40 Burst results for "Silicon Valley"

Fresh update on "silicon valley" discussed on Majority 54

Majority 54

01:08 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "silicon valley" discussed on Majority 54

"It live and I think what's happened in the time even candidly Jason since you were out here, you know working your Senate race for years ago now is it is now become so clear even in the specter of American, the spirit of American public opinion that wall everybody out here thought we were building little. David's the platforms have very quickly become glides and with that comes additional responsibility you got to change the way that you think about building. When you realize you're building a utility for everybody versus you know the startup that's got to do whatever it takes to to be successful for my neighbor Brad and like a tech CEO like the one you're describing here's what I think they have. In common, they have both put politics and what they consider the train wreck of American leadership right now in a column of separateness that they are in no way responsible for. But have the luxury of complaining about and lamenting about, which is why Brad walks up to me and you know in a way that he doesn't even know he's doing basically implies that it's my fault because I'm involved and he's not I get that all the time and I've had some pretty heated conversations with people where they basically put the whole system on my shoulders because I work in politics and we have a listener voicemail that actually dovetails nicely with this question of what it means to be apolitical. I there great voicemail My name is Taylor and I, listen to your show quite a bit I am currently like voluntary testing people for voting and getting registered to vote and voting afternoon tea. And You know there's some people that they're not very nice. But there's been a couple of people that say that they're just a political and I, don't really know how to respond to that and I'm wondering like, how is there a nice way to say I think you need to check your privilege? Yeah. Thanks I. Well I think tillers question applies equally to brad and to our Silicon Valley CEO's and I think about this a lot because where I came from Staten Island, the the trump vote. So this isn't the apolitical people doesn't necessarily mean they're not in some way influencing politics, the apolitical people viewed in trump's somebody who was also apolitical and so they voted for him kind of as a protest vote against the system, and so this is something that we should take very seriously and the good news is that in this election cycle, there are fewer of those people. Than there have ever been in American political history. So a Wall Street Journal put out uphold this weekend that showed that seventy five percent of voters rated themselves on a scale of one to ten as a ten out of ten in terms of voter enthusiasm, which is the highest they've ever recorded going back all a pass the sixties. So that means that there are a lot of people who were really into this election, one way or another and most of those people already decided, but I'll just give one quick tip and then pass. It's you guys which is. I think it's important not to be self righteous about it. So when you're you're talking to somebody instead of being like, Hey, I'm I'm active in you need to be that's not gonNA convince anybody and it also doesn't acknowledge what we talked about earlier, which is that a lot of us have had a lot of room to grow in our own civic participation even though we work in politics and so I think more just asking them questions you know. Sort of in the candor ask way of what you care about like it. The school not being open down the street or businesses continuing struggle under the weight of covert, etc like what are the issues you care about and then try to connect those issues to our political system. It also reminds me you know one of the things that I think Jason I remember your campaign doing so well and reading that was a motivation for us. When we started arena is know you can approach someone who's not engaging from the position of you're guilty. You have privilege you're doing all of these things except for your responsibility or you can approach it from a place of Hey, maybe you. Didn't know that this option was available to you. Maybe it was really daunting and you didn't know where start because you always felt like politics for those people over there and it was super non-transparent to you on how to get engaged and just invite them to start with something super and easy. Make It feel accessible I think that's something that I also learned on Pete's campaign. There's so many people in this country who care right now they care they're upset they're tired watching news and feeling that blood pressure go up but they don't feel like politics is accessible to them. Yes. Somebody put a great metaphor out and social media a few months ago, which was something akin to. Politics is like transportation system like you know you take the bus to get as close as possible to your where you WanNa go. It might not get you precisely where you WANNA go. That's Kinda how I think about politics, which is you know it's not a bespoke process. It's not like they're gonNA come to me and say, what do you think about you know hundred issues and we're going to give you one hundred, one hundred of the things you want I'm my. Only I'm only get sixty I only get fifty I. think that's like the grownup way to think about this and I and I worry sometimes that there's a segment of our our populace that expects everything they want right away and it's hard to talk people down from that Thank you very much for the voicemails. We'll probably go through some more of them. You can leave a voicemail forest possibly hear yourself You know which doesn't WanNa hear themselves on this podcast. And have US respond to you. The number is five, zero, eight, six, eight, seven, two, five, eight, nine, five, zero, eight, six, eight, seven, two, five, eight, nine is recommended..

Brad Jason Wall Street Journal CEO Senate David Donald Trump Silicon Valley Ceo Taylor Staten Island Pete
Senate committee revisits the need for federal data privacy legislation

All Things Considered

01:07 min | 10 hrs ago

Senate committee revisits the need for federal data privacy legislation

"The news. I'm terrorist Siler As U. S senators consider federal data privacy legislation again. They took testimony from Attorney general in California, home to the most comprehensive law in the nation. Rachel Myrow, senior editor of these Silicon Valley desk has more aged heavier. But Sarah has become something of an expert in data privacy as his office is the primary enforcer of the California Consumer Privacy Act. Speaking before the Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee Wednesday, he said today as we battle a pandemic that has moved so much of life online companies know more about us our Children our habits than ever before That data is today's gold. And as with gold, there's been a rush to mine use and sell our personal information. Americans need robust tools that allow them to understand who has their data. What was collected if it can be the leader and how they can opt out of downstream selling. There are a couple of bills at play in D. C. The one from Republicans would preempt state laws. Democrats want to give states like California the freedom to innovate. I'm Rachel Myrow kick you in the news.

Rachel Myrow California Siler Science And Transportation Com Senate Commerce Senior Editor Sarah Attorney U. S
Fresh update on "silicon valley" discussed on Majority 54

Majority 54

00:36 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "silicon valley" discussed on Majority 54

"I'm Jason Candor, and this is majority fifty four, the podcast that helps the fifty four percent who did not vote for Donald? Trump talked to those who did about the most divisive issues in our country Revenue WanNa tell folks about our special guest co host this week our special guests today is actually the person who introduces US Jason Back Right after your Senate run. We were putting on this thing called the arena summit right after the election and there was this rock star candidate coming out of the election I was like you know who would be the dream keynote speaker for this event but you know we probably won't be them Sky Jason Candor and she's like I know Jason Candor and so she connected us we became fast friends. Is My friend Swazi LAVAR APU who runs insights which is a mission driven organization that invest in companies, nonprofits, and political organizations that are all doing things for the greater. Good. And one of those organizations is a Renault, the organization that I run in that she helped found we've known each other for over ten years maybe fifteen years now back when we were in. College and she has gone on to do amazing things. She was the National Investment, chair for Pete's campaign and a key advisor to him. She's worked at companies like square and and quit, and at a big time venture capital firms Kleiner Perkins and she was a Rhode Scholar. She's basically just the smartest person I know and so we're really excited to have you today Swazi. Excited to be here. It's to here the two of you hosting this podcast. Glad to join the conversation. Well, thank you for doing it. We tend to start every episode. As you know by talking about conversations we've had recently with persuadable voters so that we can sort of model that behavior that we're preaching about during every podcast. So I'll start this time and I'll say that you know sometimes the person who needs persuading already agrees in his voting the same way as us, but isn't giving any time to the cause and they're just complaining and a couple of nights ago I was out in my garage. Breaking down boxes for recycling and it was sort of dusk and somebody was walking by the house somebody I didn't know and they walked up and said, you're Jason Candor right and I was like, yeah, and we'll call this Guy Brad. He introduced himself and he said I got a question I said all right Brad. What's your question? He said why aren't? The Democrats fighting back. Why are they such wimps and so we went through this conversation from it and then I said Brad. Let me ask you how many hours have you given so far this year to a democratic campaign or cause, and he said, well, none I mean is just because they just want to fight back. So why should I so that? Was a frustrating conversation that I hope Brad Wanders by the House. Again, maybe I can convince them to give some time, but I mentioned it to say I wasn't successful in that one but I'm sure a lot of our listeners are hearing from these same sorts of people and I hope very few our listeners are acting this way I hope that people. Are doing more than just listening to the show that they're actually talking to their friends and relatives about these ideas and if not, or at the same time, they're also doing things like making calls and texting yet reminds me of after the two thousand, sixteen election. There's so much energy placed on Hillary Clinton or Komi are all these people outside of our control. And I. Think. The most productive response which I think most people took to that. was what can I do differently and that certainly question I asked I looked around and I did absolutely nothing other than vote to help Hillary Clinton win and so said a blaming her maybe we should look at ourselves. As I liked that push we'll. So then you started arena. So there was a pretty you were doing better than brand. Well. I had a lot of ground to make up. You know I'd spent a few years outside of politics. You know it's really interesting because I think it takes a slightly different flavor out in my neck of the woods. But there there's a similar parallel like I spend a lot of time talking to people that are building Tech Company says, employees is founders and it's a similar thing. It's like everybody out here. There's an assumption that we're going to vote and we know how we're going to vote for, and that's the end all be all in our civic responsibility. But increasingly I try and have these uncomfortable conversations with these friends about will what are you building and how do your value show up not just in the way that you vote once every two or four. Years but also in what you're building, and if you're helping to build a social media platform, that is one of the biggest avenues through which misinformation spreads, for example, how do you manifest your values? That way if you are a building company that is generating returns for venture capital firm where the partners are funding Donald Trump, how do you make a choice in who you pitch and who you're accumulating helping, accumulate, power and wealth for you know how do you manifest your values not just in your volunteer efforts or the money that you chip into candidate or the vote that you're making but also in the core thing that you're building I, think increasingly in my community and This community of have tech builders. These kinds of questions are really really important and we don't ask them enough and I know they're really uncomfortable. But I'm starting just by asking questions how do people react when you do that while they get uncomfortable? You know oftentimes it's not surprise me here. But of defensiveness because I think we've held onto this this myth of being apolitical of being neutral for too long and I'm kind of reminded I. Tend to go to extremes here but I'm reminded about like the passage from Dante's inferno that explained that the hottest place in Hell is for the folks that try and stay apolitical during times of moral crisis and I think what we're. Learning from all of the data and the evidence is that really no such thing as being neutral we are all political in this moment and the sooner we acknowledge that the sooner we can actually start to do stuff about it. It's interesting because as you know, I've spent a fair amount of time out in Silicon Valley raising political money, and there's definitely and I think one of the reasons that I liked you so much when I first met us because this wasn't present in our conversation but is a really pervasive feeling among other people there have like well, I'm here and I'm building things and we're pretty much God's gift. So we have very little responsibility beyond that. And I you know I'm over generalizing obviously but that's you've seen that too right. That's what you're talking..

Jason Candor Brad Wanders Donald Trump Hillary Clinton Kleiner Perkins Senate Silicon Valley Dante Advisor National Investment Rhode Scholar Pete
Apple and Google have launched a coronavirus exposure app

Mac OS Ken

00:55 sec | 1 d ago

Apple and Google have launched a coronavirus exposure app

"The Silicon Valley Solution is spreading and. Trying to stop the spread of Kobe nineteen. Insider says, Pennsylvania has launched its co bit alert p. a. using the apple google exposure notification. API. The p. says the APP went live on both apple's APP store and Google play store on Tuesday just over a month after the keystone states signaled that intent. The APP sounds fairly full featured along with the exposure notification system apple insider says Kubat alert. P.. A.. Features other corona virus related content including up to date case counts from the Department of Health and the COVID nineteen system trucker. The covert alert P. A. APP also interoperable with neighboring Delaware as Kobe nineteen APP. which launched earlier in September.

Kobe Google Apple Kubat Department Of Health Delaware Pennsylvania
Fresh update on "silicon valley" discussed on Conscious Millionaire Show ~ Business Coaching and Mentoring 6 Days a Week

Conscious Millionaire Show ~ Business Coaching and Mentoring 6 Days a Week

00:32 min | 2 hrs ago

Fresh update on "silicon valley" discussed on Conscious Millionaire Show ~ Business Coaching and Mentoring 6 Days a Week

"And the answers will become really apparent. If you want your granddaughter to be the president of United States gender Equity will become really important, If you want your grandson to live in a world where he can still roam the forest then resource depletion and resource conservation will be really important to you. That was absolutely excellent. So we've talked about the close-to-home what about the community? So I want to start that with a really quick story last year. I helped edit a report on sustainability in Silicon Valley and we found that Silicon Valley is not nearly as sustainable as the mass media has been portrayed them and I started calling different companies and saying hey you did it ranked as high as you know, we expected you to and they were really surprised there were like what you're kidding. We have this program and we have that program and you know, we have a dog All fresh fruits and our vending machines they proceeded to prove to me that they were socially responsible and my response to them was if I can't find this on the issue not if I don't see this and your social responsibility report, if this is not something that is being talked about at your annual meeting, it doesn't matter that you're doing it. So when I'm talking about a community, it's not just having a community program but it is conveying that message within the community to your audience to your stakeholders talk to anyone who is coming in contact with your brand. It's fabulous for you to do it intrinsically that everyone should behaving by the Golden Rule. But how is that going to help you and it's not if you're not conveying that action to those around you. So I think that's a really good point because while it matters they're doing it off. The world doesn't know it matters and that really brings us to the third piece of well. Now how do you incorporate what you're doing and what you believe and what you stand for as a business coach a certain or you helping your clients to do that by getting a Content plant. That's going to get it out to the world. How do we that? So I'm going to start with something that many people poo poo off. And I know that in Business Schools at one point, it was hugely popular and now it has lost some in popularity, but I want to start with a mission statement include your social responsibility in your life mission statement. So instead of saying, you know, I am a business, you know, I want to be the leader in creating widgets. Change that mission statement so that it says we are the leader in creating widgets which have the least impact on and then whatever it is that you're interested. In fact the least impact on water the least impact on air pollution the least or has the most benefit to gender Equity has the most benefit to whatever you may never use this mission statement on a website or anywhere, but if you have this plastered in front of you those words that language it serves as a stepping stone and it puts into your mind that we need to write this down make it tangible. And so now how do you turn that into a Content plan so that you get content statements out there. So that would like the example you started with the tech company where it turned out they really were socially responsible, but you couldn't know that and therefore the report reflected them poorly and what the report was really reflecting off. We had no content plan to get it out there. Right? So what I would do and how I help businesses is to have them find maybe five key words or concepts and then we want to weave that into everything that comes out of the company. So you want to weave it into the mission mission statement from the CEO. You want to weave it into the executive summary of your report. You want to leave it in to your Finance Friday tweets, you want to or even want to you know, create a tweet that has, you know, you're branding in that social concept to it. What we want to do is make it natural so that this is a part of what your mission is. It's a part of who you do you're creating that widget, but it isn't enough anybody can create a widget but you want to constantly be reminding people that you're creating that region in the socially responsible way home. And the best way to do that is the same way that you brand anything marketing 101 know your audience know what words resonate with them. Use those words over and over again. Well, I love this. We're here with Rosalinda sankichi. She is an amazing person in the world of social responsibility writing. She does blog editing. She does writing Pages content plans. So this is the show where you get an opportunity to really step back and look at an area you may not have considered even though you yourself really resonate with some of them has that Rosalinda was mentioning. The next question is well, how do you bring them in to your business as a business coach or consultant and how might you also incorporate this into what you offer to your clients will be right back with the conscious millionaire questions..

Silicon Valley Rosalinda United States Rosalinda Sankichi Business Schools President Trump Consultant CEO Executive
TikTok reaches deal that would give Oracle oversight of U.S. operations

