18 Burst results for "Silicon Valley Technology"

"silicon valley technology" Discussed on Business Wars

Business Wars

08:42 min | Last month

"silicon valley technology" Discussed on Business Wars

"In our last episode, Tesla grew from a Silicon Valley boutique shop to a potential threat to Detroit. EVs still make up a small percentage of cars sold, but the trendline tells the story. Tesla's market value is way up around $20 billion. That's over 400% from last year. GM is up by 25%. At this rate, Tesla could wipe the floor with GM in a decade. And other major automakers Ford Toyota Nissan Honda and Chevy are taking notes. No one wants to be bringing up the rear. The battle to dominate the EV market is on. After near devastating financial and production issues, Tesla is finally churning out hundreds of its Model S cars every week from its newly acquired 5 acre factory. The facility is on par with any plant in Detroit. But despite the trappings of success, Tesla has serious problems to solve, like how to get cars to the people who want to buy them. And that's something that the traditional automakers with their vast network of dealerships does very, very well. And it will do everything it can to keep that advantage. To overtake Tesla in the EV market. This is episode three. Motor city fights back. It's May 2013, at the Tesla offices in Palo Alto, California. Mister Walters come in. Elon Musk telegraphs disinterest the second he extends his hand to 70 year old Bill Walters. He's chairman of the Texas automobile dealers association, representing 1400 dealers throughout the state. Walters is a gracious Texan, a veteran lobbyist who's seen his share of battles. Mister Musk, well, I'm here to say we want to work with you in Texas. You can do things just as you like. As long as it's legal, you need dealerships. Tesla sells direct using high-tech interactive showrooms. Customers order their cars online, making dealers irrelevant. When Tesla arrived on the scene in 2009, Detroit's thousands of franchise dealers laughed, the tiny company posed no threat. Now, that's changed. Tesla has temporarily sidestepped Texas's anti direct sales law and plans to do the same in other states. And now here's Walters wanting to talk about dealerships. Musk shakes his head at Walter's dismissively. Sorry, but that's not going to work for us. Excuse me? And no one wants to buy it from a price gouging dealer. It's a terrible experience. We were eliminating that. I beg to differ, mister Musk, we had almost 3 million dealers sales in Texas last year now. Listen, I'm unaware. I'm going to spend a $1 billion to beat the U.S. franchise laws. That includes Texas. Walters is shocked. The safety of everyone in Texas depends on the quality control of a dealership network. That's 28 million people. Now this is a system that works. As Walter's waits uncomfortably for a response, Musk doesn't even bother to reply. He pulls out his phone and starts texting. Finally, Walter speaks. So, this is all just about you then. Now it's Musk's turn to be shocked. Few people getting his face like this. Musk stomps out of the room, shouting to an assistant. Hey, get this guy the out of here. Musk can walk out on a meeting, but Tesla is headed for legal confrontations that are more difficult to Dodge. Independent franchise dealers around the country are fighting back. North Carolina is betting a bill to ban Tesla's online sales. Dealers in New York in Massachusetts are threatening to do the same. Virginia won't allow Tesla to open stores period. And if you can't sell your cars, well, you've got a serious problem. It's July 2013, GM's Detroit corporate headquarters. Listen up, people. We're chasing Tesla here, and we've got a job ahead of us. They're already proving to be a big disruptor. Dan akerson stands before the cream of the crop of General Motors young talent. The task force he's assembled to dissect Tesla includes everybody from engineers to managers, to salespeople. A manager speaks up. Tesla is definitely pushing the envelope with a Model S, but is it actually a threat to GM? I mean, it's still essentially a niche company, right? The Model S costs around a $100,000. Now that's a car for rich green tech lovers. Is Joe 6 pack going to buy that? Akerson stares at the manager. I don't want to make the mistakes GM made by underestimating Toyota and Honda. They came up with efficient cars that caught on while we look to the other way. Now guess what? Toyota is the biggest carmaker in the world. That used to be us. Well, what about safety? Those lithium ion batteries are highly susceptible to fire and that 17 inch computer touchscreen mounted there in the dash. That's just an accident waiting to happen. It's like driving around with a laptop. Tesla's screen is not only a web browser. It controls every element of the car from media to energy consumption to navigation. It's pure Silicon Valley technology. And think about this. Tesla says their next model in 2016 will have a driving range of well over 200 miles on a single charge. And it'll sell for under 35,000 bucks. The room is silent. The threat is clear. So I'm asking you, is that even possible? I don't see how. It's way too costly to build an EV with those capabilities. But that's exactly what we need to do. Create an EV with a 200 mile range for around $30,000. We make that and we can kill Tesla. Ackerson pauses in scans the room. We're going to do this. GM is budgeting $7 billion for research and development this year. Let's get our money's worth. It's November 2013 in Washington, D.C.. That's a brand new car. All right, Tesla. Deep within the national highway traffic safety administration offices, two officials are examining cell phone footage of a Model S in flames on a highway outside of Seattle. That thing is really blazing. Oh yeah, the 5 minute having a tough time with it, those lithium ion batteries are flammable as hell. Well, apparently ran over some kind of metal debris in the battery pack exploded. Same as the ones in Tennessee and Mexico. Tesla's worst nightmare has come true. And it's going viral. The company thought it had eliminated the fire danger of the thousands of batteries packed into a Model S they were wrong. It's lucky no one was hurting any of these incidents. We need to conduct a formal investigation before that happens. Well, Elon Musk has already tweeted about all that. He's inviting us to examine the cars. Like we need his invitation,.

Tesla GM Detroit Walters Texas Musk Mister Walters Bill Walters Texas automobile dealers assoc Mister Musk Walter mister Musk Toyota Elon Musk Honda
"silicon valley technology" Discussed on 7 Layers

7 Layers

04:19 min | 1 year ago

"silicon valley technology" Discussed on 7 Layers

"We look at different aspect of technology from literal wires in the ground to switches and routers and all the way up to the exploded amount of smart devices around us. I'm your host. Connor craven associate studios editor at sds central this week. We are getting an experts perspective on secure access services edge in just a moment. You'll hear from paul kohler principal consultant at the silicon valley technology. Alliance if you have to our previous upset the covered. Sassy i suggest to give it a listen it will give you all the basic information acronyms. You'll need to know before jumping into this conversation. I won't hold you any longer. Please enjoy interviewed with paul kohler. Welcome listeners to my interview with principal consultant at the silicon valley technology alliance. Paul kohler we are here today to talk about the technology secure access services edge or sassy for short but before we begin. How are you today. paul Doing very well. Thanks conor could you tell the listeners. A bit about yourself and philipson on where your knowledge on security service edge comes from. Yeah sure sure so So i I worked at cisco three different stints. I've worked. vm-ware also vip tele St wind pioneer and then through of had various different held various different roles Tech support seo sales engineer systems engineer t emmy product manager technology alliance partnerships running partnerships and for the coach. Just over the past year. I've been an independent consultant. I focus on. Sdn and cloud security and network management strategy then that role. I kind of talked various. Different contacts. That i've made the is These various different companies and try and keep on top of old various trends yet your focus on sdn networking security. That all seems to tie pretty well together to make what most people define sassy Speaking speaking of how people define sassy garner defined the technology in twenty nineteen but that definition sort of existed in vacuum. How would you define sassy. Yeah shaw so i think you know. It's it's really primarily two key components one is the security Sort of cloud based security portion and then the other is the actual enforcement portion so a use. Cpa portion so that cloud security portion. I think you know that there's been a lot of sort of disparite Solutions on the security side so like firewall cosby sake And then also you've got ips ideas malware and so long. And you know as as scott. I think correctly sort of defined it You know there's this increasing the more scalable lying rate Security rather than having point products and doing service chaining Just sort of being able to inspect the traffic one single time and also I think having sort of it's it's in a way. It's like applying the principles of st one and two to sassy a to security so meaning that you kind of consolidate your and unify your your policy engine. You'll management in the cloud and then the enforcement in a similar way similar to the sdn model..

