will re post some of my favorites as always and then we will gift and send the copy of the infinite game to To one of our Dustin so thank you so much thank you always want to double your brain speed and memory power if you'd like to learn rapidly and get ahead faster astor. I'd like to give you my brand new quick brain accelerator program. You will discover exactly what I teach my clients to learn. Read and remember anything in in half the time. There is no charge as my gift to you. For being one of our subscribers that's K. W. K. rain dot com or simply. Text the word podcast. Two nine one six eight to two seventy two forty six and we'll send you a directly nine one six eighty two breath growing up struggling with learning challenges from childhood brain injury. It's been my life's mission. Help you have your very best brains. You could win more every single day. Now One workweek rain here are four ways to fast track the results and lock in which just learned into your long term memory. Remember Fast F. A. S. T. The F. stands for facebook. You're not alone on this journey. I invite you to join our free private online groups. Dairy could connect with me. Your fellow brain lovers links to resources his even submit your questions for me to answer in future episodes go to quick brain dot com. That's K. W. K. brain dot com. The A stands chance for apply hacked on what you learned. Today we're member. Knowledge is not power its potential power it only becomes power when you use it and so use what you just learn. The S stands for subscribe. Don't miss the next episode in other free trade and finally the t stands for teach. You WanNA learn faster now in keys to lock it in right away by teaching it to someone else when you teach something you get to learn at twice. Here's a simple way to do that. Leave a review on I lever review with your biggest takeaway from this episode. You could also post and share this podcast on your social media helps us spread our mission of building better brighter brains and a fourth tag us to our team could properly thank you hashtag. Quick Brain K. W. K.. Brain mine is at Jim. Quick K. W. View I K on Instagram facebook and twitter. So what does fast and for facebook apply subscribe teach coach. I'll see you in our next episode of quick brain until then remember you are faster and smarter than you think..

facebook Apple K. W. K. US Steve Jobs Xerox Parc K. W. K Steve Wozniak twitter Xerox Wchs CEO Xerox Steve Ford
"simon sinek" Discussed on Hacking Your Leadership