POLITICO's Nerdcast

16:18 min | 6 d ago

TikTok reaches deal that would give Oracle oversight of U.S. operations

"And Tick Tock recently made headlines Everywhere when Resin Donald Trump signed an executive order. That would essentially ban the Chinese owned APP in the US for national security reasons. Unless it sells its operations here to an American company. And of course, if that were to happen. We would have nowhere to go to see a million potatoes singing. To Adele. And that would be a national tragedy. This week deal actually emerged between TIKTOK and American company Oracle but some people like Zachary say trump's tiktok policy effectively changes. Nothing. The argument goes like this. It will do little to protect Americans data from the Chinese government because there are still plenty of other ways China could get that data that this move is just a new kind of security theater basically. The hard work of data security according to this actually lies elsewhere. So, Zachary TIKTOK has been banned in Indiana a few other countries, but it's still pretty popular for now it's the most popular video sharing app i. can see why it seems like fun and there are mental creative. They're short I mean the whole nature of the medium has their time limited. What happened with Tiktok this week what happened this week? Should be clear but isn't. Basically, in August, the trump administration ordered via executive order whose legality remains highly questionable that the Chinese owner of Tiktok, a company called Bite Dance. Divest itself of Owning Tiktok within ninety days or face the prospect that tiktok would be shut down in the United States. I broke the deal I said you can't do business in the United States, which is at least potentially within the power of the US federal government based on national security concerns based on national security and the logistics are complicated that you probably could order apple and other people and servers that are hosting tiktok. that. They couldn't do it and it would defacto make it impossible for Tiktok to function. So that is what began a process where the owner of Tiktok, again, a Chinese company sought an alternative way to their cell, the US portion of Tiktok or what ended up happening major deals Rocking Wall Street this morning pushing futures higher. We find an American technology partner Oracle beat Microsoft and become the technology partner for TIC TACS US operations although will not. receive its coveted algorithm so that all took talks data would be kept in the United States on servers owned by an American company and not by Chinese company because the whole point of this was that all these people using Tiktok, these tens of millions, hundreds of millions that data was potentially vulnerable to being used and therefore misused by the Chinese government. How so So the fear was because technology companies in China by Chinese law are required if. By the Chinese government to turn over data relevant data that the Chinese government could tell the parent company of Tiktok, hand us all of your user data which user data of again tens of millions of Americans. and. Then China would have that data. So that was the concern right and and that's a legitimate fact the Chinese government could order that. The problem is, of course, one via our court system, an American court can order or prosecutor can subpoena data. From our companies. So it's not like what you and I do on Google or what we do on any technology provider is somehow. Unavailable. To government if government decides that it's in its interest to get it not to mention the the various many non-government actors, the vacuum, the stuff up and use it for their own purposes that is even more important I think probably more relevant to the China issue which is. Does it matter whether the data is in this case, potentially house by Oracle massive US hardware and software company versus being housed by servers in China. In terms of the ability of the Chinese government to obtain that data, it wanted to obtain it because not just third parties that hoover up data and use it in the whole buying selling and the data market, but just spying tools. Whether it's the NSA in the National Security Agency in the United States or various Israeli cybersecurity and or cyber spying companies or the Chinese government. Most of this data isn't that secure. Not. Like. Triple encrypted quantum encrypted defense department level communications. So likely true that if the Chinese government really wanted my teens Tiktok data, it doesn't really matter whether that data's House on servers in China owned by Chinese company or whether it was housed on American servers on buying American company. So I guess, then how do we get to this point? How did you know given what you just said why has this become such a big issue? How did it start? Yeah it's a good question I I'm not sure. There's a precise answer. It's part of a whole continuum of the trump administration in particular identifying China as a proximate threat to the United States and a whole series of ways competitively in terms of trade practices hence the hundreds of billions of dollars of Chinese imported goods that have been subject to American tariffs. It's part of a multi year campaign against this massive Chinese telecom equipment company called Wa wa, which has been a leader in next generation five G. Telecom equipment in a way that again, some of the same concerns have existed which is. That the Chinese government would would use the production of that equipment as a way to spy on who met from purchase adequate. And Look a few years ago. There was a a forced sale of gay dating APP Grindr, which was also owned by a Chinese company, and so there was an earlier precedent of forcing a Chinese company to sell an American APP Social App. Because, of data concerns and finally, there's the fact that for years long predating the trump administration. China has not allowed American social media companies like facebook. To function in China. So there's the tit for tat. You know you don't let our social media functioning companies function there. Why should we let yours function here? There's Several year campaign against China which the trump administration's pursued but I think has a good deal of democratic support I. Mean if it's close to a bipartisan sentiment that China, China's a threat as anything we have right now. Why Tiktok? Suddenly became a thing I may partly have to do with the fact that it suddenly became a very big deal in the United States. I mean, this was not a company that had any footprint several years ago and suddenly as. The APP does your so it may have had to do with something that got really big and is very noticeable. Salsa not that economically important. So a lot of people would be royally pissed off Tiktok were banned. It's not like tiktok is. An integral component. To the US economy either during covid or without covid. So it's an easier target. We'll be right back. Everyone wants to become a better leader this groundbreaking new book how to lead shows you how David M Rubenstein is one of the visionary founders of the Carlisle Group and host of the David Rubenstein Show where he speaks to leaders from every walk of life about who they are, how they define success and what it means to lead. Jeff bezos Richard Branson Warren Buffett Bill Gates Ruth Bader Ginsburg Phil Knight Oprah all of them and more are featured in how to lead this essential leadership playbook illustrates the principles and guiding philosophies of the world's greatest game changers discover the expert secrets to being. Effective innovative leaders. Walter Isaacson proclaims reading this invaluable trove of advice from the greatest leaders of our time is like sitting in an armchair and listening to the masters reveal their secrets, pick up a copy of how to lead wisdom from the world's greatest CEOS founders and Game Changers Bhai David Rubenstein available in Hardcover e book or audio, and we're back I get the kind of general personal security aspect of it. Where does the national security aspect of it come in? Is it because there's concern about people who worked at the Defense Department or the military whoever having to talk in in use in their households or people in the Defense Department are not allowed to use tiktok certainly not on their phones. For before this although they may have teenagers who That's vulnerability as well. So it wasn't primarily about like US government employees who might have sensitive data that tiktok would be the back door way that the Chinese government would spy on them but it was generalized sense of any foreign government that is using private American citizen data potentially for nefarious purposes represents a national security threat. Now, it clearly has not represented the kind of national security threat in the estimation of the White House right now when it's Russian. Manipulation of social media accounts the same principle should or would apply right. If you'RE GONNA ban, Tiktok you'd probably want to take action against the a variety of Russian media enterprises that are attempting to manipulate and hoover up American user data. Some of that data's you mentioned earlier in terms of third party is available to anybody for a price just because there's a marketplace for data. Which I think either most of us aren't aware of or frankly most probably don't care if politicos data on this podcast gets sold to fourteen vendors so that it can sell you and me products based on our other computer activity most people. Either like that, or don't care about that. But the national security concern is simply because it's a foreign government that could potentially. Use, our search history or browsing history nefarious. And again a, that might be true but be it's likely that all this kind of data is obtainable irrespective of whether or not a company called TIKTOK. Happens to have access to a lot of it. It's really interesting. So into this whole story comes oracle, you know huge hardware software firm but how did they get involved here? Yes. Oracle is is a multibillion dollar firm that has had the same public profile as Microsoft or Amazon or facebook or apple because most of its business is to other large companies, you know you and I don't tend to go out and buy Oracle piece of hardware because we don't need a hundred and fifty thousand dollars server or. Network system for our employees. They're largely corporate provider throw a huge provider to the Defense Department in terms of cheer equipment and material, and they're huge software company. They're one of the early Silicon Valley success stories and the billionaire founder Larry Ellison has been probably more conservative than not I don't know that I buy into the whole. This is a reward versus. A snub to the other potential main acquirer or partner for Tiktok, which was rumored to be Microsoft but this is an unusual. This doesn't usually fit oracle's business model. Well, that's that's interesting. So what is their interest in getting involved here perceived to be I'm not one hundred percent clear about that I mean look at could allow them to. Have a little bit more of a consumer facing brand. Again, I mean Oracle's. Primarily a software company primarily a database company. Maybe this could help them increase their databases. There's no way that this is a natural fit for goal. But at the same time north this a huge cost for Oracle, maybe it'll produce some American jobs. I mean. They're looking for growth just like everybody's looking for growth, and once you get to be the size of Oracle. Growth gets harder some of they're also looking for a DIFFERENT INDUSTRY TO BE President Chore? So. What exactly did they given? What did they get here that as of this conversation is not one hundred percent clear off so it was presented as or go by tiktok. That is not the case or at least it's not the case now and as possible. The deal will be scuttled or change given that all of this has to be approved by the government has to be approved by committee. Called Syfy S, which is the committee in charge of looking at global deals in terms of US national security, but it would seem that right now. The parent company of Tiktok saw own TIKTOK and get some of the economic benefits of TIKTOK. This Chinese company called by dance and that Oracle in turn will get a massive licensing deal to house Tiktok data and information on its own. Servers and using its own software. So the concern that the Chinese government would have access to that data would be allayed meeting under this agreement arrangement because the data would be managed by and it's housing would be arranged by a US company. The Chinese government could order by dance to turn over but by dance itself wouldn't actually have access to that data. It's interesting I mean based on what you said before it's they're they're they're moving this data from place a, it's not going to be in a different place and I guess the Chinese government will no longer have a key to the door. But as you said before there's many different ways that either the Chinese government or a lot of other. State or private actors can get hold on more or less any data they want to these days right? which kind of raises the question for point of all, this is ENA. It's certainly true. It would make it a little more challenging to get that data under that kind of arrangement. It seems like this a big fight over a big company. That's not actually really about. The literal subject of the conflict here. Yeah. It is totally fair to say that whatever the imbroglio about tiktok has very little to do with tiktok. And everything to do with US policy toward China. And the trump administration looking for some High profile optic to be able to say we're we're being tough on China and protecting American citizens. Again, the oddity of Tiktok is given that so many of its users or young adults. Who Don't vote although who would be? Extremely, Acetate it. If they woke up tomorrow and there's no TIKTOK meeting, it's probably not. The most popular move if what you're trying to do is gain support during a presidential election. So it's not entirely clear what constituency the served there wasn't like a huge congressional clamor for Oh my God. We're all big imperilled by these fifteen second videos. So where do you think things go from here in terms of into in terms of the real story behind all this in terms of the U., S., China relationship and the increasing in. them of that. So I think to some degree regardless of who wins the presidential election. there. Is a train that's left the proverbial station of increasing. Distrust and animosity between the United States and China. But within the context of an incredible amount of economic interdependence that you cannot just snap your fingers and several or at least not without massive massive harm to each part of that equation both the United States and China, and that's that's pretty unprecedented. Right? Right. That's like the Cold War analogy doesn't work because there was no economic relationship between the United States and the Soviet Union nineteen. Fifty S

Chinese Government United States Tiktok China Zachary Tiktok Oracle David M Rubenstein Defense Department Donald Trump Executive National Security Agency Partner Microsoft Indiana Apple Adele
Fresh update on "silicon valley" discussed on This Week in Startups

This Week in Startups

01:31 min | 13 hrs ago

Fresh update on "silicon valley" discussed on This Week in Startups

"Them as investors in your company? I think the? Visas and partners can be really great at identifying really great operators to join you on the Cap table enjoying your on this journey and so with respect to Our Series B. Andrew Reid said that Kevin and Mikey are excellent in terms of angel investors that they do A. Small volume of deals. And that they spend a decent amount of time with folks are hyper responsive and so in terms of building out. A communication platform. The built it for consumer obviously, and we're building it for the workplace that they could actually help us identify wondered like the key cognitive and psychological mechanisms that can help create behavior 'cause they introduced a photo sharing to the world, and then also instagram stories was a huge leap and maybe they weren't necessarily the innovators on that front, but they actually made it mass market and that's what we're. What were those what was their advice like? What are the things that have made it more natural for people? I'm curious like I think that. Mikey. In terms of talking to my technical co founder Vinay and making sure that that magic feeling that's actually largely driven by under the hood technical innovation like videos really really hard medium to work with and it takes constant vigilance that has been a really interesting line of conversation. I think for Taliban and myself on the product side, you actually talk more about kind of like product strategy and what are the next major step we want to take a maybe not the things that I can share openly right now but you think. The original impetus when we were talking to them was like, how do we build visual communication into the workplace but we've actually found at the core value that they deliver as more the strategic and innovation side. So you did the CO two round, which is your last series. B.. Round started before the pandemic during the pandemic. So. That round getting going because I know you did the closing dinner under the pandemic, correct yes we did that. So we raise the series be with Andrew and sequoia in September of last year. This round recalled be plus but it was at a different valuation. After the pandemic had started and we had started to see that order of magnitude shift and our analytics, and so we said, Ken, we actually bring in a great new partner. That can help us take it to the next level as well as inject some cash in order to move a little bit more aggressively as a result of being further ahead in our model than we originally predicted. So when we went out to start risen round of funding that was in March on, and that was like late March closed at officially in May. So a pandemic hits, the world in crisis and people are scared and you see, wow, everything is growing ten x three weeks in terms at least the number of us, and then eventually I'm sure the number of users signing up etc grows and you decide opportunistically we should raise funding. And we should go to market. Does that mean you did this round you raised it without doing in-person meetings and then how many people did you email and say, Hey, we're considering raising money because things are going. Did you email five people? Fifty people headed that fundraising process work broad strokes In a pandemic. Silicon Valley when you tell one person that your fundraising, the whole ecosystem knows. This weird. We had told we talked to the board internally and just let them know that we are thinking about this and then from there we had been building relationships. I think one of the most important things for founders do I learned in the early days as be building relationships in between rounds do not try and cold start any relationship when you're going out to raise around and so there is a shortlist of investors that we potentially wanted to work with and it was starting to get to be. At the valuation that we are targeting in that kind more growth stage investor territory, and so I, I'd reached out to shortlist redid all of the meetings remote actually said it was by far the most efficient rounded ever raised because I was actually able to get a material amount of work done during it because I wasn't running around Sandhill Hill Road I was. Me How many people ballpark how many? How many targets did you start with? How many meetings did you do? We just are fifty targets or fifteen and that? How many meetings did you wind up doing ten? I'm just curious Ballpark to get one of these late drowns on what's the actual diligence process you should be at least five people ten people. Yeah. So we ended up meeting with eight different firms. On Social Group small group. But that's because in. Done our research in advance of this and had built our own VC database, and then from there what was really fascinating as shameless plug for loom a little bit. But after we did the nickel meeting with the first two or three partners, we recorded a loom that was walking through the deck. Behind. Him timestamped all the slides and we linked to the deck and so said, you can share this with your partnership and we actually as a result of having that leave behind and it being really expressive an intimate look into the business of loom. We were actually able to skip the partner meetings and we actually went straight to term shit. So. How many you eight meetings at eight targets you get two or three term sheets at four or five. But what is the? What does it look like when you get to that next level of decided? It was You know overall. Term Sheets are actually something that there's the verbal and then there's actually getting a term sheet Riyadh a handful of term sheets, but we had gotten a few more verbal than that. But I mean, I think one of the best things that you can do not preneurs especially when you're starting to get to that growth stage territory, you want to build great relationships just. Setting proper expectations and communicating as clearly as possible like you don't want to lead people along and so for us real like look, there's a couple of firms that were really excited about working with. We want to build a relationship before we actually got to terms Kinda. Close, narrow the field as it were exactly. She narrowed the field and then you make a decision. And you close. This big round out a three, hundred, twenty, million dollars evaluation understand congratulations on that one third of the way to the card status which doesn't mean anything. People will obsess over it. Obviously. But. What I thought was interesting is usually you know you do a big round like this. You have a nice closing dinner VC's come out and they find someplace with expensive wide like. Your michelin-starred place. And they take everybody out for you know five hundred dollars, thousand dollar, a person dinner ten people go spend five, ten grand and it's a big deal. Right and everybody has a really memorable meal, but.

Andrew Reid Mikey Partner Instagram Taliban Riyadh Silicon Valley Co Founder Vinay KEN Social Group Small Group Kevin
Distributed In Memory Processing And Streaming With Hazelcast

Data Engineering Podcast

04:17 min | Last week

Distributed In Memory Processing And Streaming With Hazelcast

"You hear about all these different data management platforms that talk about these things but Hazel casts advantage is around in memory and in memory isn't a new concept it's been around for a while but there have been some limitations about what it can do in the past and some of these limitations are being mitigated so that in memory speeds are opening up to more and more companies and Hazel cast was founded a little more than ten years ago actually in. Turkey by a couple of very smart engineers and they came to Silicon Valley to start his cast as a former company, and it was all about in memory computing, and so the first product was the I M D product which stands for the in memory data grit. So very much like a database, but a bit more capabilities in terms of distributed computing ways to simplify building applications that could be spread across multiple nodes in a cluster and thus enable paralyzation much more simply and so from the early roots. It was all about trying to get applications that ran faster, but at the same time maintaining some of these enterprise qualities like security and reliability and availability. So ensuring that you're not getting speed at any cost but getting the right amount of speed that you need to address your use cases while also protecting your data and with added on stream processing since and we have a set of technologies that work extremely well together and are fitting in quite well with some types of use cases that people are building today. and. You mentioned that it's not being built at the expense of some of the reliability durability guarantees that you might care about is particularly if you're working on mission critical applications so I'm wondering if you can dig a bit more into some of the benefits and the potential trade offs of in memory compute particularly for data intensive workouts and things that are going to be operating on stateful sets of operations. You have the benefits of computing have largely to do with the fact that you have fast access to data stored in memory, and so I've heard some people say that this notion of in memory computation or in memory processing is redundant. When in fact, if you think about it, the processing isn't done in memory. The processing is done in the CPU or these days increasingly more in the GP and the in memory simply means that all of the data is stored within memory and not necessarily spilled out to disk, and so when you have a system that's designed to optimize that pattern where you have all your data in. Memory that means that you can get fast access to a lot of fast processing and be able to deliver on some of these use cases that have very narrow windows for service level agreements. So you get performance the same time when you have fastest, you need to incorporate some of the typical characteristics of a distributed system like replication in a variety of ways and you need to have consistent replication. So we've after doing some research, some competitive research we've seen at least one technology where at certain levels of throughput, it pauses some of the replication to be able to handle the throughput and so most people won't notice it but. It's one of those things that if you're not watching, then you could potentially have a big problem when your dad isn't replicated and notes go down and you get failures then you might see a lot of unexpected data loss when you thought that all of the data protection capabilities were in place but for us, we don't make those trade offs when we run our benchmark. So we say here's what you get in a true production environment in terms of performance, and you can be sure that we keep everything retained for business news that you would expect, and certainly some of the trade offs are pretty clear if people from there. With these, it's mostly about how much daddy can store. So you wouldn't use Hazel cast as your say your system of record for Peta Bytes of data we're talking more about operational data where you want to process it very quickly. So things like payment processing or fraud detection are good cases where you might have a good amount of data in memory as a cup, but also have the engine processing in parallel and being able to use that data in it almost transient way. So it's it's data that persisted somewhere else, but we put it into our engines so that we can have those very stringent, very data intensive workloads running. My understanding is that the actual implementation is as a library that can be embedded

Hazel Cast Turkey Silicon Valley M D Fraud Peta
Fresh update on "silicon valley" discussed on Daily Tech News Show

Daily Tech News Show

02:40 min | 13 hrs ago

Fresh update on "silicon valley" discussed on Daily Tech News Show

"The energy six times the power 16% more range as well a reduction in cost per kilowatt of 14% per cell but use a bunch of cells to make a battery. So you're talking about some pretty good savings are separately Tesla has sued the United States government over tariffs on Parts Tesla imports from China Tesla claims tariff lists, three and four were arbitrary and capricious. God wants them declared void and the amount Tesla paid refunded with interest had tipped a big Jim for alerting us to the Tariff story in our Discord. All right, let's talk a little bit about a trend that you might want to pay attention to TechCrunch reports research from index Ventures has a new report out on Europe shows that fewer than one in fifty European tech phone number. Are choosing to relocate their engineering base to the us as they expand selling their product in the US now if you're like, okay, what does that mean? It used to be standard practice page of at least your engineering Squad to Silicon Valley in order to expand in the US, especially if you wanted to get some funding so usually happen before series a between 2008 and 2014 15% of European startups, either expanded into or moved entirely into the United States ahead of series a funding that number fell to 33% between 2015 and 2019 also stack Overflow reports that there are now six million professional developers living in Europe right now compared to four point three million in the United States so long it's easier to find a developer in Europe. If you stay there and along with tightened immigration rules that makes development costs in the US more expensive. Seems to me that what this says to me. I'm no expert on any stretch of the word expert in this area. But it seems like maybe that just means some of the money are all the money is in concentration just here except funding rounds important obviously, but it seems like maybe what's happening is Europe and other parts of the world are having concentrated amounts of investment happening on their own soil. So why make this giant move if you can make a go where you are. Well, it's not just that right? Yeah. Go ahead sir. Well, I was going to say even in the US itself. It used to be. Well if you want to be taken seriously, you gotta move to Silicon Valley or at least have a presence there because yeah, you're raising money and the engineers have to kind of all be together and collaborate and that is just not the case anymore particularly off today because we're all learning how to work remotely and still collaborate more than ever. So I would think even more so if there's a European Tech firm that has you know, how long Stable base somewhere. It makes very little sense to move to the US unless for some reason money was being withheld. Yeah, my my take on this is you can still get those us Venture capitalists to invest in your European firm. There's no reason I mean once covid-19 Well, if you were wondering what ever became of that July and August boycott of advertising on Facebook remember it, you know, everybody was wringing their hands. Oh boy, Facebook's really in trouble. Now with the financial times reports that Facebook YouTube Twitter and the World Federation of advertisers have agreed on steps to curb harmful content online just by boycott happened in the first place..

United States Tesla Europe Facebook China Tesla Silicon Valley European Tech JIM Techcrunch Index Ventures World Federation Developer
Exploring The Future of Health through Dreams and AI with Antonio Estrella

Outcomes Rocket

07:01 min | Last week

Exploring The Future of Health through Dreams and AI with Antonio Estrella

"Welcome back to the podcast that I have the privilege of hosting Tony Australia. He's a managing director at Talladega Investment and advisory for health tech and insure tech startups. He's also a fiction novelist Tony's a global thought leader and fiction writer and digital health with experiences working in Asia, the US and Europe as a startup founder investor or Britain ovation leader and strategic advisor Tony currently sits on the board as an independent director, for C, x group, and Savannah CTS as both. An investor and adviser Tony Partners with Asia focus companies who are working to develop solutions to change the face of cancer human longevity and population health with core IP stemming from AI genomics blockchain smart devices, his previous work within both life insurance at metlife and farm out with Pfizer, it was focused to drive measurable business impact allowing him to help entrepreneurs enhanced their product market fit and commercial growth plans across Asian markets, his debut fiction novel comatose, which will touch on here. In today's discussion is a fiction novel about Lucid Dreaming and it's all about health tech fiction something that will cover with Tony as well. It's available in bookstores today in the UK and Amazon globally. Tony is has done tremendous mono- work and he spent some time at University of Pennsylvania's wharton getting his MBA there the London business school and the University of Pennsylvania School of Engineering and Applied Science in electrical engineering. So a tremendous individual and it's a privilege to host them. Here today. Tony thanks for joining the next. So the pleasure to be here, thanks for inviting me to share some of my thoughts and insights with with your audience. Absolutely my friend. So tell me a little bit about your journey. How did you decide on healthcare? So I academically studied electrical engineering and that's actually where I caught the bug Ford being more entrepreneurial minded and how I focused by professional life I used to build and race solar electric race cars really. Little coffee that I helped build up and and I started my career in consulting and during that period was great you know lots of. Ways to learn and be mentally intellectually challenged. But in two thousand, I had just finished doing work in Silicon Valley and that was the first Internet wave and lots of excitement about transformation and as I started business school I really thought about where did I want to dedicate my time and energy in terms of industry focus for several different reasons including personal wants healthcare just jumped out. I love the fact that you can build technology and it helps people live longer have better quality of life I had a couple of. Personal Peoria friends who dealt with health issues. I had an aunt who passed away from kidney failure and so all that just came together for me to say I can wake up every morning. Feeling excited that what I do is helping at least one individual of a better life love that man yeah. It's a compelling reason to choose the field and with your knowledge and background you've been able to make a big impact and so I'd love to hear from you. Tony will you think is should be the big thing. On health leaders agenda and how are you approaching it back when I started my first business in two thousand one, there was a lot of emphasis in terms of whereas the healthcare industry in the US the US at the time and fast forward through time they're still an enormous amount of of focus in the US in the healthcare sector is digital health or health tech has grown the US. Market clearly is an important one, but I'd say that equally as important that on every health leaders mind should be what can they Learn from what's happening in. Asia and Asia whether Asia's an opportunity or not is there are there things that Asia offers in accelerating growth and scale and product that can be leveraged for for their business and couple of facts about Asia that I think are important for plus billion people forty four countries over two thousand languages spoken and normally large region and from an investment perspective this two, twenty, eighteen we saw the Asia approaching the same amount of investment to help tech startups is in the US style so within the next. Eighteen months you'll see that Asia, actual have more capital being deployed from the venture community and startups. So when I say that every health leader medically look at Asia, it's because the region is just is as awards today with with a much greater growth potential in the number of people countries. So there was a book I read recently by Kaifu who was a venture investor, in China, who formerly headed up Google China and used to work. For Apple and driving their early AI, and he doesn't amazing job painting the picture for China's one country when when important region round where they're going with a and how it's different than the US and I think that's the key thing that a takeaway for health for health leaders it's just a different technical environment data standards, and in the way that the tencent and Alibaba by do have changed China much the same way that Google facebook. Changed West is lots of learning that can happen man that's fascinating stuff Tony and folks I forgot to mention to you that Tony Lives and works in Singapore. So he's he's been there for the last five years this time around but definitely, a global health leader focused on Asia that knows the INS and outs. So critical critical piece of of information there everybody. To know. Tony, without a doubt there's there's opportunity over there. The money's flowing over there. Give us an example of of what you've seen is working and creating results. Yeah. The landscape for Asia is complex As I said, there's lots of countries and so before a answered that question, let me give a little bit of context as to how to think about the region. So. One is mentioned China and you can group Hong Kong and China together from thinking about one of six hubs in the region. The other hubs are the Indian subcontinent, which obviously is driven largely by India, but there's other countries their third. It'd be Japan for the be the Korean. Peninsula, which includes South Korea Fifty Southeast Asia Singapore and then six to be Australia New Zealand and I didn't do these in any order of size of just kind of went north to south and regret yeah, an each hub has. Similarities that that make a logical grouping whether it's economic development or cultural lifestyle history or climate.