Paul kohler paul kohler paul Doing Connor craven today cisco silicon valley technology silicon valley technology alli one this week past year two key components conor one single time twenty nineteen scott sds central three philipson stints
"silicon valley technology" Discussed on The Unmistakable Creative Podcast

The Unmistakable Creative Podcast

08:07 min | 1 year ago

"silicon valley technology" Discussed on The Unmistakable Creative Podcast

"You want to be able to imagine the future will sort of being like. Whole Diagouraga die. Oh my God. Oh, my God. Oh my God everything's terrible. You drive a car. You're really bad person because Dr Howard Abraham Back like Oh my God I have never going to be your friend again. It's a lot like people can get in that mindset you want to. move out of that. And start imagining a hundred years what will do you want. If she want on my favorite things to think of is a world that's covered in green cities, coveted trees. So if you fly a plane over the city, you'd be able to tell the difference between forest city because it would be covered in vegetation. So and that's a real thing that actually has to happen for us to survive. We need will plant plant license cities. So I think about how you know cities would be covered in. Green. And then children grow their own fruit and vegetables at school or maybe every. Just cost mind into an imagination spice with a beautiful future positive reality. And That's a critical thing to do to create. Optimism and vision and to get ideas from. And you know. How to do this since I started doing this why? Whole. Head spice different I used to be able in the way of thinking. It's Kinda how you stop it. We will stop in that and then I started thinking about like how magnified just walk down a city street in just cherry blossoms everywhere and there was hot. There was children playing and they will not cause any more trashy gone extinct and. Every building had a little florist on top of that and that would be amazing I wanNA build and you just get into a completely different head spice and get the positive energy and you saw coming up with ideas in our better better ideas of to And that's kind of the creative loop that you WANNA be in with vision and optimism to change the world. That's you creative spice you WANNA ban and that's why. You Save. The world without entering into credit process. It's one thing. Strini row, and this is the unmistakable creative podcast where you get a window into the stories and insights of the most innovative and creative minds of started movements built driving businesses, written bestselling books and created insanely interesting art for more check out our five hundred episode archive unmistakable creative dot. com. Katie mistake critic thanks so much for taking the time to join us. Thanks so much I'm excited to be here. Yes it is my pleasure heavier. So I came across your story because you wrote in and you sent me a copy of your book how to save the World and I just As I was going to the book, I couldn't help but think, wow, there's so much in here. That is like Super Tactical, actionable and incredibly relevant to create people but. Before we get into all of that I, WanNa start asking where in the world did you grow up what impacted where you grew up and up having on the choices that you've made throughout your life in your? Okay. That's a really big question that I will try and put into a a nutshell I was born in Chicago but moved to Australia to Australian parents as a baby so I'm Jill American strategy on. Citizen, grow up in a lovely paddock struggle the Mornington peninsula. That would probably be like the Santa Rosa equivalent to everybody knows the places in California beautiful natural area and I was very bonded with nature as a child. I loved digital flowers I got roped in a creative hold. My grandparents have German grandparents my grandmother was a fashion designer and my grandfather was a graphic designer and back in those days event illustrating everything you so so my grandmother was A. masterful illustrator, we had to draw the whole figuring in the face and the different poses and my grandfather being a graphic designer back. Then they didn't have computers had to do everything by hand you have to draw the funds they had to. You could paint a photo realistic portrait on. Billboard. And so growing up in the influence, just being able to be technically masterful with Jordan and creativity and making as well because fashioned three dimensional making process that was cool to my upbringing and interested in science. And Engineering and math I sort of had A. Bit of a strength in that. and. Really Interested in science but then as a teenager, I was a teenager in the nineteen. Environmental Activism from. Greenpeace. TACO's groups. But then you know we saw wiles with. Hopkins. In the blood on the news every night, there was the Rwandan massacre and the Ethiopian famine during that time as well. We useful school children on the nightly news every night. On any would hear about. The Amazon being cut down. toxic chemicals ensure those a whole lot of environmental marketing activism going around that time. So as a young thirteen or fourteen year old that really deeply affected me, I was at a sensitive creative child who liked to draw flowers in write poems about wiles, idea of a wild being killed. So upsetting to me or tree being cut down, I was instantly drawn to environmental activism very young in my. In my early adolescence and it just went on from there studied environmental engineering and got into the the technical job of trying to build a sustainable city and was involved with a fringe punk activism as well. But I always had a foot in the real technical business vote of sustainability and ended up taking a stronger pass ended up working corporate sustainability. Saturday on media company. Called Grain Pages in Australia, which ended up being quite a successful ahead about fifteen to twenty fulltime. Please was a really fun time in Australia tried to rape brand sustainability fashionable in aggressive out of the dock ages of lentils dreadlocks. where it was seen as very weird fringe saying I wanted to make it like Chanel. I was like we are GonNa Chanel, this movement really cool methodist cool as Nike. So I, went on this mission to that. That was really fun. And then at media said it moving more towards technology and that really drew me to Silicon Valley in about two thousand ten, I moved here and then I sort of regained by tribe of people the deep nerd state in Silicon Valley. PEOPLE WHO BASTARDS EVERYBODY HAD Something who the obscure with machine learning and the whole kind of the spirit of silicon, valley that energy not just the kind of become a billionaire thing. But the actual notice yet in Silicon Valley I totally resonated with people hooking up senses and measuring things and Riding Code building new frameworks totally resonated with that community. I've been there ever since in that in that same took into the some. This passion for Environmental Data and environmental change. So there's not many people that crossover between. environmental engineering. Environmental Change and the Silicon Valley Technology sang people in Silicon Valley be very much into deep technology. So there's a few of US ran. Also, it's really fascinating to work in nexus between how to actually saved US and how do we use behold silicon, valley technology, and spirit. to do that in my book out of studying net and also studying the behavioral science how you create change because I've been obsessed with how to type the world, my whole life and I I realized there's a huge gap between everybody knows what we have to do. We have to cover the world in solar panels. Yes. We have to stop cutting down the Amazon. Yes. We have to stop taking all the fish out of the ocean, but you know. What nobody? Even at the highest levels of the EPA and the government big prophets will still not how like yeah. Okay. You want to cover the solar panels how and everybody's kind of stumped about how to do it. So we have to look into the next phase is in social influence, and that's where the behavioral sciences really come in. So have Silicon Valley. Hof Science. That's kind of I think environmental changes really at right now that's what by my book. The world.

Silicon Valley Environmental Change Australia wiles Amazon US Silicon Valley Technology Dr Howard Abraham Chicago Hof Science Mornington peninsula Katie Chanel EPA Billboard Santa Rosa TACO Nike
"silicon valley technology" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

03:41 min | 1 year ago

"silicon valley technology" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"Any security is only made by our private placement Memorandum read it first and our III dot net. And then social media has decided to mobilize on behalf of Democrats and the media. Have pushed this alone. Let's make no mistake there is this feedback loop. It exist in the media whereby members of the media so called journalists, actors, activist people like Heaven Roost at The New York Times, People like Kara Swisher at The New York Times, People like juggling gone, but soon will come. They all put out these reports about how social media by being so tolerant toward right wing views has allowed Trump to win. What we near what we need is right there. The McAfee, which is this policy in Germany that bans neo Nazi parties. We need something like that. But for the right, we need to make sure that social media never allows right wing views to be promulgated. And then when people on the right sound off about it, then we say, Well, conservatives keep complaining about social media. Look how they're working The rest. Okay, guys. You've been working the rest. For years. You've been threatening legislation against social media. I've been the one saying I'm against legislation with regard to Social media. And you guys have been pressing for legislation and you've been pushing them not suddenly at all to shut down the methods of distribution for outlets that are not mainstream, quote unquote outlets. If it's not The New York Times, CBS for ABC you wanted done. You're angry about it. When we sound off when we say Hey, look at this. It looks like they're shadow banning us. It looks like they just banned the Twitter accounts of the New York Post for a week and a half. It looks as though you're suppressing our ability to distribute. By the way we compel. You think we can tell our own traffic? We can tell when social media is downgrading us. It's happening this week in real time in the run up to the election. If we complain about it, then we're told. How dare they complain about Social media, So CNN has a piece today say it has a right wing offensive is underway to discredit social media companies just days before the election. What began as complaints about anti conservative censorship by social media companies has now evolved into outright allegations of election interference. Well, I mean, Yes, because you literally said that you would not report any of the 100 Biden allegations pending a fat check. You still have not ruled anything. Falls in the New York Post stories and Twitter is still banned in Europe Post Yes, that his election interference It is over it. It is not covert. It's not subtle. According to CNN. Outside experts have found little evidence to support claims of widespread, systematic political bias in Silicon Valley's technology. But the conservative allegations are an explosive charge in a dramatic escalation ahead of election Day. Okay, so this is hilarious, and now they're taking the perspective that Silicon Valley is not biased against conservatives. Okay, But you're simultaneously arguing in places like CNN and The New York Times that Silicon Valley is biased in favor of conservatives. I can't tell you the number of pieces that have been written over the course of the last six months about how daily wear is bad evil because we are highly trafficked on Facebook. What you will see is people putting out these charts suggesting that our engagement daily wire is really, really high on Facebook, right? Right. Good headlines. That's why, but apparently it's because social media is biased in favor of daily wire. I'm sure that's what's happening. And that's exactly what's happening. There's only one problem. It is a lie. Okay, so I wouldn't go through this for a second cause. It's actually important by using this lie. By promulgating this lie. The media have created the feedback loop. Here's how the Lou goes in your time claims Social media is biased against conservatives. Then social media in obeisance to The New York Times. Says. Okay, we're going to downgrade social conservatives. Then conservatives say you're downgrading us, then the media say, Look in these paranoid conservatives saying that they're being downgraded. How dare they? How dare they? And then they say, Look at these right wing sites. You know, you can tell they're bad, even super tell their bad because they keep repeating each other's messages since his whole loop. It's this whole circular logic bullcrap. A little more on that in a moment, But first policy genius needs to tell you about something important..

