35 Burst results for "Sima"

Gavin Newsom Survives California Recall Election Attempt

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

01:07 min | 10 months ago

Gavin Newsom Survives California Recall Election Attempt

"We welcome times politics reporter sima meta from long beach in southern california and john meyers our sacramento bureau chief. They're here to talk. What else recall winners. Losers future and whether given new symbol every at a fancy restaurant again. So john sima haru status feeling tired. Line day john. Let's start with you. Give us the math. The who voted the how the where all of that. yeah. I mean at the end of the day. Kosovo right math matters. I tell my kids that all the time in the math batteries here and because there are so many democrats in the state. They're you know basically to democrats for every republican The math was going to be hard for the republicans who were back in this recall and it was impossible as it turns out As we saw the election returns come in into the evening tuesday. The the numbers largely were kind of two to one against the recall. It's going to fluctuate some in the final numbers. We won't get for a few days as they finished opening the ballots that arrive in the mail. But i mean a two to one is is a pretty handy victory and it's a pretty solid repudiation of this recall effort

Sima Meta John Meyers John Sima Haru Long Beach Southern California Sacramento Kosovo John
"sima" Discussed on Wealth Academy Podcast - Wealth Is More Than Just Moneyhttps://www.linkedin.com/in/paullawrencevann

Wealth Academy Podcast - Wealth Is More Than Just Moneyhttps://www.linkedin.com/in/paullawrencevann

02:11 min | 11 months ago

"sima" Discussed on Wealth Academy Podcast - Wealth Is More Than Just Moneyhttps://www.linkedin.com/in/paullawrencevann

"Light transmission is my. You know on on our politics for us and be able to let god use you to impart that the people he has called us serve exactly. I totally agree. And i think that's what you stated just just a second ago about the aspect of breaking those chains of financial and come into financial freedom because unfortunately some people just don't live with freedom they don't know what it is because they've never been presented to him and so you have programs that you present to them That can help rewrite their financial story. And i think think that is really tremendous in is really what our show is all about. This podcast is all about now. One of the other things. I wanted to talk to you about Is when you talk to. People initially prospective clients and. Does it seem to you that sometimes they feel like that. This can't be true. You can't help me because they've never been helped before you also encountered that as well where people unbelievable a state of boot. Yes they by other bathroom. Leave anything really constantly unable even more so as it relates to these things that they inau something where if you're accustomed letdown promises promises thing i've ended. They deliver actionable things. But i let my work speak faceoff. My results people themselves. But definitely you get those. Those are conversations that i am very sima. I'm open view. I'm very awkward by plans as well in not as potential class environment. I let them know what my story was. I'm a walking testimony that it can be and i paycheck to paycheck to mean nothing more. Some of the other ten are l. Ten first pitch at the pitch axis so it is not a situation where you're isolated in your issue. I think is is that you have to come to a point in your life where you want. She another talking about it. But you're doing talk about. It is absolutely agree..

sima
"sima" Discussed on Podcast Metanoia

Podcast Metanoia

05:41 min | 1 year ago

"sima" Discussed on Podcast Metanoia

"You us to sabotaging cleanup obama as paul about a mile total croissant. Don't ever dodges don't avert dagi's key drink corn throughout this key. Kelly s during a nubia s so start duty. His now easing judas. Quizzes farming casual dikwi stash and she cleanup. Bbn asian she clean. I started on winning. Dodge up archie. To speak to a bbc nice down when he died the picture of a bb coma salah quad cab. You lucifer salman your last saw years. I follow akiko stuff on indicate. Johnny veen told about the district us. Y'all for sick. Gysi and silk quotas so fundamental sobe lucifer. Vo dijon silkwood assume supadio sales. It'll get emailed. Torn sima does deals. You are in the same player. The bottom is live to santa march. So billy mayes outlook as my south of movies. He city komo far shit. These terms ranges suspending follow. Add three key it keep dot darnold poodle move significant achievers premier pillow fodder to keep to the chorus. Oh gee lucifer disease. That was decisions to dakota. Assume a spinal cord assume sabi obese. Goodbye to the grass onto fee free. Call tonal dealer sima to throw those paracetamol jason yoga.

dagi salah quad Johnny veen Vo dijon silkwood Torn sima akiko billy mayes Kelly Dodge obama paul bbc dakota sima jason yoga
Interiors With Shannon of One-Man Shop Handbuilt Custom Interiors

NC Shop Talk

01:49 min | 1 year ago

Interiors With Shannon of One-Man Shop Handbuilt Custom Interiors

"Every year booth. Ziemba people traditionally stop by you know. Try out machines you know. Ask about our machines. Check out some of the supplies. I even have one or two that. Ask for me specifically since you've been helping me and part of the anc team. I actually have taken on a new job in my sima booth. And i'd like to pretty much call back interiors by shannon's press secretary. Nobody gets s four more and no lights at least five times a day. I think i think it helps that. That's on the different side of the united states. And that you know. I'm not seeing on that. Side of the united states is much so you know i'll just put it that way. Yeah it's definitely a feather in your cap. Let's dive into the work here. I know you do just about everything by hand. No lasers no crazy contraptions machines. No cnc cutters or anything like that yet. You're interiors stand up real well. Real tall to just about anybody Why is it so important for you to have your interiors all done by hand. That's the way i taught myself how to do it. You know I went to school. I went to a poster school which was a furniture school and i went two years for their. I thought i was just going to go for a short time and then leave and then maybe go work for shop. But i ended up staying in the whole two years i i went and spent one day with eminem and y s. Amazing what you can learn in one day. So i've always been you know real eminem hot rods. Yes yes sir. M hot rod a payment later. Nice people they have arise as well and I've always been real courteous on people. Come into my shop. Also you know if they don't work if they don't hurt my schedule allow let them calm.

Ziemba Sima Booth ANC United States Shannon Eminem
"sima" Discussed on MinddogTV  Your Mind's Best Friend

MinddogTV Your Mind's Best Friend

07:52 min | 1 year ago

"sima" Discussed on MinddogTV Your Mind's Best Friend

"One too. That's that's where the magic is. You always dis- positive or 'cause i'm i'm relate what you doing that kind of show business and not not saying. I'm not saying that the negative way when you're up there speaking and so i'm wondering if there's any like negativity that gets in your own head from a performance that didn't live up to what you are our show or speech that didn't live up to your expectations and you walk the every beat yourself up as i do or as people in the yeah of course i mean you know i find that if you wrote down everything you've ever didn't like that disappointed your own self. That list like the crap list on swear on your podcast but you know what we call that you know destroyed it. Everybody's got list getting better and faster at catching myself in that spiral in that negative self talk but i still have it. I mean it's a it's again. it's a human condition. Fear uncertainty and doubt Bud i have loads of fudd but the minute i see it i have to do something different to let it go there. She know going forward with all. That was all that baggage. I have been in business a long time. Considering the nature of my business is that as the speaker in a corporate trainer in the fact that i don't have the books on the shelf with my with my name on them in the courses that are up in here. That's a source of of guilt or shame would ashamed to hold it down. Hold you down. So if i give myself graced than i can give others grace lesson i. I had the Website going scrolling across the bottom and the link description for anybody who needs it. I just so getting started with you. and in these times to covert. I'm wondering you know. What are you doing any kind of like this kind of Interaction or like online keynote. Speeches or anything like that or absolutely. I've actually been delivering virtual content training and whatnot since day. One because you are a large enterprise and you have disparate teens. All over the country you know bringing them together in the room to experience an individual for couple hours. It's expensive so i work. With a lot of national sales teams a lot of disparate corporate high potential employees teams leaders. in a virtual setting. We've always done that. Associations have embraced virtual deliveries. And it's my joy to do that. But i'm itching to get get back to the place where we can like. You said press the flesh shakes hands in feel the energy in the room. I it plus only child. I'm only so had had somebody new get started with you go to. The website is their forum consultation. I mean the yeah. Click the link contact. You let's talk. It's really easy okay. It's different for everybody. And you never know so. I always have to ask now. I have a thirty seven pages estimate. No finally didn't over my website. And if i can't be of service to you chances are pretty good. I know somebody who will sit the bills. Just let me know. What would you say is the most rewarding part of what he did for personally for you. What you know fit and richard your own life and makes you feel happy about doing that. That answer is incumbent upon me to set those measurable goals with a new client from the onset. So i'm getting better at that. To how will we know if we moved the lead. And they do the thing that i do and then circling back did we did we achieve that. Did you know d- your staff now know how to do this. Do your sales teams now know the importance of that. Our view yourself getting the opportunities that you want to win. The answer's yes. It's my happy place that all comes back to market research right and and analytics about i mean when you how do you know. How do you know when you've move the meter a little bit. That's analytics in that. Falls under the category of says. Listen when a sales person follows my council for social selling in. They're getting more opportunity in more referrals than you live. Bait track where their leads are coming from. They say more people are saying. Hey i saw you on lincoln. Because i'm teaching them to stand out and post something once a week like that's done we don't need to get the calculator out for that right. So do you feel like you're living in a dream feel like i'm living a dream. Good you know. there's sometimes the dreams are anxiety riddled the other night where i was. I wasn't graduating high school. What is that. I was still missed an exam or something. When you when you dream it and you chase it. I mean that's that's really where where life gets exciting year. That's why it's definitely part of the equation of what this podcast has been all about and briefly. It's just the idea that 'cause you touched on this a little bit before knowing what your purpose purposes known what. You're what you're Why you why you want us planet in the first place. what are you here to do. And i think the biggest part of unhappiness with with people is they don't feel connected to any purpose and not sure what but they know. It's not going to cubicle. They go to every day or whatever whatever it is that they do every day and don't know what their purposes haven't asked himself that question and haven't pursued filth fulfilling that purpose. You seem like you have. And so i kind of knew your answer would be yes to that put. Living a dream is simply. Just do what you think god created you for. You know what i tell you. I've never been asked that. And i wasn't sure how i'd answer it till it fell out of my mouth but for for people who are doing a job like i build websites. I increase the amount of time. People spend on any particular webpage. Or i'm a you know. A search engine marketing. I whatever that is knowing that your function within the larger organization helps them do that. Fits the complex. Be to be understanding of self. You do this. It begets that in onward in the end. It's often not like. I'm here to change the world. People think that their aspirations it be bigger like they're not good enough. Whatever you do and we're really good at. It's needed year. I think you changed the world even in even if you don't realize it and so we shouldn't i think most people want to see big changes that the whole world recognizes than settle for one little change and see how how it makes the world a better place over the long haul and two generations and all great stuff. I hope. i hope we've made it then here. And i hope you've helped me figure something that i'm going to look not today not give you gotta give me at least for the weekend to get it cleaned up and but i do appreciate your time and personal advice in that benefits me personally. Thank you very much. And i hope we've done a service to you and i hope people will check out again. Lincoln description of semi doll dot com And that's that's all there is to it. You just go there and you'll find your way around thank you.

thirty seven pages Lincoln today two generations couple hours first place richard one little One once a com lincoln
"sima" Discussed on MinddogTV  Your Mind's Best Friend

MinddogTV Your Mind's Best Friend

06:47 min | 1 year ago

"sima" Discussed on MinddogTV Your Mind's Best Friend

"Get it so. It's not a ballot. It not about learning a whole new way of behavior but taking what i call thoughtful risk thoughtful risk in the room to lean in way into a conversation. This speak up. Use your voice. Ask somebody for fifteen minutes of their time. Build your network but hey who who. Who'd you know who can help me with this. You know using the people that share the earth with you to chase after your dreams. What we're all here for right so but And this kind of comes back your personal story because we in your personal story. You started off very shy. You don't seem very shy or introverted here at all. There's a certain mindshift that has to take place in order for people a lot of people to make that transition from being quiet and shy to being aggressive in going after join after what they really want The i mean you're not a psychologist but part of your job is or what you do is to kind of help them make that that mind shift. Adjustment that psychology. Don't say i need you to be more aggressive because that word in of itself shuts people down like i'm not aggressive but there's this there's this idea that wherever you are in your in your professional journey you have a body of knowledge you have a passion a willingness to help to go the extra I got you. I can help that all that bits when you let others in on that it's again it's an act of benevolence when we really slow down and think about why we are here on earth is it to make the world a better place to help good companies grow to help more people find meaningful employment put food on the table all the things when you see yourself as part of that story of that supply chain. This gets really much easier. It's that we think the story that we start with is what what have i got to offer you know. How am i any better. What i'm really just over here doing mail clerk or whatever and all of a sudden you don't feel worthy so you know i figured out that by helping others see they're worth telling a different story to themselves there then free to tell a different story to other people. That's a hard thing because when you're in that place It's hard to adopt self. Where i mean. You know you'd see you. We compare ourselves to other people to me and so what we look at our finances. We look at whatever and they're not as good as that guy or that guy that guy and all of a sudden we turned it on self. That's a tough. That's not really your job though to kind of 'cause that's major mental health talking about if we just set aside the that story that we're not good enough in the right training money the credentials the badges if we just set it aside and say what are we good at. Who needs it. We just really kicked the blinders on. Keep the story right there. We can move forward with greater efficiency. What are we good at. Who needs it. Who benefits it. You have a job. Because it adds value to an organization you're employable because you will add value to an organization. You started a business to add value to people. Whatever that is expressing that value in a way that others understand it that we can do fairly simply what about hypothetically somebody who was A professional in one endeavor for their whole life and then just totally switch gears. Now you're you're rebuilding your authority in your brand and your sway in a hall of a area like the app to start from scratch necessarily when you could completely like not not just a way to get it. Yeah people all the time of one woman stands out. She spent ten years in banking bank teller. I forget what as macos purchase pretty simple and then she started a career as the financial advisor wealth adviser and she eliminated the back half of her career from link. Dan and wouldn't connect with anybody from that part of her life because she didn't see them is in a position to support her career goals. Now the truth is people are cheering you on. Its how we're wired. Oh you've made a career change. a one. eighty men of she can do it. I might be able to do it some day because down the line i was fancied myself a novelist or professional speaker. When we say. I spent ten years over here. I was good at it. But i've always been curious about decided to pursue it and today my is now doing these things and i bring all this wealth of experience and success with me. I'm a rich man for it personally. There's nothing wrong in making that one eighty. I mean i was a corporate marketer. For twenty years. I started my own business. You know. I was just speaking for testimonies winter at what i told that story. Simply plainly truthfully in people are like yeah right well. We work longer than ever. We live longer than ever. We have every right to try something new. I if you look at the roster of the guests. I've had on four hundred and fifty episodes here. You'll see a lot of people who lead at least to live some some three of four lives. I mean fact people who went from Playboy centerfold in model to copy tap insurance agent in a guy who was a cop. Go to a film. Make become a filmmaker. We've virtually almost everybody has had some life shift at some point. Nobody we women and moms and dads take a pause to care for their kids know. People have passions that become professions. See somebody maybe selling beach body solutions on the on. The dl like you know for the side hustle at work for not. Maybe it'll help others next thing you know. They're leading a team of hundreds of coaches across the country and that their fulltime job. You never know but when we're chasing that which brings us joy in contributing to the to the universe that.