Asia Tony United States Tony Australia China Tony Partners South Korea Fifty Southeast As Tony Lives Managing Director Talladega Investment Metlife Pfizer University Of Pennsylvania Sch Europe Ai Genomics University Of Pennsylvania UK Amazon Japan India
A Closer Look at Sundar Pichai: From Middle Class Indian Upbringing to Google's Head Honcho

WSJ Tech News Briefing

06:11 min | Last week

A Closer Look at Sundar Pichai: From Middle Class Indian Upbringing to Google's Head Honcho

"Google and its parent company alphabet on the precipice of several major challenges regulators are expected to file antitrust lawsuits as early as this month and other example some faith company isn't as innovative as it used to be. A CEO of alphabet sooner Pechanga will play a key role in how the company navigates the headwinds, and while Pichai, is not nearly as in the spotlight as the other tech leaders. He's already had a long history Google, and by taking a look back, we can try and get some clues about how he might move the company forward a reporter Copeland joins us with an inside look rob. Thanks for joining me. Thank you. So, at the tech hearing before the House antitrust subcommittee earlier, this year Pichai himself as an immigrant sort of the picture of the American dream. And wonder if you could start by telling us more about the Chinese upbringing shore so Definitely outlier in many ways in Silicon Valley perhaps the most famous way that he stands out is that he was born in. India. So he grew up middle-class for India but not necessarily add western standards. He famously talks about growing up and getting in his first. Rotary phone. He is in such an older guy that the technology was just a lot less developed there. So he speaks frequently about the connection that he feels to technology and the knowledge that new technology can really change someone's life. So pettah eventually came to the US for Grad School. How do you find his Google? He worked relatively ordinary corp jobs until he joined Google right after its IPO google was not the Google that it is today it really was just a search engine. Quickly impresses people for his ability to one build consensus, which is true to this day, but also get the job done his first major job at Google. toolbar product. So before there was chrome there actually was an add on on your browser to search google. So his job was to convince companies like Dell when they sold you a laptop to have an automatic google search bar on there. So he's moved through the ranks since then becoming CEO of Google and then last year taking over as alphabet. CEO How did he make his way up the ladder? What's so remarkable is he's been at Google for sixteen years and we even though we're the Wall Street Journal have never done a full profile of him. So a big part of my task for the last few months was really unpacking who he is and how he got to this position and what really emerges is that Google was a place and still is a place with big personalities people who scream at each other people who say we should bet the farm on this or that and what sooner sort of did. was stay in the background, but he was also very careful that whatever he did it worked starting with toolbar but that extends to chrome the browser which he co lead and is now by far the most used web browser one of the big reveals of this reporting for me was that he's a very strategic person. It's not an accident that he stayed in the background for instance, someone who used to report to him. Told me early on in a meeting with with Larry? Page. who was CEO of Google before soon Dr Sooner made sure that they never disagreed in front of Larry. He really didn't want anyone to see any cracks and this also emerges in a lot of the people I spoke to some of whom sooner himself suggested that I speak to. But then when I got on the phone with them, they didn't seem to know him personally well. So he he keeps it very close to the vest. So it sounds like he's pretty deft at navigating the company politics now that he's in the top spot. What's he known for as a leader? So to a man to a woman ever and I spoke to said that sooner has a tendency in the middle of meetings to stand up and begin pacing in the middle of your presentation. He won't say anything necessarily sign that he likes or doesn't like it. It's just signed that he's thinking. So you can imagine people have spent weeks preparing for the CEO and he leaps up in the middle just starts pacing it can be quite disarming frankly this comes back to the criticism. Of Soon Dr to standing up in the middle of meeting and pacing as you think is not necessarily your traditional hey drive the car forward leadership. There's a big knock at Google today it's that and this comes from investors analysts even some executives of the company it's that the company is pretty much operating on autopilot. It makes almost all of its money from online advertising and you don't really have to do much besides sit there and the money comes in adding an extra add to youtube isn't exactly a high level. Decision. So the criticism is that sooner hasn't necessarily made the big move to position Google for the next decade on the other hand. When you have such a head start that Google has just not messing up is a billion dollar proposition. And what about as a coworker? What's he known for that? The best thing that's has going for him is that people genuinely like him in fact, one of his deputies Caesar. Gupta told me he loved sooner Pichai. He said the reason I stayed at Google this long as because of Dr He's someone that I trust. He moved to Jakarta because soon are asked him to. People. Say in this world where everyone is obsessed with Silicon Valley with what is happening in Menlo Park and Palo Alto and San Francisco that soon Dr a truly global outlook that he cares for instance, about Google pay in India where there are many multiples number of people using payment products in there are in the US. But tacitus surly had as much investment and one of the really fun things that is in the story is he's very much a creature of habit. You can imagine your CEO of of Alphabet you're traveling the world whenever he's in Korea he goes to the same burrito place an orders, the same Veggie Burrito. And in this world of he's hard-driving CEOS who appear in TMZ or go through high profile divorces. Everyone says that sooner Chai's legitimately just a kind nice guy.

Google CEO Pichai India Silicon Valley United States Larry Tacitus Jakarta Dell Wall Street Journal Copeland Reporter Caesar Grad School Korea Pettah
5 Years with a Photo Diary

The Digital Story

06:34 min | 2 weeks ago

5 Years with a Photo Diary

"Think one of the interesting things about a diary like this is that you can measure how quickly life changes. It's one thing with your memory to go. Yeah. You know remember back a few years ago. We used to sit around and do this and that, but you sometimes weren't exactly sure when that was or. What Would it look like an all the sort of things? A photo diary has a date and it has a picture and it has text and it has all the stuff that you need to fill in those gaps so that when you look at the photo diary entry, then you go oh yeah. I remember and then the other details come to you. This is very helpful for not only remembering things but when people ask you, Hey, when was that we did or that or what did we do on my forty fifth birthday or? All that kind of stuff you actually have information available to you. Now, I'm going to talk about the actual software in the second segment. So we'll get to that right now I'm just going to talk about the idea of a photo diary itself. One of the things that I do like about them is especially compared to something that you would write down I mean this is electric. This is on my phone on my IPAD and on my computer all my computers. Is that a searchable so it makes it really easy to find stuff and I think that's one of the things that's important when you're doing this kind of work in especially when you're trying to retrieve this kind of work is going. All right. You just enter birthday two, thousand, seventeen or something like that and You can find what you're looking for pretty quickly. Now, I also find them useful for me knowing what cameras I'm using, what settings I'm using actually put a lot of that information in the diary and in fact. When I started it back in two thousand fifteen the idea was for me was to take an iphone picture of something that I was shooting with a film camera because obviously film cameras don't record any meditate at all. Then that way I would have date than that way I would have temperature and things like that. I would definitely have location which was very important to me, and then I could go ahead and fill out notes about what was happening. So that was the original concept of this. That's what got me going on this however once I started doing it, and then once I started looking back on what I had done I was going this is far more valuable than just adding meditated to analog shots I'm glad I did it I'm glad that I figured out the system to. Get me going on it but like so many things in life it evolves to something completely different over time and in my case something better, and that's something better is what I'm going to be sharing with you right now I know a lot of you don't care about fell photography and that's totally cool. So I'm not really going to talk about that aspect of it, but I did want you to know that that's what got me going on this and then led to what I'm GonNa, talk about today what I thought I would do just to give you a feel. For the kinds of things that I enter I, picked five entries and I could have picked thirty five entries to share with you but I just picked five to give you a feel for these things. Now, each one has a picture. Each one has a fair amount of location data time all that kind of stuff, and then I usually put a caption with somebody give you five of them and then we'll talk a little bit more about maybe the value of a photo diary in your life as well. August sixteenth two thousand sixteen. Giants Baseball. I packed the contacts one, thirty, nine q for some street shooting in San Francisco on our walk to at and T. Park for a giants game. Four votes were going Zach Max Jason and myself. We took the larks per ferry over to the Barca Daryl. Strolled for a mile to the ballpark and then return to Lark spur of the giants ferry after the game, the three boys, and I had a great time. So, that's that's where the entry ends I'll tell you a little bit more about it. So Zach Amax, my sons and Jason is their friend who even to this day is their roommate. So all three of them are living together down in Santa Clara California they all have different jobs there in Silicon Valley, but this was back in two thousand sixteen. And the reason why I start off with this entry is because they're just so many things that aren't happening right now we're in baseball season we can't go to a baseball game. I'm not sure I would want to take the ferry to the embarcadero. I would have to think about that in that whole experience that we had that day and that evening you know all crowded together at the ballpark. hanging out with all these people watching a ballgame that right now just feels. So in the past to me, and that is interesting to you know look at the photo and read the entry and think about that really cool day that we hadn't by the way I got a photo out of that shoot that I just love of the three of them as we're walking down the embarcadero. The shot of course, I shared it with them later. And they like the shot so much there's actually hanging on their wall in their house So it was a great day and is one of those days that I hope that we get to have again December twenty seventh two, thousand, sixteen, the apple photos book at Barnes and Noble I was killing some time downtown waiting for the battery to be replaced in my iphone six S.. So I, ducked into our local Barnes and noble bookstore to see if the apple photos book for photographers was in stock much to my delight. There was one copy left. So I did what any photographer would do I faced forward and took a picture of it.

Giants Zach Max Jason Baseball Apple Barnes Zach Amax San Francisco Santa Clara California T. Park
Amazon is reportedly surveilling its Flex delivery drivers in private Facebook groups

Silicon Valley Insider with Keith Koo

00:42 sec | 2 weeks ago

Amazon is reportedly surveilling its Flex delivery drivers in private Facebook groups

"That Amazon has been secretly monitoring social media for the reflective driver program. Now they're flicks Driver program is very similar. Guber lift where these are independent contractors, not employees, and they're monitoring social media groups for any negative information now originally supposed to be around complaints of the service, But now they're speculating that Amazon's actually using it to predict what types of negative comments are actually coming from the drivers themselves. Again. This is not something that is legal or illegal. It's something around the ethics or the question of ethics as we adopt other types of technologies and platforms.

Amazon
Colleges and universities set up coronavirus quarantine zones

Silicon Valley Insider with Keith Koo

00:46 sec | 2 weeks ago

Colleges and universities set up coronavirus quarantine zones

"Colleges and universities scrambling to set up Corona virus quarantine zones in dorms as well as moth campus Sacred Heart University has converted a 34 room guest house at the former Connecticut headquarters of G E. The quarantine students. The University of South Carolina ran out of space a dormitory for quarantine students and began sending them two rooms it rented in hotel like quarters at a training center for prosecutors, the Air Force Academy sent 400 cadets to hotels to free up space on its Colorado base for quarantines. Health officials such as White House Corona virus Task Force member Dr Deborah Burkes has been urging colleges to keep students on campus. To avoid them, infecting members of their family and

Moth Campus Sacred Heart Unive White House Corona Dr Deborah Burkes Air Force Academy University Of South Carolina Connecticut Colorado
Culture Cults Week

Feedback with EarBuds

03:22 min | 3 weeks ago

Culture Cults Week

"This week's theme comes to us from Sean Abraham Preston and is called culture colts. Here's why Sean chose this theme. He writes. Hi. I'm Sean Abraham Preston and the theme I chose is culture. Cults Chose the theme because I'm fascinated with Howard devotion to new cultural ideals can cross over into spirituality in the worship of other people oftentimes with dark consequences. Were especially vulnerable to this when we're searching for meaning in Tumultuous Times of change. Like twenty twenty, for example. Here, are the episodes chosen by Sean for this week's theme along with short descriptions of each episode. The first one comes to us from the podcast strangers and is called the sun the Goddess Leopoldo. It's forty six minutes long. Here's the description. Born in a coven of lesbian witches in a Haight Ashbury commune after the fall of Saigon Young Joshua Safran soon hit the open road with his single mother and things only got stranger from there. A. Word of warning this story contained some disturbing moments. The next episode comes to us from. You must remember this is called Charles Manson's Hollywood part three, the beach boys, Dennis Wilson and Charles Manson Songwriter. It's forty seven minutes long. Here's the description. In this episode, we'll talk about Charlie Manson's arrival in Los Angeles. We'll discuss Dennis Wilson's life and the role he played in enabling Manson's rock and roll delusions, and we'll explain how the beach boys came to record a song written by Charles Manson. The next episode comes to us from friends of the friend called the beautiful cripple part one. It's forty nine minutes long. Marilyn Manson fan and a Silicon Valley's tech, Colt Cross paths in an adventure that ends in supernatural sex and murder. The next episode comes to us from Decoder Ring and is called the basement affair. It's forty three minutes long. Here's the description. What are the real reasons people go on reality? TV. This episode follows the story of an Hirsch and Kathy Nardone two women cast on VH1's Frank. The entertainer in a basement affair a show about an adult man looking for love while living in his parent's basement. How did one performance artists and one accidental performance artists make it onto the show and how did they behave once they made it their. Their story highlights the ways that reality television distorts narratives, obscures intentions, and stereotypes women, yet it's still irresistible to audiences and performers like. The last episode of the week comes to us from invisible era and is called the end of empathy. It's fifty two minutes long. Here's the description. In. Is a show that runs on empathy we believe in it, but are we right? In this episode, we'll let you decide. We tell you the same story twice in order to examine the questions who deserves our empathy and is there a wrong way to empathize? Those are the episodes chosen by Sean for this week's theme Culture Colts.

Sean Abraham Preston Charles Manson Marilyn Manson Dennis Wilson Twenty Twenty Goddess Leopoldo Tumultuous Times Haight Ashbury Joshua Safran Howard Colt Cross Los Angeles Murder Hollywood Hirsch Kathy Nardone VH1 Frank
QuaranTV: Ramy, Space Force And Lady Dynamite

Ask Me Another

04:03 min | 3 weeks ago

QuaranTV: Ramy, Space Force And Lady Dynamite

"On the line with me, we have Jimmy Yang and Roy Wood Jr.. Hello. Well, hello gas. So Roy who are you quarantining? I am quarantining with. Myself my girl, our four year old. and My mother in Alabama I am doing the same thing you around your four year old all the time and. They've got some they've got some value to add to the comedy world. and. Masan talks a lot just say that I know what you're saying. Talking. Every day just nonstop. I feel like being a parent during quarantine is as stressful as being the head coach of a major franchise I'm trying to keep his family on threat. Make sure the family performs world every bay. I like Jimmy that you were coming from a beautiful apartment saying thank you. How dare you? It's a house I own property now owned land. But, yeah unfortunately, I am quarantine by myself. Yeah. No kids but it is by myself and once a week I go see my parents have been pretty separated. They live about an hour away from me in La are you out walking still? So backstory Jimmy and live in the same neighborhood. And like any time I leave the house to walk. It was like a purpose but I always see Jimmy out walking and I couldn't tell if it was just for health or just see was just in deep thought or if a standup process, it's. Always respected because you were walking clearly with no destination. Cool. I like that you can see my aimlessness in my in my stride there's an aimlessness to it. Yeah, I used to walk quite a lot for exercise because I didn't exercise at all for like years and I was just walked to the Grove, which is like I don't know thirty minutes or something. But. Now, actually not to brag or anything but I gotTA pull now I've been using that. You're now. Yeah. So we I. Brag but here it is Silicon Valley. Okay. So you probably have noticed that the big celebrity trend during quarantine is making tutorial videos, and so we have a game about that. We're going to play you a video of a celebrity doing something and you just have to say who it is. Right away and you're going to be competing against each other. So we'll go back and forth. All Right Roy this one's for you straight out of a loss Angeles mansion here's an attempt to Eddie makeup tutorial. Eyebrows among us wes we. Kenworthy. Can you do it in the other room of in the middle of something I don't want to get this all wet speedy. I'm hiding in the guest room. You guys I'm hiding guestroom because my kids data will not leave me alone. I, don't know which one. You're a cardiac. Yes sure Kardashian. I'll take the half point right now because I don't know which. because. I say kids, which is plural. So that's Courtney or Kim four euro though, right? She says she says northey. She says, okay. Northey Internet. Yeah. That's Kim. That's a layup. She also said you guys you guys you got and that's something that Kim Kardashian always says social media, which I only know because my girlfriend watches a lot of it. Okay. Not Me sure you are. You are weirdly well-versed on the Dash. outs. I love that her a tutorial during currently in involves her child asking, can I wash my hands and she says, no, no. No No. Just wait. Touch your face while you're waiting the cameras rolling. Okay.

Jimmy Yang Kim Kardashian Roy Wood Jr Courtney Alabama Masan Silicon Valley Kenworthy LA Eddie
Palantir Plans to Go Public

Squawk Pod

02:10 min | Last month

Palantir Plans to Go Public

"Details on one of the most anticipated public debuts of the last few years, data analytics company. Pailin. Tear. Technologies has released its prospectus to debut on the public markets in the filing pound here reveals that plans to list on the New York Stock Exchange under the ticker he l. t. are and will pursue a direct listing rather than a traditional IPO, the same unconventional route taken by slack and twenty nineteen and spotify two, thousand, eighteen the company said it lost about five hundred eighty million dollars last year despite a twenty, five percent increase in revenue from the prior year. Tear was founded in two thousand three by a group of Silicon, valley entrepreneurs, including CEO, Alex, Carp, and Peter Thiel became wealthy as a founder of pay PAL and an early investor in facebook, and just in case you didn't know I did not until today Pailin tear the company was named after a magical or in the Lord of the rings that lets you travel. Vast distances. Here's Andrew Ross Sorkin with more in the filing co Alex Carp said quote our company was founded in Silicon Valley and by the way now, it goes to take on a shot at Silicon Valley but we seem to share fewer and fewer of the technological technology sectors, values and commitments from the start. We've repeatedly turned down opportunities to sell, collect or mind data of technology companies including some of the largest in the world have built their entire businesses on doing just that. Carp recently announced plans to move its headquarters from Palo Alto to Denver in part because of. This value issues talked up how also clear on its stance on China. Says we not work with the Chinese Communist Party and had chosen not to host our platforms in. China. which may limit our growth prospects. Company proposed three classes of stock, a Class B and Class F which will be held voting trust established by its founders including Peter Thiel with just below fifty percent of the total voting power for that stock that's similar to voting structure of other tech giants, clean facebook, and Google. So if you're concerned about the power structure. That is that is something they do share in common with with the rest of the

Alex Carp Peter Thiel Silicon Valley Facebook Andrew Ross Sorkin Founder Silicon Chinese Communist Party China Palo Alto Spotify New York CEO Google L. T. China. Denver
Best hurricane trackers for two severe storms now approaching Gulf Coast

Silicon Valley Insider with Keith Koo

00:42 sec | Last month

Best hurricane trackers for two severe storms now approaching Gulf Coast

"Along the Gulf coast of Louisiana and Texas officials and residents are preparing for the possible onslaught of two storms. Tropical Storm Marco is now a hurricane is is expected to come ashore somewhere in Louisiana as early as tomorrow. The second Big Storm Laura's working its way through the Caribbean but could be a hurricane. National Hurricane Center spokesman Andy Lotto says this is a historic situation Lords in the forecast, for example, close enoughto Marco would have overlapping warnings for different storms. So that's an interesting That we did not encounter here very often at all. Very, the National Hurricane Center warned of life threatening storm surges and hurricane force winds along the Gulf Coast Hurricane Watch has been declared for the New Orleans metro area.