Hacking Your Leadership

12:58 min | 2 years ago

"simon sinek" Discussed on Hacking Your Leadership

"We've never really as workforce workforce spent a lot of time on making sure. Developing good leaders will be able to share stories experience. Mistakes failures successes packing your leadership. Welcome back in your leadership. I'm Chris Lorenzo for those of you joining us for the first time this month for the month of December December Lorenzo and I are talking about the five most viewed youtube videos on leadership and this is based on our listeners. Telling us that they would like us. To Ted give our perspective on these people continually ask us what our thoughts are on these and other videos and we wanna Kinda go through the ones that tend to get the the largest audience's For the first Monday in December we talked about Simon Lancaster and his video. Speak leader was at a Ted. Talk Video The second week in December we watched the video of Oprah Winfrey being interviewed by Stanford Graduate School of business on career life in leadership. The Third Week we talked about Laura Cola and her want to sound like a leader video last week. We had a great discussion on the first follower by Derek ciphers and for the final Monday of December. We're GONNA be talking about what might be not just the most viewed viewed leadership video on Youtube but could be the most profound in terms of the the lasting impact and the idea the the the what is being spoken about in this video is probably never going to go away and the video in question. Is Simon cynics. How great leaders inspire action? And it's funny because when I was when we're looking at these things and I saw the title of the video I didn't even know that was the title of the of the video. I've always known this video as being called start with Y or the golden circle every talks about it from from that perspective. If you would ask me what it was called I probably would have said one of those two things if someone had never said to me. Have you ever seen the video called how great leaders inspire action. I'd be like no I don't what is that but yet I've seen this video minimum fifty times and it. There's no question it's the most well known to video on leadership there are probably people thousands of people listening to us right now. who have seen this video if if it's been more than a year since you've seen it watch it again? If you've never seen the video pause us go watch it then come back. That's how that's how important it is to watch This videos eighteen minutes long and I really. I don't know anybody who ever heard the name. Simon Sinek before this video. I don't know of anybody who knew him at all. And obviously he's one of the most well respected elected names in leadership and and human resource perspective in the marketplace. Now and I think a lot of it started with this video which is approaching a decade old it was published in May. Hey of two thousand ten as as Ted talk video and to hear him. I've heard him speak about this video. Because there was a lot of audio issues swapped out his microphone. Halfway through it The the camera was having a problem and they had to go to a rear of House camera to record a wide angle. You can't see what he's writing on the whiteboard. At the time and given all the that the production value value issues it still stands head and shoulders above the rest when it comes to the importance of the video and you'll lash video on the first follower had six million views was this one's approaching twelve million views so the the gap between number one and number two is double. And so the first thing I asked you. Lorenzo is. Do you remember the first time you saw this video or what what impact it had on you when you saw. Yeah I remember specifically like it sounds so funny but to know that like half the audios crap like the video quality is not great. It's just like there's so many things that when you think about today's overly polished over produced leadership motivation vacation videos. It's like the exact opposite of all those things but the content in the concepts were so amazing in this and really kind of talking talking about the connection of what actually motivates people to want to do something or purchase from your organization or your brand. I watched the whole thing and I stopped and then I wash it again a second time immediately afterward and I liked opened up a book. It's taking notes because it literally spelled out about what you would. I knew to be true but never actually had the ability to put it together in such a way so like you know when when he and he reiterates. The rates continuing talks about people. Don't buy because of what you do. They buy why you do like. He's just like that whole idea of the golden circle and starting with the why and then how he a utilizes the examples I just absolutely love the way that he breaks video down which is why believe it connected with so many people in white is so absolutely early popular yeah. I don't think I've been in a room with people talking about leadership talking about the employee experience where the concept of articulating your why in quotes hasn't come up in five years. I don't think a conversation has happened where that isn't part of it. And all of those conversations are rooted in this all those conversations that you've had or been a part of you you've never seen this video been in a room where where someone has asked you that or told would you how important it is to to articulate. Why you're here? Why you exist your purpose for existing your purpose for doing what you do if you've had a conversation about that it is is rooted in this video and and You know I'm sure conversations happened before this video about that kind of stuff but all the modern leaders that I know today they have seen this. And that's what they're backing whether good or not they at least are giving you know paying lip service to the importance of it and so a couple of things I I WANNA I wanna go over about this because it's such a it's such a great video it's eighteen and a half minutes long it flies through because you get so enthralled in what's going on that you don't realize how long long you been watching it until it's almost over and you don't realize you've been sitting there watching it for eighteen minutes but it's absolutely worth watching the the cool things I like about. This are that Simon scenic roots this in biology. So he says in this this one of the great moments in the video after he goes through everything he says. This isn't even my opinion. It's rooted in biology. And what he's doing there when he says that he's saying I understand how this might. You might be skeptical about this. I'm not GonNa route this in something that could be opinion in based I'm not GonNa say this