The New York Times New York Post CNN Facebook Twitter Democrats Kara Swisher McAfee Trump Germany Europe Biden Lou CBS ABC
"silicon valley technology" Discussed on Abiding In God's Grace Ministries

Abiding In God's Grace Ministries

05:47 min | 1 year ago

"silicon valley technology" Discussed on Abiding In God's Grace Ministries

"And you'll pay in suffer in the long run I promise. Virtually identical to the socialist universal basic income idea on which Andrew Union based his failed presidential run. Norway Mongolia Islam Republic of Iran Finland Alaska Iran and Kenya have already tried this universal basic income better known as YOU BE I. And failed yet. Our government tells us that this. Universal basic income concept was created in thought of with us the people in mind because of the crisis in atrocities that have happened from this covert nineteen. Yet. When you do actual research, you'll find that this concept of you by of the universal basic income has literally been around. Since the sixteenth century. However, advocates like tech billionaire. Mark Zuckerberg to libertarian economist Milton Friedman. Have and are endorsing the UB universal basic. Income. Did you know that here in the United States of America, their current projects and stopped in California and they're in the midst of an eighteen month experiment five, hundred dollars a month to one hundred, twenty, five people money comes from individual and foundation philanthropy with the initial one, million dollars in funding coming from the economic security project. Canada did the B. I between nineteen, seventy, four and nineteen, seventy nine and they tried it again in two thousand seventeen for three years but they cancelled the project and cut it short in two, thousand and eighteen. Brazil is experimenting with a lot lately, but let's stick to the UB. Brazil. Has Been experimenting with universal basic income since the nineteen hundreds. Germany started universal basic income experimenting in two, thousand fourteen and by the end of two, thousand and nineteen, they kicked off another project form of you nine of EUBOEA. In two thousand and seventeen Netherlands kept off a universal basic income experiment and it still running now. Iran started Thir- universal basic income project in two thousand eleven and it still running now. Can you started third universal basic income experiment in two thousand and Sixteen for twelve years and it is still currently running. Nambia started their universal basic income experiment between two, thousand, eight, and two, thousand, and nine. India started their universal basic income between two thousand eleven in two, thousand and twelve. China's started their universal basic income experiment in two thousand eleven and it only lasted one year however, they did revive their experiment back in two thousand eighteen. Now as of June fifteenth two. Thousand and twenty Spain's Government started the world's biggest universal basic income experiment thus far. Scotland United Kingdom and Canada yet again are discussing and planning their experiments for you bi now. Members of Silicon Valley technology including Elon Musk in mark. Zuckerberg enthusiastically endorse you be I which is universal basic income go figure. In Germany has begun, it's universal.

Iran Mark Zuckerberg Germany Canada Brazil Elon Musk Andrew Union Norway Scotland United Kingdom United States Kenya Milton Friedman EUBOEA Nambia California India Finland China Spain Netherlands
"silicon valley technology" Discussed on Venture Stories

Venture Stories

10:58 min | 2 years ago

"silicon valley technology" Discussed on Venture Stories

"The I think some of it is like Charlie Munger whereas this idea of of liking the thing that you have irrationally so and so I think some of that comes up when you Kinda give people the the instructions sort of transfer shares but we ended up. We ended up spending a ton of time in a ton of capital on it. We never even launched it Because we just didn't want to do something that we didn't feel like was going to be successful exist in some form it's in soon or do do you think it's for the reasons you mentioned kind of during challenging and I think that the one of the big changes you've seen in the last five or so years as a company starts to work. There is a reasonable secondary market in once a company hits escape velocity generally. They're stapling primary and secondary together and so there are more opportunities to take five or ten percent of your position -sition off which is coming becoming much more mainstream and sort of how the late stage markets all do is like that by the way. Do you enable that to courage that you are you against that to have a view on. No I think I mean I think that oftentimes some amount of secondary allows a founder to continue to take the risk inherent in building a business that have by nature here for the first time and to continue to push and to scale. I think the when when you start looking at not even so much. The percentage of their ownership I think but just the amounts of wealth comes off. Sometimes it can. It can create some perverse incentives or otherwise change the the mindset of a given founder. But I think for the most part were very supportive of founders. Doing something in the later stages where they're able to get some liquidity and there's no reason that the people should be living with tremendous stress and that the ups and downs of their company should flow over to the the overall economic wellbeing. Oh being of their their family totally so do do you think there's other ways to get liquidity or other ways to prevent us to diversify which will get discounting in a second but do you think you'd ever work with employees play Putin I think it's challenging when you actually look at what has to happen for any of it to be meaningful and so I think the more and more you shrink your ownership position the more and more challenging it becomes and I think the the odd thing about certain anytime you diversify is the people that are thrilled that they did it are in are in the situation Asian where the company didn't work and the people that are very frustrated. They did it in the one that did work as human beings are just fundamentally rational about that in some ways. Do you WANNA create this employee pulling entity that all the most quote successful high impact people and employees companies or whatever felt like. This was not a good idea. The end the ones that the there's just a lot of pragmatic issues that I think make it very hard. So the the biggest one for me is is one of the massive benefits that we talked about with the Exchange Fund was not so much diversification across a given cohort of companies. But across time. And so you'd say gamma founder. I'm just starting but I get a small piece of someone who's four years in and potentially sort of headed towards an exit when I'm raising my series and so now you start to get a little bit of time. Diversification in addition to spreading across multiple equity slices from different companies. And so. I think that the the the really hard thing about that is is somebody has to start it. And it's one of those ideas that I think similar to some other businesses. Where you'd say wants everyone does it? It's a wonderful idea. But until everyone does it an existence proof exactly and and so I think the getting and particularly to the problem of for people whose company is working there much likely to want to jump in and participate and those tend to be the more more mature companies that are successful that you need to participate in order to draw everyone else in and so I think you have this problem the cold start problem with this. Tremendous my my question and I've been looking into like quadrajet. Voting crag finance so maybe mechanisms by which people agree. It would only happen. which if all people agreed in the first place? But I'm just interested in a broader question of would we have more founders wonders if it was somehow less direct to be a founder if founders could approach some of the you know portfolio diversification that. VC's get or now. I don't I think I think right now with in today's market with the access to capital that we've seen and the ability for people to to raise money assuming access which is a whole social question and that we can get into but but I think there's lots of problems but I think that for for the people who are starting companies today access to the capital to start them and the ability to have a salary in the perception. Shen of risk I think is on the on the lower end Also I think is there's more ups and downs in volatility in large companies. You know you could say okay. Okay if I'm a technologist could go work for a division of a very large tech company or I can start a company and in either case you probably have two to three years of working on a certain problem before there might be changes that are outside your control and so I actually think that the while the perception of risk for starting a company broadly across across the economy is pretty high. I think for people who are in the startup world or in the broader Silicon Valley Technology Road I think startups relative of risk in starting a company versus Being working at one is is not that great and we actually see one of the challenges that we see in. Today's market is people. We'll believing that they can just start a company and then raising money before they really done the work to define the company and the product and the customer and I think not realizing some of the risk that brings on in terms of once you raise money kind of your now running at a target relative to when you decide you're going to explore an idea you have a tremendous amount of leeway away and surface area to navigate in order to figure out whereas whereas best opportunity and do you do both do you invest in people who are. I don't even know my idea. I'm I'm super eleven days zero or do you typically invested. Hey We know are going. We're not yet so so I think I think that companies have four stages so there's and we do well into so the first is the inspiration phase where you say. I'm gonNA leave Google facebook. Whatever I'm going to start a business and it's going to be in in the healthcare space right and you're on a journey of discovery and actually think other than very specific angels with domain expertise investors investors at that stage are usually not super helpful and probably forced you to lock onto ideas before you're ready and force you to move forward when actually we should be doing is broadening so they force go deeper when you should have broadening and that's the inspiration phase as as you start to learn more about your market and you define your customer and you've sat with them and you understand their pain point and you understand the problem? They have the way. It's currently being solved the solution you can bring the market how you solve it. I think now you're in this aspiration phase where you kind of defined your Northstar and you don't know how you're going to get there. You may don't even know the team that's going to help carry their and you probably haven't built a product that even starts you along that path but you've set you've identified done the work identify Northstar. You understand the market. You'll understand the customer and you have some sense of the value you want to deliver and you have this aspiration and I think that we are very very good. Engaging with you there as you work your way through the aspiration phase you move At the beginning everything due net new. It's not repeatable in the Paul Graham parlance the things that don't scale right. And you move through the aspiration phase you start recognizing what works and what doesn't and you're going through that build break learn cycle of product creation nation and of company creation and evolution as a founder and growth. And at some point you flip over into doing more things that are repeatable and marginally improving them to make them more efficient efficient and fewer and fewer things that are net new to the business. And you move from aspiration to operation and now you're trying to figure out that Wash Rinse repeat cycle and make your operation as efficient as possible so to do fewer and fewer things but create more and more value with high leverage. And we're very good as you evolve into that operation face and then once you have of Wash Rinse repeat or if you put a dollar one end you get a dollar plus x out the back. That's when you're ready for scale and that's were probably not so good at that either so I think in the in the early sort of journey of discovery. My view is investors. Aren't super helpful. I think in the aspiration and operation phase. I think we can be tremendously helpful helpful and you can get a lot of leverage from the community that we've built in the way we think about helping you have the context necessary to make your best decisions and then when it comes time for scale you having engine that works and you just need to pour fuel into that engine and I think there's lots of options for that. He either built out this amazing platform fifteen year run a great companies. Great Track Record I think you're the best in America right now. My my question surely debated this. Here's where you need it on the why you didn't pursue these past so one is doing survey Tuesday you why. Why couldn't you compete with the best firms out there and the other Who Given their recent strategies we do? Okay makes sense of moving early. The other is why. Why not You already have his platform. Why not an accelerator redoing advocate for seven percent. And you're doing many more companies and you scale at the platform the network effects. You guys stay true to what you do why. Not Besides Focus Blah Blah Blah which which is true. But I'm curious how you thought about those conversations. I think I think it for for the team and we leadership team the way we think about the product and the customer that serving has over time. I think we've we've built an understanding of that customer and I think that we have a very specific point of view on the products that that that customer needs and a way of delivering that that value to them and I think every time we look and say should we should we somehow rod nat. Should we move into this gap in the market or or some other opportunity. We always think the trade off between the value. Focus as you're saying and sort of our ability to continue to deliver. The product continued to evolve. Continued to experiment and make sure we don't become static in our core verses the potential value in some of these other areas that trade off has so far has has never been worth it and it doesn't mean that you know over the long course of first-round as a firm and hopefully it's a it's a professional institution that point there might not be other ways but so far we've looked look there's been so much opportunity within the core seed investing landscaping and even more brothers looking at early stage and how we can engage with the founder and build build wonderful partnerships with them that sort of moving into different methods of product. Delivery a haven't been appealing. I think a lot of hinges on tweeting we can be exceptional sexual at something and I think when we talk about different directions to go the bar is pretty high and I think you would see us change. Our strategy wind the aperture even more which which we have a lot in terms of if you look at the range of check sizes we write that SORTA dramatically changed from five or even five years ago. I'm GonNa go with his wet and now it's five years ago. The average check size was under a million dollars. Maybe seven hundred fifty eight eight.