National Hurricane Center Marco Louisiana Gulf Andy Lotto New Orleans Caribbean Texas
Sheryl Sandberg On Facebook and Elections

WSJ Tech News Briefing

26:19 min | Last month

Sheryl Sandberg On Facebook and Elections

"Last week John spoke with Facebook Coo Sheryl Sandberg Zoom Call, and we've got their conversation for you as an extended show today. John Obviously people know Sandberg as Facebook, Coo. But what else should they know about her? She's very well known in the tech industry, but also in in circles of leadership in advocacy for women in leadership minorities, leadership But yeah, the most visible role she plays as the number two to mark facebook in that has been enrolled. That's been developing over more than a decade and prior to that, she was a in early employee at Google and played role in the Clinton administration as well. Of course, there's been a lot going on facebook and we've reported on it along the way, but they're kind of always as. So. Why talk to San Merck now it's been particularly busy summer and there was a lot to talk about on the call. You know you've had this advertising boycott. You've had a lot more questions about their willingness to police hate speech and and make sure that civil rights are being protected on the platform You've also had this run up to the election and a lot of focus on small business and what they can do during a pandemic both to stop the spread of misinformation and help small business stay afloat. Cheryl's also well known for her foundation Leinen, and at the time that we talked, it was a black women's payday and Kamala Harris had just been tapped as the vice presidential candidate for Joe Biden. Leinen had just done this study that pointed out some things that are fairly obvious. But maybe we didn't realize how cute the problems really are, and that was related to advancement opportunities for minority women in Business both leadership management opportunities just their ability to move forward in their careers. Here's what she told us the data's incredible right now, men are doing a lot to men are doing an average of fifty hours a week of childcare and housework. That's something. We've never ever seen before women doing an average of seventy one. And Black Women and women of color doing even more that GOP is twenty one hours and single mothers, many of whom are of color but single mothers of all backgrounds are doing twice as many hours per week caring for elderly or sick relatives as well and doing a great majority of childcare and we know that all of these numbers hit women who were core hit poor families harder than wealthier families across the board. But even amongst the elite, what you almost always see is the average woman even if she's working full-time is doing a lot more in the home than the average man and that is a big part of what happens to us in the workforce. Until we get to a quality in the home, we're never getting to a quality in the workplace and that has become even more urgent with coronavirus. These are all important issues to the Wall Street Journal, we cover these things all the time we've been covering them aggressively and comprehensively, but we could only manage to get so much in today's episode. So with the issue at hand is clearly. The election and facebook's huge role to play. They're given what happened in two, thousand, sixteen and expectations in the twenty twenty and that's the part of the conversation we wanted to share with listeners today. Thanks John. A couple of things. We should note here this was a video call. So it's got that feel to it and it was recorded last week we've got that conversation after the break. Robotics, artificial intelligence augmented reality. The future is here listen to tomorrow today with the Wall Street Journal's future of everything the podcast that takes you to the frontlines of science and tech and shows you what's coming next. Look ahead. What do you hear? The future of everything from the Wall Street Journal Subscribe Wherever you get your podcasts. I want to set the context of you know of the problems and our criticisms aimed at your company, not just Sheryl Sandberg the executive, but the user of facebook is well I I. I have to assume that you're not just running a company that you're using the product. The company faces a Lotta Chris the you know. The the frustration about incentivizing the you know spreading misinformation allegedly incentivizing that extremely provocative in hateful speech that that gets through and get seen sometimes gets pushed up in our news feeds. The suspicion facebook is still a place for unwholesome characters and actors can manipulate the system in use misinformation to get results that they're looking for etc.. Nah Not. Not so much yet about the solutions that you guys have put in place in the learnings but how do you feel today about facebook is a place against the backdrop of those criticisms so we do face a lot of those criticisms and anytime you have a platform as large as ours you know three billion plus people on it many many of them daily. We have huge responsibility. And I think that is a responsibility that we really had to grow into. When I look at this election, we are a different company than we were in twenty sixteen and we are going into this election in a very different place in touches on all of the issues that you you're talking about. So let's go back to answer your question to twenty sixteen if you think about the election in two, thousand sixteen. We obviously had systems in place to defend against attacks from other states. But what those normally or thought of what we thought of them I think everyone of them was. People with hacking steal your data, remember the DNC emails remember Sony. That was basically what state actors did, and we've had very good systems in place in great defenses there what we completely missed in two thousand sixteen was not going in and stealing your stuff. But was going in and writing stuff. Fake host trying to get audiences to believe things in ways that you were representing. That's what happened with Russian interference and we completely missed it. So did the FBI. So did every government of the world? That is just not true when you think about the election in twenty eighteen and you think about being election today. We now understand this threat and are deeply engaged in working on it, but we're also not on our own homeland security has a department on miss the FBI has a task force on this in two thousand sixteen we call these groups coordinated inauthentic behaviour. So coordinated authentic like we saw the Russian fake posts in twenty sixteen, we took down networks we'd never heard of it twenty seventeen we took down one. In. The last year we took down over fifty. We now do these. So often at people used to write stories, we've Allah publicly. No one even does does that mean we're going to catch every single thing I will never claim that we will always have every single thing the services big. But does that mean we're in a very different place going into this election Absolutely. And one retake really seriously. We're also trying to get even more proactive on the good like on facebook there's things they're stopping the bad stopping the hate stopping interference with there's also promoting the good at, and that's something that I care a lot about mark as a lot of Bob. So we want yesterday. So it's perfectly timely to talk to you about it, our new voter information center and what that Information Center is a one stop shop where you can go to get accurate information on this election. That's never been more important registering to vote who's eligible that stuff's always hard. But in this election with corona virus and holes potentially closed getting accurate information is even more important. So We'd put this out. It's modeled on our coronavirus center where we put out very definitive information really helped people get the right answers. Now anytime people post about voting on facebook working a link to this center. We're also trying to be as ambitious as we can. I'm a woman I'm I'm owning the word ambitious, but it's ambition by my company. To Register people. So in the last two elections, we registered two million people to vote. which is very large, but we've put out pretty audacious goal that we're GONNA try to help register four million people for this election cycle, which I think would make it the largest effort of its kind by were invasion and were really. We're really proud of that really excited about it. So we I sit here John Taking, you take the criticism when we deserve it very seriously. We take our responsibility very seriously atop to show work every day trying to stop anything bad we gotTA learn quickly bad will always try to get ahead but also trying to use our platform in our services for the good. What do you do as the user? Something on facebook doesn't along there. Do you just pull the red phone out and make a phone call or are you pensive about that and thinking about emits broader context at it needs the nuance as market said it's very hard. To directly police the content and and just hit the button? Yes. So look it is hard to directly police the content. We know that it's very hard to pull heat down. It's very hard to find it and identified. That's why we've invested so much think our standards are the highest not the lowest I think our enforcements the best, but that doesn't make it perfect. You know as a user I actually don't remember seeing something that violated our policies and most people have not most people hear about it or it gets pulled into press and they see it now. I've certainly seen things I. Disagree with I have some family members whose political views I do not share. You know I have some ice stuff about fuck I disagree with. But in terms of my actual experience of seeing real hate yes I would pull I. Don't have a bat phone, but I would definitely take a screen shot in forwarded. Personally, referred infant I haven't had that experience or know how many people actually do see content that violates the rules is there a way to kind of measure that? Millions of people report content millions of not not all of it is actually violated with our standards but millions of people go through that process. In fact, we released our latest community standards enforcement report, and it gets to exactly what you're asking what that shows. Is All the different kinds of content we take down how much? How much violence? Were Nagasaki and it shows what percentage of it. We took down and found ourselves or someone reported to us. And that's where the progress on hate I think really becomes clear when we first did this report years ago, twenty, four percent of the hate we took down, we found ourselves which meant that seventy, six percent of the time someone had reported it to us. That's not a good experience. Our latest report we put out this week were at ninety, five, ninety, five percent of the hate that we take down we are finding before it's reported. That means five percent of what we take down is still being reported to us, which is still alive on facebook. So we have our work cut out for us, but clearly a significant improvement over twenty four percent just a few years ago and it to really the investments we've made in systems in AI in. Huge teams to monitor that's gotten us. There are your standards tough. Enough I mean that's something that we know is a sticky situation because everybody wants what they find to be offensive police in. As you said, sometimes it borders on my own bias is what I don't WanNa see. But when you look at the standards, where are you guys at particularly because they have in freshly criticized and there's rolling dialogue about whether whether you're going to get tougher? Where are we met? Her students are very tough but they're not as tough as some people would want them to be or they're not as comprehensive as some people would want them to be you know one person's opinion. One person's free expression could be another person's he. We work really hard on these definitions and were very public about the our entire standards are publicly out there including most to the material that the people who use inside their references that were very public about them. You know for the most part, we've always been a very protected society and the criticism has always been on both sides I'll give you an example that was very hot for a while was breastfeeding. We don't do pornography, we don't do breasts. In some parts of the world, a new woman who's naked from the top would be on the front page of every newspaper, and there are people that really believe in breastfeeding. It felt that we were suppressing their free speech because our computer systems were picking up any time. You saw a nipple of any kind even if it was a breastfeeding picture so we've worked more nuance there, but I think over the course of time, people have found us to be very strict on the standards. There are people out there that think are hit standards aren't strong enough. We are continually evaluating them continually making improvements. But I think a lot of people think our standards are too hard and so we try to be as transparent as possible. We try to evolve to meet ongoing things that are things. We'd never heard of no one ever heard of years ago. That are brand new movements that are hateful and there are things that some people find offensive that we do leave up because we think three expression in having that too is critically important in a lot of situations sodden. You're thinking on your role as an information broker during corona virus. How did that? I emerge and how did you deal with that at facebook given? All of the things that the most elite elite medical personnel don't know in yet. Here you are with the responsibility of not disseminating misinformation that may cost people's lives or fan pandemic. So our policy on misinformation is we don't take down we send it to third party fact checkers if it's marked as false or partially false, we dramatically decrease the distribution we market this has been marked false or partially falls and we linked to more information that often can tell the whole side of the story. Even, before Corona virus, we had an exception to that, which is information that was going to cause imminent harm and that policy really came out of other parts of the world. Misinformation was leading to death or imminent harm. The Corona virus we took the stand to things we said we're not going to have information that will lead to imminent harm. And we're going to rely on health experts. We are not decided there was no decision made by your marker anyone on our team. This is true about coronavirus and this is not because we're not experts but we partnered from the beginning with local health authorities the CDC the. H. Show the you know the health ministers in different countries to make sure that we were taking down misinformation. No matter who posted it up would also give very accurate information out and I think sometimes in these discussions, we forget that there are two sides. Of course, we need to take down at least marcus false things that are harmful, but we also have to use our services. To, get out the information people need. So governments like the UK, government local governments when they needed to get messages to their citizens, they've turned on us and we've been I think a very effective way of getting messages out. Interested. In in several high profile advertisers including some that I shot from it said, we're gonNA take a break and it wasn't just facebook it with social media have companies come back and what what are those conversations and like I know. The effect on the bottom line may not be what well understood you do rely. So heavily on smaller and middle sized companies for revenue but but it was a huge moment, a big headline where where are you guys at conversations are they back? So advertisers are starting to come back not but a good number are coming back have come back in process. Look those conversations were really hard John because normally. If someone is boycotting you or is protesting you want you to do a whatever a is in. You don't want to do it. That's not the case at all here the boycotters and the advertisers didn't want hate on facebook and we don't want this book Sosa. I think we had completely aligned goals and we have challenges in enforcing that. So again, we just released our enforcement report. We were at eighty nine percent of finding hate we take down ourselves. Now we're up to ninety five. That's an improvement and we know we have we have further to go. We also do have some notice agreement with people on what hate is we tend to take a broader swath of allowing some information that we think it's free expression to stay on so that people can have dialogue but in terms of hate, I think the real issue is that there's a fundamental misunderstanding of our service out there that we need to do a better job correcting we don't want. Hey. We don't benefit from hey, we don't profit from hey users don't want to see it. Consumers don't WANNA. See it. Advertisers don't want to be next to it. So the the narrative of facebook is leaving pay because they WANNA profit for. That's just just you talked about voters earlier and the initiatives that you're putting your proactively being part of a solution is what I hear you saying. But Marquez said very recently with this electric this unprecedented situation and I'm I'm guessing given your. Your half glass full mentality it's an opportunity but what's at stake here for facebook I? Mean we're all GonNa Blaine facebook if things go wrong and a certain candidate decides to use the platform and you're not taking down information with speed or at all is it a noble no-win situation here or what's at stake for this platforms ability to prove its productive place in this discussion? So we all know that there's a lot at stake for the selection full stop. There's more concern in confusion about how to register to vote what is valid I think there's more concern around misinformation around any kind of coordinated attacks. I think we're going into this election in a totally different place than twenty sixteen and interestingly, I think our track record in twenty eighteen was actually fairly good when people talk about things facebook missed in an election getting upset at us for things that are almost always talking about twenty sixteen you almost never hear about twenty eighteen and there have been hundreds of elections around the world and to look our job is to get people accurate information to be proactive. We are being much more proactive around. Pushing out information in this election and we have or have been before, and that is modeled on what we did with Toronto virus. We are taking that approach doing everything to get rid of the bad. We are doing everything to get in front of people the accurate information as well. And then we want to make sure that people can use the prop. One thing that's worth really thinking about is how many small people small people running for smaller offices. Are Using our platform provisionally when we're in social distancing and can't campaign. That's right. So how do you advertise to? No one's ever heard of me. I'm running for State Senate or I'm running for school board and I want to do it cheaply and efficiently we allow that to happen and we're proud of that role replied. There are you prepared I mean thinking about four more years of questions regarding how quickly you should be policing the president and his tweets given the thus far has a track record that trump is definitely more aggressive with platform Vice President Biden ever has been he trump wins. You're already in a in a in a situation where you guys are have been accused of dragging your feet on or taking a less aggressive stance against him. How do you think about that in a world where we might see four more years of that? It's our. It's our job to have clear and consistent rules. That, we apply in a fair way globally and I know we are very focused that we should be very focused on this election. There are important elections all over the world with people on different sides, and so we have experienced not just in the US cycle, but obviously the hundreds of elections that have happened since since last US cycle and we do we. Get accused from conservatives of being anti-conservative. They look it. Awesome. A see liberal silicon, Valley company I mean, I've been very affiliated Democrat. I remain unaffiliated Democrat other people look at us and they say we're not going far enough and our answer is going to be very clear about what our rules are and working apply them as even handed away as possible we also. Recognize that there should be limits to our power to decide what stays up in. Probably one of the most important things that's going to happen in the upcoming twelve months is the rollout of our content for which we've announced but has not yet come together to play. So for the first time, there's GonNa be a possibility that if you either have something taken down. And you think that's unfair or you take it down or you WanNa leave up in either direction, you can appeal it to the content board in your case much like the court right they'll have more than they can but they'll try to hear the big months. Someone else will decide and that board is independent does not report to mark does not report to me. Were also working with governments around the world. We think government has a very big role to play. Wouldn't it be good if governments to find hate rather than private companies would you be good if governments defined what is a political ad? Not Private companies were working hard to make sure that there are checks and balances and that the government's role is really important not just here around the world. You're not just the Democrat I mean you're you're a friend of the president presidential candidate on the Democratic ticket at an I I don't know the. Friendship, but definitely, it's been noted that the two of you have relationship you've been support I'm wondering if you're kind of jaw drops a little bit about the delicate role that you need to play his business leader given facebook's place in society if you're running Ben and Jerry's, which is much smaller if you're running. Patagonia. If you were running for Motor Company, you probably feel a little bit more free an mistaken to be supportive and to give the porch that you want to feel it all that your your ability to help is checked by your role I mean, my day job is facebook and my nights on Facebook, and then you know I work on my foundation as well, and so it is not my job to be very active in the political process and I've chosen a career that keeps me in business. So I don't wake up in the morning. You know what should I be doing politics 'cause I wake up in the morning with a very big job for facebook I. think that's consistent with business leaders. You know as a woman and as a woman who's long fought for the role of women to have more to celebrate ambition to celebrate what we're reaching for the highest office I'm thrilled to see a woman about to be nominated a woman of color about to be nominated and I spoke out anatomy horse I would do. Of course, I would do that and my foundation has done that as well. Do need to think twice about how supportive I mean it it's not a heavy lifting to be supportive publicly. Meaning you don't have to put in a lot of hours, but like running a news organization, I mean it kind of is a proxy for what facebook has become what we think of as a neutral platform even well, I've said, we're GONNA work with anyone who wins for us. So when I'm asked when you work with trump, if he wins the election, will you work with Biden if he sorry president trump if he wins the election we work with Vice, President Biden. Of course, we don't get to pick. Citizens elect their governments and we work with them, and we work with all over the world and we have to be willing and able to do that. Would you work for President Biden if there was a president Biden, you know I have a long decided I had my time. I worked at the Treasury Department under President Clinton and it was an amazing opportunity. What about the open seat in California right now not interested at all I mean. I really love my job and I really have so much respect for mark and my colleagues. Every day is not easy I don't expect anyone feel sorry for me or any of us we have great opportunities big role to play. We have serious responsibility to get this election right? We have serious responsibility to get hate and you know misogyny off the platform. against, wake up every business, I feel lucky to have this opportunity and I feel lucky to work for someone who is strong and has such conditions as mark. Are you having a guest one final question is the enormity of that task of getting it right. Your back and forth about what that looks like all day. But getting it right as a business challenge. Also, when I say this, I wonder if you are amazed at the trajectory of the importance of this as a public trust, almost as a is an institution and we aren't just considering a business but has a responsibility to society. Is there one? That outweighs the other giving you have shareholders, others, or is there is there a way to balance those two things at the same time? These things that people think are in conflict sometimes, but I really don't think they are we need people to trust our service we need people to trust that we're GONNA make content decisions not for profit on either side. But for the right for the right reasons and to doing the things that need our responsibility to protect elections takedown hit, they don't trade off against the business. They're important to drive the business. Now, there is a resource tradeoff rehiring engineer. We can put them on an ad program to build rags ads we can put them on safety we can put them on security. Of course, we have resource trade-offs, research trips of my time reserves tradeoffs mark if you look at how do our jobs and you compare it to for years ago, Mark Myself All of our senior leaders Chris Cox who just came back. Incredible. Chief Product Officer Mike Shrimp for our incredible. CTO We all spend a lot more of our time on the protection of the community. Then we did five years ago but I think that is super important and for a while we were playing catch up and I think all of these things work together. There's not a trade offs. We have to absolutely meet our responsibility and build our business and without meeting our responsibility, we're not going to build Turkishness. Kyi No your plane to grab people from. What you go Thank you for your time. It's always nice talking to and. Until next up. On.