is my opinion of somebody else's opinion or a lot of studies have been done. He roots it in biology because the credibility that our physical physical body and and the biology of our body and our brains lend to these things. it it gives the the concept credibility and he talks about how our brains are set up and how how human beings react often on what feels right versus even in the face of competing evidence so the words that people are telling you the facts that you're looking at might tell you one thing but we all know what that that feeling in the stomach is something she doesn't feel right or the numbers. Don't look bright but something feels right see go and do it anyway and he talks about how that that part of our brains that the. That's the part where y exists. And I know I I have said many times. I've done thoughtful Thursdays on this. We've had conversations about this both on and off line how when I have had career conversations with people if I'm a leader of people and I have a career conversation with somebody the very first thing that I make sure of at the beginning of that career conversation are the two questions that I think are the most important questions you can ask of a person reporting to you. Do you know why our company exists on the planet and is that exciting to you. Are you excited by that. Because if the answer to either are those two is no. There's no point in continuing the conversation further and that's why it's rooted in if the people who report to you don't know why you exist. Maybe you can explain into them. You need to be able to articulate. That and you'd be able to articulate in a way that leads them to believe in and buy into it themselves because if they can't get there there's no point in them continuing to work for the organization if you can't articulate why the organization exists or why you work at that organization. There's no point in you working there and I think all of that is rooted in this video. Yeah I love that and I think it's like the examples he gives. I even think like our show. And it's Kinda like his whole flipping it on its head from like the the where most people start with the what's like what do we do. you know the hacking leadership podcast. So what is it. It's a it's a podcast where we talk about leadership. Well how do we do it. We sit in front of a computer and recorder episodes. And then we upload our audio and then you know why do we do do it because We enjoy it and we believe that we need to create better leaders but if you flip it on its head start with the why. Why do you do this? Because does as a workforce we have struggled with and not done a great job at helping our leaders become better leaders to better support us so that we can show up every day. Do the best work of our lives lives in show up as our unique individual cells and at the at the best possible version of ourselves. Well how do you do that by by distributing podcasts around the globe. What what do you do rerecord a podcast? WanNa listen right like I just love. How does that in regards to like completely flipping it on its head and when you start with the why to your point with the biology algae piece like it speaks to the emotion it it makes you connect with what it is like why we do this? And we've set it on our show that that we they do this because we feel that people need this and that we based on our experience in our tenure in leadership that we may have perspective did we may have thought we may have ideas. We have stories examples of our successes and failures. That may just help somebody else. Work through what they're working through to be a better leader and therefore help their people. You know Accomplish the goals are looking to accomplish so like I just love how he talks about that a couple of different ways And and really makes people go. You know what that totally makes sense. And now I know why I act that way or by from that company or I do that thing and he's absolutely spot on that it is an emotional thing it is a a bio Biology thing it's your gut is just what feels right and as humans. We just naturally want to go down that route. Yeah absolutely we. We've been doing this. We're coming up on two and a half years now of doing the hacking leadership. podcast you. We've never said. Oh here's a here's a five minute teaser. Now good you are patriotic and pay five bucks a month and and hear the good stuff for you know. Here's A. Here's a teaser. We we've had to advertisers ever in in two and a half years and neither have been ones where we've asked our listeners to buy anything this this clearly is not a a money making thing for us. We do this because we absolutely enjoy doing doing it now without making any money. If we didn't enjoy it could we do it for six months. Probably maybe a year. I could not do this two and a half years later for no money unless I absolutely enjoy doing it. I enjoy having conversation with you about this stuff. I think we align on eight out of ten things and the two things that we that we don't align on I don't think either of his writer wrongly have different ways but talking through it and going through these conversations is what drives me being able to Help other people become better. Leaders is what drives me. The fact that there's a microphone in front of me is in is incidental. I it's it's it's it's the how and the and the what but but these conversations and the impact we can have people is my why when it comes to this and there's no question that this video allows me to articulate something that I would have done anyway regardless of the video but this is why do it and I think that this this holds true in every aspect of life that people who know why they do what they I do tend to get followers even if those followers disagree with them. Because there's something in there is something absolutely a magnetic nick about a person who knows why they do what they do. Even if you don't agree with them absolutely and I think to your point earlier the importance of a y in in in how they keeps you committed and how it keeps you driven in kind of what you talked about with the podcast in two and a half years later still continuing to do it. We've assured this and I I. I think maybe we could be better Sometimes it's sharing how much we get From our listeners in regards to comments and questions Russians and Kudos of sharing their appreciation for the show and that really is the why of why we do it. You know as a great example yesterday. Four four o'clock linked in Surname Esther said. Hi thanks for the connect I stumbled upon your podcast so the only recently got into meaning podcasts and I had to share a gratitude of thanks for such a great series. I'm in a moment where I'm looking for more ways to support my development as leader beyond what I get.