Dan fifteen minutes ten years twenty years today four hundred and fifty episode three eighty men hundreds of coaches Playboy one endeavor one woman earth four lives eighty one
"sima" Discussed on MinddogTV  Your Mind's Best Friend

MinddogTV Your Mind's Best Friend

07:47 min | 1 year ago

"sima" Discussed on MinddogTV Your Mind's Best Friend

"Issue with that. I really don't i'm glad you don't and i i don't i wouldn't think people would. Which is why. I kinda presented that way but i i know from the emails and stuff and i also know from numbers when we have a business program that as with all in the middle of the entertainment stuff You just see the numbers. Just drop off completely on you know in the published You know the the analytics and all that stuff so it's just confusing to me. Well it's not terrible. I mean i. I say this i beat myself up. Say says i just hit a new milestone of one hundred thousand downloads of a single episode and within two days of publishing. That's that was tommy. Cheung here so it's I beat myself up. You know a lot of podcast is a killing for those numbers and not doing it know i come from. I have a high expectation of myself. And i'm really concerned i'm brand conscious and i think that's part of where we this has to start right. You have to be conscious of your personal brand before you can start building and improving upon right. I agree you know the other day. I read some article from a woman who thought brand building started high school and you had belong to the clubs and play the rate sports getting the right college. Well i'm really glad. I wasn't aware of any of that ahead enough pressure when i was fourteen. Just like cleanup mine. Acne whatever but at some point as a professional career minded who has aspirations most of us do. It's a human condition the the speed with which you want to achieve them can only be helped by strong personal brand. Not unlike you in that. I'm a bit of a badge chaser. The girl scouts sash get the get the badges. That's why have all those letters after my name. I'm a certified speaking professional certified virtual presenter speaker from another organization like left. You think. I'm not good. At what i do. All these strangers. Let me say this or that or the other thing. Because i never feel like you know just me telling you what i do is going to be good enough. I gotta figure out. Different ways to position and differentiated couldn't market matt will can market as who do you sell to go getters. Who says that. That's ridiculous and cuts. Those are the people who bring me joy or lecco geddes. But you're right. And you know what. I wonder if it's too late for me but i know but that's your badges i've My history. you know through wait diplomas and and when i had to go for a job years later where they required me to show my diploma anti right to two quick. I need a replacement but That's a really important thing that i don't think you know some people. I at least like me. Just really careless about net putting up your accomplishments in that wearing them on uniform put him on link. Are you kidding me. Your salesperson of the year do using prospective buyers are cited to work with these salesperson person of the year. Because you know what you're doing you're gonna help me find quickly. Let's not waste time. That's exciting not just to prospects but also recruiters also internal staff. Your company acquires another company. New hires are looking you up online. Whit store you're following them right. Dial and something else that occurred to me before the cell i was looking. I got a bunch of emails from people who are Giving me testimony of somebody on on twitter said thank you for consistently putting out quality Podcast and information. And so and i have hundreds of those from guests and from listeners and i never post them but would that be part of my social profiles. Should i be putting that on the website. Or how should i Personal testimonials are badges of of sorts. When i started professionally speaking. I didn't i didn't get paid. You know sometimes gas money. Yeah we'll give you a twenty five dollar gift card okay. Fine we'll pay your parking and you can get a box lunch. Whatever that's how the industry starts. So i would say okay but if i do a good job. I wanna written recommendation on lincoln an introduction. That's three people like you. Who can hire people like me. In that assumes i've done a good job at are you okay with that that would be my my handwritten contract my handshake and i had an egregious number of decimals. In the beginning. I more than one hundred. Because that's all i could get in. That was social proof. Social proof powerful. Good stuff. I'm slacking on that it for me. You know i sit here. And i know i know i know. I know but you know what there's a lot to do here. that's not an excuse. it's just the out. there's a lot to do. You have to let go doing it all at doing it perfectly like what's the one platform you're going to start with. What are the changes. You wanna make what we stop doing. What will you continue doing or start right. Stop start continue. really easy. framework hyperfocused narrow narrow goals. You start there and all the rest will wait makes what. What is your biggest challenge in in doing what you do in putting your message to people what what what what challenges the effects i have a vision to create a platform upon which the world driven professional go-getters can learn how to promote themselves that sway factor movement. If you will. So if i'm going to achieve that where's my book. And the next book in the book companion course in the companion workbook. And it's it's creating that product if you will. It's all up here. The getting it out of here into the different buckets that help people on their journey. That's my that's my focus. Right now hyper focused on. This is a great great conversation. People are listening the learn. Something but for folks miss this. Where can they get the information. It's a we're actually this year launching a new website and i've just revived my newsletter. Unlinked people can check it out. A similar dollar. Lincoln published twice a month. Get some tips. But i need to do more of that. At that takes time. It takes help support. Do you have a book. I am britain chapters in other people's books but my book. After that i could just see you on a cover Pointing out to be a go getter. I love that term. Go get it. I don't think i've heard that in a long time but you know it. It is what it is. It's very straight to the point. Go get it got it. you'll have me back on and that's pretty When it comes to success that's real. I oversimplifying things. But it's it's the truth. I mean if you have to be aggressive and go after opportunities and take advantage of opportunities. 'cause we all know of opportunities. We all kind of Sense around us. I think the thing that separates people who are go getters.

Lincoln fourteen one hundred thousand downloads twitter three people two days more than one hundred this year hundreds twice a month single episode twenty five dollar gift card lincoln one platform two Whit know tommy years
"sima" Discussed on MinddogTV  Your Mind's Best Friend

MinddogTV Your Mind's Best Friend

06:51 min | 1 year ago

"sima" Discussed on MinddogTV Your Mind's Best Friend

"We'll talk specifically about lincoln in a moment. But how much does social media in general I'm thinking the answers a lot. Play into the Personal branding motif. Not nice. i i could tell by your giggled. Fun when i i think it matters. I don't think it's it's matters more than anything else. But your let's just say linked didn't profile right forget twitter and facebook and instagram. Whatever all else should. But you're linked in profiles index google. So if i look for you. I'm going to find it and i want. I want to read about you in a way that i'm so excited to meet connect partner with work for sell something to you. I want you to jump up the page. Your story is fascinating your fascinating people. You wake up that way. It's not effort your fascinating in that. You're human being so this reticence to let other people know who we are what we do. You know people feel it's bragging. But i think it's an active benevolence if you don't let others know how you help in how you sir. Those people can't benefit from that which you know best. I think it matters. Yes i do too now. I got my pen and my note ready. Can you give me some classic mistakes not to make on that. People make very often on lincoln. And that i should look for in my own profile to and i. It's funny because they've looked you up recently in preparation for this. I don't want to click pull it up again. But i'll tell you what i see a lot. I see people cut and paste their resume anche for if a recruiter wants your resume. Think of agent is a sales tool. Sell me on you and what you do. I want your resume. I'll ask for and then you can give me all that weird. Bullet resumes speak like lincoln. Perhaps trifle sentences used first person and show a little passion for who and what you do like. Come on sell me. Yeah i know i know. My lincoln is It's not not good. i absolutely. That's why i'm taking notes in this way of asking this question but it's something that i never really thought about a useful tool. I mean up until six months ago. When i had somebody on the program who specialized in lincoln marketing a wasted social media sites. Never got it. And i never thought any people re i don't get how people interact on so please the anything else. So here's the second tip right in such a way that people who don't know your industry or your field generally understand what it is you but that the people in your industry and field understand what is you. Do you want. Everybody encounters your digital footprint to come away saying well. that's interesting clearly. He or she's passionate about that. Understand that job function. Because you know you're in a specialized industry in some microcosm. I was just talking to folks in the in the valves and fittings space very specific Large cab you know construction jobs. I don't need to know all the details and get to get that you're really good at sales. Just let me get that art. We use job titles like engagement officer. Wouldn't it that. Oh you sell say that. So you project manager level. Three doesn't mean anything to anyone except for where you work. The level twos come on. Is it fair to say. I should remove everything that's not relevant to what i wanna do now because i'm getting a lot of you know private messages from their about the packaging industry could for one year out of my life. And it's still on my resume. Which i cut and pasted on their as you pointed out I it. I was worked. I worked as a marketing director for a packaging machine company. I get every day. I get hundreds of dmz from people in the packaging food packaging industry about machine stuff. And i i one year out of sixty wet all right. So i recommend people are transparent about their career history. You know if you've ever heard me speak you know. I've had more than boyfriends because i tell you so and i don't take any jobs off because it's not like i woke up one day and was born in to this business at earned my strides that being said. I don't give a lot of detail for the early career. I give just enough to shore up the story. I want you to remember to day so shut about at school. I worked for a power tool industry. Let me tell you how sexy that leads. Sexy part was like the calendar women. I mean this was so long ago. Anyway i talk about getting my feet wet in in marketing in learning the importance of networking which was true in. Certainly still to this day. You don't need to know that. I proved the copy on the side of the box or all that detail that being said if i was continuing a career marketing there's two words i would love my profile market research. I hate it on bad. I never wanna do it again. I love a career as a marketer. But please don't ever asked me to do market research so you won't find those words on my profile so it's it's a little bit of both matt little bit of both That's interesting 'cause. I sure there are people that have things on there like me. That adjusts a soliciting the wrong kinds of Interactions now you mentioned networking. What what do you recommend as far as social media is good for that but it's bad for that And right now with covert is not like a and and. I don't know what it's like where you are right here. It's not like there are networking events where you can go press flush with people. What do you recommend As far as networking and and how to start.

twitter facebook instagram second tip one year six months ago sixty two words lincoln google hundreds of dmz Three both first person one day level
"sima" Discussed on MinddogTV  Your Mind's Best Friend

MinddogTV Your Mind's Best Friend

07:03 min | 1 year ago

"sima" Discussed on MinddogTV Your Mind's Best Friend

"We really ought to. We do something with sally. Anne stanley ends. A bright star stands up. But what are the other hundred people in the department doing right. So you have to jockey for that visibility build your intra-company network to the business owner a sales person be the expert. Show up as the expert. Let others know. You're the expert in its. You know it's full court press but within reason most people element lemme netted out for you. Most people are afraid of being that blowhard chest beating bradford and instead do nothing you know the antidote to being a jerk is not to do nothing. It's to just trust yourself. Do something that's funny. I'm laughing at myself as you. You're saying this stuff because first of all my experience in the corporate world has been the opposite of described. I come in i would. I've only worked for one really really big corporation now at the time it was a knee Ninety early two thousand and it was twenty seven thousand employees at that time and a lot of a lot of executives in in the whole bit. But i ended up at myself. I literally hide myself. I walked in off the street and started working and before they knew what to do. I started sending him bills and then they decided well. This guy's bill muscle work is when we might as well put them on. And within six months i was a supervisor and when within a year i was a director and a ended up a junior vice president in About eighteen months From the day. I hired myself so you know it was a how to succeed in business without really trying but i was bluster full of bluster and telling them what they needed to do from day one and that the gorilla in the room. I was definitely that you know. Eight hundred pound gorilla coming in and saying you guys are doing this right. You're doing it all wrong. And the more i would do that the more i would make my superiors feel stupid. The more they would want to promote me. But here's the no. It's not good advice. That i understand that but i it led to a big problem and the problem is where we started this where the the employee has to go to management and say. This is what i need. Not what you need. Because they were promoting me to places. I couldn't turn down the money but it was not the position that i wanted to be in so it was kind of leverage. Take something. I didn't know what was not going to make me happy. Not gonna keep me productive and in the end. It's what forced me out the door and at being somebody who really helped the company in a big way. And i'm not saying that just because i'm full of ego or any of that stuff but it's actually documented to but it pushed me out the door because i was getting promotions. I did not want. I didn't want any part of it. And they were not right for me. Even though the upper management just kind of kept pushing forward put they wanted to eventually be a senior vice president or president candidate turned on the money. When it's in your. I mean it's hard and i get that but ultimately you weren't happy when you hit pause and you take a look at what makes you happy. What brings you joy. I did a similar thing. I took jobs at progressively larger technology. Companies i was working for one of the top ten largest global software independent software companies in the world. You know for for a good good tree doing good work getting accolades for it. Not really happy at all at all in. That's when i started doing my shine hustle freelancing through the freelancing word that business was born so alternately found my way there but you know those those of us who live those stories like you matt and myself we can help others being more intentional about the path. They follow So it's any difference between personal branding and employee employer branding that that makes a difference in what you teach it. It's a great question so the personal brand is the story that we tell others. The employer brand is the story. An organization tells potential talent. You know to build their talent funnel in the the interesting to most interesting part for me is when a progressive organization understands that by leveraging their own staff the right now the way they are to attract top talent. They win the talent game because people want to work with bright bill. Sure you might have a huge like company name and be famous or whatever you know maybe you want to work for your favorite beer company or whatever but at the end of the day if you get into the job in the people around you are slobs at. You're not learning anything. You're not growing anything. You're banging your head against the wall like the company brand isn't gonna save you opt out you're gonna bounce out whereas we know studies show that tap talent like minded town hang out with people who would also be good cultural fit for your organization. So why not turn your employees in do brand ambassadors for the firm. Give them the tools of the power in the training to look good online promote open job positions. Get the get the referral fee and put him to work. Because we're all what are we to three degrees of separation from one another Why you you can ten. Your taylor poll just by having employees. Post your hiring over just using a recruiter. So let me ask you this because this is in my in my head as you're saying this Because i do agree that you want to be part of a good team where everybody you have confidence in everybody. Everyone of you teammate In building your personal brand when you're deciding to take a position That seems to me that you should put a lot of research into the talent. That's already there the talent because you know join a last placed team rebuilding and you be. You don't wanna be the all-star walk in. Yeah we have. We have people who like the managers hiring and you look manager a lincoln and they look. It's a struggle to get out of bed in the morning. Like how is that exciting to me is a potential new. Hire like maybe you should look like you care about what it is you do. And how you the needle and expressed bat mix it so much easier to have people. I could really see working for a leader like you. So when you mentioned lincoln profiles and.

Anne stanley Eight hundred pound twenty seven thousand employee hundred people one Ninety three degrees six months About eighteen months day one first town a year bradford ten two thousand lincoln
"sima" Discussed on MinddogTV  Your Mind's Best Friend

MinddogTV Your Mind's Best Friend

07:37 min | 1 year ago

"sima" Discussed on MinddogTV Your Mind's Best Friend

"I'm facing here. I think there's a role for just talking I tend to attract a lot of marketers into my life because like you. I spent the majority of my career in marketing. Thirteen of those twenty years in high tech with the slow complex sale. So those are my people right there. Slow complex sales and this hill says to me. You re entering the workforce it's been ditching years. I raised my family. I did a job. I did some volunteer work. You know how to position myself. I said as a generalist. There's a need for that companies of a certain size that certain stage of growth need a barker who can wear all the hats of that being said if you're one of thirty brand. Managers in a giant organization will not a brand. That's i'm just like all the other twenty nine and nobody really is. So what part of your job. What part of your job description. What lights you up in the air. You do need to bring that part of your story. Forward as a means to differentiate. But there's nothing wrong in having a foot in entertainment in a foot in business in honoring the boundaries. Use set mine. Dog no is complete sons. No well i think he just hit on absolutely the actual in congratulations for getting right to right to the point. I i understand that. I need to be a stronger and settled boundaries. More more stringently But so is that part of what you do when you're consulting with people not give them a hard honest truth like you just to me. Is that part of your job. And you're all at a loaded question because the truth is i don't know any other way would listen if you're the one woman in the organization and there's ten men in your always called upon to get the coffee and refill the water in whatever like what you permit persists so there's a there's a challenge there that you have to face on and it won't go away by looking the other way. I'm always inspired by people who make room for themselves at the table. Look there's no chairs you can sit on the back wall or you can say. Excuse me in in. Get the seat at the table. So that's really what we have to do. And i work with people who can handle the straight talk because otherwise i'm gonna take love your money it's gonna take forever and you're never gonna seat results right So that's i agree that that's the best approach but you know i think in in a lot of ways people like me. I know the. I know the message and i need a good swift. Kick in the ass to get myself to actually Follow through sometimes as an entrepreneur. Anyway so i'm thinking delay you actually working with solo preneurs and and people running businesses for the for or you're working with teams are are in big companies. What is your what is your personal niece. Demographic that you want and here in lies the conundrum of it all miami. Sh-she or niche is some say i called go getters and there are go getters everywhere. There are go. Getters in the enterprise. China get ahead. Get the promotion you do. Do more work vibrated at higher level. Like really fine career fulfillment. There are those people. In sales people own their own businesses. The court played interesting. A just wrote an article about this. This morning i published it because yet your top talent in the enterprise and they get bored and they get frustrated and they don't tell you believe they quietly leave and you can't figure out why you're having this kind of turnover. This employee churn. Because they don't know actually how to have the career management conversation and if we teach employees had a market themselves. Better they'll stay longer. They'll find more rewarding work. Sales people need to know how to position themselves as the who wants to buy anything from somebody. Who's like a jack of all trades. Nobody rate so this whole idea of positioning to the buyer. To the stakeholder a is true for everybody and still struggling to do it for myself. Yeah i as you're talking about that. I'm seeing myself. In a position. I was in seven years ago And small company about fifty five employees just over what the definition of a small businesses and run by a family group but Man of turnover and there was a lot of reasons for that. But i thought the biggest part of that was not connecting with the people that were on the An understanding that people and understanding who they really why and what they will differently motivated by and what they different goals were just not really connecting with the people below below them. Is that what you're talking about when you talk about You know decreasing turnover is that basically what are we on the same page with that and actually looking at the flip side of the equation. What does the individual due to drive those conversations and awareness. Okay i mean there are people who help a small businesses medium sized businesses with customer employee. Engagement rather a culture those kinds of things and you can do all of the hats and still have the individuals who have no understanding of how to market themselves in raise their visibility and have a tough conversation that says look. I love the work. I do here. I love working here. But you know when i look in the next eighteen to twenty four months. Here's wanna grow. How do we together. That happened because while i grow so too. Will the business that win win outcome the employees have to have to meet you in the middle that that's interesting. 'cause i think part of the problem what you're saying is the the employer or the person who wants wants to make a difference. These take that initiative a lot of times. There are red tape and bureaucracies in all kinds of things Where especially if you're just beginning out near you on your entry level just above lynch ea level where you're working and you wanna make that difference. There's a lot of road blocks in your way in or obstacles. How do you get that first. Conversation started way. You want to explain your goals and what you need what you want to get out of it. What will what will keep you Productive and happy in that organization for as long as they need you to be there. Gotta pay your dues. You can't start work place in three weeks later. Say you're ready for a promotion is out there. That's like where's my award. I was on time. You know name. That's just not how it works before you exit the organization it's worth exploring where you can grow within especially if you like it fits well the benefits need your knees salary opportunity on the table and it's really more about being in a leadership role in your life in your profession because the days of other people grooming you noticing your your skills incensio..