Facebook John Taking President Biden Wall Street Journal Sheryl Sandberg Google President Trump GOP Leinen Kamala Harris Twenty Twenty FBI San Merck Black Women Cheryl COO Clinton Administration Information Center UK
Ken Nguyen: Republic  Bridging the Gap Between Investing and Startups

Epicenter

05:14 min | Last month

Ken Nguyen: Republic Bridging the Gap Between Investing and Startups

"We can grander founder and CEO of the public and really excited to speak with you. Today can about republic and so moved to super innovative things. You guys are doing with crowdfunding in republic note in particular. So thanks much for joining us. Brian thank you so much for having me. Wonderful being year. For some people probably haven't heard about Republic Right but republic east of connected with Angel Lists and lists of course had the big impact on crowdfunding I mean there's also growing list right that has come out that we've had on the podcast before as well. Speak a little bit about your background time angels and sort of how that evolves into starting republic. I started out my career securities attorney in New York, and then over time went into asset management in back into academia. So back in twenty, three, thirteen, I got a chance to get introduced to novel and injuries team and became their general counsel Wendy roll out his new investment product costs indication right did everyone knows about but injuries syndication is only available to millionaires or accredited investors then under president, Obama is a change. In US law and very relevant for blockchain laid on as well that did change in the law allow non accredited meaning. Anyone doesn't matter what income and net worth to invest in private securities, and that became fully legal in two thousand sixteen and that's when I left. Angeles to Launch Republic with a-list ended up invested in us. So there a significant backer among many of the VC's suggested to heritage between to companies. Role and yeah, I think many people have heard of the jobs act in in that regulation. So tells a little bit of what was that changed at happened in two thousand sixteen and you know what was the opportunity that opened up back then? If I may take a walk down memory lane or history lane and go little bit far back through the Great Depression in the United States back in the nineteen thirties easily eighty years ago after that will regulate is in DC decided, hey to avoid investigating defrauded no-one can invest in private securities in private company unless they really Ridge if they rich, we assume that this fisted and can you know tolerate the loss of capital that went on for eighty years in even though in the US people spend like eighty billion dollars a year and lottery ticket. And the same amount addict casino, and yet you have to be a millionaire to invest in start it obviously stop making sense a while back, but it took the Obama administration and a change in the law of for that to really now opened a gateway so that anyone if they go through a platform like republic can invest in early stage, Google early stay facebook or a restaurant even and will little bit behind compared to European counterparts particularly the UK and other countries in the EU that had allow up for democratized private investing years before the US. So what inspired you to start Republican? was there anything that you saw during your time angel which convinced you that there was a problem worth solving here? The problem with stuffing I think goes a little bit back before my time at is so my family immigrated to the US from Vietnam in we stuttered out in Palo Alto in the bay area. Just because you're right in the thick of innovation in at Tam Amazon and Google new startups and everyone wanted to invest but like we weren't accredited so we weren't able to invest and even neighbors who were credited meaning millionaires, doctors, lawyers this still couldn't invest either. So Cadillac the teenage me was like men I wish I get to put a little bit of money into Amazon Google early on but couldn't and I think catalyzed stay with me and I went on and became a lawyer Working Wall Street and still couldn't invest privately us so that desire. To make venture capital private investing more accessible I. think There's a little bit of a personal background behind that an angel is each is Amado that when I knew about I was like, wow, these guys are making it possible for my oldest siblings who are physicians and engineers to invest. That's really cool and so that's why I joined injuries back in two thousand thirteen does only a glimmer of the possibility. What we do at Republic is Cadillac to hope that a single mom Vietnam Ecuador when they can invest like five dollars in Assad of in Silicon Valley. blockchain and ICO

United States Google Founder And Ceo Angel Lists Cadillac Brian Amazon Barack Obama New York Obama Administration Palo Alto DC Attorney Amado Tam Amazon General Counsel Wendy Roll Vietnam EU
Major US postal workers union endorses Biden for president

Silicon Valley Insider with Keith Koo

00:22 sec | Last month

Major US postal workers union endorses Biden for president

"A major union representing US postal workers endorsed Democrat Joe Biden, the National Association of Letter Carriers representing 300,000 current and retired workers. Said this week that the president's longstanding hostility to the male delivering agency has heightened uring the covert 19 pandemic. They say his administration is taking steps to undermine the postal

National Association Of Letter Joe Biden United States President Trump
Canadian tech group spends $100K on billboards to lure anxious tech workers from U.S.

The KFBK Morning News

00:58 sec | Last month

Canadian tech group spends $100K on billboards to lure anxious tech workers from U.S.

"You you watching watching on on this this Friday? Friday? Oh, Oh, kind kind of of an an interesting interesting You You know, I love these little Inside stories, but they tell you a little bit more than maybe we knew before. So a Canadian tech company. Is spending $100,000 on billboards along Highway 101 in Silicon Valley, trying to lure tech workers to Canada that you basically saying that they're you know, it's a different brand of capitalism up there. You've got health care with no co pays. You know, not know where none of the civil unrest none of the you know urban decay that San Francisco is experiencing right now and so they they want to get people and their preaching. A group of people who have suddenly realised they could do their job from anywhere. Sort of kind of an interesting little case. You're driving. Wanna one and you see the Canadian billboards up Now you know what that is all about Market

San Francisco Canada
How to Make Your City an Entrepreneurial Hotspot

The Small Business Radio Show

04:40 min | Last month

How to Make Your City an Entrepreneurial Hotspot

"Brad Feld welcome to the show. Thanks for having me. I'm delighted to be here. Brad. You've been a leader of the early stage investor for a very long time. In fact, you found I think one of the most important startup institutions techstars. How did you get started in this whole startup community? Well I started my first company in one, thousand, nine, hundred, seven. and. With a partner grew, it was a self funded business. We sold it to a public company in one, thousand, nine, hundred, ninety, three. I started making investments as an angel investor with the money that I made from that but I told my wife Amy. That We'd move to Bowl I told her that we'd be we we leave Boston. We're living by tomorrow was thirty. She told me she wanted to move to boulder about two months before I turned thirty and I was welcome to come with her. Sounds like. Right it's kind of. Talk goes sometimes. So we went and we moved to boulder. We knew one person he moved away. So when I moved to Boulder in nineteen, ninety, five, I didn't know anyone. And I didn't really expect to do any business and I was investing on the East Coast to the West Coast flying around all the time. And what's happened over the last twenty five years is not only have I been involved in creating spectacular startup community in boulder. I really got my mind around what a startup community was. I labeled it with my first Burqa two thousand twelve called startup communities. Came up with some fundamental principles around it but importantly. Had Two assertions one every city in the world needs a startup community as part of the engine of the city for long term health and development. The. Second is that as humans we choose to live and bill are like around it rather than go somewhere because as the cliche used to go. If you want to build a Tech Company, you've got to move to Silicon Valley and maybe you in two thousand twelve and it's reinforced today by what's happening around the world is that you can build great new companies anywhere in the world and. The startup communities that have evolved everywhere in the world support preneurs building couples, and that's why I think you're you're the updated version of your book startup, Communities Building Ecosystem in your city, which comes out this month is so important because as I used to travel around when you remember when used to be able to travel by air use again, an airplane Brad and was no problem Oh. Yeah. That was. Can't remember it seems like we used to do that. Maybe even last year I exactly. I would visit these cities against age I would speak and I was an angel investor in the early two thousand people say, well, we can't do that because we're not silicon valley right? We're not boulder. We're not Austin. But as you say it's important and you believe that every city can do that. Where do you start? There's lots of different. Pieces to it. But the very important starting point is to recognize that the leaders of startup community has to be entrepreneurs. So you have to look to and have a critical mass of entrepreneurs in your city. Or committed. To taking a long-term Journey Alec to say at least twenty years. To, build a startup community in that town and it's especially powerful for entrepreneurs. You don't have to be successful you don't have to have had. A multi-billion dollar exit, you just have to be someone who cares about both building companies and building, your company. Entrepreneurs in general intercity, and that's all you need to do to be a leader or there's lots of other people who contribute to the activity in the startup community including lots of organizations city state government? Universities. Nonprofit organizations corporations. But you need this critical mass of entrepreneurial leaders and it's it's important to recognize it. Nobody appoints that it's network not hierarchy right? So you have this emergent phenomenon I and the new book that I wrote with Hathaway, the startup community way. We talk about the startup community growing developing as a complex system. It's not one with deterministic outcome. You have lots of things that are constantly interacting with each other and I'm holding and you come back to this notion of network instead of a hierarchy, there's no president of the startup community. There's no vice president membership or vice president of education. There's just a bunch of people interacting with each other who are playing leadership roles with a focus on growing and evolving and developing. Got Their start up community

Boulder Brad Feld Austin AMY Vice President President Trump East Coast Boston Partner Hathaway Silicon Valley West Coast Alec
"silicon valley" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

NASA In Silicon Valley

11:07 min | 9 months ago

"silicon valley" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

"More. Yeah we have a Joseph. Urban here says well cargo air-taxis be allowed to Flatiron Asli before four passenger taxis so Maybe Joey and I will tag team this one but all start. I think As autonomous applications come forth north Certification I go back to that because that's also part of this. How do you certify an autonomous system right? So that's a question that we have And we're doing research to explore what that means generally folks do believe you know. Flying Cargo may come before flying passengers right just as a natural progression but there are still lots of questions. Even if you're a cargo autonomous flight Yeah no I totally agree. I think the cargo stuff is where we'll learn a lot probably before the passenger stuff but that's a somewhat separate question from how autonomous they're allowed to be in the airspace. How do they prove that they can still stay safe? You know you have the benefit of not having people people onboard. But you still can't have it doing bad things in the airspace or anything on the ground rate So there's a lot of questions to answer but I would guess yeah. A lot of the things in cargo would happen prior later to passenger activity. You make sense. I think it goes back to what you said. Joey is performance based solution right. So let's understand the performance of these vehicle and then how do we integrate them into. Who are national airspace? And those are still questions that need to be resolved. Always the same goal. Here's a cool idea from space. TV Net they're asking. We'll augmented reality. Holiday used to display virtual roads in the sky. Could you that yeah definitely can we. We sort of have we've seen it and we've done a little bit here as well and the roads road. You know it can be as simple as you know cylinders that you know you have to stay within but again we're getting to these beyond visual insight things And there's not necessarily a pilot on board for the small drones owns. Obviously it'll be hard to carry it You know it. It is more about. How much can be an autonomous operation? Right visualizing leising your plan visualizing the airspace structure visualizing a different aspects of your operation Augmented reality could be a key. Part of that We actually tested some of that in Texas as well. We had folks with the Goggles on looking at the data from the air traffic side as well as the management side of that and interacting with the aircraft in the air in terms of Zooming in on them and saying information that's available digitally So you can see folks managing and dense environment. Maybe just being aware of everything that's going on Could have a lot of value so yeah some work is actually going on in that direction already. That's awesome that. Seems like a perfect use for that kind of psychology seems really helpful We have a question. Here from mega man be X.. Are Do you think draws play a bigger part in crime prevention. I E monitor the streets streets overhead enroll time etc.. We are now that a lot of public safety organizations are looking at using drones more and more And Yeah and if you think about safety and security one of the big things. We've seen a lot of success on you can just see it in. The news is search and rescue operations. Cities are able to buy these drones can actually see heat on the ground so at night they can be flying and see a lost child in field right And and then send folks to that location You know obviously you can do a lot of good things with drones right. Yeah One of the other cases a fire department wanting to send a drone out ahead head of the truck because it can get there faster to survey the scene before the people get there to fight the fire That's another use case. That people envision again the airspace has to be ready for that right rates. Go back to the the hotdog drones. You have to get out of the way of that. That fire zone coming through right so without a unified a system to share that the information you you can't really make that happen cleanly But yeah there's a lot of interest in in from police and fire and and other agencies to to use these for are the things that they already do. I think we already see a lot of emergency response. Application say I think with the recent fires here in California we saw some of that here as well. the the tools provided a great insight for some of those for example firefighters to fight the fires that were were blazing and then also for Like volcanic eruptions. There's been there's been a whole host of other use cases For Surveying and providing emergency response but like Joe was saying we need the rules of the road there right how these aircraft are gonNA operate or these are gonNA operate to really enable them to do their missions and we think about public safety keeping the public safe but these drones can actually keep the first responders safe as well right so they can send a drone to the top of roof to see bad guys or whatever it might be or someone that might help with actually putting people in harm's way I right so safety does go both ways So there's a lot of really good uses for this In in the police and fire realm right and in some cases like in a testing in Corpus Christi. We had the fire department there with their job as well so working closely with Exactly yeah we got the fire department as well Corpus Christi Police and fire great partners. They're organized by the FAA FA test site in Texas And again they had drones already in their inventory. They're participating with us in the flight testing getting some feedback on the concept as a whole and US understanding how they already used their drones and make sure that the traffic management system and the concept still accommodates what they would like to do. It's really really important to get that feedback early and often So yeah we're we're already seeing these agencies do that. The police were interested in using it obviously to identify drones right like if in the future. There's more of these in the air. They want to know that they're supposed to be there. They're allowed to be there. They're doing something good and not bad. So police who have an interest in knowing the space is safe around the public as well. Of course. Yeah I of course making me picture of the Fifth Element Scenario Asks with drones. You can have many many small missions starting starting an ending constantly. So how do you ensure efficient use of airspace with an unknown number vehicles entering the airspace. At any time it sounds like a lot of unknowns is a lot the potential drones. Yeah and I think you do want to Stepped approach right gradual approach to build the system right now to handle twenty thousand thousand operations a minute than a city block right. You don't have to have that system ready today but how can you start to enable Thirty forty fifty operations over a city at once. Right and then you'll start to see where there are some issues with them sharing the airspace or information so that they can all accomplish what they wanNA do and slow. You can build up those densities and that's kind of been our approach in the research. Yeah and we see that approach being adopted as an industry right as they come up with standards around this based on our research to help inform the airspace They're not looking to solve the problem twenty years from now they want to enable more and more operations today and tomorrow and it is that scaled. Approach So we'll come up with solutions to make sure that the architecture and the concept will support them. I'm in the future. Don't box off any solutions. And and it's it's going to work it's GonNa work and I would even up level that complexity right so you can have drones operating below four hundred feet and then above that you have these electric Urban Air Mobility vehicles flying across Urban Centers men above that your commercial air traffic so so. How'd you have interoperability across all of those layers and that same density of operations and that's actually where where the real Fund research. Where where some of our work comes into play is how do you have that air traffic management system to support all of these new entrance? And all this Density of operations we expect in the future right. I raise you one up level right when you go sixty thousand plus traffic and then you have folks that Wanna fly over sixty thousand feet. Maybe you know maybe autonomous vehicles. Maybe not but how do they show that. Airspace up there with autonomous vehicles. How did they get up there? I in the officiant way such busy Inter operate and you know Work well together the whole space for you online. Do you think maybe one more question question are there and throw out. Well we have a question. here what was the biggest barrier for you personally getting hired but we always get questions like this and people want to know. How did you to get started at NASA and Yeah Yeah Rebecca Louis? Sure so Often they'll start so I'm an aerospace engineer. So that's what I studied in school. That's what I got my bachelors and my masters in And to be honest I've always been passionate about Aircraft and flight and specifically flight controls. And that's how I got started but I think there's a whole host of opportunities and avenues I don't think you have to study aerospace engineering nor necessarily even just the era. So there's there's a whole different set of feels undisciplined. That make our researcher reality right. We have people who are psychologists engineers You you know analysts people who work with data. So there's a you can really do anything so I think it's all about the passion if you're interested in seeing how we can push the bounds and bring in all all of these new entrance bringing innovation and into air traffic management. I think there's so many ways you could come in and play a role here definitely and just to illustrate that with the the Stroh and Traffic Management Project that we had We had folks that were Aero. Engineers are very important to understanding the system and how the equals work and all of those sorts of things I'M A computer engineer. So I'm not an engineer by training So that's important and kind of building systems a lot of computer scientists computer engineers helping with this as well And then you do get systems. Engineers and physicists and other folks that really matter in doing these human factors people right that understand again. chevrons Louis was talking earlier about. What are these new control systems? Look like how two people interact with them. It's a completely new system. We're talking about so we don't really know how the human needs to interact and impact the exactly. And what makes we'll make their job easier or harder So all of those kind of folks are really important in building out a system like UTM. And that's what we had in our team. It sounds like it makes sense you've talked. What about so many aspects of this work different facets different layers you kept saying different layers of The system you need so many different perspectives on that. So that's awesome so that's good news. News people out there. Yeah it really does take a team. I think you have a team with whole wide range of disciplines that really allows some of this technology to come to light. Sounds like it. It's a great place to solve hard. Problems aeronautics really offers what it brings a lot of people. That's what brought me in a good place to solve really hard problems that make an impact fascinating fascinating awesome. Well this has been awesome. Thank you guys for joining us today. We have just about run out of time. But thank you for being here and thank you to everybody who joined joined us in the chat on twitch will be back in the New Year so follow NASA on social media to hear about upcoming shows and to see past episodes of this show you you can check out. NASA dot Gov slash aims slash NASA in Silicon Valley. Live right. Things are watching. We'll see.

engineer NASA Joey Flying Cargo Texas Rebecca Louis Flatiron Asli Joseph Corpus Christi US Corpus Christi Police FAA Urban Air Mobility California Wanna Joe Urban Centers
"silicon valley" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

NASA In Silicon Valley

11:21 min | 9 months ago

"silicon valley" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

"Who has the right away in certain scenarios and and how do you share that information and make sure that everyone's aware of the same rule set and things so that is a lot of the research we do as well? So that's really the traffic management system. It's you know defining those roads the procedures Making sure everyone's checkout on all those things to enable all these operations to happen. Yeah yeah that's a good thing and you know you and you have on your phone. It tells you when there's a traffic jam ahead. Let's the next couple of services right and that would be part of the system as well. There is whether ahead or there is a lot of drones over here so maybe you should go for their sharing data so that you can make those decisions awesome. Yeah that's really clear cool We have a question here from Chen Dane Will Jones have an option for multitasking. For example all the junk could be delivering a kidney also acting as a traffic camera in routes so they have like different. I think the person waiting for the kidney new hope. Maybe it's it's focused on the kidney but in general. Yeah it's all about the vehicle capabilities. What did they design the vehicle to do and the idea with our research with traffic management and and and all those sorts of things? How do we make sure we don't cut off any of those use cases? How do we make sure we enable folks to do the things they need and want to do in the airspace safely really So yes And we have looked at drones being re purposed en route. You may be doing regular traffic surveillance. But then maybe there's a search and rescue go to happen and that drunk could be re purposed in-flight and and take off and do something. So this idea of repurposing definitely out there and I would say for whether it's single task or repurposing multitask tasks. You know what you need is the secure communication navigation platform right so you have to be able to communicate to that that vehicle that drone or that you am and be able to have that communication nations secure and that's I think as you have multiple tasks that still is a foundation is how do you have safe and efficient operations right. Yeah cool the So this year you guys actually had a big milestone year right. Tell us about what went down right. I mean we've been doing this since two thousand fourteen you know Researching this drone traffic management system. And we've been kind of building up in complexity of the kind of cases that you can handle so when we got to this summer We actually executed executed a A flight test to demonstrate the most mature version of the system. We have and we did that in an urban environment. So we flew in downtown Reno and we flew in Corpus Christi. Texas exists With the help of the test sites at those areas and many many partners doing that with us right And showing how the the system would work in an urban environment and find out where the limits are where the gaps are and where it works. Really well That's what we did this summer and that was a really exciting time for US awesome. Yeah you guys got video of that. Didn't you all right. Yeah we probably have some tell us about if we can assure so. Yeah you're looking at Reno here. Are you looking at a couple of drones Taken off from the top of the building and you can see. They're flying lying near the casinos and they're coming really close to each other actually more space than you can tell from the ground here and the key thing is that the two pilots for those vehicles know what the other one is is doing. Because they've been sharing information. You can see one holding up here all another one passes by again. That's the rules of the road stuff. We were talking about Testing all those concepts and here. You're seeing kind of a mission control centre with folks from NASA as well as the Nevada test site working together to execute these these activities interesting. So you're not the only one there joey you guys have you. Yeah I had the chance to go out and observe the UTM test both in Reno in Texas and I would say seeing the drones flying in the urban environment Really makes it tangible right. This is a reality. That's coming fairly soon to see how how it's a combination of software They they leverage cloud services plus the drone technology plus the interplay of the folks on the ground. You really see what Joey was referring. During two as earlier as kind of the national airspace kind of in a miniature version running in these field trials which is great to see and it really lends itself to help us understand and what are still some of the major questions that have to address. So all the data that's collected from these Demonstrations is really I think very valuable. Oh Yeah what was your experience like tiffany. Well so I seem to remember into near anything like that so I I was going to cover and help them apply you know the research that they're doing for the public but I mean I would say Reno was code and then Texas was very very hot I would say you know. It was really a great experience to see the team kind of just Ev. Ethnic every day was different They learned something one day and they applied it the next day and even when their challenges to see them all kind of come together fix come up with a plan fit. The next day was was really great to see and to have covered this project for. I don't know if he for years. Now it's kind of great to see see you know. They come together this accomplishment with them it was really cool. That's awesome. Yeah so what. What would you say you learned in the end from these tests in downtown? Yeah you know I mean it sounds kind of silly to say aloud but it's really important to know that we learn that the system works. We're actually you can actually do the things we thought it should be able to do right. It helps Jones say separate again. It's not the only layer of doing that. It's a key layer of doing that You can make sure you have access for priority operations you can actually identify. The drones owns in the airspace digitally and and in other ways So all of those pieces were executed in that in that airspace and the other key thing is finding out more about what it takes next to fly in that environment right like kind of what kind of things makes this hard right. Let's go there and fly that and it's not again. It's not flying drone right. A lot of folks can demonstrate something with with one drone and a lot of folks have done that with a lot of cases but bringing a full system out with many stakeholders trying to collaboratively manage. This airspace and execute missions is really important to do and finding we're we're more work needs to be done and where things look like they're solved right and that's what these flight tests do for us. Perfect and so. What's next for the Drug Traffic Management Project? So so a lot of this you know we've been continually handing off to the FAA. We talk about a partnership but it really is a partnership we we meet with them often. probably more often than they would like. Yeah we're we're talking with with them quite often to make sure we understand what the FAA is thinking about where this is going to make sure that what we're we are research tracking with that and maybe leading it a little bit if we can But they're going to be executing a pilot program as well as a second part of a previous pilot program and we WANNA help them in that execution and really. That's about taking the technologies news that we've been developing with the FAA and our industry partners and making them real in the space. It's a it's an important step in that direction. So we're going to. We're going to keep going in that way. All right. Excellent Great We have a question here from resonated. Games is there any fundamental concept that those in the private or commercial Sector Hector testing of the drones should be paying attention to there are so many pieces to this rate so a lot of folks are specialized in a certain area might be on the platform itself building. You know a detective avoid censor. How do you actually see things in the airspace and get out of their way And I think that continuing to put all of those lanes is important. I think understanding the ecosystem as a whole is also really important. I think folks that Do work on important sensors and it's important platforms. It's important for them to also understand the ecosystem in which those drones will operate so just trying to keep pace and understand where the research is heading where the FAA is signaled. Things are going Just trying to to stay abreast of all that stuff is really important. Yeah Yeah Here's a comment on the traffic management system. Maybe can respond twisted. Did metals asks. The pilot will be watching a movie just like now. Ninety five percent of the time so drone pilot will be watching on screen. We'll I would love to watch movies. Ninety five point five percent of drone pilots. I understand okay. Are they watching their flight. ONSCREEN are they physically watching the aircraft or are they watching some representation of their operation on a screen. I guess that's the question I think it's more the latter right again. Because we're we're trying to build a system so that these vehicles can go beyond visual line of sight of the operator the pilot. Oh yes all right. So they're not gonna be able to just wash it and dry And that's how you enable all these business cases you can't have someone watching the drone if you're going to go deliver that thing you know Five miles away. You know you can't have someone or a line of someone's watching that. So how do you build a system that allows that so yeah there would be some representation of the operation occurring that the person that's in charge of that operation would have access to. It might might be as simple as a moving map with some alerts that are coming onto it right. Something like you'd see on your you know For for your regular driving right something that's letting you know where you're going or it could be more advanced right. It could be a three D. view it could be a first person view really depends on the mission and the environment. You're flying in what the future rules actually are to do that. So I guess yes. Yes I would add. Regardless of whether it's a drone pilot or a pilot on board with these new types of vehicles there's going to be different ways of interacting with the vehicle and and controlling the vehicle just as automation increases and There's changes in how those vehicles fly. I think there's GonNa be some changes in that traditional pilot flight deck or cockpit cockpit relationship. And how you interface with that is going to change and that's also another interesting area of research All the way from you know human computer interface logic jake that goes behind that as well as do I push to to land or take off or is there an easy fly button right. So there's all kinds of new ways to engage with with an aircraft whether it's a drone more some of these new vehicles that's a really interesting area now. I think one of the key. Things were a lot of research on from industry as well as the NASA society is out of these pilots. Maybe control more than one of these right. Does it have to be a one to one relationship between one pilot and one active operation for. Can you extend that further further. Can you actually have three people controlling eight vehicles or it'd be one controlling to like what are the limits of that and what tools need to exist in order to make sure sure that again happens very safely. Yeah for sure. Your question here from Tom Oh no. One is there any corporation With autonomous car research. I expect there would be similar challenges and opportunities for with communication and control. So I think the same Principles of of autonomous car autonomous vehicle. Self driving cars. Are we wish to call it now. Some of those same principles are I think. Important in in aviation as well also What can I understand what my environment is presenting to me right so do I have some awareness of what my environment is for airplanes that would involve where aircraft often drones it would involve weather Knowing how strong your communication signal is to your base operations all of the same types of of questions about communication indication safe communication reliable communication Understanding of the environment around you being able to react appropriately to the environment around you knowing the rules of the road that Joey kind of reference. Whether you're actually on the road or flying flying in the air those are all the same principles. Yeah.