Youtube Chris Lorenzo Ted Oprah Winfrey Stanford Graduate School of bu Simon Sinek Laura Cola Simon Lancaster Derek Simon Simon scenic writer Wan
Innovative Solutions for a Happy, Healthy, Connected Workplace

The LEADx Show

09:30 min | 3 years ago

Innovative Solutions for a Happy, Healthy, Connected Workplace

"Lot of people have perceptions about what funding the workplaces some of you may have been traumatized by creepy team building stuff. It's not that it's really really not so. I think you'll be surprised and pleased that there's there's alternatives to that and establish fun as a process. Ask Not an event and that was one of my moments years ago when I was doing this in the workplace. We'll we'll talk a little bit about that. that God wouldn't it be better if you took those euphoric but fleeting feelings that you get from an event once or twice a year and break those up consistently throughout the course of the year wouldn't that yield better revette better results and in fact it did and that's that's how we really got started with this model and then finally teach you how to easy effective affordable programming again. I think you'll be pleasantly surprised tries so let's get into it so the agenda terms you will not recognize that's because we made them up. The first is easy. We're going to talk a little bit about the evolution of fun the work place the why and the Roi So so why is fun your competitive advantage thankfully. There's a lot of people out there today. A lot of brilliant mind Sean Acre Simon Sinek Tony Shay others who have done a lot of the the research and have the experience about the Y. Fund and we're going to talk about that it. It's usually frames frames up a conversation about the health too but know that our expertise really GonNa talk about today is how to successfully implement fund or place place so after we do the the the evolution of wine or why the laws of fun in these are the things that we learned over the course of a more than a decade of delivering of funding workplace in every conceivable vertical market that you could imagine any is companies doesn't matter these laws or universal truth. I WANNA call them our our standard within any application and then the shared experience agreeance and this is where the model really gets different. We talk about what's fun for you. Your culture your environment not inflicted fun on on you as some people may have experienced in the past and then how to develop your creative inventory. This is literally how to put it together and create brief but organic in fun activities in the workplace that really will get you moving on your way to establishing a culture of funded happiness at work and then finally finely design activate and sustain so you know it's all words and talk unless you actually make the commitment to do it and put it on the calendar even make it happen so that's the agenda. Let's let's get started so the first peers the Lucien end of the why are are alive fun at work. I'm going to spend a little bit of time just credentialing if you will so what makes us the experts and you know why is this information meaningful and what I want you to take away in this piece of it is that this is all based on practice and experience right so it's not a theoretical this is based on practice and experience it all started many many years ago at a company. United Electric Supply or there for many years and they had a work hard play hard ethic act before culture was even a term that was used in business but work hard play hard ethic ethic and I just naturally gravitated towards the play hard. I already knew how to work hard so but my my hunters suspicion was that that was was this companies competitive advantage that play and fun. I'm led to all these wonderful results. This company had on high productivity high retention high profitability on paper. They shouldn't have even been in business because there's a lot bigger competitors that could take them out from a pricing standpoint but wonderful customer service great place still is today but we formed the circuit club and many of you may be on on committees at at work trying to fund plan fun activities in the workplace or engagement committees culture committees so we had the circuit club we met every two weeks ten people and we learned a lot through that process but I started to see that it wasn't just appropriate to have fun after work work while we did those events in Annual Holiday Party and summer picnic as many of you made may still do what I noticed over the period of years as they became Louis and less popular as people's demands for the personal time just became more and more evidence. There was less attendance at at those events so I thought Jeez. Let's plan things brief but consistently throughout the course of the year and we did in that model really seemed to work so my fascination continued. You'd I started to research fun workplace and this guy came up so if anybody can guess who that is and you can type it in Dan. I'll give you send you two dollar bill or a book or something. I don't know but that is Dr Paul McGee and he's one of the foremost authorities is on fun and humor laughter and very well published and just really awesome guide. He happened to live in my home town or when house research in it. I thought what the heck this guy's from my neighborhood so we met and you know he he really thought that this theory theory I had about starting a company called the fun department to to change the model of of traditional team building you know was was a good one but he he said be prepared for a long haul. there's a lot of nonbelievers out there and then before. I got started. I thought wow jeeze. Maybe I should get some professional help. Somebody who really cleaners deliver fun so I got this guy so Dave Raymond is the guy who who created the best mascot of all all time he lived as the philly fanatic for many many years and it was a friend of mine and I thought Jeeze if anybody knows how to have fun at stave so God together with Dave and and we created this this company fun department back in five did this team building events for many many years until today and we still do lots of team building events and then wrote a book documented or process. We wanted to teach people this model in process that you're GONNA learn today so we started a training consulting part of the business and then we got out into the product business in two thousand seventeen actually shipping subscription a services as of boxes of fun and then finally in very proud to be partners with delivering happiness twenty eighteen we started a partnership with the age age and if anybody knows that company born out of Tony Shays experience with ZAPPA's starting a company based on culture the happiness and fun and taking a very tradition no boring business online shoes and making it mega successful so one of many examples of companies today that are disruptors in the marketplace that are starting with culture starting with happiness happiness and fun and and building a company from there so much like the experience at United Electric where nothing fancy or glamorous about electric electrical supplies allies but they had this amazing culture that was based on funded happiness at work so that's enough credentialing sorry if it seemed like a commercial just wanted to give you a little history and background and and why you know why it's important to recognize that this again is based on practice and experience so the more data and we're going to again talk about the how to but I I want to cover the why because most conversations about funded happiness happiness at work. Somebody's gotTa be convinced. It's leader you know. CEO CFO somebody's gotta say Jeez. Why do we WANNA do this. What makes it important so this. Is You just one statistic and it's one of my favorites because it says eighty one percent of employees not this is not from leaders. It's not for management. eighty-one birth sign of employees in companies denoted as great in fortunes one hundred best companies to work for say they work in a fun workplace. Environment Arment so that's significant because from an employee standpoint fun has the highest correlation of any other thing that makes up a the culture and what people think denotes a great company so it's important to know that from your employees perspective that fun ranks very vary hi it's sixty to seventy percent correlation to a great company so important to notice if you're GONNA start with culture why not start with you know with fun