twenty years Thirteen ten men seven years ago three weeks later This morning miami fifty five employees one woman thirty brand twenty nine first one China twenty four months getters next eighteen
"sima" Discussed on MinddogTV  Your Mind's Best Friend

MinddogTV Your Mind's Best Friend

07:47 min | 1 year ago

"sima" Discussed on MinddogTV Your Mind's Best Friend

"It's great to have you It's a wonderful spring day here. I hope it's a beautiful day wherever you are. We're going to talk about branding today. Personal branding employer branding. And we're gonna talk about something called sway factor which is a trademark An idea concept. I guess that my guest today. will be presenting And letting us know about This show i gotta say it's it probably more About me today. My personal needs. I know needs some serious help with the brennan kind of screwed my brand up by mixing entertainment and business and It's come up a lot lately. Came up this morning with a lady who has a business topic Presentation and she wanted the pm. Flatland tried to say i'm trying to learn from my lessons here and not mixed it to do the business at one pm and do the entertainment at eight pm and So it's really important that you kind of drill down in an established brand. And i'm thinking about actually splitting the brands. So hopefully i'll learn a lot of my guest today and maybe she can help me Figure out my had a fix a brand that you've broken a wholly different part of a topic that we didn't even consider we might be talking about today before bring her in. I gotta quickly Talk about my sponsors today. Today's show is brought to you by fun. Wise capital capital is a business lender matching platform. That gets you the best credit loans. Guaranteed you can get You can play online and sixty seconds in fact the credits which you can get used to funding for anything. You need to start or grow your business. Get the best funding. You can qualify for because their strategic lender matching platform. Sisters do hundreds of lenders to find the very best possible option for your unique situation. They have hundreds of five star reviews on google trust pilot and facebook and in a plus rating with the better business bureau. They provide unsecured lines of credit at zero percent interest for nine to fifteen months. It's wide unsecured term loans loans based on income short-term gap funding of prisoners They work with real estate. Start after they mentioned franchises restaurants. Any kind of business any kind of project to get started. It's real simple. You just go to apply that online dot com slash mine dog applied that from is that -ccomplish mine does go into description. And i do appreciate you patronizing our sponsors now Some doll has Many titles international speaker corporate trainer virtual instructor But just one mission to show. Business professionals had to market and sell themselves her early experience as an award-winning abi. Marketer pave the way for sway factor. Which again is the trademarked. Concept groundbreaking personal strategies that power and buy it professionals to stand out. Stay relevant and be in demand be Being a keynote or virtual classroom she's helped thousands of people catapulted career drive sales and retain top talent by unleashing the purse the power of personal brands. We didn't gentlemen. please open your ears. Open your minds and help walkman some adults with my dot. Tv pockets of a welcome. Hey there thank you for that very housing introduction they love your intra video and i don't think your brand is all that broken. Let me just say that. I appreciate you saying that. I'm just. I know it comes into conflict and when people want to do the business stuff late at night especially the the entertainment portion that i i have you know. I meant to always keep them separate. Apm would be for entertainment. But i'm too much of a nice guy. And sometimes i when people who are business oriented want that Slot in the evening it turns a lot of the entertainment people off. So what i'm thinking about. And i hate to make it all about be right from the start but what i'm taking about is actually splitting the brands. And i would love to get your input on that but let's save that for later we can tell audience basically A little bit about yourself background and all that stuff so we can establish a foundation for the conversation. It sure i'm just excited. Anybody says my name right at cima like simmered down and that's been a challenge for me my entire life. I'm recovered corporate marketer. Never really felt like. I hit stride in a corporate setting and today. I'm on my own teaching people how to market themselves so i work with corporate. Go getters you want. Make a name for themselves in the industry in the enterprise i work with sales teams business owners anybody who wants a competitive advantage for their career job their sales their profession. And i love it. I love it. The truth is i was a shy awkward self-conscious kid out of school. I could barely walk chew gum and you know. Tell you my name. Let alone what i did or what i wanted to do. And i quickly saw. That was holding me back so slowly but surely to push myself out of my comfort zone and learned the what we now call personal brand date then we call it leadership we call it sticking your neck out speaking up taking a risk but today that's what it takes to get more of what you want so i learned by doing and now excuse me. Help others fasttrack their personal brand it. I i think i have a similar background. I mean but so this idea of personal branding the where we start to to brand ourselves. Personally i mean it. Sounds like a great concept but getting started is is I think the hardest part of this understanding how we build a personal brand. Can we talk about that at short. Listen you could come at one. Two ways are you what are you. What do you do in that. You don't want to do anymore like you know my first job at school. My official title was secretary. And i was like i got a really expensive. You know college degree in my back pocket. I gotta affect some change. So i remember getting my first business cards and asking if they could read marketing assisted instead a secretary in the personal brand campaign began but in other terms. Who are you selling to a core. People get really freaked out. I'm not in sales. Yes yes you are We all our who needs to buy into your story. Should you can do what you wanna do. More of you get ahead. Build internal champion stakeholder who see you in a higher place. So it really simply. What's the job you want. And how do you market yourself into that role. What's the ideal client buying from you. What services what problems do you solve. Interview join the work. You're doing well. Then that's a whole different podcast right. I get it. So but here's the thing now with personal branding with and coming from a marketing background myself. I mean i understand the power of nisha for an organization but in personnel. You for your personal reasons. I guess it would be called specialization. or niching. down is part of that. How important is that to build your personal ban or illness be a specialist or can you be a I guess multi varied person in so bill bad as your brand. Is that the challenge..

nine hundreds facebook eight pm zero percent sixty seconds one pm Today Flatland today one mission first business cards Two ways fifteen months thousands of people this morning first job dot com hundreds of lenders five star
"sima" Discussed on A Família PODe

A Família PODe

02:43 min | 1 year ago

"sima" Discussed on A Família PODe

"It maliciously what are they gonna sticky. What who's cutting edge. He it will this huge much leave without insistence cranston could be touched saying cnn's must-reads spectacle time seeing a smash agents Mellish sound simple. The assistant vitamin c. to media mason bought it. But it gets people going. Zoo won't work ethic as opiates Kara could be cdl since the present that ninety who full gay but Other scores smuggle estimates nicotine fight tweets Type of mental illness to be. Of course quincy southwest Cuesta farmer eighty five. When you're going to stem smashed pinkas coins scheme started Yoga amid zone. He's not Orange colombian into which we sound. Mcnabb acknowledged concealed You we'll get these Contact with Sima those initiating predicament cousin's genome project Advice.

cranston cnn pinkas mason Kara Mcnabb Sima
Dj vu in Alzheimer's research, and OWS's legacy

The Readout Loud

03:48 min | 1 year ago

Dj vu in Alzheimer's research, and OWS's legacy

"Joe biden is heading to the white house. The us is grappling with an economic crisis and biotech is debating the amyloid hypothesis. Twenty twenty. one is starting off quite a bit like two thousand nine. Thanks in part to ally lilly and some surprising data on a new treatment for alzheimer's disease the biggest story coming out of j. p. morgan this week was news that a lily drug called banana managed to significantly slowed the progression of alzheimer's in small clinical trial. So why this is so notable denham ab like so many failed drugs before it is designed to attack toxic proteins in the brain called amyloid and that was reason enough to reignite the decade plus long argument over whether clearing out amyloid can actually make a difference for patients with alzheimer's disease so before we get into the implications of all that we should summarize what we actually know. Here's what lily disclosed in a study involving two hundred and seventy two patients with early stage alzheimer's those who got to non-arab some of their cognition and function decline. At a rate that was thirty two percent slower than those who got a placebo. The company used a metric called the integrated alzheimer's disease rating scale which we should note is a different measurement than what we've seen in past trials and that's about all the detail we got so far. Lilly said it would present full data at a conference in march. But until then we've only got a press release to go off of so i. I'm curious what you guys think. What are the implications of this. All the caveats that would apply to any alzheimer study. Let alone one this small but it arrives as we await word from the fda on a different Amyloid targeting treatment from biogen called which we spent a lot of time talking about on this podcast and then here comes this lily. News like a comet from the sky. How does this change kind of the state of play of amyloid so to me. This is just it's like deja vu right. it's we sort of fall into into this pattern of just keep recycling. The same arguments about the you know the efficacy of amyloid. Whether you're drugs that target amyloid are effective in alzheimer's and i i don't know what to make of these data. I i mean. I think what it says is that we will be having this debate for years to come. Even after we get a decision on atacama. I totally agree. I mean the sense of deja vu was so strong. I was looking back at articles trying to see what had happened through the years with these drugs targeting beta amyloid and i got back to you know twenty ten. When a lily drug called sima geza stat failed and there was this great npr story actually. Quoting bob langres who at the time was at forbes announced bloomberg my old colleague saying that this was really going to call into question the amyloid hypothesis. This was eleven years ago And we had daybreak on. Cnbc this week to talk with him. He's the ceo of eli lilly. And you know. He was the first one to note. How many failures. They've had in their thirty years of working on alzheimer's disease at the company. I'm focused on on this target One thing he noted that's different about this. Trial is its size. It was small and he said that was the reason he was more optimistic about the signal. They saw that they saw such a strong signal in a small study. Made him feel like it. Had to be an even stronger signal He noted that in the past they had gone to these very large phase three trials because they thought they would have to order to see a signal and here they did this small trial to see if this was even worth pursuing a before going to that big one so i thought that was pretty interesting but i also think we're still arguing over whether amyloid is a cause of alzheimer's or like jeff jonas. The former ceo of sage. Who's still at sage in a different role You know he. He's put it as he thinks. It's more like a scar or a scab where you pull it off. That doesn't fix the underlying wound. And we just don't have those answers yet

Alzheimer's Joe Biden Denham Lilly White House Banana Sima Geza Stat Morgan Biogen Bob Langres Lily Atacama FDA United States NPR Eli Lilly Bloomberg Cnbc
Ghost of Tsushima Wins Game Awards Player's Voice

Kinda Funny Games Daily

02:18 min | 1 year ago

Ghost of Tsushima Wins Game Awards Player's Voice

"Who shema winds players voice award at the game awards. This from wesley leblanc at iga jeff. Kelly has revealed that goes to shema. Is the game game. Awards players voice award winner this year. After three rounds of voting from fans the game awards will take place on december tenth. And it's there that awards like best narrative best direction and of course game of the year will be announced. These awards are voted on by both curated voting jerry and fans but in those instances the voting jury accounts for ninety percent of the vote while the fan votes account for the other ten percent. That's not the case for the players voice award which is which is entirely decided upon by fans. There's no weighing way. There's no vote weighing involved with with this award. So gauche seema is the game that got the most total votes out of all the other nominees. It beat out other twenty twenty releases like the last to haiti's and do maternal go sushila sauce placement in the rankings shift each round at it had a three percent lead over the last two during the second round of voting fourteen percent and eleven percent of the votes respectively and then when the when the final round began on december sixth last part to you climb to forty three percent of the vote while go see my only had thirty one percent then with just four hours to go before before the closing of the votes goes through your schema jumped up to forty seven percent in the last two dropped to thirty three percent. That was the last update. Kelly gave to gave the voting percentages before announcing tuesday. That ghosts shema is the players voice award winner of the game awards this year. M ron does this surprise. You trending that direction. I like we were talking about this a bit about games. Cassie were talking about earlier. Where we're predicting the awards. One of the things i said is less of us. Divisive but it's not devicive on critics. It is divisive among fans. So i i'm not stocked. People rallied around sima. There's a little bit of campaigning along stuff like this to like. I saw a sucker sucker punch out there on twitter like hey sima and like they were doing it pretty consistently i saw some of new haven over last of us too but not nearly as much and not as many people like i said last semester was divisive so i i'm not shocked. Goes one well. I'm not shocked to go. See what beat last of us. I am surprised that beat by that much

Wesley Leblanc Iga Jeff Sushila Sauce Kelly Seema Jerry Haiti Sima Cassie Twitter
'Wonder Woman' director warns movie-going could become extinct

Monocle 24: The Globalist

02:17 min | 1 year ago

'Wonder Woman' director warns movie-going could become extinct

"Tug I took a walk down Hampstead High Street, yesterday, and it was utterly heartbreaking. So many clothes shops. This is something we're just GonNa see more and more of his mood. Yes, I think. So unfortunately and today we're also dealing with a grim warning about the future of cinema and you can decide for yourself whether this is overly pessimistic enough. But Patty Jenkins who sent him a lovers well know as the director of the recent wonder woman movies things movie going actually going to the cinema is facing a real threat of extinction. Now, this because her latest installment of the wonder woman franchise has been delayed three times during the coronavirus pandemic and it's worth remembering that just in the past week the delay of another big movie franchise that James Bond until next year. sparked the UK and US cinema owner cine worlds to actually just give up trying to operate during this pandemic and it's closed at cinemas temporarily. But for the foreseeable another UK chain Odeon is now only opening at weekends I what Potty Jenkins is worried about is that actually if cinemas do closed and during this periods that the process won't be reversible, she thinks we could lose. moviegoing at for movie theater going forever, and she's one of a number of big Hollywood directors harassing the US government for financial aid for cinemas in the US. Anyway. But I guess as you quite rightly pointed one of the dangers of this crisis business close even temporarily or even if they get state aid, will they actually come back because you know cinema is not as essential. As something like aviation at Cinema, the actual act of running and what they call a movie theater is not a super profitable industry. It's actually the film producers who gets a very large share of your ticket price, and that's why the popcorn is. So bloody expensive and of course, producers have the option of bypassing Simas going straight to the net fixes of this world aretha finding. Other ways to monetize by going straight to viewers in their homes whereas cinemas actually need movies to come out to get people through their doors molly through there till. So it is a very, very tricky time for

Patty Jenkins United States UK James Bond Aretha Odeon Hollywood Simas Director
Two New Bodies and Upgradingor Not - and more

PetaPixel Photography Podcast

05:22 min | 2 years ago

Two New Bodies and Upgradingor Not - and more

"Now that the Sony a-7 seven s mark, three's been released I've got some thoughts about it, and if you listen to the show for a while, you know that I used to own the originally seven s a body that while pretty darn amazing was not perfect I mean we're talking five plus years ago or so my old friend Paul Giro's sonar is in somebody I've known for a long time since way back when I was in. College and he was a photo journalist in Phoenix Arizona not only gave me the push to launch this podcast. He also introduced me to the murless world without his encouragement. It might have been a few years before had serious experience with murless and if you forgotten the story or just haven't heard it, I, ordered the Sony a seven ass the a six, thousand incredible Zeiss fifty, five, millimeter, one eight, which is unbelievably sharp and Sony's Seventy Two Hundred F. Four all amount, not only that they day after they arrived I, shot the Utah State High School Football Championships with them a day. Later that was crazy I also brought my Nikon d four s with me but I don't think I even took it out once I shot the games with that tiny town little a six thousand which I still have and guess what I still got the shots I needed I have done. Significantly better with the deforest of course, but I wanted to put the Sony gear through its paces and that was definitely a good way of testing it. The A six thousand was great for action and there was light aplenty. So I S O wasn't an issue ISO also not an issue with the a seven ass where it failed of course was in shooting action though it's just not made for that. We're talking the original a seven. Ass Sony design their various lines of murless bodies to be purpose built. You know the a seven are was for resolution the a six thousand line was the gateway drugs I called it into mere less for Sony the a seven is your all around camera and the nine for action. Of course, the seven ass being for low light shooting and video or was since then they've Kinda all matured and they kind of dabble capably in each. Other's areas I like that a seven ass but I didn't love it. You know it could see in the dark and that was pretty darn amazing. But for what I was shooting at the time, it just didn't cut it. So I got rid of it. I had my defoe ass after all and later on at the D. seven fifty and then later came the as seven asked mark too which was way better. I didn't get one. Though and now finally the a seven asked mark three a body that if you're shooting in crappy lighting conditions a lot, let's say mainly, this is the body that you want. Sony. As we know has been absolutely killing it for years now. So at this point, you just can't go wrong with a Sony and that's coming from Fuji. Film. Guy If you need and that's the operative word here need full frame and DSR's are dead to. You go Sony I mean you just do if you want a pse crop, you go Fuji Film, take the savings on not having a buy full frame glass and then you just call it good and good the a seven ass is not great. Great is the word you're looking for it has a twelve megapixel backside illuminated sima sensor. Okay. That's where I probably lost something. You guys right it's still has a twelve megapixel sensor will. Yeah. The goal isn't massive resolution. It's light sensitivity. So you keep the mega pixels lower and with each iteration of these cameras, you can not only shoot in lower light. Those images are going to be less normally you're just not going to see a twenty four Megapixel, a seven S. model for at least five years or more, and honestly they could wait a decade and we'll be just fine I. think the very next one the. Mark Four, which would probably see in two to three years from now, at most is going to be sixteen Megapixel, you just wouldn't go higher than that. If you're GONNA want low light sensitivity and smooth nice noise free for the most part images you go higher in the Megapixel and all of sudden that's all mostly out the window besides who needs all. Those mega pixels when people are increasingly viewing your images and video on a smartphone or tablet rather than a computer. So there's that. Now what is new in this body is that has incredibly fast readout speeds a native ISO range of eighty on up to I s O. One hundred and two, thousand, four, hundred that's unbelievable and that's things to the new. Processor you can also capture four K. video at up to one hundred, twenty P and four K. Sixty P ten bit for to two with no pixel binning or line skipping and sixteen bit pro res- raw out the HDMI port up to four K. Sixty. P.