Reno FAA Joey Chen Dane Will Jones Texas NASA US Nevada Tom Oh Corpus Christi
"silicon valley" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

NASA In Silicon Valley

11:21 min | 9 months ago

"silicon valley" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

"As NASA as well as industry and other research institutions they are looking to. Did you understand what are the infrastructure requirements and their sensor requirements but then also things such as lighting requirements right. What kind of procedures are needs to be developed for the that type of infrastructure So there's a whole host of information that would come along with the infrastructure that that will be needed for these vehicles to land or take off from from locations near US right. There's lots of interesting research there. Yeah Yeah the research. Can I lead the way to those answers discovers the questions and AH yeah. That's interesting Maybe just one more and this question came in a while ago from Hobbs Fifi Five. So maybe it's been answered but I wanNA know is this like flying cars was the question. Can we call these flying cars or is that something else well so if you if you want to call them flying cars you technically can i. I mean some of these vehicle configurations do have wheels right for landing full. Some do some. Don't right so if you have wheels and you can actually do taxing. I guess technically if if you can do all the flying car You know people do call them. Urban Air Mobility vehicles due. To the fact they can perform a number of different functions and have slightly different operations perations than what we're used to today right so the terms you use can change but essentially. It's like an air taxi flying car kind of whatever you wish to call it. The car car implies a lot of freedom right and that's that we were mentioning earlier. I'm so most of these. Initial vehicles are probably more like the air metro honestly was mentioning earlier right there. Kind of designated resonated. Where they're going to go if you wanted to call that a car sure you could? But in general it's more like a subway or yeah. It's going where it's going to go and you can help you get there quickly quickly to start us off. Yeah okay cool all right. Well let's move on to our next topic so that we don't run out of time but we're GONNA come back more questions later. So I know that NASA has already done on a bunch of research or several years that really helped lay the groundwork for this urban mobility. Work that you're doing so joe you're a big part of that. Can you tell us about the system. You're works on yeah so For the past five years or so we have been working on How do you manage small drones at low altitude at kind of a big go? How how do you have thousands of small drones flying over the state of California? Taking care of things So again that's the current air. Traffic Management System was not designed a to handle that kind of traffic. So how do we enable those use cases in those business cases to occur without overloading the current system and keeping everything as safe as possible. So that's what came about Our research was called. UTM US traffic management and again US traff managers means or. How do you manage drones? Right how do you draw the. US is the drone. That's right. I know favorite news we get bonus points compounding. Yeah Yeah We. We were focused again on small drones trying to fifty five pounds and under okay. And we're talking about low altitude to believe four hundred feet and under but again you can accomplish a lot of things just in that airspace space with these kinds of vehicles and it made us ask certain questions and develop certain systems and certain things with partners and the FAA that lays the groundwork for some of the still open questions Sion's for urban mobility that we have been talking Yeah yeah that sounds familiar kind of work. You're doing You mentioned of applications. What are some examples for small drones? There there are a lot Usually the you can actually classify them into some of the more interesting ones into the threes dirty dangerous and Dole jobs. Because a lot of job you can do with these drones that can actually keep people safer that are doing them right infrastructure inspection for example. You know looking at a cell tower taking pictures and making sure it's working correctly People die climbing those towers every year right and and other kind of power line inspection. These jobs aren't always the safest jobs but you can make them safer by using drones thrones for agricultural applications as well taking pictures of your field in doing analysis on that as well as public safety things fire and police agencies are using these a lot more at a local level large companies talking about delivering things to your doorstep again. All this can happen with drones under fifty five pounds and under four hundred feet. So there's a Lotta things you can actually do with them right. Yeah for sure. And how do you let everyone do all those things simultaneously and keep the airspace safe. That was kind of the research that we were looking at us. Because that's that's always the key right there. Yeah what was your role exactly. So I was the chief engineer for the project so it was really about kind of coordinating a lot of the technical aspects of it I did focus a lot on the software aspect of it so we talked about automation earlier. In the airspace management. How automated in the future to handle all of this traffic? So how do you build a system that enables all this stuff to happen. You know. It's it's cloud based and it. It leverages a lot of best practices in the software industry With our knowledge and expertise at NASA for air traffic management things. And that's really what what we were looking at and Joey won't admit this but he was the brains behind the the UTM project. And I would say that Joey in his team most recently won the NASA software of the Year award. So that's actually kind of a big deal so we'll give joey shadow for that. We we have a lot of brains on the project which is great right. That's how you make successful unique perspective having a lot of people with a lot of different backgrounds to come to that is how you kind of get to these innovative solutions. Great Place to kind of allow that to happen. Yeah Awesome congrats So what are some specific Abilities you gave the drones or the system Like you want to keep them. Keep them separate specific examples. You know we had sort of clean sheet to begin thinking about how to get this done a clean sheet with the understanding of how the experts works vehicles work right so those bounds. What what do we want this to do? One of the key things is how do we help. Make sure the drones don't run into each other some that helps them stay safely separated Some degree Also to keep them separate from traditional aviation how do we make sure they don't fly into other aircraft right. Can you build some system that helps helps with that process. You know one layer of this isn't going to be the end all and be all of these answers. But how do we start this process of keeping the airspace safe. Yeah also. How do we allow folks that are doing these operations on the vehicles that are doing his upbringing identifiable right we don't want just rogue unidentified flying around the in your space right To keep the airspace against safe. There's kind of security aspect to that as well And then you have some priority for important Morton operations right so for example Recently there was actually a drone that delivered a human kidney transplant. That was actually transplanted into a person. Successfully excessively right So that was demonstrated when when important use case for drones. Yeah how do we let that happen. Without being hindered by drones that are delivering hotdogs to people. They make sure the on drones get out of the way right and let the kidney drone. Come through you know. That's just one example. These priority operations need to be taught of his important in the system as we designed it out. There's a lot of the important class of operations you can you can. You can think about but they D- is how do we make sure that that can actually occur right that all of this can occur right. You'll get your dogs. After the kidney gets delivered thirty seconds later and I would actually add that services that Joey just slade out they are extensible and applicable for any new entrant right so joey was talking about how they were applied for Drones you can think about for these larger urban air mobility vehicles vehicles for any new entrant Zeppelin. These same tenants can be applied. So it's actually a really great foundation for us to build off of an extend for new entrance into our national national airspace. Yeah Yeah it's a clear how supports the same thing as working in China in the end. The key thing. Is You know the current system again. Air traffic controllers don't want to be controlling controlling a forty pound drone. Two hundred feet right they. They're not have enough to do with your credit rating. They don't WanNa hire ten thousand more operators to you you know all of these journalists. This is the automation of the airspace and allowing these entrance and again a lot of these things. We'll translate over to This this air taxi urban world. Yeah finding out how much of that transfers over much to change a little bit But we have a foundation to start with totally. Yeah so they. Kind of enters genesee twenty-five question here management will be Thomasson Mason. Yes it will be a time as it will have autonomous aspects. Doesn't end you. Just push a button and the airspace is completely free to go And the autonomous the the autonomous nature of it will increase over time right. You know when you get started you only have so many operations and you might have a good amount of human supervision but the thing scale out how much of that can be automated and making sure you do it again in a safeway. It's more of a continuum right so it's there's going to be pieces of it. That are automated some functions ends. And how does that can continue to grow as four-time yeah makes sense building upon it right exactly. Yeah so The German traffic management system. What does it looked like or feel like for a user a pilot like if I want to fly drone? What am I gonNA see? Yeah in the future hopefully it would be very transparent. It shouldn't be a big burden to actually use the system So there's actually a layer between you and the airspace and it would be kind of a service provider to get into the airspace. Almost like a cell service provider. You want to make phone calls. You have a service service provider and you can talk to other service providers cleanly So you would have one of those providers that get you access to the airspace right. You would tell them what you WANNA do. Maybe your intent. I'M GONNA fly from here to here ear and I'm going to do it about this time. The ideas that the service providers share that information amongst each other they do what's necessary to keep the space safe and de conflicted and messages flowing that I need to flow and you as a pilot. Just take care of your mission right you just fly your operation. How much of that operation is automated not automated? You know that depends in the future how far you go uh-huh But a pilot would be in charge of that operation and would do it cleanly and receive information back from the service providers about any changes in the airspace or things. You need to know right like there's a storm coming up exactly. There's an emergency operation since right. Yeah but kidneys coming through right now. Something nothing now. I was just GonNa add that I think there's the whole host of different types of operations Kind of lends itself to setting up different missions right and then I'd also add that the tools and technologies and the integration with the partners That was built up under. UTM I think is a great model They interface with a whole host east of Industry partners along with the FAA and that same model of collaborative innovation is what we're aiming for and I wanted to go back to earlier you somebody asked about Like traffic lights. There's I forget what the question was saying. There will be digital traffic lights not physical things up in the sky but but you told me that we can think of the traffic management is like rules of the road that we win driving right. Yeah you know we we think about driving today the folks that are driving living in general you hope and expect that they knew the rules of the road right. They know what a red light means. They knew what to do. When you both come to a stop sign at the same time? They know how fast you can go on the freeway. And how to change aims lanes those kind of things don't exist for drone traffic right. So how what are those procedures. What are those rules?.

NASA Joey US Urban Air Mobility FAA California chief engineer joe Dole Sion Thomasson Mason China
"silicon valley" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

NASA In Silicon Valley

09:58 min | 11 months ago

"silicon valley" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

"That's got a plane with a telescope forty seven size telescope in it also reveal even I built a spectrometer for that one and that was all about understanding the chemical fingerprint says twin and understand the makeup of the universe and the communities very excited about the most ambitious infrared space as telescope to be launched in about a year and a half from now James Webb Space Telescope the James Webb is a successor to hobble I didn't mention Hubble Hubbell's amazing observatory right now and transform the way we understand the universe that is worked in the ultraviolet and visible with a little bit of infrared but it's been most sensitive and the show demonstrated the power of putting telescopes and Space James Webb is very different and James Webb is going to be the biggest observatory we have put in space wow a collecting area almost seven times larger than Hubble with a sensitivity a hundred times more sensitive than hobbles crazies Hubbell's already incredible images it gives us but what's GonNa to be what gets me excited about James Webb it's the first time we've had a telescope to look at the birth of galaxies we have never had an observatory that can look that deep into the universe because of its sensitivity and also exploiting eating the infrared to peer deeper into the universe that will potentially catch the birth of galaxies for we will see this baby Ellie's baby galaxies the deepest we've gone with Hubble with that wonderful image the Hubble deep field Hubble stared I heard a piece of the sky for over a month yeah and revealed that there so many billions of galaxies there those are quite a toddler galaxy uh-huh galaxy that have worked themselves out the baby or the birth of galaxies is very unknown one of the biggest onion questions is how did the galaxies four and one in particular we now have observed over the last couple of decades that all the large massive galaxies are fueled by a supermassive black hole these are black holes that are thousands to millions to billions billions of solar masses teaser incredible beasts we have no idea how they four nor do we know whether you need a supermassive black coal to form a galaxy or whether the galaxy has got massive four and the supermassive black hole wow we have chicken and egg yeah dilemma James Webb is GonNa tell us that black holes come first right or did GAL Jeez wow I didn't even realize that we didn't know these things excited so much to learn yeah I think we have an animation do James Webb Yeah I don't know about this is a Most the going to be the largest space telescope ever launched me launched in March of twenty twenty one you see a eighteen segmented primary mirror that's coated in gold. The diameter is six point five meters about the height of a draft the the bottom part that looks silvery purple is a sun shade the Sun Shades about the size of tennis court this is going to be launched just to an orbit around the sun a million miles from earth I mean Hubbell right now is at three hundred seventy five miles from earth so this is a very different way uh of running a space telescope with his large aperture and its ability to look in the infrared it's cooled on this gives it a lot more sensitivity uh-huh and yes it's going to really reveal the dark universe excited we've never and not to play up the star first thing it is going to bring galaxies far far away very much closer to home really an observatory about the first stars and the first Kelly's wow amazing yeah what a good start we can't wait now I always love and Kimberly uh-huh but before we have to let you go let's get a couple of questions in here a valid sparkle asks what's The coolest thing you ever saw looking into space how how can you name just one is it's difficult I was very privileged to work on the new horizons mission that flew by Pluto in twenty any fifteen I was one of the deputy projects is there and to actually see a world that had been just ten pixels in the Hubble Space Telescope Camera Very Blurry and have it come into life and to full-color showing glaciers snow was the most unexpected phenomena that no one had expected to now I know it's closer to home rather than the black holes in the exotic dark matter dark energy that is shaping our larger universe but the fact that we have a lot yet to discover in our home backyard yeah so that was just phenomena I we don't expected this amazing your sciences this is taken you near and far as well we studied the universe we wanna understand and plus when we understand that there are more planets than stars stars hosting lots of these EXO planets on it and trying to understand our solar system in context I mean we have a laboratory here to send our own solar system but then we have thousands and now millions of solar systems yet got to be explored they so much more to do all right well I guess our last question for you is how could we recreate your look for Halloween alouine well go to fabric store make a black with Luke for my dress I just looked for constellation address online it's been great at parties for the lightsaber barred one off of friends teenage child if you wanted one at home just take clear plastic tube and attached to a flashlight with some duct tape and I've learned that if I if I sanded the outer side of just to make a little bit more opaque I created some diffusion effects and I was able to scattering affect and got to see my lightsaber just a tube been a duct tape and a project for Halloween totally doable all right well thanks for the tips and also the wonderful stories about your I love it and exploring the universe and may the force be with Oh things are just about the dark universe first fabulous thank you and we will bring you back out later when it's time to vote on our costumes thank you Thanksgiving really when you could just listen to Kimberly all day I mean really you really could yes yes and just being mesmerized you know you almost feel like you're actually sitting there looking into the sky I can't believe I I could picture it all yeah L. Ever Passion yes yeah she's wonderful well we have two more fabulous yes people coming up now all right right L- get ready for this here's their intro set your phasers to fun. This pair bully goes through their workday advancing the science of flight at our flight a simulator facilities come on out Sumita and emily caused playing as starfleet command. Hello very nice yeah hey don't look so good and I love you have these costumes to of course own star trust startling perfect so espn tell us your name and what you do I I'm Sumeida and I work at the flight simulation labs as outreach and communications and Dan my name's Emily Lewis I'm a simulation engineer contractor at the SIM labs at Sim's all right you're gonNA tell us more about that I know I know what you're wearing star trek uniforms but tells why because I know there's a connection here yes so as a kid I watched star Trek Trek Growing up with my dad the reruns and I was really inspired by Lieutenant Harare Communications Officer and so my costume is is similar to that and you know of course Star Trek with its mission to do discovery and explorer is on you know very similar to kind of what our mission is at at the simulation facilities to advance science for that increasing yeah makes perfect sense and I'm wearing a next generation in star trek costume and I fell in Love Star Trek when next generation was on when I was in college so I watched it in college and I found the vision of Star Trek and its positive approach to space exploration and technology really inspiring and that's one of the main reasons that I decided to study aerospace engineering and why also I'm really happy to be working on NASA Medicare and one other connection that we have between Star Trek and we work at the Simulation Laboratory is star Trek has holiday of you're familiar with it the whole check Zack is kind of a really cool high-tech virtual reality simulation facility and you know we don't have a holiday but we aren't thinking about including Vr the are sometime in the future but we are advancing aerospace technologies and we are supporting.