Dave Raymond United Electric Supply Sean Acre Simon Sinek Dr Paul Mcgee Louis CEO Tony Shay United Electric Tony Shays Philly Jeeze CFO Zappa Eighty One Percent Seventy Percent Two Dollar Two Weeks
Marketing vs. Branding

The Futur

10:50 min | 3 years ago

Marketing vs. Branding

"Let's say you have a product and you have one hundred thousand dollars. Despite that on branding do you spend on marketing the continue feature podcast. I'm your host Christo. What is more important branding or marketing. What's the difference between the two which efforts should come I in this episode. I sit down with Melinda Lucy a brand strategist and the founder of marks and maker. We're also joined by Fabian Gear Halter was also branch outages and and is the founder of Fenian in this episode of the future we discuss if video posted by marketing consultant. Donald Miller speaks about his controversial opinion a pal. You need to be making fifty million dollars before you think about branding your company. Melinda Fabian and I sat down and have a thoughtful discussion about how we view branding mm-hmm marketing which is more important says it back listen to find out where we stand on the issue and how we view the relationship between branding in marketing so guys when Melinda calls answer in here we are millions like I think it's time I'm for another meeting but the switch today is that she's brought in another person that you are familiar with two if you're familiar with the channel none other than Fabian Garrelt are here and I think I think we're GonNa be talking about something that started to get under the skin of a lot of creative people. Donald Miller put out this video about the importance of marketing over branding he he gave branding short shrift for sure in this video branding though is a luxury. I think you need to be making about five hundred million dollars or even start thinking a whole lot about brand new and get your colors right in your logo and that sort of stuff but branding people have to be familiar with your brand in order to be trained to feel a certain way about your brand until then you need to do marketing as marketing is really where you make your money. Marketing is when you tell somebody to buy your product and you explain why they should buy a product mostly because I think he's a marketing Guy Guy. Of course he's going to talk about marketing so I think that sets the stage for the conversation. Let's see where this goes so Melinda. What are we talking about today about the difference between between branding and marketing okay so you have a perspective on this not yet it to bring news one little canary the cat the Cheshire cat here okay. I'm sure I have an opinion on it that I am unable to yet articulate but I would like to hear from both of you and your perspectives because as a brand identity designer turned bram strategist. There's a lot of overlap in marketing in from from Hearing Mountain Donald Miller video about. We shouldn't even worry about it until the company was that what did he say. Fifty million changed his mind throughout the video but fifty million yeah fifty million yeah. You shouldn't even worry about branding unless you're a fifty million dollar. Come out okay he started out with five hundred and they know it change five hundred a million and then it went down then he corrected himself to fifty okay and you work with a lot of startups to yes. I'm working on at that point with companies of all sizes and Milinda sent me the video and my head exploded and I'm like wait a minute. Don Miller is a good guy. He's talking about story branding. That's his friend right yeah. That's that's a name literally the name of his book Iran Bright and I read it you know I I liked it quite a bit and then I see this video and CD statement and as a Yemeni. I'm ready to talk about that. Okay well. I'm going to ask you because I watched it and I think there was a lot of fire and fury before watched a video so I'm like chill. Just watching objectively tried to remain neutral watches thing and see what's getting people prickly. Gli about it so you said your your head exploded so one of the things that he said that really made you think I don't agree with this point of view so I think that we did he position. It was one of if those quick videos I I think he the way he framed that was a little bit misleading and that's what gets everyone fired up including myself but rightfully so right because you shouldn't frame mm something that way. I'm in my eyes right the way that he talked about. It needs to be fifty million company. dollar company before you even start branding. It makes absolutely no sense to me. This is very much the cart before the horse right because you is very like antiquated analogy here but you you cannot you cannot talk about something. You cannot market if you haven't read it yet if you don't know what you're talking about right and in the video heels a talked about Simon Sinek famous wine. He says there was no need to ask why you just need to send emails at that point. You just email l. e. mail email and don't ask the question why behind the company and to me that is completely against my fundamental ideas right like you. I have to create a platform. You have have to create a brand platform to really derive why to company exists. You have to create obviously the company name. It's basic branding pieces that need to be in place the the reason why he said it is because he talked about this fifty million dollar company that said we need to do branding and he's like no. You don't so what doesn't work in there's video is that of course the company already had to spend a lot of money. Branding otherwise would have never gotten to