Sony Mark Four Paul Giro Nikon Utah State High School Phoenix Arizona Fuji Defoe
Jackie Ruiz: Author, Publisher, Aviation Lover

EAA's The Green Dot - An Aviation Podcast

04:02 min | 2 years ago

Jackie Ruiz: Author, Publisher, Aviation Lover

"Get started like like we almost always liked to do and I go back to the beginning a little bit. What was your? What was your first exposure to aviation? How did you first get involved? Well you know a lot of people ask me where this passion king from. Certainly wasn't for my childhood because in Mexico growing out both you know middle class family the SIMA flying planes. So I was just not in the not on the menu and My first sort of experience was a beautiful hot air balloon. So here in Illinois and I happen to spot this beautiful lights craft I thought it was kind of a toy airplane and as we approached this day said, no you Texas fly aircraft and we immediately my husband and I purchased the discovery flights and I think it was the first time that flying that aircraft with no doors on. Feeling freedom and those wings It just like it was like Lois Recite About how long ago was that? I was probably about six years ago and I started. Sort of you know like it's almost like sometimes you find ambition find a passion and sometimes the passion finds a way to find you and I think that that's how it started to kind of fit into every part of my life with the ideation school asking me if I could do their marketing and then being invited to an island to keynote or three hundred soldiers and my finding a way to get there with the traffic that this growed represented asking. To give me a ride in but you know sort of opened up this whole world of. Possibilities I looked at a section I said What if I can fly myself to places launch in breakfast thing and see the beautiful sunset either y you know if I could do that and Anything that bug. Just seeped into my heart and never loved me. So it's been about five years and got my license, my sports pilotless inside two years ago in July. It's awesome. Yeah and it's a great great sign that when you did that discovery flight with the doors off, you enjoyed it I. I've done a couple of young eagles flights in the zenith. We we had an are flying club where we we pull the doors off which I love a pilot but sometimes I look over there and that that Young Eagle was a baby in the seat a little. A little too hard. So say there's a little getting used to. Yeah. Yeah. That's that's good that you enjoyed it Why did you go sport pilot? Why? Why did you Y how? Why was that a good fit for you? I the school that I was But I basically, with were kind of experts saying you know light sport aircraft, which is the new that BFA introducing two, thousand, four and It seemed to be you know hobby it seemed to be a wonderful way for me to get my hands but you know just kind of getting to the beginning to the industry and You know running to companies and nonprofit organizations in between my travels around the world I, Kinda wanted to see how Would you know fulfill my life and in in in this passion continues to grow. And I just found that aside an amazing stone having the responsibility of three passengers just one. Done by Katie. To to really you know to make that happen. So in hindsight now back and say, well, I I wish I would have gone straight to my private but the experience all the hours and a gain to close one hundred, fifty hours on the four aircraft You know I, it's it's just getting more confidence that I can fly bigger aircraft and now I mean they journey of getting my

Katie BFA Mexico Lois Illinois Texas
That history should not repeat: Hiroshimas storytellers

The Economist: The Intelligence

08:16 min | 2 years ago

That history should not repeat: Hiroshimas storytellers

"Seventy, five years ago, this week, the B twenty, nine, bomber, Nola gay dropped little boy, the world's first use of an atomic weapon. At Eight fifteen in the morning of August six Japanese time. The first atomic thumb has done enemy talk. It detonated over. Hiroshima immediately killing around one hundred and forty. Thousand People I'm was aimed to explode about zero point. In the city at the junction of. Untold River. Three days later, another stroke sake. As Japan marks the anniversary, it hopes to keep the wartime memories alive using the stories of people who survived the attacks. On all. Holland. But the average age of survivors is now over eighty three. But those. This'll be the last chance to hear from those witnesses during a major anniversary. August sixth nineteen forty five was supposed to be a day off for seventeen year old. Takeo to Toco. No Snyder is the economists Tokyo Bureau chief. She had made plans to meet two girlfriends at eight fifteen owning at a train station on the west side of Shema. She was running late, and then she stepped outside, she saw flash and heard a bang. Which you regained consciousness, she found herself lying thirty meters away a mushroom cloud rising over the city. People with charts skin peeling from their arms rushing over a nearby hillside. Mr K. Ohka left's to look for her mother. and. Found rivers filled with bodies took her six days to locate her mom who is still miraculously alive. Mom lived for another twenty two years. We stuck ohka became a prominent voice amongst the hypocrisy shower, atomic bomb survivors, atomic sufferers. Telling Her story abroad many times in hopes of preventing atomic bombs from ever being used again. I heard this tale from her daughter. He got no. Mario. Who's part of a fascinating unique project underway in both your Sima Nagasaki to help preserve the stories, of Hypoxia, for generations to come to, how does this project work? So there are still some hundred and thirty thousand living. inbox. Amiss. Gone. But their average age is now over eighty three and the number who can tell their stories publicly is declining drastically. Just. You got the fact that could have done this. So the city government's in both fishermen sake have been recruiting scores of volunteers like music Otieno to become what they call dense Shosha or legacies successors. These are essentially memory keepers, people who learned the stories of the hypoxia down to the most gruesome details in order to be able to retell them with power and veracity for years into the future do. So the volunteers in, Hiroshima, have to go through a rather rigorous course, three years of study training discussion with hypoxia before they're allowed to retell the stories in public. Ms Higashi, no is somewhat unusual in that. She inherited own story, most of the Dan Shosha, take on a stranger's burden. And it simply because that's that generation of of survivors passing that the these city governments have started this program. Yeah, it is. It's really reflective of the anxiety that many people in here, C.`mon, Nagasaki and throughout Japan feel about fading wartime memories I'm what will happen. Once this generation firsthand witnesses passes away the city governments and the peace museums. Atomic bomb museums in both cities have been collecting and recording testimony for many years. But this then social program is away, they hope to preserve these memories in living form to retain the emotional impact. The comes from searing these stories from another human being. and. So where does this fit in with the the wider of up the bombing of of the war in Japan? For Japan, the Hiroshima Experience became central to wartime memory and park has some scholars have argued because it allows victim narrative to dominate shifting the focus away from the atrocities Japanese soldiers committed abroad in Asia and the Pacific certainly oaks in China and Korea have bristled at the lack of context that some of the retailing's of the aroma and Nagasaki experiences or trey. and. If you look at Japan today, it's of course, wrestling a new with the legacy of the Second World War and its aftermath in particular the constitution that America imposed on Japan after the war, which renounces war bars Japan from maintaining armed forces. In practice, Japan does maintain a powerful military which it calls the Self Defense Forces and its Prime Minister Obey Shinzo years has hoped to change the constitution to revise the constitution in order to make explicit that Japan's military is constitutional and and perhaps to expand the limits of what they're allowed to do. Curiously, the public still supports maintaining the postwar constitution. So in short pacifism is still deep seated in today's Japan. and. What about the the the effort of auction others to to learn the lessons of the second. World War d? How does nuclear non-proliferation look at this stage from where you are. Well. This is another source for concern. Of course, non-proliferation efforts in recent years have been faltering just this January. The Bulletin of Atomic Scientists. It's doomsday clock. It's subjective measure of our proximity to self-annihilation closer to midnight than anytime since its establishment in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, seven, the hawks are are pleased and take solace in the signing of the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in two, thousand, seventeen, it invokes there unacceptable suffering in its preamble and a nod to how the memory of interesting Nagasaki continues to shape non-proliferation efforts globally yet at the same time, no country with nuclear weapons has signed up to that treaty neither has Japan in fact, which shelters under America's nuclear umbrella. And, and how does that sit with Hypoxia at this stage at this anniversary being marked. I spoke with US Akihiko the governor of the prefecture, and he expressed the view that I heard from many others both your seem sake, which was a wish that Japan would use its moral authority as the only victim of atomic weapons to push harder for their abolition. The hypocrisy. Have Long gramps and spoken about abolishing the bomb before the last houses away. Just to make the do. You call. You can. That's unlikely. But the hypocrisy hope that their stories at the very least. Deter the world from ever using his weapons again. Thank you very much for your time. Thank you very much for having me.

Japan Hypoxia Hiroshima Nagasaki Bulletin Of Atomic Scientists Sima Nagasaki Untold River Mr K. Ohka Dan Shosha Toco America Takeo Holland Ms Higashi Snyder Tokyo Bureau Chief Mario United States
Nintendo Release Gaps and the Nintendo Gigaleak

Nintendo Voice Chat

05:07 min | 2 years ago

Nintendo Release Gaps and the Nintendo Gigaleak

"Hello and welcome to Nintendo voice chat I'd Jen's Nintendo podcast this week the week of July thirtieth. Today, we'll be talking about the huge release gasoline intendo bestselling games. The NINTENDO GIG leak ends a lot more I'm your host and this week I'm joined by Friday Tato. Guy Is here to join the show. Perfect. Let's he delivering today. something I might be able to show next week actually. Okay. Cool. Awesome. Okay to do that, build it. Now, I'm thinking of what it could be. A spoiler and I'm also joined today by pair. Snyder. And Zach Ryan. Hello I didn't see their. Her. How many chapters to get through your book while waiting for me together Brooke Myers retired who was supposedly. So yeah, that's true too I. Don't know how to read it. Did you get to the part where the skeleton is link yes. Very. Can, be time. Ns. Skeleton. Mr. Historic Also, have skeletons Brian I. Not. Christ. Disagree agree to disagree that's fine we can agree to disagree. But you can't agree on is that there's nothing coming out for the rest of the year from Nintendo at least as far as we now. Agree on that. Disagree. Last week we got a mini direct, but we still don't know anything that is coming from Nintendo specifically for the rest of this year pair went ahead and put together a really awesome lists. You might of seen it if you follow his twitter about. that. We haven't seen in wild that might be coming I. Say my I mean, this is super speculative. We really don't know but I thought it'd be interesting to go over this list of games to see how many years it's been since we've gotten a new installment of games. Probably. Doesn't say that we're the ones. It's been the longest since we've seen but maybe Now see that's what I was trying to get a I was trying to figure out. All right. Is there a certain cadence and I haven't done this in the past to look at whether there's a certain cadence when intendo renews these Games they there is right Nintendo in order to keep keep the franchises going they. They send life signs out but that doesn't necessarily mean a new installment in May, mean a character inclusion in smash or you know like putting NFC or track in Nintendo land stuff like that. So I don't I don't know how helpful it is to to actually predict what is going to come out and what will come out because like at first I was like. The Games that sell the most are the games that Nintendo puts on a schedule to be renewed at least every four years, and then you go while hold on his animal crossing sold forty million or something at the series, and we have to wait eight years eight years animals. New Leaf right right. But they did have a mobile released. So you know they kind of unhappy designer everyone loved happy. Home Design. Side. So happy home designer. Dave count. Twenty thirteen. They count in the way that they're both animal crossing products. That's definitely fall under the same umbrella. Look. Do. You want to talk about the ones that haven't been renewed in a long time or you know maybe our guest is like I. Think Everybody here has the list in front of them but like our guesses what we think will be revisited next. Yes. Yes, let let's really quickly recap in the last five years. We've gotten paper. Mario Animal. Crossing we've gotten to poke them on like we always get new pok months, Yoshi Lewis Mansion, fire emblem, and some of these like had big gaps. It had been kind of a year since we had another Louisi- mansion it had been. There all been short, really short gaps between these games like Mario and Zelda and Mario Party like they're not long gaps within the games that we haven't seen in the past ten years. They always have really long gaps. It seems. Yeah, I mean the nets Roy yeah. There's a lot of metro happening though you know there was there was a brief period there with with prime. Prime two prime three. Metro Fusion Metro Observer Mission. The Ball Three D. S. and. There's a lot of metro I feel like in a very short timeframe, and then now it's just been forever since we've seen a metro. A new one right we got Simmons returns overseas so. We're looking at kind of they are shortening the gap between with remakes and that's what happened with link's awakening obviously to right we got link's awakening to take the spot in between you know the mixed breath of the wild, the last one, and certainly that happened with metro to with Simas returns and the other game that shall not be named.

Nintendo Fusion Metro Observer Mission Mario Animal Zach Ryan Brooke Myers Snyder Dave Count Yoshi Lewis Mansion ROY Simmons Mr. Historic Also Simas Louisi Mario Brian Mario Party Zelda
Elon Musk's Starlink internet-from-space satellites leave astronomers 'frustrated'

The Tech Guy

05:45 min | 2 years ago

Elon Musk's Starlink internet-from-space satellites leave astronomers 'frustrated'

"I want to go back to starling for this episode. That's the. That's the thing that I'm very torn about. An many photographers are very torn about because on the one hand. They promise this this fast Internet for almost everyone anywhere because it comes from satellites, but on the other hand there are asked to photographers and. astronomers who are not that happy about this because. What these satellites do and definitely, or you're likely have seen articles about it. They add new light dots to the sky, and those dots are turned out to be bit of a problem so now I have to say though this is musk's spacex and they're going to plan a launch guest Dan back. As twelve thousand of them, there's already hundreds in the air, but one thing they did talk to astro photographers, and they understood their concerns. They are now putting a sun shade on these satellite something. No other satellites do so That's and that's what I wanted to explain what? To what's actually happening than what the reason for this is, so? They initially had one of the satellites with the White Antenna Arrays, being painted black just to see if that would. well first of all reduce enough lights to to make them more invisible, and also about, and it turned out. This didn't really work because they were heating up too much, and they were blacks colors space. And they weren't reflecting infrared now. I got good for for watching the sky, so that didn't really work and. I think we have to I. Look into what is the problem because when you WanNa, take a photo of the sky and of the night sky, or if you have a telescope, and you WANNA take an exposure off whatever faraway galaxy, then you will too along exposure, and that long exposure means. Things that move during that exposure will be visible under picture so instead of having just a dot from a satellite you have a stripe, or in case of x and the and the starting system, Yup multiple strike especially when these satellites have been launched, and when they're still on their way to the final orbit, which takes weeks or This is nothing new, but with the prospect of maybe one hundred times more satellites in the sky, it might be a little problematic. So so. I'm I'm kind of happy. That's basic is listening. Trying. So they tried the what they call dark sat, which is the painted sat and that didn't really work and then. As you said they are now, have a test satellite up which has visor that shades these parts from the from from the sun, so there won't be sun falling on those areas of the satellite that are reflective that doesn't mean the satellite won't be there, and it won't block late, but at least it will afflict collect light. And it will also not make them completely invisible to the astronomers what they are looking for what they're trying is they wanna make them invisible for the naked eye, and now they have worked with an observatory to really understand the problem and it. The problem is not necessarily that there will be additional things on the paper. Because what these? What these sky watchers do, is they? They do what's called stacking. They take multiple photos and right. Take out what is different between them. So that's a method that is is being in use already. The big problem is that these telescopes use what's called CCD sensors, though if you if you're in your camera in your Ds Alanya Murless Camera, you probably have a a C. Moss sensor and the Sima. Censor If you overexposed Pixel, then that's pixel that's over exposed. The rest is not affected. What happens with the CD's is that. If you overexposed group of pixels from pretty bright satellite like if those are really saturated pixels if there is if they are what we call blown out, then that has the chance to to affect more than just these pixels. It might affect an entire row of pixels. It's called blooming, so that takes good. Might knockout an entire row of other pixels, and that is the big problem, so. What they are working now on is several things. The first is the the visors. To reduce the reflectively. And the second is that they as soon as those satellites are in their in their final. Like. Five hundred and fifty kilometers up there. they have their their solo areas, which are also reflective what they call a shocking configuration, so it stands on top of the satellite, so she look at it. It's pointing away from the earth and what they can do is and what they're planning to do. Is they planning slightly? Rotate the satellites in a way that the the the the the whole era isn't visible from the Earth so. Reflections are pretty much shielded that way too so there's multiple things they are doing. To to get a hold of this, they have that. We don't really have results just yet I think as of today there's there's one of these visor satellites up there, but they seem to be so convinced that this is going to work that they are. At. They are planning to have all the satellites from now on quickly these visors.