founder Charlie Munger Exchange Fund Northstar Google Putin gamma America Paul Graham
"silicon valley technology" Discussed on Venture Stories

Venture Stories

10:58 min | 2 years ago

"silicon valley technology" Discussed on Venture Stories

"The I think some of it is like Charlie Munger whereas this idea of of liking the thing that you have irrationally so and so I think some of that comes up when you Kinda give people the the instructions sort of transfer shares but we ended up. We ended up spending a ton of time in a ton of capital on it. We never even launched it Because we just didn't want to do something that we didn't feel like was going to be successful exist in some form it's in soon or do do you think it's for the reasons you mentioned kind of during challenging and I think that the one of the big changes you've seen in the last five or so years as a company starts to work. There is a reasonable secondary market in once a company hits escape velocity generally. They're stapling primary and secondary together and so there are more opportunities to take five or ten percent of your position -sition off which is coming becoming much more mainstream and sort of how the late stage markets all do is like that by the way. Do you enable that to courage that you are you against that to have a view on. No I think I mean I think that oftentimes some amount of secondary allows a founder to continue to take the risk inherent in building a business that have by nature here for the first time and to continue to push and to scale. I think the when when you start looking at not even so much. The percentage of their ownership I think but just the amounts of wealth comes off. Sometimes it can. It can create some perverse incentives or otherwise change the the mindset of a given founder. But I think for the most part were very supportive of founders. Doing something in the later stages where they're able to get some liquidity and there's no reason that the people should be living with tremendous stress and that the ups and downs of their company should flow over to the the overall economic wellbeing. Oh being of their their family totally so do do you think there's other ways to get liquidity or other ways to prevent us to diversify which will get discounting in a second but do you think you'd ever work with employees play Putin I think it's challenging when you actually look at what has to happen for any of it to be meaningful and so I think the more and more you shrink your ownership position the more and more challenging it becomes and I think the the odd thing about certain anytime you diversify is the people that are thrilled that they did it are in are in the situation Asian where the company didn't work and the people that are very frustrated. They did it in the one that did work as human beings are just fundamentally rational about that in some ways. Do you WANNA create this employee pulling entity that all the most quote successful high impact people and employees companies or whatever felt like. This was not a good idea. The end the ones that the there's just a lot of pragmatic issues that I think make it very hard. So the the biggest one for me is is one of the massive benefits that we talked about with the Exchange Fund was not so much diversification across a given cohort of companies. But across time. And so you'd say gamma founder. I'm just starting but I get a small piece of someone who's four years in and potentially sort of headed towards an exit when I'm raising my series and so now you start to get a little bit of time. Diversification in addition to spreading across multiple equity slices from different companies. And so. I think that the the the really hard thing about that is is somebody has to start it. And it's one of those ideas that I think similar to some other businesses. Where you'd say wants everyone does it? It's a wonderful idea. But until everyone does it an existence proof exactly and and so I think the getting and particularly to the problem of for people whose company is working there much likely to want to jump in and participate and those tend to be the more more mature companies that are successful that you need to participate in order to draw everyone else in and so I think you have this problem the cold start problem with this. Tremendous my my question and I've been looking into like quadrajet. Voting crag finance so maybe mechanisms by which people agree. It would only happen. which if all people agreed in the first place? But I'm just interested in a broader question of would we have more founders wonders if it was somehow less direct to be a founder if founders could approach some of the you know portfolio diversification that. VC's get or now. I don't I think I think right now with in today's market with the access to capital that we've seen and the ability for people to to raise money assuming access which is a whole social question and that we can get into but but I think there's lots of problems but I think that for for the people who are starting companies today access to the capital to start them and the ability to have a salary in the perception. Shen of risk I think is on the on the lower end Also I think is there's more ups and downs in volatility in large companies. You know you could say okay. Okay if I'm a technologist could go work for a division of a very large tech company or I can start a company and in either case you probably have two to three years of working on a certain problem before there might be changes that are outside your control and so I actually think that the while the perception of risk for starting a company broadly across across the economy is pretty high. I think for people who are in the startup world or in the broader Silicon Valley Technology Road I think startups relative of risk in starting a company versus Being working at one is is not that great and we actually see one of the challenges that we see in. Today's market is people. We'll believing that they can just start a company and then raising money before they really done the work to define the company and the product and the customer and I think not realizing some of the risk that brings on in terms of once you raise money kind of your now running at a target relative to when you decide you're going to explore an idea you have a tremendous amount of leeway away and surface area to navigate in order to figure out whereas whereas best opportunity and do you do both do you invest in people who are. I don't even know my idea. I'm I'm super eleven days zero or do you typically invested. Hey We know are going. We're not yet so so I think I think that companies have four stages so there's and we do well into so the first is the inspiration phase where you say. I'm gonNA leave Google facebook. Whatever I'm going to start a business and it's going to be in in the healthcare space right and you're on a journey of discovery and actually think other than very specific angels with domain expertise investors investors at that stage are usually not super helpful and probably forced you to lock onto ideas before you're ready and force you to move forward when actually we should be doing is broadening so they force go deeper when you should have broadening and that's the inspiration phase as as you start to learn more about your market and you define your customer and you've sat with them and you understand their pain point and you understand the problem? They have the way. It's currently being solved the solution you can bring the market how you solve it. I think now you're in this aspiration phase where you kind of defined your Northstar and you don't know how you're going to get there. You may don't even know the team that's going to help carry their and you probably haven't built a product that even starts you along that path but you've set you've identified done the work identify Northstar. You understand the market. You'll understand the customer and you have some sense of the value you want to deliver and you have this aspiration and I think that we are very very good. Engaging with you there as you work your way through the aspiration phase you move At the beginning everything due net new. It's not repeatable in the Paul Graham parlance the things that don't scale right. And you move through the aspiration phase you start recognizing what works and what doesn't and you're going through that build break learn cycle of product creation nation and of company creation and evolution as a founder and growth. And at some point you flip over into doing more things that are repeatable and marginally improving them to make them more efficient efficient and fewer and fewer things that are net new to the business. And you move from aspiration to operation and now you're trying to figure out that Wash Rinse repeat cycle and make your operation as efficient as possible so to do fewer and fewer things but create more and more value with high leverage. And we're very good as you evolve into that operation face and then once you have of Wash Rinse repeat or if you put a dollar one end you get a dollar plus x out the back. That's when you're ready for scale and that's were probably not so good at that either so I think in the in the early sort of journey of discovery. My view is investors. Aren't super helpful. I think in the aspiration and operation phase. I think we can be tremendously helpful helpful and you can get a lot of leverage from the community that we've built in the way we think about helping you have the context necessary to make your best decisions and then when it comes time for scale you having engine that works and you just need to pour fuel into that engine and I think there's lots of options for that. He either built out this amazing platform fifteen year run a great companies. Great Track Record I think you're the best in America right now. My my question surely debated this. Here's where you need it on the why you didn't pursue these past so one is doing survey Tuesday you why. Why couldn't you compete with the best firms out there and the other Who Given their recent strategies we do? Okay makes sense of moving early. The other is why. Why not You already have his platform. Why not an accelerator redoing advocate for seven percent. And you're doing many more companies and you scale at the platform the network effects. You guys stay true to what you do why. Not Besides Focus Blah Blah Blah which which is true. But I'm curious how you thought about those conversations. I think I think it for for the team and we leadership team the way we think about the product and the customer that serving has over time. I think we've we've built an understanding of that customer and I think that we have a very specific point of view on the products that that that customer needs and a way of delivering that that value to them and I think every time we look and say should we should we somehow rod nat. Should we move into this gap in the market or or some other opportunity. We always think the trade off between the value. Focus as you're saying and sort of our ability to continue to deliver. The product continued to evolve. Continued to experiment and make sure we don't become static in our core verses the potential value in some of these other areas that trade off has so far has has never been worth it and it doesn't mean that you know over the long course of first-round as a firm and hopefully it's a it's a professional institution that point there might not be other ways but so far we've looked look there's been so much opportunity within the core seed investing landscaping and even more brothers looking at early stage and how we can engage with the founder and build build wonderful partnerships with them that sort of moving into different methods of product. Delivery a haven't been appealing. I think a lot of hinges on tweeting we can be exceptional sexual at something and I think when we talk about different directions to go the bar is pretty high and I think you would see us change. Our strategy wind the aperture even more which which we have a lot in terms of if you look at the range of check sizes we write that SORTA dramatically changed from five or even five years ago. I'm GonNa go with his wet and now it's five years ago. The average check size was under a million dollars. Maybe seven hundred fifty eight eight.