"silicon valley" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

NASA In Silicon Valley

08:42 min | 11 months ago

"silicon valley" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

"Oh wow okay I have not seen music for pull up a chair and kids have you you gotta love the matching Yes sir word needed so tell surname and what you do here yes my name is Nettie reuss boom I am an aerospace engineer here and I am Jennifer Burien I'm also an aerospace engineer and Nettie and I both work in the unitary tape plan wind tunnel here aims tunnel yeah all right tell us I wrote what you're wearing and then have on coveralls there's nothing really to the colors I also had different kinds of respirators on important part is to protect our lungs and is from the paint that we're using okay yes some UV glasses because we we also use UV lights going to have to hear all about bring your respiratory ass wow that's that's full face respirator serious yeah okay so this is to protect you while you are painting yes what are you painting aerospace engineer not expected right now it's not normally aerodynamic amick models but specifically I think we have photos of we are painting rockets hat cool tell us about how that works so you're painting models of rockets ready to go in a wind tunnel why don't you yes. We die paints scaled models of rockets so we put it in the wind tunnels in wind tunnels are these these facilities that can be small they can be really large as we build scale models we put them in these facilities where the air moves over them if we could we would launch these rockets yes were aircraft and we all the time I we have to first semester model them and we put them in a controlled environment like the wind and and we blew air over them and we measured the pressure distribution across the model that's at the heart of what we're wanting to do most wind tunnel tests okay right before anybody builds it and tries to fly it it you're going to test it all out on a little model yes meet understand better over the the model yes understanding how it acts under these controlled environments environments we have several tunnels here right and when we have the biggest in the world doing yes yes several in tunnels yeah and we had the the world's largest but also the one that we work at it was built in the nineteen fifties before even NASA was NASA under the NEC has a very rich history of the aircraft craft that are predecessor. Aca was responsible for and then all of the the space missions that have had launch vehicles and of course crewed missions have been tested here historic place okay so you guys are in their painting about the paint because that makes no sense anybody the special kind of paint called pressure sensitive paint it is a characteristic pink color because of the chemicals in the paint it makes it really special is when you expose it to UV light it emits midst or fluorosis its own light as well it goes we have a picture of one of the rocket models painted yeah yeah yeah I'm not sorry Hashtag NASA power of pink yes as you can see in the photo the the model to our is is pink you see also so the blue light that's coming around it and that's ginny highlighted so that we have these UV lights Look kind of blue or purplish that's me there in the test section so as you can tell us as a scaled model of rocket this is the rocket that is project artists this is GonNa take the first woman in the next man to the moon and on on that picture Syrian there's a place where the crew will sit and so understanding how that model is designed and how it will be controlled when it is launched is very important into this why we do extensive studies extensive test and now with the pressure sensitive paint you know we're syncing that pressure over the whole vehicle that's that's the new state of the art on what we're applying to wind tunnel testing how long does it take you to paint the model usually a couple of hours and we use spray spray guns than that he has modeled over here and we apply primer a base coat that's white and a red topcoat that's very light which is why gets Nice Pink Color Awesome I have some comments here verified amy I'm in awe of all of you relevant rj the new have you tested tested any models for the future artemis missions to saying and yeah that's what we're doing right now is testing both for the crude artists missions but also so the cargo so the maybe a few images that you'll see on the Internet there are very different vehicles that you use to move people because that has a much higher level of safety eighty that works to keep people safe but then we also move satellites we we're GONNA move rovers we're going to move habitats we're gonNA smart landers unders yeah cargo so there's different rocket no sparing shape that we test and and we actually did very recently yes yes and so that's that's the rocket you're talking about cold yes this is this is Sim One but this is also part of artists and the rocket is the space is launch systems have time love so you guys let's see that and you can tell us where to show this as you can see that's our respirators on on their and we're moving around the tunnel the those small cylindrical sections that you see there at the left is are the boosters boosters that you know and this is you see animations you see two boosters and his corps and this is GonNa lift off up into space so we take those off for painting and then we'll put them back on but yeah a lot of work goes into that you know getting a wind tunnel model even just to that point and so I think it's a really beautiful beautiful because it gives you a really big appreciation for you know when that model is on the launch pad just knowing how many people had a fingerprint on that model on who was involved in all the facilities of NASA and you know what what rich facilities technology and people that we have awesome we have some more questions some to to review and clarify wordsworth that's what makes it pink eye there's different colors so we have the white base coat that goes on and then there's a Taco and the main chemical and there's actually a red red color okay so it's a very light coat though and that's why it ends up being pink and not Red Oh yeah yeah all right scary crazy butter knife again forget that yeah right yeah is there anything special about the paint to keep dust and condensation from accumulating on it while in space so let's clarify do you use the paint only for testing I'm here yes okay very particularly it's just to help us see how pressures are distributed on the model the actual rocket will be painted with real paints okay not this special pay yeah hi tech tool right so it's a pressure sensor basically it is a pressure sensor and yes so traditionally we've had these pressure sensors that are on the on the mind aw yeah they're they're fairly fine but in respect to the area of the model they really course and they're only in these discrete locations so we know the pressure really well there but but like I said at the heart of a wind tunnel tests you wanna know the pressure distribution everywhere on the madrasa that's what the the pain is offering that's really where the state of the art is moving like how do we know the pressure across the whole vehicle in between those sensors right yeah can't figure out what's in between yeah because the sensors are so expensive ends of and you can't put them everywhere there's not enough room and certain type models use this paint to kind of fill in those gaps yeah yeah yeah makes sense sinful seven within cg these models that you're testing for the mission are they simulated in areas other than the wind tunnels painted models. No I would say it's mostly the wind tunnel technology certainly could work here on the benchtop but Yeah it's I would say the main application is in a wind tunnel and of course we we apply as much hardware as we can't we have multiple high speed cameras we will mount for we will start mountain eight high speed cameras emmers around the that's that's what we're capturing so the paint respond to pressure so it's either brighter dimmer.

"silicon valley" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

NASA In Silicon Valley

08:56 min | 11 months ago

"silicon valley" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

"Them there's very few microbes on it and it keeps keeps all of your microbes on the inside and human factually will omit about a million particles per hour and that's like after showering we're really yeah exactly we're just shedding shutting off bacteria and organic molecules all the time so you can imagine if you're studying a sample that has maybe only a few hundred thousand als is going to be like totally overwhelming you don't WanNa take that back to your lab and then analyze yourself like my own so look here okay let's see if you can give us a number for this ballast sparkle asks is there a percentage of how much less microscopic life there is in that desert desert compared to an average environment yeah so in an average environment like if you took like the same amount of seawater you'd probably find about a million bacteria and compare that to the drives nice place in the Atacama where you'll only find about one hundred so it's significant ridiculous well we have a question here from Z. Track how did you get a degree in this did you joining to become scientists scientists. I've loved Geology Edgy since I was in first grade and they loved space too and I actually got an internship here when I was in high school and then I went to college and I studied geology she and Planetary Science and then I went on to get my Phd and Earth and Atmospheric Sciences with a focus on biochemistry. Oh yeah but I think a lot about being a students about being being self motivated and coming up with the set of questions that you're really interested in answering and then learning whatever you need to learn to pursue those questions whether that's geology physics or chemistry history or biology or even English and Gosh I'll tell you being at NASA a lot of what I do is writing yes yeah yeah so there's no one right path it's so now there's follow what you WanNa do and do whatever you need to do right exactly let's take a couple of quick ones and demand says working at NASA as awesome it certainly sounds it if you're married Ian is a D. bag so she's wearing her work outfit is his question so Oh to clarify yes indeed you do work in this yeah so this is what I wear when I'm doing fieldwork in the Atacama but actually I did do some work once in this ancient DNA laboratory Tori where people have to wear suits like this probably even more restrictive with complete coveralls on every day while they're doing extractions from really precious samples they don't want to contaminate okay okay all right so yes this is Mary that's real work outfit but if you want this to be your Halloween costume can you help us figure out some ways we could recreate this look absolutely I think it's going to take a good trip to the hardware store some drill bits overall yeah a lot of what I buy is actually from the hardware Oh really really yeah yeah it makes sense those same stuff yeah yeah can you hands dirty out there for sure right well awesome thank you during his answering questions we're gonNA bring back later on for the voting's but thank you for bringing your samples and your tools and we we will see you in a bit thanks guys hey super cool pretty impressive yes yes you know doable I feel like I've could put together that costume for one day why not don't you research wanted to be married bath me Halloween is awesome lawn to our next contender up next we have chuck come on out Chuck Oh excellent hello as you love Lakota some gloves and dirt some gloves and feel free to come on up table chairs are hard to Tuck in so what does that tell us your name and what you do here at my name is Chuck Cornell Listen I'm a mechanical engineer and I work in the ballistic ranges here at Ames the research center quite interesting we'll hear more about that in a second personal tells what you're wearing I'm wearing basically the standard attire we wear air when we're conducting experiments in the ballistic ranges it's a it's a fun place to work but can be quite dirty so we typically wear lab coats protect our clothes we have typically handle explosives and and various hazardous material so we have the safety Aku trauma you know all these things You WanNa go home with the same number of fingers browser you come in with so goal so this is standard list of grange attire approved by Ralph Lauren I believe designer lab coat see your dirty and you work with explosives what exactly is going on range ballistic ranges there's actually two facilities bility's within the ballistic range complex are currently active one of them's called the Ames vertical gun range and what we do there's we use a large gun to shoot high speed projectiles into the targets to simulate what happens when an asteroid Ra- meteor impacts a planet or moon's surface we observed the formation of the crater where the debris goes etc and fact I've got a brief video that demonstrates that video there you go there is the blue chambers workplace are targets and adjusts the environment according to whatever conditions were trying to simulate the Orange section was our our gun beam there's an impact you see the the the create the debris curtain evolving his materials being excavated as soon as the smoke clears Wallah there you go there's the crater I see it I see it yeah yeah sure regular gun no no no it's not not a typical gun it's it's what we use what's called a two stage light gas gun and the way it operates as you use gunpowder to shoot a piston down a tube that's filled with hydrogen and as the Piston traverses the tube compresses the hydrogen too extreme pressure tens of thousands of pounds per square inch and we then use that high pressure hydrogen propellant medium or what we used to launch the bullet out of our gun barrel and the reason we do that is you can get much higher velocities than you can can with the standard gun our guns in the range complex top out at about eight kilometers per second which is roughly eighteen thousand miles per hour or in this way if you're traveling that speed you could fly from San Francisco to New York in about ten minutes Oiseaux little fun fact where we are in fact the fastest gun in the West a am yes that's that's okay and I know you have you have another one we have some clothes for you you just jump into the chat here as DAS- X. through chuck caps big too low speed razor to sixteen those mechanic's canucks gloves I love those gloves we have various types of gloves off you know depending on what we're trying to do some of them have this you know Geico Geico Gecko like texture and additional working in the ballistic ranges I can save you fifteen percent on your car it's we have subtext to improve manual dexterity depending on what what you're doing okay yeah and what sort of chemicals you're working with because you WANNA protect your your skin and whatnot from Acetone I cool sleepy underscore jerry so cool and I know we're GonNa hear more about the other facilities so let's do that first service if you answered some of these questions the vertical gun that was ranged number one hyper velocity impact testing the other facilities call the hyper velocity free flight facility we use the same sort of gun technology but rather than looking at the impact we shoot small scale models of planetary entry vehicles down a long long flight corridor we take a lot of pictures of them as they fly to to map out the trajectory from that information we can infer the aerodynamic characteristics of of these planetary entry vehicles and I have one right here yeah this this is a picture of one of the models that we've we've shot out over the years now it may look like some sort of drawer pull that you would buy at home depot you know for five bucks but I assure you this is actually a precise scale model of of the Orion capsule and so we do have a video of of one of these tests these Arrow ballistic. Let's see that there you go there's the test section notice all the windows that's one of the reasons you get dirty of sixty four window soclean after every test we launched the models here's here's a video of a model flight and we take three to still images.

"silicon valley" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

NASA In Silicon Valley

08:39 min | 11 months ago

"silicon valley" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

"Hello Everybody Eddie and welcome back to another episode of NASA in Silicon Valley live I'm your host Abby Taber and if this is your first time tuning into the show NASA in Silicon Valley live in a conversational show out of NASA's Ames Research Center where we talk about all the nerdy NASA news you need to know about so today I have with me my friend and officemate tiffany hey everyone I am your co host Tiffany Blake if you didn't know we are live on twitch Youtube facebook and periscope but if you want to participate in the chat and ask guests questions there's only one place you can do that and that has at www dot twitch dot TV slash naphtha right and we are excited today to be holding our second annual NASA themes Halloween costume and 'cause play contests I'm excited I'm flight if you're a fan during last minute Halloween outfit you're in luck we are going to show you a collective NASA inspired costumes and tell you how you can recreate them at home right and if you do end up using any of our species themed costumes for Halloween or some other NASA inspired costume we want to see it so you can share there those with us on social media using the Hashtag NASA costume yeah so before we start how about you remind people about Colo clock okay okay yes so this is our moon countdown clock that you see right here and that is because five years from now in twenty twenty four we are planning to send humans to the moon as part of our program so this clock right here is counting down the days hours minutes and seconds until the next man and the first woman will will set foot on the South Pole of the moon so to learn more about that you can go to NASA dot gov slash artists so should we get right into it yeah she'll we see some guidance yes okay so our first category is every day NASA looks so the the going to see are things that are researchers and engineers where her day to day doing their work doing special tests you'll see them around the center wearing these things so let's bring out our first guest come on out Mary Beth best pay now yeah come on they're excellent we'll give you a minute to get you tools there get all tucked in and you might might have to take off your gas mask does well so why don't you start by introducing yourself to the audience I'll tell us what you do so my name's Dr Mary Beth Wilhelm and I'm a research scientists here at NASA an astrobiologist which means I study the origin of life the evolution of it and then I search for it elsewhere in our solar system so tell us about what you're wearing all right so this look is what I aware when I'm collecting samples in a Mars analog environment on earth so because Mars is so far away and it's so expensive to get there we often go to two places on earth that are like Mars so we can study certain things about it and take things back to our lab studied them what kind of environments on Earth are actually like Mars or is like what are you looking for there right so right now I'm studying this place called the Atacama Desert Chile and it's one of the driest places in the world it it only rains in the region that I visit once per decade that's absurd drives count the number of plants I saw on one hand during our field trip that's so strange and because of that it has some of the lowest levels of biomass on the entire planet so there's very very few living organisms there and US humans are very dirty yeah and that's why I'm wearing the suit because when I'm taking samples I don't want to contaminate the samples I'm working with with your own skin cells and whatever it might be unfolding off we have a photo don't we think so yeah Mary best in the Comma all right tell us what we're seeing here right so this is a me taking a sample from one of the driest places on the planet and here I'm trying to study the extreme limits of life and then trying to understand whether any remnants of life get preserved in the fossil record wow how so you're talking about life like bacteria and things like that yeah exactly microscopic life okay so we're looking for the chemical evidence of life that gets preserved in the rock record and specifically I'm studying type of molecule called the bed eleven bats which we love to eat obviously and the cool thing about lipids is that they're extremely well preserved in the fossil record so if you look back at the very oldest rocks on earth and you're looking for evidence of life you can still find some some of the lipid molecules from those organisms that lived in those environments the first life on Earth yet find traces of it that's still around and so like when we're we're thinking about what we want to look for on Mars we want to try to target these types of molecules they can live for can they can stick around for long periods of time because Mars used to have really nice conditions for life but like three billion years ago okay he used to have a sphere and it would water on the surface and so we I have to look for the remainder of what might have lived on Mar right right if there were any little microbes exactly what parts of them would survive long. That's what you're looking for yeah do you you use your tools here yeah okay so I'm kind of a cool hybrid scientist so I do a mix of geology and biochemistry so I have my Handy Rock Hammer um so I can break open the rocks and then for the really for the really tricky samples we have a this is a drill string so you can see like I have some of the Atacama still stuck on the red dust on there a few of these and then once we get the stuff out of the rock will put it in our sample jar desert being soil samples and you get it in the bottle there actually have a few samples from our last she brought samples from the Atacama among these are some really cool samples I collected from an ancient salt flat this is a probably about a few million years old and you can see some of that black stuff in there those are some of the remnants of the life that lived body of water that formed this how this is Salt Salt Salt Yeah Yep so this took a couple of drills to get out so what do you guys do with assembles when you bring them back acted lab right yeah so we take back all the samples were interested in and then I take them to my biochemistry lab here at NASA and we you dissolve the rock and we pull out all of the chemicals and then we study them with analytical instruments that tell us a lot about the sample like what who who it is what it might have eaten like really information so we'll spend years studying a particular site and did my phd in the Atacama they warned these things for a long time very familiar with buddy match you learn to love the heat I guess yeah I I like a few years ago when we went like the ground temperature's where like well over a hundred degrees so you're sweating inside the suit right you're dressed head to toe totally covered up man I have some questions for you all right willing to take some cushions from the chat. Yeah let's do all right how third is asking is there any kind of precipitation on Mars Arse Oh like precipitation of water so I don't I don't think it's ever been seen before maybe maybe a long time there may have been have to look back at the literature but right now no Mars is one big giant desert and actually comparison the Atacama is a thousand sometimes wetter than than Mars and it's the surface of Mars gave so the dryers place on earth place on times a winter sweater so it's like comparing haring driest place on earth to the Amazon that's the Delta Mars is extremely dry wow but but it's the best place you can practice on earth really likes to practice fence standing okay let me get through some more there's probably five in line for you speed racer to sixteen what material is the suit made of it does it keep cool so the suit does not keep cool at all and their special clean suits so like when you buy.

"silicon valley" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

NASA In Silicon Valley

11:02 min | 1 year ago

"silicon valley" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

"Play my favorite song it is it is that the <hes> it can be helpful on you know <hes> if they need to have a procedure brought up <hes> so <hes> you know help them with different tasks that they're doing and your personnel robotic assistant i can you know voice commanded yeah. It seems handy station what you need from it also check. I think we have another hair and blah. The most adorable herbals impo is built by the japanese space agency <hes> and it's meant to be basically a floating camera can and move around <hes> inside the japanese experiment module <hes> and take over some of the sort of videography chores of astronauts so a lot of times <hes> astronauts astronauts need two documents activities you know so they're filming other astronauts doing things and so <hes> this little robot can take take over that job. Oh some great yeah. I have a question here before we go to our rapid fire questions when we're gonna take as many as possible <hes> but sham family wants to know would robots on the international space station be controlled by houston or command here on earth or would they be in the hands of the astronaut aboard the station all of the above <hes> i mean i just like the there's no one perfect robot. <hes> you know for everything. There's not one specific way that any of these robots would be operated. You know they could be controlled. From from the earth they could operate <hes> you know autonomously or they could be operated also by astronaut so yes yes and actually spheres that we were looking at a minute ago. It does do some things autonomously on space station rate and turn certain extent we have video of docking and undocking no here's oh really okay spheres. Somebody experiments that we've done. What's is fears you know we've we've tried to allow to operate <hes> <hes> and fly around inside the space station by itself. It can be used to carry out things like <hes> interior surveys days can fly with various specific locations. Take readings locations and then fly on yeah do a video of that. Maybe that's what i was thinking of yeah. Let's see if we can get that video. Oh look narratives so there. You see smarts fears. This is yeah. This was a different smartphones so we worked with not just the next assess but this was a project tangos smartphone <hes> that we worked on in partnership with <hes> our friends next door over at google <hes> and here is a picture. This is a video here. Are you guys you see a smartphone on the front of spheres flying around inside of the space station <hes> it's actually going back and forth back and forth flying lawnmower pattern and this is what mission control sees even see video coming down from the smartphone cameras. You can see what looks like a video game on the right side. You can see the path. It's flying and the way points that it's going back and forth worth between so here's flying towards point seven <hes> at the lower right there. There's an image that shows the representation of what the cameras seen that kind of blue thing and this allows us to have a really good understanding of the robot in its environment and what it's doing at any given time yeah awesome. It's so cool so there's your answer to that. We have a comment from <hes> <hes> snow the end. I heart robots your to heart robots. Yeah there were awesome others. Go canada harm others. We jump right into our rectifier session session emphasis on the quick trying to get a lot in our eight tiffany. Yes i have one so let's say for fears fierce. How long did it take to actually create. The robot actually designed that <hes> well <hes> as i said this. This was a project that started m._i._t. With <hes> with an actually an undergraduate engineering class <hes> and so the students worked on that <hes> extensively that led to a number of different prototypes and eventually those were sent up to the space bay station <hes> but you know the reality is that it's hard to say exactly how long it takes to build something because you have to design it test it <hes> there are a lot of things for the space station that we're concerned about in terms of making sure things are safe right of course in terms of like materials and how it operates and all those kinds of things so <hes> a fair amount of time especially with that and then and of course once they get on the space station you know just because you get rain back every single day every single robot that goes up into space. We're still learning how to improve rueben and make them better <hes> a comment about into ball from airplane man nineteen ninety-seven so cute are- yes the j._p. Guy has a question about learning and training to do things. He's like. You guys do it. Is it possible to learn robotics by self study and tinkering with machines. What books or resources would you suggest yes. I would say i would say so. Robotics onyx is it's very broad field so you can contribute to a robotics project. You know with any kind of background. Almost <hes> product product designers per grammars <hes> electrical engineers mechanical engineers so really it's whatever you love to do you know what what would you i prefer to to do and then you know you can contribute then to a robotics team. That's awesome. That's good news could do a lot of different things yeah. I i think a great thing today which didn't exist a few years ago is there are a lot of online classes you can take in robotics and so i think learning by yourself is totally possible. They're even open source research projects that you can contribute to <hes> and so i think the important thing is just to get involved <hes> and not worry about whether or not this isn't a university or at home. I mean the robots at home. Get a little raspberry. Pi and legal set and get started. Yeah nice the more <hes> trick prime queer to your back. I saw the floating square robot assistant astor be or maybe it was the other one. I forget the name. The assistant robots testing on the international space station. You're.