Ds Alanya Murless Camera Spacex Musk DAN C. Moss
Direct Connections - Chuck & Matt McMurray

Talking Mopars

09:48 min | 2 years ago

Direct Connections - Chuck & Matt McMurray

"All right introducing my guests for the first edition of direct connections. Chuck mcmurray and his son. Matthew mcmurray guys. Are you doing good good and happy Easter by the way Yeah Happy Easter? Do you guys to before we get into your current mo par endeavors. Let's rewind time a little bit and chocolate start with you. What got you into Mope ours. So it's an interesting thing. There was a A nineteen eighty eight hot rod magazine. Maybe it was car craft and they had the the top ten fastest cars of all time and they were measuring the cars in various road courses in quarter miles and things like that and so you know at the age of thirteen. I was really into like Lamborghini. Coon Tauch Ferraris did not the cars and car that owned the quarter mile for that particular top. Ten that they did was a sixty two Max Wedge Dart Right which is the opposite looking of a Lamborghini coon touch and I was just completely floored that something that was that ugly could be that fast and so that kind of caught my eye and from then on I just started picking up reading magazines and kind of following the Mo par story and of course once you get into the four twenty six Hemi content and you realize how many engines they own in straight line racing. They've been pretty much the dominant force when it comes to top fuel and those types of engines and things and so I stuck with it then Got Into my own cars. When I was fourteen. My Dad let me by a seventy four valiant with three hundred bucks out of a walgreens parking lot in Chicago knew nothing about it. You know toward the slant six out and and learned the hard way and After that got into a sixty six cornet and from then on it was it became pretty natural to me to be able to fix stuff was always kind of good with my hands and just fell in love with the brand which was weird because in the early nineties you know. Mo- par didn't have nearly what they have today. Or what the late sixties so sure it was definitely a hard time to be the underdogs so to speak. Definitely Matthew. What about you? Obviously your dad had to have some sort of influence on you and your love of no go ahead. Go ahead and tell your side of the story. Yes so I mean I've actually got two different peaks Because I'm interested in both old offers annual And the the new generation are and actually both have to drexel cars that he's bought so that goes twelve years old. My Dad Decides to tell me. Hey we're going up to Wisconsin and we're GONNA TALK HUNDRED DOLLAR. Nineteen Sixty six dodge. Coronet THE ROAD. Kill the road kill influence. We actually did have a pretty big influence. And I can't leave that part out because I started watching roadkill with him and that definitely sparked the interest in him to want to go and fight in this car. So it's kind of whole cycle on. We started with them. And so when up to Wisconsin? We bought this car and drove at six hours home and it was incredible. That was we almost did. Maybe almost didn't make it. We ended up. You ended up getting home all right and we spent six months with that car before we decided to try it out for our newest nineteen seventy-three Dodge coronet which we still have today. But then so that's my interest in Olmo parts. That's how it all started and now since day. I'm actually driving a nineteen seventy seven plymouth. Which we bought on Saint Patrick's Day this year green current Saint Patrick's Day in and right around the same time my dad decides to get a two thousand ten dodge challenger Archie. And I'll be honest at first I was not kind of it. I was Kinda weird new car. He's always had cars around and then we decided to take it out to route. Sixty six raceway out here. Julia took it down the track. And I for some reason to seeing the car out on the track comparing its other cars. My Dad was out there I was like this is so awesome just the track experience everything about it and pretty much that moment on just seeing the cargo down the track during during a testing tune into it was awesome. Was that your first time at the drag strip. No I've been since I was like three dragged him out every summer and spring we would go down there and go to the MCA events and took him to the Shows when he was so young. The only thing you wanted to do is by matchbox cars and free ice cream. I think the influence of seeing enough of it you know. He started to kind of pick up the hobby and took to it. Pretty naturally right on right on well now that we have a little bit of your background. Let let me ask you a couple of questions. We get into your businesses journey. What do you guys think about? The current mopey marketplace as far as where pricing is for not only project mopeds that are classics but also fully restored Mo- parse. How do you feel about that? You know it's interesting Because you know we've done worked for retailers in the automotive market we've kind of followed where the investment Moped level cars have gone since you know after the economy crashed in two thousand nine and it really got inflated right. It was almost frightening to think that if you wanted to go out and get a four forty four a barrel automatic body that you're GONNA be spending at least forty thousand dollars for something so that was crazy but I am happy that the market is recognized that these cars important enough to put the money into them and take care of them because so many of them just got left out in the weeds and crushed and everything else. So it's been interesting to see kind of how that's continued to change over time but what? I found what I found really interesting where you know. The price of the aftermarket is gone. It's actually a lot cheaper now than it was so many years ago to be able to build engines and get parts. There's you know we went to. Sima last Fall and you know you go to the Diamond Piston booth. And there's four different piston types just for the four hundred in a low deck engines. There was stuff we dreamt of twenty five years ago so I think that's great and the new stuff has certainly respond generation in the market You know it's challenging that hell cats. Are you know to get into one now? If you're going to get into a used one you're probably looking at forty forty five thousand but the demons you know. They're still at that inflated price is you know even with all the incentives you're still looking at a seventy thousand dollars. Eighty thousand carbajal are also buying a ten second. Turnkey Quebec killer so I guess that does make sense. But it's it's really exciting time and I think It has never been good to be a mope or guys it is at least in the last couple of years and my personal. I definitely agree. What about you matthew? What do you think about? These prices are the crazy. Or what for me definitely barely for anything that any of these cars I see him? I'll go on facebook marketplace a lot. Just dream you know. Look at Ebadi's I'll look at peabody charters and stuff and I'm just thinking to myself like if it weren't for the fact that he was into the stuff I would just continue to dream and but I think that it's words at is pretty good because if you look at the comparison of other domestic vehicles New prices used prices. They're they're pretty expensive and I mean it's when you're in the restoration market alone. You're looking at expensive prices anyways. When you're going to get into a project you know you're GONNA be spending money but I would definitely say that. For where things are you know. Where the economy is. I think that the prices are very reasonable and and for some cars for some. I feel like you know the demon. The inflation should go down. I'm hoping it goes down as I just I mean. It's an incredible carbon. I just one hundred and thirty nine hundred now. Let me ask you both this. Do you think that 'cause I I've been seeing almost a divide between modern moped enthusiasts and the the old school guys for lack of a better term. Do you think it takes a little bit of fun out of the equation when you go out him by say a demon or even a hell cat or a hell cat red eye because they're already fast out of the box so like you know you dump will say fifty thousand or a hundred thousand plus on a car you know unless your pockets are really deep. I mean how much modification are you really going to do? How much fun are you really going to have aside from just turning the key in going? Do you think that those cars take the fun out of it you know? It's it's a twenty to say that because we've we've really Invested in in both old and new and having a two thousand fourteen thirty eight that ran he got an eleven ninety. Three out of it with soft tires out of the box mods and It was neat. Because you know out of the box you can go that fast but at the same time. There really wasn't a lot that you could touch easily. If you'RE GONNA make one modification you need at least a tune and with a tune in a few modifications if you put the Karni Eleven's then you need to start trason Dr Line making improvements and so it's really never just a bolt on. It's a few thousand bucks so you know I'd say that it's reinvigorated the market but I would agree that there seems to be kind of a divide between the folks that did restoration and were part of this for thirty or forty years and what the new market has done but in some ways it has kind of taken the fun out of. I think you know when when you can get in a red eye in run ten teens or high nines to do that in a body would require a lot more. Yeah so it makes it easier if you are not mechanically inclined and you don't have tools but at the same time it has reset the bar for. What is a fast car? So it's a it's interesting right but they're also forty six hundred pounds. So you know the safety equipment. My concern with a lot of those cars. What happens if you do have something happen at the end? I mean forty six hundred pound car versus twenty. Eight hundred pound. Cars is a lot more inertia

Matthew Mcmurray Wisconsin MO Saint Patrick Lamborghini Coon Tauch Ferraris Chuck Mcmurray Dodge Coronet Olmo Facebook MCA Chicago Julia Quebec Sima Ebadi
"sima" Discussed on Geek Girls Universe Podcast

Geek Girls Universe Podcast

02:41 min | 2 years ago

"sima" Discussed on Geek Girls Universe Podcast

"Hey geeks it's jan ashley. Thanks for joining us for this episode of the girls universe. Podcasts your place for the latest geek and fandom news welcome back friends to the geek. Girls universe podcast today. We're talking friend. Mary kill marvel addition. But it's not exactly what you're thinking it's more like front stands for character or actor actress. Be like but we're okay with never seeing them again. Mary means the casting is perfect. And we don't want them to leave us ever and kill well. It's you know whoever we think doesn't really belong in the mcu and that could mean the character casting or story live we are looking at you fantastic for and dark phoenix but will take joining us. Today is our good nerdy friend and marvel brother mike. You can find mike on twitter and instagram. At mike y. U. a. n. Eighty two might introduce yourself to our listeners. Hi everyone i'm mike. I'm a big marvel fan. I'm also onto other podcasts. But today let's not talk about that. Let's talk about marvel steph. I'm so glad to be here with you guys where you're super excited to have you. Yes and those podcasts. Mike is talking about has a what you talking. Podcast which is about kim's convenience and room escape divas escape room podcast. We'll have the links to those on our website as well chris. So if you've listened to our previous episode about unpopular fandom opinions. And if you haven't you should definitely go back for that one. You might remember us mentioning a mike who had a very unpopular opinion. He doesn't think sim you should show his avs and shang. So yes that. Is this mike that we're talking to today. So mike before we talk about mary kill. Why are you trying to rob of his time. Shine literally because you know those. Ads oiled up and glistening. Why why do you have this opinion. Make the radio listeners. They need to know as you mentioned. I do a podcast on kim's convenient. So i i have met seem you a bunch of times and i've had to grind through that material over and over again so when you're watching the scenes for the hundred time and you see see moo you know. He's taking off his shirt and it's all nicely oil than everything it's like. I've seen enough to sima with his shirt off and even in person like he's i've seen him with their shirt off so it's like getting you know i'm good. I'm good. I don't need any more shirtless sima. I think i'd be okay grinding..

mike y. U. Mary mike kim marvel sima twitter
Office Romance Gone Wrong

My Favorite Murder with Karen Kilgariff and Georgia Hardstark

03:10 min | 2 years ago

Office Romance Gone Wrong

"Let's get to it And then she put an asterix. I changed names out of respect for victims human and She did which is Great. I also pulled out a detail she left and because I think it's very indicative. It's almost I changed another name but not of a person's got word. Shandon name words easier back in my twenties. I worked at a TV network where I helped produce all of the horribly wonderful countdown shows. You only really watched when you were hung over while working there. I made friends with a guy named Henry whenever anyone in the company needed anything. You always called him. He was very popular Charmian. Good looking man anyway. He became romantically involved with a coworker of mine will call her Jenny. It was under the radar for a while. But after a few months they decided to dot dot dot get married red flag in all caps. Oh the next boy. Yeah and the news of their marital bliss was the talk of our office cut to six months later they were separated and Jenny moves in with her sister. Anna who was also a coworker a one day shortly after their break up. I'm leaving work to get into an elevator with him. We have some small Chitchat. I asked him what he's up to that night. He says not much the elevator doors open. I say have a great night and I'll see them tomorrow except I don't see him tomorrow that night. He goes over to his sister-in-law's house where genius staying to bring her a few things she had left after she moved out. J. Invites him in. They have some wine. They're actually getting along well until they don't a few hours later. They start to argue and he becomes enraged. He pulls out a knife and starts stabbing her thirteen times to be exact. Jenny Sister Anna. Here's the screen. She runs to her sister's room where she sees Henry stabbing her Anna tries to stop him but he turns towards her and starts to strangle her. Oh my God and as able to kick herself free and gets away but she but he chases her down the stairs and started stabbing her with broken wine glass. Anna manages to grab the wine glass during the struggle. And this bad ass bitch stabbed Henry the nuts twice Steven Steven instead of physical react. Fana runs out of the house where he keeps chasing her. She's able to make it to the neighbor's house safely. Henry stops in the driveway and stabs himself in the chest and slits his wrists. Oh my God. Detective at the scene said it was the bloodiest crime scene. He'd ever seen in his thirty years on the job. And that's in Los Angeles Holy Shit. Jenny died at the scene Anna. Her sister survived. Henry didn't stab himself. Deep enough of course and was convicted of second degree murder and involuntary manslaughter and received twenty one point five years to life in prison. I'd say that's not enough everyone. It's a murderer. Yeah Yeah it's still hard to shake that I actually knew noah murderer and someone that's been murdered. Stay sexy and be careful of office. Romances as she wrote. Sima dating in. La Really does so. Hey Man

Jenny Sister Anna Henry Shandon Charmian Sima Noah Steven Steven Los Angeles Second Degree Murder Involuntary Manslaughter
Photographing Women in a Conflict Zone

This Week in Photo

07:58 min | 2 years ago

Photographing Women in a Conflict Zone

"All right he would need a welcome to this week in photo. It's a pleasure to have you on the show. Thank you yeah no. This is great. This is really great as we were. We were talking about before I started recording. I'm really excited to do interviews with people that are. They're doing real work in photography and using their cameras to not just for the sake of you know taking pretty pictures but to actually tell stories. And that's what this interview is all about so I'm excited to be doing this part of the Fuji Series with you. You're right now. You're based currently right now. You're in Colombia. And you know you're you're like we said in the intro your photographer based in Columbia. Let's start with the beginning so before we dive into the piece that you did around their wrinkle. Let's talk about the. What led you to be a photographer. Why why is when Nita photographer right now I started. I got in love Kelly I started to work seating months since when I was seventeen you I quit school and a have degradable to to join Both Sima and I continue the whole movie like to mom so I discover like this fashion two stories to the come around basically due to give storm so after these movie I joined on these people I learnt with them for the years of my career then I decided to do stories just with a comment about the beginning was and we'd seen him on really well so why why why the transition to still photos from cinema. Why not continue with with motion for me? I wanted to be defeat lightly and cinematographer actor and I was doing like these to training myself and so from the beginning of the camera. Mice field bad to just Like a few department but also I was very touched by documentary and I wanted to do mentoring but then I realized I was very young but I was seventeen and then I realized that being among all these speed bull and moving with the such amount of people who was not that E. C. N. Not that easy for me to to find a quick Dissatisfaction we did with the stories. I wanted to start from each year to go to travel out of the descend and start with my oncoming So and I had the opportunity to to go and travel with a friend photographer to award team the planes so so I was able to sign my sales. Y'All sweet the commerce and I preferred These these non leanness and these T. Messy saw as soon as I say what was like the first assignment just would become. I decided that I prepared these instead of being Group of people photography depending on the genre photography. It's it could be very solitary and therapeutic for a lot of people where you just Kinda go out by yourself and capture these stories but like we read in the story that you you published on full blog. Refer DOT COM. The the solitariness is an aspect that you have to be aware of especially when you're doing stories like you did around the rink. Oh River right. It's not necessarily the safest environment can you? Can you tell us about just how that particular story came to be? And what drove you to create? Yes when I told you that I started very young here we do and I can that links the audio so huge region one of the Sikhs Reunion Columbia and it's almost like easily so all the rivers goals to the walker reader which is because Sweden region as I arrived in two thousand seven and two one bar the region but not not not so I started this erste eight years and say to to become a photographer and true telling the stories of the genitals. Char the cowboys in America or the team so I was working like a we. Don unto policies going with them. By course we'd all descended notable Alana's and living with them by Morrison's many use and by reading so all the time they'll be norcal I never. I was never been nobody all the time. Whilst Reference Geographic referencing quitter restaurants. As well time I want to go there. We was nightclub. Oh one once. Arriving was like Connecticut Journey for me. I tried to borrow once but by course. It was very complicated. We just need like one or two and we go look. We went back and so he was until two thousand fifty. That for the time I arrive by won't likely now the Twin Towers to buy By DMITAR even and I are rightful decision sciences building so it was not the something new because I was never been there but was like my goal always to arrive. There was. What was it like when you when you got up? So a twelve hour journey on the boat. And then you arrive there. What was that like having that? Been Your that being your goal for such a long time like a like a result like a all. These previous years was was there at same time and and get like empowering these moments of being facing an enormous river and Oldham needs that I caught before the previous idea. There was like more money. She sank and season Thursday. Sixers contact I I will. I knew that I had to stay there and leave their and explored sweeter. So how long did you did you say there and explore the river and I have been. I came back Team days ago. And it's just now okay. It's new and senior working. There are now here young means you bud is a small town. A declaims is like the department is the next department next to the visa which is worth noting local east so I am in the same region and I see leaving here

Oh River Fuji Twin Towers Sikhs Reunion Columbia Colombia Columbia Kelly America Alana Oldham Morrison Walker Sweden
Uncut Gems, Little Women, Microsoft Project Silica, Instagram Profits.