founder Charlie Munger Exchange Fund Northstar Google Putin gamma America Paul Graham
"silicon valley technology" Discussed on Sustainability Explored

Sustainability Explored

09:09 min | 2 years ago

"silicon valley technology" Discussed on Sustainability Explored

"So my guest bread Koukoulas. How're you today? Brett doing great. Thanks for having mood. It's so nice to finally get to speak to you. You get to work with a very controversial topic nuclear energy. Can you tell us? Where is it going today? And what are you as Managing Director of Energy Epoch Center? You know it's funny. I actually don't think it's that controversial in some circles you know when debating I amongst the very rich in the world who have the luxury of choosing whatever energy source they want and paying for more expensive entered if they want and growing up in an era. Where you know. A lot of the elite may have talked badly about nuclear. I think some some those people might think it's controversial but I think for the majority of the World. The world just needs energy so badly that they don't even think of nuclear is controversial. Just think of it as a potential way for them to access energy. That's what I thought you know. I was thinking it's controversial to me personally but maybe I'm just implying my views on other people. The reason why I ask I mentioned a little bit in the injured two weeks ago. I attended very nice intensive seminar on energy transition and climate change when we spoke about alternative energies end where the world is moving. The pricing for alternative energy in the world and nuclear was not mentioned. So I might just you know. At some point the world just turned. It's back to to the nuclear saying. No no it's too dangerous to us. Let's just completely switch so especially this year was the HBO Chernobyl reach it. Brought back again. This narrative of cades probably cheap. It's probably controllable but it's it's still very much connected to to Environmental and social you know accidents so the damage is still fresh in the minds of people. That's why I was thinking you know you. As a promoter of nuclear energy cheat what do you get to hear the most? Are People draw or against well first off clarify? I'm a promoter of anything that can solve climate change and after running the math. And that's what my organization. The Energy Peck Center does where Research Center based at in Washington. Dc my former life is a Silicon Valley Technology entrepreneur and I thought to take the same mathematical tools that I applied to technology and bring them to the nonprofit space and so when we looked at which energy sources were capable of actually reversing climate change not just slowing down new emissions which doesn't do anything to reverse climate change. You need to pull carbon from the air. The only energy source that's capable of doing that is nuclear energy. So that's why we focus almost exclusively on nuclear energy throughout our exploration. We spent last two years meeting with experts throughout the nuclear space and we found virtually everything that we thought to be backwards of what we started thinking about. The safety concerns about the weapons concerns about the waste concerns literally you know. I grew up probably with the same understanding that you did. And what we learned in these last two years the exact opposite. Can you expand a little bit more? What is the exact opposite and I personally still don't get what is pulling carbon from the air. We'll start with a carbon from the EPA. 'cause that's probably the most important you see the carbon that we have in the air the four hundred parts per million right this is what captures the extra will anything above three hundred parts per million. You're going to be adding heat to the system year over year over year so even if we went zero emissions tomorrow that's an every single sector industry transportation electricity. Heat everything everything zero right. That's the goal zero. That wouldn't do anything at all. We would still have the four hundred parts per million in the air which means we have a three watts per square meter radiative forcing the extra she'd that we and the Earth would still get hotter and hotter year-over-year. There'd be nothing salt if we went. Zero new emissions so with the goal is to actually go negative emissions we need to pull the thousands guitar of Co two that we put in the air or last two hundred years. We need to pull that out. And the tricky part is that's going to require a lot of energy. And every energy sources including solar panels wind turbines everything nuclear everything has a carbon footprint so your carbon footprint has to be so low that the energy you produces capable of not only pulling out your carbon from the air but all the other carbon from the air as well and that's where nuclear is the only one that fits that mathematical requirements and. We're still talking. The how does the technology look like? Are we still talking about the energy blogs like the must probably familiar picture would be the one from the F. B. O. T. V. series of Chernobyl? Or is it something else simple smaller something more controlled? What are the conditions will nuclear? It doesn't really matter what the nuclear looks like. The nuclear is just would power the system to remove carbon from the air. The systems removed the carton from the air. We probably be a bunch of giant fans. Some chemical solvents in order to remove co two. But you still need energy to do that. And so energy any new type of nuclear energy source could be possible to do this. At their many different types. The type see-saw Ternopil where essentially giant graphite blocks the reason you don't Wanna use those is because in the case of an accident. They can go super-critical right and they can also catch on fire which would spread radioactive material. That's the RBMK graphite reactor that the Soviet Union belt most reactors in the world out of the four hundred fifty reactors in the world. Four hundred of them are based on. Water is just a giant trouble water with some hot metal rods in them and so in the case of an accident. You wouldn't have the same conditions that you had Chernobyl. You just have a bunch of hot metal rods. The boil off some water and they turned into a puddle on the ground. And that would be. It still is very different than we've seen portrayed onto it and how about waste. What can be the residuals of such a system because it's still a bit concerned in the narrative discussions that are woke ler. Yes so this is one of the things that we learned early on just totally backwards like we couldn't believe that we were so wrong about nuclear waste now turns out that out of all of the radioisotopes that nuclear energy produces efficient process and produces hundreds of different isotopes which are radioactive for different periods of time and are different elements in order for it to be dangerous to humans right. They need to be able to burst. Move through the environment right because if something is dangerous but it doesn't get to you that interest to you and it needs to be able to be absorbed by the human body. There many toxins that we bring into our body. Every single day for instance. There's chlorine in drinking water right but including the glass of chlorine would kill you but the chlorine that we purposefully added to our drinking water doesn't why is that you need to have a certain level of concentration dosage so out of all of those radio-isotopes in the waste there's only one that can both accumulate to toxic dosage and travel through the environment and that one radio isotope is is seen one thirty one CA. Now here's the thing about item thirty one. It only has a half-life of eight dates which means that within a month it's ninety four percent gone within another month. That's entirely gone okay. So the only part of nuclear waste. That was dangerous is gone within a few months. Nuclear waste isn't really a hazard to human health. We still characterize it that way. The government still controls it that way but it is not a medical hazards. I can't help but notice that you speak like a real. Scientists them no cameras. There have life of iodine the these many aces by the number of identified reminds me. You know my parents were teenagers when Chernobyl exploded and they told me a story. How in their schools the teachers were Putin Dine. The this little what is it called bottles of iodine. Open the windows at the entries over to their classrooms but it was not that type of iodine so that they thought they would help can reduce the radiation level in through a speaking of of this. What does your bed? Crohn's how come you're so knowledgeable in this topic specifically later on the Radio Ready Shifts topic. Thank you flatter me but my background is as a mechanical engineer. So nothing chemistry related you know and I used to run a technology company so I have a little bit of business sense to but as I started the energy impact center I.