houston google
"silicon valley" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

NASA In Silicon Valley

04:51 min | 2 years ago

"silicon valley" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

"We've done several the x planes using the pressure sensitive paint to it's a new technology is uses optic. So we have the the paint which is interesting because there's the whole chemistry of the paint the application science of the paint, and then the data acquisition. So we use UV lights to excite this paint. It response to oxygen as I mentioned earlier. And so the oxygen is going to come in and quench these molecules. So the molecules they're shining really bright as we saw in the the picture earlier this fluorescent pink light oxygen molecules come in and make it shine really dim. So ox oxygen means higher pressures president if there's an absence of oxygen so lower pressure, then it's not. Serving the luminescent molecules of energy. So it's really bright yet, we use, you know, eight to twelve cameras mounted around the wind tunnel, and we will record the intensity that is being emitted by the paint. Right. So you can know the pressure every point. Yeah. Yeah. In a previous episode of Silicon Valley live if you my colleagues came on. And we're talking about syncing, the the PS P, and you know, we acquaint like young we use cameras that have one million pixels on them. And we use for some of these up to eight or twelve so you can imagine we have twelve million pixels looking at this vehicle. So that's essentially twelve million instruments that we're using to since pressure on traditional models. Maybe there's two hundred or three hundred pressure taps if there's a lot. Sometimes we'll do it even with just twelve pressure taps. But yeah. Using the the knowledge of and the technology behind high speed cameras, high intensity lighting that we used to excite this paint and the and the technology that's come along with the pain. It's really made this possible. That is so cool. Yeah. Want to give a shout out to you director of NASA, Glenn Janet Cavani? She had her start NPS p or she did her peach PSP chemistry did some of that very early wind tunnel tests involving using PSP here at NASA Ames, so very cool. Tender woman questions you have to boroughs what if the tooth? Yeah. This is the base coat, and this is the top coat. So we need both of these for the paint to work on and and often with painting. This this is where all my stress lies is that I take a lot of pride in that in the paint job. And that's one reason why also of ESPN like, you know, there's this Artistique. Learned art behind it that you don't just slap it on. Like, I wanted to do also that the paint responsible. Cool to all long. Does it take for you to to paint and to prepare these models using your pressures paint for some of the larger models? Like we saw in the photo. Go ahead and get that brought back up on screen yet. You know that since we do several different layers, and then we actually have to cure it. So I will bake the solvent out of the paint that that took about eight hours to paint. So, you know, this pain is toxic. So we wear respirators. So I would say that's one of the more like the two physical parts of the job crawling around this wind tunnel and amounting all the cameras and lamps, which is a lot of fun. You get to use your hands and use mechanical skills and think of ways to design lent mounts camera mounts to to make things better. But yeah. And then the the painting wearing that hood for eight hours and finally coming out and taking a breath of fresh air. Do a lot of different things in your. Cool. All right. Well, I think we should keep going can grow. Put your says object. Parts of this. Look familiar to me. But I don't actually know what they amount to. Thus. Yep. So these supercomputer note. One of the eighteen hundred sun, the breach notes we have in the plea supercomputer eighteen hundred eighteen hundred. And then so each of these Huste sixteen processors, so yes need to multiply. And the thing is we all we don't only have sandy bridge. No to have a bunch of e b breach knows roadway. Lows Hosoi note skylight, not Jessica. I don't know any of those things a lot of it. Yes..

president NASA Ames NASA Silicon Valley sandy bridge Glenn Janet Cavani ESPN Jessica director eight hours
"silicon valley" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

NASA In Silicon Valley

05:40 min | 2 years ago

"silicon valley" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

"All right. Teams that we have again run out of time. And while we would love to spend the rest of our show with you guys. We, unfortunately have to think you and sake. Thanks, guys. So remember, you guys are watching us in Silicon Valley live today. We're celebrating national stem day by talking to some of the amazing wonder women of NASA. And if you have any questions for our guests, fill free to write them in the chat. And if you wanna learn more about women at NASA, you can go to women dot NASA dot gov. All right. So let's go now to our fabulous 'aeronautics crew. Let's bring out Nettie Patricia and Sarah come on out. Share having way too much fun. So I think I can you ladies introduce yourselves. And I know you guys are all aerospace engineers, but what exactly do you do? Okay. I'll start. My name's Nettie route. Airspace engineer, and I lead our pressure sensitive paint technology here at NASA Ames. Okay. Three seven through two. I'm gonna space in euro. So. Supercomputing supercomputing awesome. My name Sarah Sousa, and I designed guidance and control systems for spacecraft. All right. Should we find out where you go from? Origin stories have how did you know you wanted to do this? So I will claim that I knew when I was eight months, eight months. Kid when I was why kid is because when I was a freshman in college are sorry sophomore in college. I was able to get a internship at Johnson Space Center and work alongside astronauts who were on the space shuttle and many years later. My sister was going through our photo album. And she she sent me a picture as a picture of my mom, holding me when I was a baby and with a picture of the space shuttle in the back room, and I just I just think everything I've done throughout my life has been influenced by my family, and what we did as kids. I've always space, and it's always been something. I love your parents did. Copy of the day. My dad took the picture. Dad is very much a space enthusiast and a dreamer. And I definitely get that for my dad too. Pretty cool. So what about you Patricia? I remember took me to the planet Tanya when I was like four years old. And then so surprised but all stars you could see. And so I thought that Boeing that I wanted to something space today to and then when you know, when they always ask it's what do you wanna do when you're like a grownup? I was always saying, but then when I was in high school, I was pretty good in math physics. So I decided to go for engineering well like with space outerspace space engineering. Okay. So we have a photo of a young you can we get that front. Well, he's not old voting. Yeah. That's two years old. He's a was thinking, I think one moment after I started my internship here names on the first time, I visited this computer on. I was so surprised he was so big unload. Super Peter happened to have a name that we may know about. Yes. So this super computer. But yet anes we have another supercomputer that he's called Electra. We're actually building a third one Lewis cool those platies and electro rate. So what about unity like, what's what's your origin story? Yeah. I grew up in Tennessee. Remember going to see a see the Saint Louis arch. And I remember driving across the bridge and going to the Saint Louis arch. And I just you know. Lifted both of these things that are studying drafting in high school, and how these are extremely impressive. I wanna do whatever it is that can produce something like this. So I went into college started studying mechanical engineering, and then found fluid dynamics thermodynamics. Wow. You're speaking, my love language, the world made sense at that moment and just kept. We're going my way that had an internship as well here at NASA. Ames we go my way over to the Winton divisions. Wow. This is really cool. Yeah. These giant compressors radiators and all the things that you had studied there in your in your textbooks. We here in life and huge. Yeah. And then I found my way over to pressure sensitive paint, which which was just a a great melody like hardware-software wind tunnel. So really my happy place. A photo of young Nettie..

Nettie Patricia NASA Sarah Sousa Johnson Space Center NASA Ames Saint Louis arch Silicon Valley Boeing Peter engineer Ames Tennessee Lewis eight months four years two years
"silicon valley" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

NASA In Silicon Valley

04:43 min | 2 years ago

"silicon valley" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

"I'm I'm jumping one more time just because this is a good question and attended topics. I know the Abby wants to talk about. This is this comes from Higgs bacon. Awesome. Between Celani Saul titan which moon seems more promising for life. Two for a NASA mission and sell it versus titan. Yeah, I want to be only one I wanna go to and sodas is wonderful because it's going. And giving us sample that's coming out of the planet without us having to dig. But when you look at titan, it looked so earth like it looks so familiar. So titan certainly at least has prebiotics chemistry going on. And maybe there's some kind of lifelike process. We have no idea. So I wanna go to both greedy, and I want to go everywhere. Refuse to choose refuse to choose. Yeah. Do you have what I, I have so many questions. It's quite insane, but I'm not going to be. Things that we definitely want to talk to you about before we go to fly. Abby files, the vials are interesting. Okay. You're sure might let you tell us what's the deal with hydrothermal vents, keep, Dave. We'll zoom in on it and your caves, right? Why do we talk to our buddies who work in the ocean? I think the essence of the question is an, it's because amazingly enough the micro organisms that live in the bottom of the ocean are doing amazing things. They're tunnelling through volcanic glasses and other rock types. And a lot of the organisms that we have in caves are also doing something like that. Okay. So even though they live in what we from our human perspective thinker wildly different environments. But man, their lifestyle is very similar, and we even see genetic relatedness between some of our cave organisms and deep sea, hydrothermal vents. And we've known that within our research group for the last twenty or more years, I think. So we think they're deeply connected mystery of life. So the things you study on land in crazy caves, right? Those crazy microbes and those crazy. Yeah. Right. Compare these different habitat, then that sort of thing tells you, sorry, what you might look for in the solar system on the moon's people were just asking about, obviously, obviously, really interested in how life did all of its stuff on earth. Yeah, but we use this as a template as a as a pattern for. How do we figure out where to look on these other amazing places. Because when you look at our solar system, we got one of everything very kind of body got hot, we got, we got small yet we got dry. Yeah. The shadow for Dave from TD waffle. He's saying Dave's zoom in on the violence. Also LeBron James headband is like saying, let the man speak. 'cause I got questions for example speaking. That's my question. FOX, Tango typed in the chat just like you can. It was asking penny, what are the chances of finding DNA based life elsewhere? And, oh, man, that thing is going too fast, and I completely lost the chain because the chats moving too fast. So anyways, well, it was kind of with that like DNA by base is one sort of way of coding living information. I can imagine a whole lot of other different ways. So since we already understand quite a bit about how how DNA works here we for sure. Gonna look for that, but. I know that nature is amazing and may have great ways to make living things out of other stuff. So we're not just hedging our abouts on one chemical system. People have done work on alternative DNA's where they're sorta similar, but you know, the details are different and we know that maybe there are ways to put carbon together in different ways. Of course, people have long suggested silicon, and we're right here in Silicon Valley. So let's go. Speaking of nature is amazing. Let's leave Valley. I know depart the nice warm temperatures, Silicon Valley, and let's head to Hawaii. We're gonna see if we can get the Skype up and working. Yeah. How's it going..

Dave Silicon Valley Abby NASA Higgs LeBron James leave Valley FOX Hawaii penny
"silicon valley" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

NASA In Silicon Valley

03:23 min | 2 years ago

"silicon valley" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

"And in fact, keep aviation an export for our country. Yeah, we ask one question. Okay. This experimental aircraft you, but I'm not a pilot. What are here is because of the way it's built. It has a really, really long nose, I guess, does it doesn't work to have windows for the pilots look out and you're going to be looking at screens. Does that sound weird and disturbing for pilot challenge? Everything. Again, these are investments made by NASA for the purpose of of retiring risk to do to kind of really important work. Now. This is not really. It's not actually new. We've we've done this kind of work before and at the end of the day you're, you're looking at images from, you know. And I think on the x fifty nine. I don't know how they do it on the x, fifty nine. But on other aircraft, you're looking at images from cameras to alternately, no, no, your trajectory. But but the the last time I flew an x fifty, nine simulator wasn't a simulator anywhere near as nice as the one that about to get in. But the last time I flew on, I can tell you this, it's it's built to go fast. It is not built to turn. Oh, it turns like a pig, try spinning. I hear that's drawing this thing would not turn it was it was, yeah, it was difficult to turn it out now. It's also true that it owes. It can depart pretty easily as well as an aircraft, which is why flight control computers are an important part of it. By the way, those flight control computers going back to the nineteen seventies originated at NASA. Nice. And of course, I. Do those same flight control computers that were in the twenty nine at the time in the f. eighteen hornet when I was a pilot in the navy. So we're coming up on all the time that we have left with Jim. You have a flight to catch do a simulated flight, but a flight nonetheless catch it. I'm gonna fly. We're gonna fly feed. And so there's a ton of questions in the chat, a bunch of comments in there, but I'm sure that they can also direct those questions to. Lutely. Absolutely. And that's be r. s. t. I n. e. thank you so. It's been fun. Always. We'll do it again maybe next time I'll get a whole hour. We'll see. We'll see. Watch your career was very interesting important for your audience to see these. I guess these test tubes with nasty things and it looks like somebody urinated in a tube, and now we're going to talk about it, but we are, but I'll be gone all in the name of science that I'll be gone penny. I'll look forward to watching this later though. All right. All right. Thank you. Appreciate it coming folks as as we take it by Jim, and we're going to welcome our new guest penny, I'm going to sort through some housekeeping and Jim get head on the back and he's gonna come on up. It's okay. Everybody on the show. Everybody who's watching knows this is how the set goes. So. Okay, just a little bit of housekeeping. If you are just joining us, this is NASA and Silicon Valley live a conversational show out of Nasr's Ames research center with the various reach researchers, scientists, engineers, and all around cool people here at NASA where we talk about all the nerdy NASA news that you need to know about. So if you like that we are simultaneously live on twitch YouTube and Facebook. But if you want to participate in the chat, you're going to have to go on over to twitch dot TV,.

NASA Jim YouTube Ames research center Silicon Valley Facebook Nasr
"silicon valley" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

NASA In Silicon Valley

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"silicon valley" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

"I i took our by the intro to computer sciences like an 1999 like for your a college in fiddled around making little like windows and programs and stuff and i was a good thing that struck me was like how similar of felt till like learning another language learning like spanish and french them and they can i quickly realized i could follow instructions with it it quickly went to the point where i'm like i don't even have the vocabulary for this and so um the ah that that was about vows he had to buy computer science that's so came at uh back to selfdriving cars nick gaurs asked what do you think the adoption rate for selfdriving cars will be in the next decade and will they ever reach the price point of manual cars well so twopart question there are forever nears by shin read adoption rate i think it depends on where you live in the us might think that uh if you're in an area where you have the good weather is like silicon valley um it's a lot easier because you know there's a lot fewer things we have to deal with light thunderstorms in snow and stuff like that so i will be easier to to have selfdriving cars out in places like california arizona new mexico first um will they get down to the price point of normal occurs well i mean it depends uh a lot of cars these days are just really becoming you know software platforms i mean you know all the tesla's out there are these days i mean they get software upgrades flip a switch and they go from manual driving to selfdriving so as not by even so much a question of like an ad on i mean the cars themselves are going to be ready to be selfdriving oh yeah all right that's interesting cool dan a quick yeah wordsworth asks what is your favorite science fact were theory there were a pressure the.

us mexico tesla nick gaurs california arizona selfdriving
"silicon valley" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

NASA In Silicon Valley

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"silicon valley" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

"Fell my way here oh nice met people at a conference ends came gave a presentation receive an offer awesome so we'll go volvo more into some of the stuff that you're working on of the terry's working on an of course will get the questions from the cia but folks if you are just joining us your watching the second ever episode of the nasa instead of nasa in silicon valley live this is a conversational show go on twitch tv i with various researchers scientists engineers and all around cool people at nasa net specifically here at masses ames research center in silicon valley so as i mentioned at our premier episode we are trying something new here we're basically taking the audio podcast in doing it live on twitch it's the last time we had a lot of fun talking about the moon and today we are talking about selfdriving robots planes and automobiles so first and foremost a shout out to the live audience on the chat uh we're going to kick things off by talking with our guests and we're gonna try to answer as many questions as possible from the chat and based off of last time we're going to try some rapid fire questions at the very end so don't be shy send in as many questions as you can or just feel free to descend a modes and spam that at us nonstop in the czech because we're going to be looking at it so i'm your host matthew buffing ten and this time my host abby taber i see is going to be looking in taking the questions from the chance that could look with that i thank you very much i.

terry cia volvo nasa matthew abby taber
"silicon valley" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

NASA In Silicon Valley

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"silicon valley" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

"I i took our by the intro to computer sciences like an 1999 like for your a college in fiddled around making little like windows and programs and stuff and i was a good thing that struck me was like how similar of felt till like learning another language learning like spanish and french them and they can i quickly realized i could follow instructions with it it quickly went to the point where i'm like i don't even have the vocabulary for this and so um the ah that that was about vows he had to buy computer science that's so came at uh back to selfdriving cars nick gaurs asked what do you think the adoption rate for selfdriving cars will be in the next decade and will they ever reach the price point of manual cars well so twopart question there are forever nears by shin read adoption rate i think it depends on where you live in the us might think that uh if you're in an area where you have the good weather is like silicon valley um it's a lot easier because you know there's a lot fewer things we have to deal with light thunderstorms in snow and stuff like that so i will be easier to to have selfdriving cars out in places like california arizona new mexico first um will they get down to the price point of normal occurs well i mean it depends uh a lot of cars these days are just really becoming you know software platforms i mean you know all the tesla's out there are these days i mean they get software upgrades flip a switch and they go from manual driving to selfdriving so as not by even so much a question of like an ad on i mean the cars themselves are going to be ready to be selfdriving oh yeah all right that's interesting cool dan a quick yeah wordsworth asks what is your favorite science fact were theory there were a pressure the.

us mexico tesla nick gaurs california arizona selfdriving
"silicon valley" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

NASA In Silicon Valley

02:06 min | 2 years ago

"silicon valley" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

"This is the nassan silicon valley podcast will technically this is nasice in silicon valley live but we're a podcast were not the only nasa podcast gravity assist houston we have a podcast is one is out of johnson's fate senate work a lot with them um there's a youtube in audio version of this week at nasa that they are still go in its shorter like four or five minute little segments so a lot of content out there for people to grab this has been the mass in silicon valley podcast huge thanks to jim green egg schmidt for joining us and be remiss too we have eric is in our audio studio we have him on the the voice of god you over there and if we go to the cloud the cloud cam over on the far left we have jesse and dave casey dominique is it over there clive it brian sitting there so huge things guys have been way fine for folks who are listening are watching on demand for fuel listen to this on your audio like too bad you can't see everybody wave but trust us that they are well if you're watching on demand or on all the major social media platforms under nasa aims we are using the hashtag mass in silicon valley and we've gone analog so uh we have a phone number if you have any comments questions you can also call six five zero 604 one four zero zero call we're not going to answer the phone but leave a comment or a question and then we'll try to figure out how we can wrap that into an episode if you you know huge thanks everybody who participated live and participated in the chat we're gonna keep doing this a not next friday but the friday after that we're working on a fun show we're we're talking some the early days of vr development also atanas vehicles systems stuff like that uh we're we're trying to solidify that up so not next friday but the friday after that if you haven't already go ahead click like shares subscribe every button on the screen or podcast app that you can think of uh how you can find us.

johnson dave casey dominique nasa houston senate eric jesse brian social media five minute
"silicon valley" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

NASA In Silicon Valley

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"silicon valley" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

"Hey folks thanks for joining us we're gonna jump into an intro in a little bit while we for some people to jump online but don't be shy jump in the cia and we're going to be looking for your comments but wanted to started off we were chatting earlier jim we've we talk about like the nazran silicon valley podcast jim has his own podcast so there is a plug for that i called gravity assists and the thing that i get a kick out of it is at the end of the show you always talk to the people have like what was your gravity assists 2 landing at nasa were working on space so now it's i'm going to pay for the question to you what was your gravity in assists how did you end up at nasa we you know i was always good math and science and i actually was watched all those star tracks from the very beginning noses would william shatner and leonard and and really enjoyed that but i ended up working in an observatory i ended up having a twelve inch album clark refractory my beck and call i was able to the instruments on the back end of it and i started doing a lot of astra photography and then developing my own film and and and the high school chemistry teacher was just opened the doors i had i had the keys to the school you know i was trust at here's the guy he's the school go down observe whatever you wanted to cetera and then you know some of the stuff i actually got published in the sky and telescope so when i left.

cia jim astra photography nasa william shatner leonard twelve inch