Photography Radio

06:22 min | 2 years ago

Uncut Gems, Little Women, Microsoft Project Silica, Instagram Profits.

"As photographers animators or just digital content creators. Many of us may lament. How. Instagram has changed over the years since facebook bought instagram. Back in twenty twelve for one billion dollars which seems like an insane amount of money to pay for an APP. That didn't have a clear monetization model eight years later. We can see how facebook has integrated ads on the most popular photo sharing platform and according to Bloomberg Business. The one billion dollar investment is paying back at least twenty full. According to insider information from Bloomberg INSTAGRAM's total ad revenue from twenty thousand nineteen was twenty billion dollars a quarter of facebook's total ad revenue for that year now just as a comparison YouTube AD revenue for Twenty nineteen was just over fifteen billion dollars and remember youtube shares or profits from that revenue with their content creators. Instagram does not if these numbers are real first of all that is a lot of revenue second if facebook is creating this much revenue from this platform like Youtube. I think there should be financial compensation for content creators who helped generate this much income for facebook. This may be one of the reasons. Why Many Power Users on Instagram Aka influencers have to use outside sponsors to try to make a living to generate income for themselves? And at the same time. It's something that instagram appears to be trying to curb claiming that it makes the platform and these accounts less transparent or in the least Craig contests I think and pay artists that are featuring instagram's main account and perhaps have monthly features to charities that they donate to more evidence that facebook is not reinvesting back into the platform is when CEO instagram. Adam massery in recent posts on instagram claim that the reason why there is no instagram for IPAD was because he lacked resources. You can believe that now. If a company like facebook only uses inscribed as a vehicle to generate profit without ever giving back to the company itself as well as those who helped make the platform successful I think many will gladly jump ship when it competing platform comes around to usurp instagram and become the new leading social media photo and video sharing platform twitch or talk. Anyone last week I talked about the possible end of the Microsoft Platform and the evidence seemed pretty clear with Panasonic joining the like elmont alliance and the Olympics is recent flagship. The OIL MD EM one more threes lukewarm reception due to mediocre specs on their flagship. However there has been some news that appears to a point in the other direction report out of Japan says that in one thousand nine hundred nineteen the microphone. Third System took number one spot in market share with nineteen point eight percent of all digital interchangeable lens camera sold in Japan in two thousand nineteen. So that is very surprising for many of us here in. North America or Europe. But I've found over the years that the Japanese market is not always the best indicator of Global Trans Japan makes way more money selling to the US and the European market versus own domestic market and the domestic market tends to be a bit quirkier odd know for a fact that small compact and as I mentioned quirky cameras sell well in Japan as well as in much of South Asia. Even though the sales of these cameras maybe duds in the rest of the world as an example the Nikon one and the Pentax q system sold very well in Japan but that trend didn't really sit well with the rest of the world that it whoever it is interesting to see that microphone. Thirds is not only doing well in Japan but it is a number one platform in Japan and again. I'm not surprised in the sense that small and compact and sometimes quirky cameras do very well in the domestic market. But another piece of news that made me think about the popularity of the micro third system and something. Maybe I'm missing here. Is that both Olympics and Panasonic made joint media announcement. Recently that young new media edge Venus optics are all joining the microphone. Third Systems Standard Group. Which means they'll that there will be developing products that lenses camera lights and other accessories specific for the microphone third system which is great for those that currently are invested in the microphone thirds cameras finally on the same day that they made this announcement casino. Japan just announced the new Voice Lander knocked-on Sixty millimeter f point. Nine five lands which has a hundred and twenty millimeter coolant. Thirty five millimeter. A very high performance Lens. So perhaps I have to eat my words from last week. About the end of micro four thirds that perhaps there is a future for this smaller format and platform. Which really is a good thing? I've always said that. Competition is good including competing formats however my point from last week still stands true that Sony really needs to update that old twenty megapixel sensor with something more modern backside luminated Sima Sensor with phased attacked autofocus across entire surface and perhaps an upgrade up to twenty four megapixel my pick for photographer. The Week is previously mentioned Wilson Web. Now we've already talked about Webs of work on the movie little woman as the onset photographer as well as shooting these wet plates for the actors you also worked on other notable movies such as marriage story the secret life of Walter Mitty Zoo lander to men in black three. He started his career in the movie industry. So he's an onset photographer as well as a DP director photography and camera operator.

Facebook Instagram Japan Youtube Bloomberg Instagram Panasonic Global Trans Japan Walter Mitty Zoo Bloomberg Business Nikon Microsoft Olympics South Asia Oil Md Sony Adam Massery North America Wilson Web
Coronavirus Outbreak: How Scared Should You Be?

Science Vs

10:35 min | 2 years ago

Coronavirus Outbreak: How Scared Should You Be?

"New virus infecting infecting people in China with the number of cases. Going up and up there are nearly three hundred confirmed cases eight hundred thirty convert cases. This is now heading towards three thousand more than forty five hundred have been infected. China has gone into full blown crisis mode building new hospitals closing schools and shutting shutting down transport between cities effectively putting millions of people on the lock down. The country has quarantined multiple cities. The streets are deserted. Shops shops are shut. It is cut off from the rest of the world but still their cases showing up around the world cases confirmed in Japan South Korea and Thailand in Europe Australia to the United States right now though. The vast majority of infected people are in China as of January thirtieth. That's today Chinese. As officials have reported almost ten thousand confirmed cases and more than two hundred people have died. The head of the World Health Organization has just raised the alert level. I'm declaring a public emergency of international concerned today on the show we're going to ground zero talk to a doctor in China who's treating patients now. We'll also talk to researches who tracing this virus back to its source and trying to figure out how bad this whole thing might might get a few months ago we didn't episode about a fictionalized pandemic with things got pretty bad will be anything like that and finally we will hear from the man who is advising the president about this outbreak. We have only five minutes Wendy five minutes without the president in the room. Well I can't tell you it was to stop let's head to Ground Zero Wuhan the CD in China where this virus broke out. She'll join us on condition. Luckily she is a doctor in John. Non Hospital at Ruhan University and he's seen the outbreak growth from its earliest days. Normally only works in the allergy department early in January. He got a call from his boss. Saying y'all needed elsewhere. Judicial Israel should sound law on January. Third I got a phone call from the director of our department. He said the medical services team had told us to send help to stop the virus spreading at the the time. I had no idea what I was going to get involved with that night. I was actually pretty nervous mainly because I had no idea what I was getting myself into or what I can do to help or where I'll be sent to help to shoot. Jesus in the next day he went to the hospital and because the people that were so worried about how dangerous this disease could be. Dr Way had to bundle himself into what he calls. It's a full body. Antivirus suit basically looks like a spacesuit time quoted with his hat and they'll be covered from head to toe in an antivirus suit and there's zipper which also had the Hoodie on top. Finally finishing up with an oral mask and face masks cover my whole face. His shift at the hospital was pretty calm. But then in mid-january mid-january things to Catan. It's winter over there and Dr Kway remembers that it was really cold outside and infected people will lining up at the hospital. Some some were really sick and they didn't have enough beds at the hospital that most of the patients were seated or waiting outside of the hallway standing. I felt overwhelmed and stress. Since I couldn't take care of many patients immediately. Your the disease that's infecting. People is a kind of virus cold corona virus. It's it's a family of related viruses and not all of them deadly in fact according to the CDC most people have been infected with a corona virus at some point in their lives. They typically give you just like a runny nose or a cough mild symptoms but this virus. It's new science. Didn't know no about it before for now. Scientists are calling it twenty nineteen and CR V. The novel Corona Virus and. Yeah some of the patients that's infected. They are also experiencing pretty mild symptoms but the patients that Dr Gray is saying they have high fevers some have chest and and muscle pain some have difficulty breathing. Dr kway remembers a patient that he sold one nice. Remember a more severe case Wanna made a huge impression. Russian on me was one case from before Chinese New Year around January fifteenth or sixteenth. I was working day shift. This patient was very fragile and she came in carried by her family to the hospital. She had so little spirit left in her that she couldn't even lift her head of she just seemed very fragile Schiro. She was sent to emergency care and he thinks she survived. But he's not shaw over Japan over me were totally unaware of the seriousness in time. And how many people would be infected Julia. The few currently the fatality rate of the virus is estimated to be between two full percent that means some to in every hundred people who get infected and get treatment. It meant a dying that doesn't mean that two percent of those who are infected. We'll die because that number doesn't include people who get sick have a bit of a cough. Maybe feel lousy but don't seek treatment this is all unfolding in real time though and there's still a lot we don't know so leaving the hospital next question. Where did this virus come from? There's a lot of reports beginning at two a wet market in Wuhan a place place where they sell seafood alongside porcupines foxes and snakes and other animals but then it became clear that some of the earliest patients never never been to that market. Leaving the question. Where did this virus come from? And just how long has it been infecting people for well. Really Elliott outright Chinese researchers worked out the genetic code of the Corona virus and they uploaded into an international database. They keep adding samples samples from other patients so now scientists in China and all over the world using these sequences to unravel where the virus came from and when it first emerged and one of the first things they did was to compare this viruses genetic code with other nasty viruses ones that we already know about and Bam. They found something. This virus was really similar to a virus found in bats. So we think that's bats. That's Christian Anderson. The Director of Infectious Disease Genomics at Scripps Research Institute. He's one of the scientists who's been researching the origins of this virus. The Bats Poli. Oh you don't get sick from this virus rights of the virus gets to infect pets and just sort of hang out there so this virus is hanging out in bats maybe for a while how. How did it jumped to humans? Well it might not have been a director like with SAWS which was another corona virus that emerged in two thousand and two and killed around around nine hundred people. Well that disease started in bats as well but it had what's called an intermediate host a middle animal that infected I Christian talk to produce a Marylebone about it. We know from sauce for example that there was an intermediate host as it's called recieve. It's what's a what's a sieve of it I think it's like a cat like googling it now. Oh it is yeah. It's kind of like a cat very long spotted cat it's pretty cute actual relate and okay cool. Yes so we think something similar probably happened with this corona virus to write for this virus if there was an intermediate host. We don't know what it was. An early paper suggested it might have been snakes but Christian doesn't think that's right. We also don't know how this virus arrest got from one of those animals in us. The state really don't know it's possible to animals simply just there and you know droppings or whatever around the animals people could get into contact with that. They could be traded in the market. They could be consumed for food but Christian told us that it's not surprising surprising that this happened when you have animals including humans living next to each of them. A virus has a lot of chances of leaping from one creature to announce how it happened with the ball. Love bird-flu even the bubonic plague. Okay so next question. When did this virus make make the jump? There's this idea out there that the virus has been around for awhile simmering away infecting people before the word got out Is that true well. He's how scientists like Christian finding out. First they take all those samples of the viruses from different patients. The ones that have been uploaded to the database and they compare them to each other now. And what you're going to see because viruses changed slightly over. What time is that? You're going to see that the viruses are going to be slightly different between different. Patients is a virus. Mutating all the time. It's not necessarily early dangerous mutations sometimes that just changing so the idea is that if a virus has been around for a while it will have accumulated lots of different tweaks thanks to its genetic card. There'd be lots of versions of it out there but if the virus is really knew it would look pretty much the same in every patient. Who who has it? And that's what Christian found him. He looked at the genetic code of the virus found in twenty seven patients and they were all really Sima camelot's other research has found the same thing so this means that this virus it's probably emerged really recently. Oh and what we can show is that it happens somewhere around mid November to early December based on this early research. It looks like this virus was first born on maybe in November China told the World Health Organization about it on December thirty first so this idea that the disease was simmering hiring away for ages before we knew about it Christian says now based on the genetic data we can show that. That's not what was going on. It really was a picked up very very rapidly after the break. How contagious is this new virus and if someone is infected what should you you do?

China Christian Anderson World Health Organization Director Dr Kway Japan Cough Europe Bats Poli President Trump Australia Dr Way Ruhan University Dr Gray Wendy Wuhan
What American voters want from the 2020 candidates