Energy Epoch Center Energy Peck Center Managing Director Brett Crohn Soviet Union Dc Putin EPA Washington F. B. O. T.
"silicon valley technology" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

06:42 min | 2 years ago

"silicon valley technology" Discussed on KGO 810

"I'm John that's with North China. discussing the threat represented by the Chinese Communist Party. and I thriller novel which is column red China but I understand I've got to be fancy about this the Chinese Communist Party and its business plan of theft piracy is an old fashioned word these last twenty five years of the Chinese miracle and know where have they stolen more effectively than in technology especially Silicon Valley technology we welcome Brendan why could of the why could report to comment on the top of the tower of stealing technology which is artificial intelligence Brendan a very good evening to you I read from a news report in these last hours that U. S. senators bipartisan for senators have warned the US export controls may not be strong enough to stop China acquiring quote security sensitive technologies I'm quote through Hong Kong as as the trump administration to review the laws branded in general and a lot playa to a I directly does the US have good security about our best technology from China does it exist or the Chinese still coming in here like where candy store and taking what they want good evening. thank you for having me well it's so that's a that's a couple of questions first of all in general our security is porous to say the least we certainly have things like the committee for investment in the United States and see if I you what city is we have which which create sort of governmental safeguards are supposed to at least that would prevent a potential rival like China from getting a hold of proprietary advanced technologies so far since this is been very effective in preventing China from acquiring things like indigenous semiconductor capabilities they keep trying to buy semiconductor plants in the United States are and then they're even looking at Canada now and so there are things we've done and we've created but they are as with many so so many things they're good ideas but they are not exactly holistic defense of the sort that we need they have prevented certain transfers but those don't go nearly enough and obviously as we as I've spoken about with you before my concern actually is more with the voluntary technological transfers from advanced US tech firms in Silicon Valley over to you know the Chinese space because China has this ability to woo US tech firms to come over to their neighborhood and when the US tech firms get there as a manufacturing firms found out over the last two two or three decades doing business in China once they're over there the Chinese tend to sort of nationalize on some level or to simply steel and then replicate the capabilities that the advanced tech firms from the west will bring in and they'll build indigenous capacity that way so we do have some defenses and like I said surface is done a very good job so far preventing certain forms of. tech transfer but what we really need to look at also is the voluntary transfer and something that I think we should do is make any kind of advance voluntary tech transfer from our private sector to a Chinese company or doing business over there we should actually file that under a international corruption charge and that'll stop those businesses for being so willing to do that. so Brandon to be clear about fifty years Hey Brandon a city is actually only applies related to the acquisition of direct acquisition by a foreign company country of a U. S. business what it does not look at and this is what I think you were referring to is that if you have a U. S. company transferring technology pursuant to for instance a license or some certain the sort of cooperative research project there you can have significant leakages of technology which are not going to be rescued by any sort of government body and this is where we really need to have new legislation and before that an emergency order from the president stopping these transfers of tax and that's why I think one of the things we can look at is is logging any of those kind of transfers as a violation of international corrupt practices and just tell those businesses get con get Congress to do it they say Hey look if you're gonna do this you're going to be a violation and you're going to get fined or you know your answers can be some serious liability criminal or or or. I do indeed lodged against your firm and that'll probably slow at least half of those transfers down because those companies are not going to want to have to be being you know financially for by the government for doing that but you're absolutely right yes I would be I'd talk about acquisitions in the United States was surface and that there is a huge gap in our ability to stop the transfer that yes absolutely. I I hear the big headline China and the U. S. are in a race for a I but there many more countries involved the United Kingdom has a very good research and very good development so do other parts of Europe what what it comes to this is report nature magazine is that the Chinese are hobbled in fact there probably permanently damaged because they're unwilling to share in the protocols that have been created for A. I. researchers the one that can handle is transparency because their their program is military and their program involves stealing technology so they can't really participate at as an equal in a all. yeah that's true you know I really I have a bit of a split opinion thirty seconds for your go ahead but it is true but China has proven very adept at using the promise of greater you know lucrative business deals in China tip to woo certain less than savory actors in the wax to come over and open their crown jewels you know for the promise of some trinket the cell it's true the transparency issues a huge problem for them but I'm like the Soviet Union of old China is integrated heavily into the world economy and you know I think that the United States is going to have to be a lot tougher than it already is on the high tech side do what we're doing with Arabs you know right now. why because of the lack of report Gordon Chang.

China Chinese Communist Party. United States North China. United Kingdom nature magazine Europe Gordon Chang Soviet Union twenty five years thirty seconds three decades fifty years
"silicon valley technology" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

06:42 min | 2 years ago

"silicon valley technology" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"I'm John that's what's going Chang. discussing the threat represented by the Chinese Communist Party. in a thriller novel which is column red China but I understand I've got to be fancy about this the Chinese Communist Party and its business plan of theft piracy is an old fashioned word these last twenty five years of the Chinese miracle and know where have they stolen more effectively than in technology especially Silicon Valley technology we welcome Brendan why could of the why could report to comment on the top of the top of stealing technology which is artificial intelligence Brendan a very good evening to you I read from a news report in these last hours that U. S. senators bipartisan for senators have worn the U. S. export controls may not be strong enough to stop China acquiring quote security sensitive technologies I'm quote through Hong Kong as as the trump administration to review the laws branded in general and a lot of play to a I directly does the US have good security about our best technology from China does it exist or the Chinese still coming in here like where candy store and taking what they want good evening. thank you for having me well it's complex question so first of all in general our security is porous to say the least we certainly have things like the committee for investment in the United States and see if I you at fifty years we have which which create sort of governmental safeguards are supposed to at least that would prevent a potential rival like China from getting a hold of proprietary advanced technologies so far since he is has been very effective in preventing China from acquiring things like indigenous semiconductor capabilities they keep trying to buy semiconductor plants in the United States are and then they're even looking at Canada now and so there are things we've done we've created but they are as with many so so many things they're good ideas but they are not exactly holistic defense of the sort that we need they have prevented certain transfers but those don't go nearly enough and obviously as we as I've spoken about with you before my concern actually is more with the voluntary technological transfers from advanced US tech firms in Silicon Valley over to you know the Chinese space because China has this ability to woo US tech firms to come over to their neighborhood and when the US tech firms get there as the manufacturing firms found out over the last two two or three decades doing business in China once they're over there the Chinese tend to sort of nationalize on some level or to simply steel and then replicate the capabilities that the advanced tech firms from the west will bring in and they'll build indigenous capacity that way so we do have some defenses and like I said surfaces done a very good job so far preventing certain forms of to. transfer but what we really need to look at also is the voluntary transference of that I think we should do is make any kind of advance voluntary tech transfer from our private sector to a Chinese company or doing business over there we should actually file that under a international corruption charge and that'll stop those businesses for being so willing to do that. so Brandon to be clear fifty years Hey Brandon city is actually only applies really to the acquisition the direct application by a foreign contact the country of a U. S. business what it does not look at and this is what I think you were referring to is that if you have a U. S. company transferring technology pursuant to for instance a license or some sort of the sort of cooperative research project there you can have significant leakages of technology which are not going to be rescued by any sort of government body and this is where we really need to have new legislation and before that an emergency order from the president stopping these transfers of tech that's why I think one of the things we can look at his his logging any of those kind of transfers as a violation of international corrupt practices and just tell those businesses get current get Congress to do it they say Hey look if you're gonna do this you're going to be a violation and you're going to get fined or you know there's gonna be some serious liability criminal or or or. I do indeed lodged against your firm and that'll probably slow at least half of those transfers down because those companies are not going to want to have to be detained you know financially for by the government for doing that but you're absolutely right yes I would get our talk about acquisitions in the United States was fiftieth and that there is a huge gap in our ability to stop the transfer that yes absolutely. I I hear the big headline China and the U. S. or in a race for a I but there many more countries involved the United Kingdom has a very good research and very good development several other parts of Europe what what it comes to this is report nature magazine is that the Chinese are hobbled in fact there probably permanently damaged because they're unwilling to share in the protocols that have been created for A. I. researchers the one that can handle is transparency. because their their program is military and their program involves stealing technology so they can't really participate at as an equal in a are. yeah that's true you know I really I have a bit of a split opinion on thirty seconds for your go ahead but it is true but China has proven very adept at using the promise of greater you know lucrative business deals in China tip to woo certain less than savory actors in the wax to come over and open their crown jewels you know for the promise of some trinket himself it's true the transparency issues a huge problem for them but like the Soviet Union of old China is integrated heavily into the world economy and you know I think that the United States is going to have to be a lot tougher than it already is on the high tech side do what we're doing with terrible you know right now. one third of the why can report Gordon Chang I'm John.