fifty million dollars. Okay anything else doc for now. Okay being so accommodating okay. I think let's I understand the structure of these kinds of videos because I make these kinds of videos to their designed to push buttons and to incite true emotions because nobody cares if he's like. I love branding marketing the soccer ball marketing today nobody from the design side. Nobody on the brand space would would even care. Nobody would share does videos like what do you think so he's doing. I think what many people that are really smart. What about positioning says I'm for this and right now. I'm not for that so gets all the people that are yes. We're marketers and I also want us to kind of be aware of our own bias or bias sees right or by says. Are you saying that word. which is your branding guy? So of course you think branding is really important. I think I didn't fully we realized this before but he's really a marketing guys teaching people how to market their products and services so he's a marketing guy and I think this is our own kind of we want to shape reality reality the way we see it so I'm just trying to look at it like as a as as robotically as I can what is being said and what is more important. Whatever so let's get get into that okay. Let's say you have a product and you have one hundred thousand dollars. D spend that on branding or do you spend on marketing. I think you have to divide it in a very smart way. I mean you should in his thirty. Seventy rule is is not a bad rule rule right. I mean out of that budget. You should most probably take thirty percent of so branding because you have to establish thing right. You have to create the word before you you spread the Gospel Right and so marketing advertising. It's basically putting the word out there. You need to do a lot of that right but I need to define what the business for so I think it does make sense that you split less branding and more for marketing because if people don't hear about it they're not going to buy your stuff if they don't buy your stuff out of business right yeah I think I can also imagine why put out this video because he consults for firms probably fifty million and up and we're going to spend all the money in branding business so after hearing that for a while a piece like this comes up. That's why I like some people Chris. You're really salty. It's like we'll I've heard this question and and people beating their head against the wall so many times an eventual I come to the conclusion that this is what you guys need to hear and let's cut out the BS. Let's get started because you're here because you don't have enough runway. There's not enough revenue talk about you're GONNA be out of business in six months. We got to fix that and stop spending money on branding okay so let's take a step back for people who are like branding marketing. These are like terms. I use all the time interchangeably. Let's start with the definitional branding. Okay the way that you see it. What is branding. You know. I have different ways but I'll just you know off the cuff now. What is branding branding really is that it establishes rushes the why behind the brand establishes look and feel it establishes a positioning in differentiator in the marketplace and and all of that combined is beginning of branding and so I think it gets complicated right because in one of your posts recently Chris about branding being something that gets people to come back marketing something to get people to go to in the first place that too I think is a fine line right because without the brand being created created you know you can't markets like branding marketing branding marketing it kind of goes and it goes into this flow yeah so branding on the one hand is establishing gnashing that emotional connection and then the other hand this to keep it up right then go back to values to make sure that we keep evolving our brands but marketing is obviously key to getting the message out right so when I hear this it's like okay. I'm I'M A graphic designer. I've been calling my logo branding or you're saying sounds a little bit different than what I've been doing so I think it's healthy for us to have this conversation and and do like a public service announcement that if you make a logo well if you make a mark your identity designer your logo maker a letter form person you're not a branding person yet is one facet but it's just one very small facet actually right so when you say it's the why behind the company establishing the look and feel differentiating through positioning what look like what are what are the things you make when you help. Somebody brand their company the product or service so in the beginning. It's a brand platform as the industry calls also dried so it's really identifying how it's kind of like a business plan but the brands plan right. What do we stand for. Why do we exist. How how do we differentiate. How do we need to position company to stand out. What is the big why I call it too because statement right you know this is why we exist. You know what it connects with customers and understanding the customers before you even launch understanding. Who will these people be what channel so dion right? How can we connect with them read to comment on social media and start becoming part of psyche all of that even though it could be seen as marketing that should be established as part of branding before you even create the name for the

Donald Miller Melinda Chris Melinda Fabian Brand Strategist Founder Melinda Lucy Fabian Garrelt Cheshire Fenian Simon Sinek Don Miller Consultant Milinda Dion One Hundred Thousand Dollars Fifty Million Dollars Fifty Million Dollar Five Hundred Million Dollars