Here & Now

09:15 min | 2 years ago

What American voters want from the 2020 candidates

"We've been taking a deeper look at where the candidates stand and on key issues important to voters today we look at immigration. President trump ran on the promise of building a US Mexico border wall and during his presidency. He has worked work to make it harder for many migrants to apply for silom among other things. Some of the other top Democratic candidates are promising to reverse his actions joining joining us to talk about what Democrats are pledging to do a Sima Meta political writer for the La Times. She's an Iowa ahead of the caucuses. Welcome thanks for having me. I WANNA start with the news this week. The Supreme Court allowed a trump administration plan to go forward that could deny green cards to immigrants who need public assistance offence. What's been the reaction from twenty twenty candidates and we've heard a couple of candidates? Speak out about this already. I was at an event with the Mayor Buddha's yesterday Just outside of two moines and he was asked by voters about the specific case and he started quoting scripture. You know saying that you know the strangers was to be welcomed at this is sort of a core tenant of his faith And he really spoke about how this was sort of. Unconscionable we've also heard Elizabeth Warren. She tweeted about this. And we're probably I mean if you look at what the candidates have said about immigration and about about the trump administration's policy. This is an area where you're going to see a lot of agreement. I mean there's not a lot of daylight in other immigration policy their differences here and there but in terms of sort of cutting down access access. you know for people who are in the country illegally who are seeking a documentation. This is an area where you're going to see broad agreement among the Democratic candidates. Let's talk about some of those other there Big Questions on immigration. What our candidates saying about president trump's push to build a wall along the US border They're already some structures that are up. WHAT WOULD DEMOCRATS CRAT STU I most of them are completely against the wall? Some of them have the if you look at some of them have in some of the members who have been in the Senate for for example in the passive occasionally voted for uh-huh border funding Some earlier this year. I'm sorry late last year. When there was discussion about Daca young people were brought into this country illegally? When they're very young Some of them said that there they were amenable to some compromise. Like if you grant these young people citizenship might do a little bit of border funding But largely I mean they're pretty much in lockstep up in opposing the president's policies. They talk about several of them. Senator Klobuchar they talk about you. On the first hundred days using any type of executive action they could to undo Many of the president's policies the areas where you see some distinction is whether you know crossing the border illegally whether it should remain a crime or whether that'd be a civil we'll offense for example send closer she would keep it a crime other people like Bernie Sanders would decriminalize that decriminalizing illegal border crossings. That's something the thing that former vice president Joe Biden does not support here. He is at debate this summer. We're in a circumstance where if in fact you say you can just crossed the border. What do you say to all those people around the world who in fact want the same thing to come United States and make their case meant they don't that they have? I have to wait. Line the fact of the matter is you should be able to. If you cross the border illegally you should be able to be sent back. It's a crime this is an interesting topic in that It's been shown that Americans do want some sort of reform They perhaps wants some. I'm sort of a change at the border crossings. But exactly what they want. is still a question whether these candidates really address what the public wants. Well I think The former vice vice president is really an interesting spot because he's faced a lot of criticism from activists in throughout this campaign because during he was part of the Obama administration deportations rose was to record levels. During the Obama Administration. Someone's activists called President Obama the reporter and chief so he's as the live scrutiny on on the campaign trail. I mean I think you're exactly right. I mean if there's anything that people in both parties agree on it's that the immigration system is incredibly broken on the way it currently exists. They obviously differ very much in how they would fix exit. I WanNa talk to you about its immigration and customs enforcement which of course is responsible for deportations Bernie Sanders has called for the breaking up of Ice Elizabeth. Warren has called for the remaking of ice. How big of an issue is this? What our candidates saying well? This is an area where you actually can see some differences among the candidates in the field. I was at Bernie Sanders. There's rally on Saturday in the Ames and he was with Alexandria causing Cortez and she when she brought this up as a huge point in this was very very popular with the crowd that wants to. Do you have children in cages at the border once you have babies being from their mother's arms at the border that there is no reforming ice that needs to be abolished Other candidates take a more measured approach for example former South then mayor He sort of leans on his Mackenzie background here and that he wants to study it figure out what to do with ice. But he doesn't. He's not calling for abolishing it warrants and other ones so this is an area whether it's a little bit of daylight between the candidates another Issue that many Democrats are bringing up is increasing aid to Central American countries WHERE MIGRANTS OF COURSE COMING FROM HERE Senator Warren in September debate? Why do we have a crisis at the border in no small part because we have withdrawn help from the people in Central America who are suffering? We need to restore that help. We need to help establish a reestablish the rule of law so that people people don't feel like they have to flee for their lives. A number of candidates are also promising to protect so called dreamers of those are people who are brought to the country illegally illegally as children here Senator Bernie Sanders at a San Diego rally in December we will restore the legal status to the one point date million young people and their parents eligible for the Baka program. What if some of the other candidates Democratic candidates said set about DACA? Buddha judge coach are some of those others and this is an area where there's broad agreement that something has to be done for these these young people maybe all talk about this being one of their the top priorities tip. You know if they're elected to do this as soon as they get into office to take steps to protect these people Some of them also talk about expanding for example sanders who you just played. He would expand it to their your parents Kluber Sherwood raise the age for for which people were eligible which would also increase the number of people who could apply. Yeah you know when we talk about about This issue of immigration were often talking about coastal areas but former South Bend Indiana Mayor Pete. Buddha judge has spoken about what immigration can do for rural rule areas. Let's listen heart of my plan for revitalizing. The economies of Rural America includes community renewal visas that would allow cities towns and counties. That are hurting not only jobs for population to embrace immigration as we have in my city you know the only reason that south bend is growing right now after years. Years of shrinking is immigration That's an interesting take have have other candidates talked about this about spurring. The economies and other parts of the country intrigue through immigration former Vice President Biden. He's proposed allowing local governments to petition for new immigration visas to support economic growth. If there aren't enough local workers to jobs. I'm just sort of a new proposal. We're hearing this cycle. I don't think we've heard before and it's interesting. I mean being in Iowa I was obviously an incredibly homogenous state. It's a very. It's more than ninety percent white but there's certain pockets of you know when you get outside of the The Metro areas there these rural areas where young people are leaving and they need workers and you see some areas that have you know. have an increase in Latino workers. I think it started out long ago with the slaughterhouses etc.. But it's certainly expanded since then. I'm so I think it's an interesting area where people are talking about. You know where they're just simply aren't enough American workers I to fill the needs of a community. You're in Iowa as you as you just mentioned Has that been a topic of conversation about those immigrant populations in Iowa how they make up Iowa and maybe some of the candidates are trying to reach them. I mean immigration has come up on the campaign trail but it hasn't come up as much as some other issues is just because I think because there is such broad agreement among the Democratic candidates among the field About these proposals about what. The right thing is to deal with. People who are in the country illegally On the Republican side which have covered here in Pascal's it hasn't been much more of a flashpoint terms of what should happen to them. We talked about this a little bit but presidents on on both parties have failed to tackle comprehensive immigration reform for years. I mean this has been an issue if a Democrat is elected. What do you think the chances are that? They'll actually have success. I think it would depend on the makeup of the Senate. I mean there are some policy areas. Where if you look at the polling? There's pretty broad agreement among among Americans about what should happen in terms of you know for people who have been in this country for decades who have not committed crimes who have worked who paid into the system There's question about you should do they. They become citizens or to become legal residents but there is sort of agreement that you know we're not kicking out eleven million people. The question is once we we saw this Under George W Bush how the President Obama once it gets caught up in Congress and the Senate. It's it it just keeps stalling. Even when there does seem to be a chance of reaching agreement

Senator Bernie Sanders President Trump Iowa Elizabeth Warren United States President Obama Vice President Senate Donald Trump Vice Vice President Joe Biden Buddha Obama Administration Mayor Buddha La Times Supreme Court Writer Senator Klobuchar Central America
Scientists develop artificial nerve cells which behave just like real cells

Not Too Shabby

00:41 sec | 2 years ago

Scientists develop artificial nerve cells which behave just like real cells

"Scientists in Britain say they've created artificial neurons that could potentially be implanted into patients and used to repair a disease or damaged brain cells Alan breaks has the details artificial nerve cells that behave much like the real thing have been developed by a team at the university of bath in what they describe as paradigm changing the researchers used a combination of maths computation and chip designed to replicate what nerve cells or neurons do naturally the researchers want to use them to treat diseases such as out Simas when you're owns to generate die they say we can engineer brain cells on a chip that can be used to repair damage cells in the

Britain Alan Engineer
"sima" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

03:37 min | 3 years ago

"sima" Discussed on KGO 810

"Oh, eight ten. Oh, that's the no aren't you Franklin here on K, G O. We just heard from Sima the court TV reported from about the twenty fifth anniversary of the OJ trial. Right the middle of it. Now do you remember I was Outer Banks of North Carolina during that? And I mean and my wife and I were together when he was announced that not guilty and we looked at each other like you gotta be freaking kidding me. But, you know, everybody I knew I knew a lawyer, my, my mom worked for US district attorney's office, and he said he was surprised that they stand out as long as it. Did he thought that that Mark Furman killed the case for the prosecution and that exactly as Sima had said earlier, there was no sympathy at all for her that she was like it was almost like this thing like like she was a horrible woman, but he decapitated her? I would if OJ Simpson had a coronary tonight and died. I would shed, no tears. I think the guy should have been in jail the rest of his life. He decapitated his ex wife. He literally cut her. They heard head was barely hanging on that holds a lot for me. Clint you're on with chip and Nikki Keijo. If the glove doesn't fit, right? Right. Move ever God. That was so brilliant, Johnny Cochran. He was he was, of course, in more than Seinfeld with that. That's right. Forgot about that. Yeah. Unbelievable. Everybody knows the you're not doing nineteen eighty nine earthquake. And I'm over everybody knows that they've got the difference yesterday in the xactly where they were hit here, Tober, eight nine and they know exactly where they were. When they watched the OJ chase. That was actually Becky in, in New York to buddies wedding. We're sitting in a bar and it was like sundown, you know, perpetuator evening, down there, and we'll Washington west coast radio with that slow chasing on the Bronco. Everybody knows exactly what it wouldn't have an issue with here. By the way, I remember court. TV. Yeah. You know, it's funny, I for the sports stuff. I remember I was when a magic announced he was positive, and remember thinking. Oh my God. I mean, because I loved Magic Johnson. It's still do I mean, you know, I just like I was like, oh my God. Yeah. Thanks for the call. The white Bronco that was that's been. You can't see a white Bronco today. Absolutely, dave. Hi you're on chip in Nikki. Yeah. I think yo J Simpson case reflected three things to be still true today. Money buys, one by excellent lawyers better adversarial, ability to manipulated hearing it building. Suppress evidence in the building, just to suppress the truth of what the defense, but that was just all it was was the. Money. Your money buys the kind of experience can by the kind of deer excellence that you need. If you can can intimidate the other side, it can do a lot. You're right. I mean, they can they can bury you and depositions that can do money is. Yeah. It's that's what's there's, that's a real privilege in American society, money privilege. Right. Coming up. Congresswoman Jackie speier will join us. We'll talk about how hard it is to get Republicans to work with them on guns next to you. Fit evening. I'm Nikki medoro. San francisco. Fire officials say a fourteen year old boy pulled out of a vein near Chrissy field has died. Rescuers say they got to the boy about ninety minutes after his friends reported missing many people headed for the.

Sima OJ Simpson Johnny Cochran Outer Banks Congresswoman Jackie speier chip Nikki medoro Mark Furman North Carolina Franklin Nikki Keijo San francisco Chrissy field J Simpson Clint Tober Becky New York Washington west
"sima" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"sima" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"Yeah. Sima saw bones. The jabbed me that gets hardly any attention, nothing really gets intention outside of impeachment on land abortion impeachment and abortion to we have a great feature at for you on on that topic little bit later on this hour. Congress guy. Right. Was that a congressman Sean? Yes. Democratic Representative he blasts his interviewers for their shallowness. Oh, it's great. Bipartisan joy, folks. Coming up, please. Stay tuned. Well you got yesterday. You got that the largest group of illegals crossing at once that we've ever had of one thousand thirty six it's, you know. How's it not a story? And then if you watch MSNBC, the only thing that's ever going on as impeachment. G only store exists in the world. Now, Florida CNN. They mix in abortion soldiers dying Afghantistan, Russia's building warheads. Measles outbreak. Whatever's going on nothing makes the news except for impeach. And for goodness sakes. I mean, that's, that's like your hard news news. But what about why are drug prices so expensive is anything being done about the cost of health care? How are those great new cancer therapies coming along? You know, there are so many issues, you know, workplace safety thinks people actually care about day to day that don't exist in the media. It's all the beltway and abortion. So Matt target yesterday after doctor's appointment with my son because we promised him a small toy he went along with everything you need to go along with any didn't at target trying to decide between this LEGO box and this LEGO box. Gotta hurry this along. Sometimes you get stuck on trying to make the. Vision eastern. Grandma type person comes along says to my son. Oh, look at those cheeks, I just want to pinch them. You're so cute. Oh. He puts them one of the boxes, we gotta go and being humiliated here. For every channel. Oh, boy, what do you got your news? Doubling down on illegals and a lot of those about Disney Star Wars land Fantasma by ads.

Sima Sean Congress Measles MSNBC congressman Disney CNN Representative Afghantistan Florida Russia
Fears grow that China could weaponize rare earth minerals in U.S. tech war

Mac OS Ken

04:33 min | 3 years ago

Fears grow that China could weaponize rare earth minerals in U.S. tech war

"Might throw up barriers between manufacturers and the rare earths. They need and Japan may come through with rare earths of their own and save us all. Yeah. Turns out today is a clip show. It was not last week story about China stifling, rare earth that I was thinking I'd heard before nor last year story about Japan finding a bunch either. Let's go back to the twenty six March twenty thirteen either. So what is Chinese media seemed to have it out for apple right now, there, have it in for them Giga highlights idea, presented in a piece from the Wall Street Journal, the journal the bad PR could be the Chinese government's way of defending national companies from being beaten by foreign competitors or its way of doing more to encourage the growth of domestic smartphone companies and eat away at dominant foreign companies such as Upul cult of MAC. Meanwhile, sees three possibilities for the rift won. The iphone is the greatest tool for freedom and democracy, movements, and similar teeny Asli the greatest tool for suppressing dissent, tracking dissidents and monitoring the conversations and movement's political troublemakers idea. Number two, apple draws a persistent spotlight on unsafe and inhumane conditions for factory workers in China and number three China doesn't want apple to kill domestic competitors. That can be controlled by the government like Hugh way. All of this is up expect China to overtake the US as its largest. Market any minute. Now that could certainly drive apple to one to keep the Chinese government happy, or at the very least keep it from being unhappy. There's another reason to though, rare earth metals. I know that sounds like more than one reason, but rare earth metals are pretty much thought of as a thing, not several things. Jealous dot com says rare earth, metals, and allies, that contain them are used in many devices that people use every day such as computer memory, DVD's, rechargeable, batteries, cell phones, car, catalytic, converters, magnets, fluorescent, lighting, and much more. So you can see why they would be important to a company like apple and just about any company that makes anything besides bread. Now, guess where we get most of our rare earth metals, if you said, China, you move ahead five points today's game to an article from the telegraph out of the UK China has a near total monopoly in the heavier end of the spectrum, though, it has also the dominant supplier of the whole rare earth complex after driving rivals out of business in the nineteen nineties, it still accounts for ninety seven percent of global supply. Sue, probably apple has to shut up and take what China gives right? Mel sure wouldn't seem like that last week though the telegraph article I just quoted as a really interesting headline Japan breaks. China's stranglehold on rare earth metals with see, mud bonanza Sima, bonanza, by the way, worst desert ever. According to little research. I did online, rare earths aren't actually that rare. But you need to find them in high concentrations, and that's rare. But now, the telegraph says Japanese scientists have found bast reserves of rare earth, metals on the Pacific seabed that can be mined cheaply a discovery that may break the Chinese monopoly on a crucial raw material needed in tech industries and advanced weapon systems. We have found posits that are just two to four meters from the seabed surface at higher concentrations than anybody ever thought existed, and it won't cost much to extract said, professor. Yes. A hero Kato of Tokyo University. Eighty the leader of the team professor Kato, by the way, not a fan of China, China, according to the telegraph began to seriously restrict rare earth exports in two thousand nine they said that was to combat smuggling and environmental abuse, though. Kato says their real intention is to force foreign companies to locate plants in China. They're saying if you want our rare earth metals, you must build your factory here and weaken then steal your, Doug -nology professor, Kato expects production of the metals could begin in a couple of years, that's much better than the decade. The US figured it would need to get production up and running here and. Knows it may give China a little time to consider how it wants to do what it wants to do going forward. Now, the idea of apple production, going anywhere else may seem silly, then again, there are rumors from time to time it's chief manufacturing partner.

China Apple Chinese Government Japan Professor Kato Professor United States Wall Street Journal Giga Hugh MEL Tokyo University Upul SUE Partner UK Ninety Seven Percent Four Meters
"sima" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

03:48 min | 3 years ago

"sima" Discussed on KOMO

"The new Honda passport Honda. And so it's comfortable interior has a nice integrated split-screen, it has all the bells and whistles, you can get the top of the line which has heated and cooled seats because it always a five passenger you end up with a pretty good amount of rear seat space. And you have a lot of cargo space. It becomes a pretty useful vehicle, especially for those who by the seven passenger because they want the extra room not because they have seven passengers. And so it makes for a nice option for anyone who's looking for something like that. And you know, I'm quite certain it would have done really well in the snow just based on the four wheel drive system that they have in the car. I mean, I like a lot of things about this vehicle. What what's the sort of starting price? How much is my investment? Let's see I think that there's not believe there are four trims, and the base model is the sport which starts around thirty two thousand that's with front wheel drive. Four wheel drive ads about two thousand dollars on. So you probably them at forty thousand for one I might want. Yeah. For one. You would might you might want. I mean that fully loaded top of the line elite which comes with all wheel drive is forty three eight sixty three six eighty sorry. I'm elite, but on the radio, I try to tell people the whole idea. Is has been on sale for a couple of weeks? You think they're gonna do? Well, I think it will do. Well, it's not gonna be barnstorm or necessarily. But it will it will fill the nice gap. And I don't think it's going to take anything away from any of the other Honda models, which ideally is what they're looking for. They sell ten thousand a month. They'll be over the moon, and it's good too. Because it keeps people in the family, right? If they wanna go from view, but not quite ready for the pilot. Yeah, they have something in between there. And that's what they were really trying to do with this car is that you know, to fill that gap now being raised and a bit more beefy and cloudy is it going to use the gas the gas miles in it. I don't believe. So I mean, it's like we said it's a lot of its appearance. And so it's in the field of me numbers. I believe are pretty similar to the pilot. Don't believe that they had announced. Oh, yes. Actually, they did. So it's it's a little bit better in the pilot. I think with front wheel drive a little bit worse actually with four wheel drive, but it still gets about twenty five miles per gallon. I can live that is when it gets down to about nine miles a gallon, which just on my truck. Does it starts become painful? Yeah. You don't get a lot of new cars doing nine miles per gallon at least not that we can afford. But then, you know, boys like me, go out and put lift kits on them and big wheels. And before you not nine miles a gallon while you could do that with the passport or the pilot had a passport pilot. You do both of them. Exactly. She was looking at it. I think it looks like it's raised off the ground quite quite nicely. I think if you put a big lift on it. It would start look bit top heavy. Imagine this fall and Seema. We'll probably see them, of course. And then we'll see somebody make one into a truck, and blah, blah, blah. That's I think they call it the rich line. Yeah. Well. Let's see if they don't make a possible truck. But who knows that's what the welding torches for foreign Sima, those type of things do you think that this vehicle is a good? Well, I will what's his competition that size vehicle. You've got Toyota Highlander have a Subaru was sent supercenters actually seven passenger. It's not five passenger. But size wise. They're very similar. Santa seven passenger too, right? I think technically seven is probably the right way to say it because. Plus, perhaps a better way to say it too long as they're under three foot tall when we come back. We're going to switch from Honda's to talk about Toyota's Dan Johnson. Joining us from Toyota is a new Tacoma. We're gonna find out all about that is our auto expert continues very beefy show today. Beefy.