China Chinese Communist Party. United States Chang. United Kingdom nature magazine Europe Gordon Chang Soviet Union fifty years twenty five years thirty seconds three decades
"silicon valley technology" Discussed on AM 1350 WEZS

AM 1350 WEZS

08:22 min | 3 years ago

"silicon valley technology" Discussed on AM 1350 WEZS

"It's snowing in Texas right now we have three inches of the white stuff no I'm sorry I figured if you believe that nothing was fishy with Jeffrey apps dean suicide you would buy the snows story Hey everybody K. Delaney and this is where we start I talk about the show is being the buzz in your backyard and mine I've never seen so many people who could care less about some rich financier and his tawdry sick wife I can I've never ever seen so many people talking about drug trafficking sex trafficking sexual abuse related to one man that I have in the last three days in my entire life because people were appalled by it people in small towns people in big cities people in every nook and cranny where they heard the little blip that yeah Jeffrey F. steam he pled guilty to state charges soliciting in procuring a person under eighteen for prostitution basically had a Country Club time of it and then he finally gets a federal charge a couple of them slams Adam he tries to commit suicide in a Manhattan jail and then the sixty six year old who had been placed on suicide watch less than three weeks after being found itself bruises on his neck killed himself supposedly because he was to return to the jails housing area for notorious an infamous people so what did the details of his death tell us he was placed on suicide watch and supposedly he was removed the warden had the power to veto it he should've he didn't I really really would love to know the true details of this so the M. C. C. the metropolitan correctional facility is definitely under scrutiny the chief of the federal prison workers union says well they've had shortages because of the bureau of prisons they have been dispatched officers from other locations they're trying to they have a little bit but they have to fill the void there's about thirty openings at the facility so they're just making the civilians work a little bit longer they're pressing officers into overtime shifts you have a high profile case like this so check this out supposedly the word is from the A. P. that a guard in his unit was working a fifth straight day of overtime another guard was working mandatory overtime the day he was found of course they can't publicly discuss it so they are unnamed sources shortages problems at the place where Jeffrey apps team the billionaire times ten was being kept that the victims deserve what was taken from them to confront their accuser in court well now they won't have that esteem was awaiting trial on federal sex trafficking charges when he was found unresponsive that happened just before seven o'clock on Saturday morning and then they took him to new York's presbyter hospital he was pronounced dead shocker we pretty pretty much was dead when they when Anne was unresponsive ruling on the cause of death who is pending people are watching this closely and they should be they should be watching this I mean what kind of responsibility is it for the jailers and someone decides to take their own life there are far more questions than answers with the death of sixty six zero Jeffrey abstain especially when he's tied to so many well healed the people like royalty prince Sandra they deny all all of the connections to abstain when it comes to under age girls and there are others high powered business men supposedly tied to him as well because he was having parties in his Manhattan and Palm Beach mansions along with other locations yeah he owned an island the indictment itself came eleven years after he avoided what could have been a lengthy prison sentence when he pled guilty in Florida to the state charges I mentioned of soliciting and procuring a person under eighteen for prostitution and of course that plead deal drew intense scrutiny that is gripping rather and that's what led to Alex Acosta who negotiated the plea deal when he was an attorney in Miami to resign as the labor secretary he couldn't take the heat over the questions as to why did he get this old light sentence in the end I don't want to belabor the point and what a way to open the show except for to say it's not fair in a world where people who are younger or inexperienced have no what armor to whether the seductions of people who are out there for this facilitating these introductions sometimes with hocus pocus ridiculous lice allegedly no wonder the French are demanding an investigation in France for all the time you spend there and how about this like I said more questions than answers about what was going on with not only is monitoring but also what happened in the past because there were so many documents that had just been gathered that were just released that had damaging or embarrassing information about a lawyer rich famous and powerful people who were those people and there were rumors as to some of those people were less as a Silicon Valley technology gurus supposedly arranging for drugs sex and who knows whatever else the key is there was a nickname the low leave the train is what they called it but again the victims who came forward will not get to face their accusers they are robbed of that because it takes the coward's way out because someone help some take the coward's way out the somebody turned their head who knows but that we do now there is no justice for those that came forward even though the promises and according to our Attorney General William Barr that they will pursue the co conspirators those who helped him recruit under age girls on been known to them so who has blood on their hands I think there's a lot of people let's see if they did come up they're going to have to do a lot of excavating in all corners of apps dean's life to be able to find those people let's see if they have the guts to do it.

Texas sixty six year eleven years three inches three weeks three days
"silicon valley technology" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