Honda Honda passport Toyota Toyota Highlander Tacoma Santa Subaru Dan Johnson two thousand dollars three foot
"sima" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

16:20 min | 3 years ago

"sima" Discussed on KGO 810

"To coast AM. I'm your host Sima church. You can follow me on Twitter at J church radio. I've got some Twitter questions lined up for the rabbi that we'll get to in just a second. Rabbi also got an entire rack of phone calls that everybody wants to ask you some questions tonight. So we've got to manage to squeeze these end. But before we do want to I know that you just heard me say I need some clarification. Here are you suggesting that all of this magic that we are witnessing today? And that I have seen in the skies that it potentially may not be another species are another extraterrestrial race. But it's us visiting ourselves. Very possible. I mean in all respect, we have an enumeration of ten different types or species in Joel's, one of whom are called the team who are men human beings. Right. And the rabbis of holy said that they are physical like us. We read in Genesis chapter. Six of the quote sons of God coming down taking the daughters of men. Well, dr. You know, other worldly beings of a different species or beings of light in entrepreneurial older respect what is their interest or traction to our hot human. I mean, it just doesn't make any sense about pets. Really? Let's be honest. I'm with you go. Sure, let's go. Let's go to the zoo you and I. And we're going to look at the orangutangs and the chimps, and I don't think you, and I are to be saying. Wow. Let's let's go get it on. Yeah. She's not something that we do. It's not even the most bizarre. You don't think like there's no energy kind of connection. Why would these entities me draw human women other than the fact that there must have been some form of attraction? And makes clear that they pro created. No, let's understand a little bit of biology here. There's only one way procreation that will. And that's it. It's possible. So these entities we understood to a been these damage overlords who came to earth. Now, according to our legend. This is the foundation of the Christian tradition. That they were a group of these higher more evolved. Pre-adamic human beings who pretty much looked at what was happening on earth. Didn't like the plan that was set into motion and thought that they could do a better job. So they decided to come to earth in violation of whatever. The universal prime directive was and gotten involved and apparently messed things up. This led to the coming up the blood which itself pleasant astronomically caused event quitting to our understandings. What caused the flood with some type of an asteroid or mediaworks, which was by whatever powers flung towards the earth with such precision that as it orbited around the earth, its gravitational effects caught onto our oceans dragging them up into the atmosphere and then as the body left its gravitational pull off the earth. Then the water. Glue back down and cleanse the planet. Now, this is significant because what happens afterwards, and I'm speaking of the tower babble, according to a compiler. A number of biblical and extra biblical teachings of which I document in my book aliens angels and demons the building of the tower babble was actually supposed to have been the building of a nuclear powered spacecraft where in which the individuals that race that time knew very, well, what caused the flood they saw that asteroid coming for centuries. And they thought that they could change its trajectory. But they were thwarted the stapler was a natural event. Didn't realize there was a power behind it. And essentially as a response, many did survive the flood other than Noah, they rediscovered the ancient technologies which were supposedly buried in the what would be modern day Iraqi desert. This is all, you know, spoken about in a in a Hebrew text called courtroom set up out of the iron furnace documentum sources my book, and they were gonna go to the stars do if you will attack those who they believe attack the earth, and we all know what happens they came down from heaven, and they didn't come down with laser beams and Reagan's and the like, no it says that they made the people not understand each other's language, which means that they were able to influence people in the power of the mind, which is exactly the same force in power that we recorded in the book of Daniel. The power of the watchers is recorded in chapter four these are the governors of the earth, and they influence us through influencing the human mind, very famous story of Nethercott Netzer, the famous emperor Babylon. When they wanted to punish him. No. They didn't strike them down with a lightning bolt from heaven. They attacked his mind literally caused him to succumbs to psychosis. And that's a horrible horrible power. Can you imagine? If we human beings had the ability to psychically attack each other and to influence others, mentally that apparently allegedly began end or extraterrestrial technology. Can you imagine if our governments actually acknowledged that such a thing existed? Yeah. I know everybody in the world. I just gave the the story of the car that. Oh that flipped over and California said somebody aliens made me do it. Right. Well, you and I might chuckle and joke and say, oh, yeah. Right. But based upon our original authoritive understandings of things, you never know. He might remember the old comedian flip Wilson. I remember the good old day the old days, you said, oh devil. Maybe do it trying to stop right. Well, we don't know about the devil doing it. But the concept of X karnal influences upon the mind is very well known in all of our customs interdictions, some more this as demonic possession and the light so more referred to it as some type of psychic all kinds of different names to describe what very well might be an external influence upon the mind from within. And again, our entire religious culture is based upon strengthening the mind through moral righteous living in the light. So it's to bring strength to the power of the mind clarity thought, purity to heart. And that is what quote brings us closer to God at enables us to push off any type of negative external force. It makes sense. It makes sense. But there's something I want to get to these phone calls rabbi. But when I hear you relate this information, it makes me wonder about your your other rabbi friends out there. Do they do they call you up and say, you know, what I hear you? I get it. And I'm with you. But I can't talk about this stuff. Or is it the exact opposite? No, I get a lot of that. Remember for the most part any clergy, regardless of our religion are mostly congregational leaders rabbis priests, ministers or imams. Our major concern is the lives in everyday affairs. Mark congregants. We want people to live decent moral, happy balanced lives. Right. Most people aren't deep thinkers, they're not interested in all this spiritual stuff. All they want to know is pretty much how to have. Piece in the home. How to do good for their kids how to get along with their spouses to most of my peers like anyone else who's a cleric deals with if you will the day to day affairs for those of us who are involved in deeper things. Yeah. Most of my peers like I said don't really involve themselves. But there are those who do and of course, the materials that I presented my works and teaching my school, these aren't like private revelations to me from some, you know, alien or divine source. I'm a scholar my job. I go into the books. I translate from original materials that people have never even knew existed. Nice show. You what it says not my job to tell people? What to believe it's only my job is a scarlet to provide the information for people to make their own decisions in that respect, many of my peers from all the different religious. I'm honored to say, we'll we'll use my my my material and use it as. As a springboard for their own research. And you know, so. Yup. In that respect them honored to serve. Let's get some of these phone calls. Let's go out west Mitch in Seattle. Thank you for holding. Mitch you're up next on coast to coast, thanks for taking my call Jimmy and thanks to the rib to for doing his work. And and it's very interesting. I wanted to ask. About his well, his thinking on Samaria in policy and. Actually, I wanted to mention about to that. I scored off of archive dot org. Samuel Noah Kramer. I guess he wrote it in forty four and revised it nineteen sixty one. But in the book, they mentioned the chamber of creation. And I wondered if he you know, what is thoughts are on the flood myths, and the the other things that go back, obviously to Samaria and Babylon's, you know, repeated them, and we have the epic of Gilgamesh stuff talking about the flood. But I was just curious as to what he thought about this Marion aspects of it. Yeah, absolutely match and that all excellent questions. Thank you for the phone, call Mitch. Rabbi the Sumerian text. I mean for us today. It's one of the most fascinating rabbit holes to go down and so much of it is we've been blessed. I can't think of another word that it that they wrote into clay tablets and archived there day to day existence. And also where they came from. It's all there. What do you make of the Samaritan text in the words of the bible? There's nothing new under the sun here. Jimmy. I mean, remember that Samaria ancient Samaria ancient Babylon or pretty much semantical in that respect and Yvette a a break. Connection to that part of the world since the beginning. That's where Abraham came from Abraham came from the area of the Colby, which is old Sumerian old Babylonian, and in that respect many of the traditions. Epic of Gilgamesh, you're caller Princeton. The like sure, you know, these things this is nothing new. It doesn't necessarily contradict anything in the bible. But it does go to show what scholars Jewish otherwise have been saying percents. And that is that the store is that we know from our biblical texts are not unique revelations unique to us the story of the flood. It's not unique to the bible. It's not even unique to the epic of Gilgamesh. You'll find flood myths literally around the world. Yes, I'm out somewhere. Something did happen. And it's been recorded. The fact that we find that these overlapping stories and no way detract from what the bible says, but puts the bible at a better historical context. The fact that we find similar stories around the world. Some will say well only show psychology or sociology anthropology, but for others shows, especially those who have experience in the spiritual realms that all of us the somehow in the same reality experiencing the same higher domains. But each interprets of if you will within a cultural context of one's individual, you know. Background and in that respect if we can transcend, the superficial differences and get to the underlying universal essence, I think that's where we're going to find the truth that many of us are looking for this comes in from Twitter. This is all the way from Australia bloke from ours. He wants to know if the rabbi has any thoughts on the hollow moon theory. Well again. Yeah, we do believe in the hollow moon therapy. Do believe that the one is inhabited probably by watchers, and it is one of the reasons believed in modern times, which is why we're not very welcome on the moon. And now that China has put a Lander their or our plans are to return there again. I question what that is all about. Yeah. Any of our spiritual or religious teachings are valid and that the more itself is inhabited. Well, watch is going to happen. If we go up there. Well, you could say maybe we're being invited up there as part of a disclosure events. Or maybe all the the planning is not going to come the bell or something else. We don't know. But we do believe and again that word believe 'cause there is no proof. It's a matter of faith that lack hollow earth. There's a hollow more than a hollow Mars and other things and based upon our understandings of our ancient prophetic traditions. There is that's just the way it is. What do we do with? We've got two different conspiracy theories here one that the Apollo missions were a complete hoax and fabrication and created here on our. Okay. There's there's that. And it's pretty it's a pretty pretty big audience. And then the other side where we of course, we went to the moon, but we had contact there. And. And we were told to leave and there's all of the evidence of the communications with the with the astronauts on the moon about what they were seeing right there. Looking at us the lights are on the riches behind us. Look, there's there's all of all of that. Is that ultimately what was happening in that? We were watched. And and that's why we didn't go back. Well, again, we're dealing now with speculations of which we have no proof, but again in accordance to our understandings and beliefs. Yeah, the moon is occupied and it has an atmosphere which might explain why he flat. Flap in the breeze. Right, right. Yeah. There there there are a lot of these ideas..

Twitter Jimmy dr. You Samaria ancient Samaria ancien Mitch Sima church Abraham Noah Joel flip Wilson Samuel Noah Kramer Babylon Nethercott Netzer Seattle Daniel California Reagan Mark Marion Princeton
"sima" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

02:33 min | 3 years ago

"sima" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Collective pathway set that you believe that the governor Sima spreading misinformation about your team can comment on that collective pack is made it statement. And so I don't know precisely where this is coming from. And you know, we've heard different things. But but here's the thing. Does anybody think it's any coincidence that on the eve of potentially being elevated that's win? This uncorroborated smear comes out this anybody believe that's a coincidence. I don't I don't think anybody believes that's a coincidence. That's what he's saying by asking that rhetorical question. Do you think it's coincidence? Justin. Fairfax say, and you know, who did this to hurt me? The African American Lieutenant governor to ascend to the governorship the guy who's right now in turmoil because he's either in black face or in a clan hood or lying about both. This is a beautiful thing to observe. Is that they're they're trying to keep me just in. Fairfax. The black democrat Lieutenant governor from becoming governor. And by the way, the only reason that is happening that I might be governor is because the guy was in black face or clans hood. And now is lying about it. But that's not the only lion. This story. Let's not forget when Justin Fairfax. When these first allegations were made about Justin. Fairfax the Lieutenant governor his statement was quite clear, I'm going to read it to you. This is a quote from his statement the post carefully investigated the claim for several months. He's talking about the Washington Post after being presented with facts consistent with the Lieutenant governor's denial of the allegation about let me pause there for a moment. This is a he said she said thing what kind of evidence could corroborate. Or be inconsistent be consistent with the Lieutenant governor's denial. His denial is this was consensual. So what I mean? I I don't know. I don't even wanna know. Now that I think about it never mind. Sorry. I went there. The statement continues the absence of any evidence. Corroborating the allegation and significant red flags and inconsistencies within the allegation the post made the consider decision not to publish the story. Here's the thing. The post came out and confirmed. Yeah, we have this during we didn't run with it. But then they said this quoting the post did not find significant red flags inconsistencies within the allegations. So in other words, the post just said that Lieutenant governor Justin Fairfax is very.

Justin Fairfax Washington Post Sima
"sima" Discussed on Mark Bell's Power Project

Mark Bell's Power Project

03:22 min | 3 years ago

"sima" Discussed on Mark Bell's Power Project

"They just did the they practice the piano, and they you know, whenever like s- a certain part of their binder stimulated, and they were able to get X amount better. The second group they were just told to imagine themselves playing the piano, and they actually got better than the ones that practice every day. That's just visualizing in actually playing it in their head. Yeah. And I was like, whoa. Like, those another like, oh my gosh moment when reading this book, I'm just like, I doesn't make any sense. But when I visualize myself making a lift it happens. And then when I go up to the bar, and I'm like, oh, man. I don't know what's going to happen. It doesn't happen. So it's crazy to know that like I'll say like even before meet you wanna you want to figure out what the weights on the bargain. Look like. Yeah. You know, put it on your phone figure out what the plates are gonna look like an like think about the plates and think about every single command makes a big difference. Yeah. We talked about a lot of different stuff on this podcast and to kind of tie everything back together from some of the stuff that we're talking about in the beginning. You know, we were talking about, you know, some of the different things that he did some of the different things I did at a young age, and then kind of progressed and moved into some other things and almost like how do you know when to have? Kind of jumping off point. You know, how do you know that you're ready to jump into a new endeavor? How do you know when you're prepared for it? We talked a lot about like mindset as well for you in Sima like what are some things? What are some goals that you might have coming up that are things that you know, like, and I guess how how will you know, kind of like leap towards these things for yourself. How will I know to leap? Yeah. How will you know to leap towards something that you have a goal towards like, I don't know. Let's say you have a gold ahead. You know? That's that's pretty big. That's pretty lofty goals. Pretty like, let's say a goal to be like an of like, how do you know? You know, when's a good jumping off point to go from you know, what you're doing to something like that. Honestly, thinking back to like the things that I've done and the things I've able to have some success with. I can never really think of a point that I knew that it was I didn't know it was the right time. But I'm just like. Off prepared. I can prepare more. But at this point, I'm just preparing to continue to prepare. I just need to go for it. Like, I'm gonna go like a conversation. This get me. And this guy had about getting engaged. Yeah. Yeah. Not trying to put pressure on you. No. That's the thing. Like, I just had to I really need to get. I do get outta my head. And I just go for it. So I do everything I can like that's why trainer jitsu so much because of the specific politicals I have there. I want to be as prepared as I can. But I'm gonna make the jump when I make the jump in. If I'm not ready. I'll I'll fail at that potential thing that I did. And then I'll go for next year. Like last year, I lost worlds in a very sad fashion. I lost my first match by points. I thought I was prepared realized I wasn't and then totally changed my game. And it's working really well, go at it. Again this year. I might not be ready. I might lose my first match or might get silver or gold. But I just got to go for it. I was having a conversation with a guy that I work with and he wants to be a coach..

Sima