08:19 min | 3 years ago

"silicon valley technology" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

"The company took you took a very non traditional approach to marketing and wonder if you could talk a little bit about that, as well as the rationale behind it. So I think our model generally is characterized by just prioritizing the customer in the buyer and trying to remove as much friction from the customer buyers Pat as possible. And so we do some things that a little more conventional now in kind of modern, modern SAS and cloud products. But, you know, we're super unconventional in two thousand and two in a press, hopper company, we publish pricing. Like all of our pricing is open and transparent. You don't there's no part of our website, this con- that, you know, that says contact us to figure out how much this costs. So we can talk to you about it. We made the product free to try and, and, you know, when you're trying to reach hundreds of thousands to millions of people you have to really focus on building a product that is going to bring people, you know, actively all the way to be. And engaged. And so the belief was, you know, most people actually want to figure things out on their own, if it's easy, and if it's hard actually they're gonna raise their hand and say, I need help, and so, you know, we prioritized make it as easy as possible continue to refine the process, and like where a customer, stumbles, where they raise their hand and they say, I need help here. Why was that is that something that we can remove so the future, the next customer behind them doesn't have to raise their hand at they don't want if they want to great, if they don't want to, you know you don't have to. And so I think the company atlassian has really pioneered. I think this, this alternative approach to at least selling businesses software or other businesses offer to B software. It's a lot more consumer oriented, if you think about us as consumers like even when you go into retail store, I mean, for the most part, probably specially guys you, you know, if you only really want to want help, if you need it, if, if things are sort of laid out and simple. And you know you kind of go in. Sort of how most of us prefer to shop. And so, I think we've been able to scale that approach, you know, basically since are found and have built what we sort of think of is this flywheel where, you know, by the way, the other, the other kind of key input to the model is building a product that is remarkable because word of mouth is the key propellant of our growth. And we, we chose that word early on in our mission remarkable because, you know, intentionally it was, we wanted to build a product where a user felt compelled to remark about it. And so you would say to a friend or to a relative or just somebody at a bar kind of, you know, at a weekend barbecue. Hey I I use this thing at work, and I love it. And it's great. And that is a really powerful force, and has been a corporate growth that word of mouth. And so, I think the, the model begins and ends with building great product, refining it, and then removing friction from the customers path in recent years. You've made some strategic acquis. Positions. You. Jenny ups round is he's me last year trello, that your prior can you talk a bit about the criteria you use as you think about either filling in holes in your portfolio, or the right kinds of companies to bring into the fold? I think the lessons done nineteen aquisitions, I think, in its whatness seventeen years straight six near history. And so, I think we have a healthy pattern of organic development, and re releasing new products that we build ourselves constantly improving the ones that already exist to make sure that, you know, jurors are all this product in JIRA in, in twenty nineteen kind of barely resembles the era of even twenty ten and so that takes a lot of effort and making sure that in the hands of somebody new, this is covering for the first time it is, is super modern, and even more effective at the jobs that it could be hired by a customer to do. And then we've complimented that with, with. Acquisitions and adding new products and technology to the portfolio. It really depends on, I think kind of the market and what we're going after in some cases, we've acquired technology that augments product that we're building, so your service desk is a product. We acquired a technology that added service agreement capabilities to your service desk. That's an example of, of just said of building that capability acquiring, it sort of blending into the into the, you know, the product that we're offering in the case of trailer an option. He those were two products that had product market fit in their respective markets. And so they built, you know, pretty rich and deep technology that addressed a problem that, that, you know, that, that they'd identified resonated with the market with customers and had kind of amendement velocity. And then we also care deeply about culture fit. And so, I think in in model fit and in both of those cases in every case that we've acquired technology. Cultures are really similar. I think I think that the belief in, you know, unleashing team potential and helping people accomplish more faster with less, and more effectively is, is sort of center to what the products do. And so that's part of the acquisition strategy. And then and then the believing in this sort of high velocity model where, you know, the product is doing a huge part of the selling. And then, you know, people are complementing that by removing friction serving and helping the customer, and so that's sort of the thesis, and where we decide to build them, where we decide to buy is sort of a calculus, that involves a bunch of different things as you get your some of trends, or technologies that are particularly exciting you at the moment. One excited about the product that we have, and just the, you know the opportunity for for the products that still remains in front of them. I mean you know, wants to tick that we shared just in our last earnings call. I think we have one hundred thirty thousand customers roughly and our largest and oldest product has sixty five thousand so even in the existing base of customers Jura software has a lot lot of room just to grow within itself. And, and then, you know, when you think about just the continued wave of companies that are becoming more digital native. I mean, there, there are are trying to operate as, if they were a startup are trying to move with velocity of, you know, a, a sort of a poster child, Silicon Valley technology company because I think they recognize that they need to in order to be competitive, or in order to be more dynamic, or create more opportunity for themselves. So I think I think that there's just a ton of opportunity left in kind of what we need to do to make those product better to reach more of the market. I think in terms of technology trends machine learning I think is maybe an off buzz. Buzzed buzzword or enough to use kind of thing. But, you know, ultimately, as, as a provider of collaboration, collaboration technology, and proxy, people used to work, better together the product, the software, I think can help people achieve more and not just in terms of giving them a place to compost ideas, or to organize projects and tasks. But, but, you know, it software can look at, at what other people are doing to make recommendations to help to help you become more effective as just an individual contributor to, to the team or shortcut things that you're doing. And when it sees you do five things in a row. Maybe the six time it can make a suggestion advance. And so, I think there's, we sit on on, you know, tremendous amount of data and kind of usage patterns, and our products have a whole bunch of connection points between people they're trying to accomplish. And we can use those to basically shorten the cycle of what people trying to call. Excellent will Jay, thank you so much for taking time. Mutates been create to, to get your perspective. Yeah. Thanks for having me. Excellent good anything, you would wish to cover that we don't think so. So awesome. Yeah. So nice to meet you. Yeah. Likewise, it. I think for much pleasure. Thanks for tuning in. Please. Join me next week might guess will be Harry Moseley the chief information officer of zoomed..

atlassian Pat Jura software Jenny Harry Moseley chief information officer Jay seventeen years
"silicon valley technology" Discussed on This Week in Startups

This Week in Startups

02:28 min | 3 years ago

"silicon valley technology" Discussed on This Week in Startups

"And a lift is six dollars bird is four dollars. Where free and bird, you can't do in the rain and all these different things then you can blow up and say, and there's three people who've tried this idea. One of them's out of business, we investigated it is your second, slight sure. Here's why they felt they couldn't get advertising to. They didn't have the municipality by and regulation. So the why now is the municipalities get it. Now we're heads out with another competitor. There, enforce it is where in twelve with your money Jason. And if I million dollar investment, we're gonna crush them because we have this, this, and this, what is Jim Carlos Davila? What is gem car cost? What does that carquest fifteen twenty grand? It's a little more than twenty because we use lithium batteries GIO expensive. It is. Yeah, the little by a real car for twenty grand. You can but fuel costs start to add up pretty quickly. I see. And the lithium is more upfront. But we replace them yet. We replace them less the other thing I should mention to the car. We've really built everything. So the vehicles are interchangeable. So while we use those cars, they work. For us now. I think we're a great speed speed to market strategy for an autonomous company if when the technology's there. Yeah. That'd be the obvious question. Autonomies very far away. I think in this setting you're right, nap. -solutely well done. I'm very interested in what you're doing began vase, and we'll be right back with two more companies. Thanks so much. Almost all the wealth created here in Silicon Valley. Technology comes from equity, not salary people. Salaries may be paid for the rent, but people's boats and planes and houses, and vacations that contra equity, and we are specialists in this ourselves here at this week in startups, as an investor and all of that gets tracked on something called a cap table CAP capitalization table, but they're always broken. They're always wrong. Always having to go back and check them as angel investor and make sure that the employees and everybody's getting the same amount of equity that they were promised because, hey, this is compensation really Manish half to get it right. But companies and attorneys are still using spreadsheets and paper certificates to issue their options and to keep track of equity, this lead to problems if these things are messed up, and they're updated so frequently every single higher valuation, or new round of funding and it leads. Tons of inaccuracy. Well, Cardiff fix cap tables, inequity management in more than ten thousand companies you heard that, right?.

Jim Carlos Davila GIO Manish Silicon Valley Cardiff Jason million dollar four dollars six dollars
"silicon valley technology" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

09:53 min | 3 years ago

"silicon valley technology" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Are the headlines this morning and his first rally since the end of the Mueller investigation. President Trump has accused his opponents of seeking to remove him from power illegally. And the Chinese telecoms company while away made large profits in two thousand eighteen despite espionage fears voiced by the United States at eight fifteen in London. Let's get some sports needs monkey Kenan coach. Now, let's win the title apps. The headline on the back page of Britain's times newspaper this morning over a photo of only gonna socia- holding a Manchester United scarf after he got a three year contract as manager at Trafford first test for him home game against what for on Saturday. Coverage in sports world here on the BBC. Elsewhere just thirty fans again to be allowed to go to the biggest club game in Egypt's season. Athle- against demonic, the Cairo Darby continuing security restrictions on domestic games in Egypt main that the eighty six thousand seater Borg al-arab stadium will effectively be empty for the game on Saturday athlete can go back to the top of the table above Somali. If they win that game. And this doesn't strictly qualify of new as news. I have to tell you this. It is it is great because I I saw this yesterday, and well it's a bit of flimflam Janine Van Dyke the captain of banana Bunia South Africa's women's football team who are going to the women's World Cup. You remember has posted a photograph of herself on Twitter filling up her car with petrol. She spent four hundred grand and as a consequence. She was told. She was given the opportunity to win a ticket to go and watch the women's World Cup. And she was able to tell the attendance. Thank you. But I'm already going they so what? You already won our competition. Now, she said, I've got a VIP to Berlin patriots. Perplex but very happy day. Tarasov fantastic. Matthew Kenyon with the sports time. Now to look at the business news and there's considerable excitement in the United States over the stock market launch later today of a Silicon Valley technology company that is losing millions of dollars AJ wet. What did you all about Philip is here on the business debts lift it's all about left lifters listing shares on the NASDAQ market in the United States company was valued at seventy two dollars a share giving a market capitalization of twenty four billion Tommy stolen is the tech entrepreneur and startup investor. And I asked him is this a good price for lift. Well, it's beaten expectations a couple of days ago. People were talking about sixty dollars a share. And I think everyone is very excited now about left beating expectations because we've got so many IPO's coming up this year and technology. What do you think people are so keen to get into this company given the last year it lost nine hundred eleven million US dollars? But that's right heavily. Loss-making? I think investors are making it back that lift can three technology drive down costs in the future. That's obviously controversial. Because what does that mean? It means driverless cars, potentially. It means all of their current workforce potentially not being in a job. Lot of our listeners will have heard of Uber. They might not have seen lifting action though, because it's only in the US and Canada is that a particular choice. They've made I think it reflects the fact that are just much less. Well, capsulize than Uber. Uber has had a very effective strategy of either launching around the world or taking very significant stakes in their competitors around the world. And I think that's a bit of a concern for life because of the scale and the machine learning data that will enable Uber to have that's a potential advantage for regardless left. Does a lot of competition in this particular space? So how do investors go about picking winners and losers? Well, this is an interesting market. It looks like it's either going to be a GOP Uber and left or in the long term when things go down the route of the driverless cars, which requires all of that machine. Learning data, some people think that this will become a winner takes care people will eventually just win the whole thing. So you have to believe that there's room for competition in this market. If you want to invest in. Left. Tommy stolen tech entrepreneur. Thank you very much. This is Newsday on the BBC world Celis next. We're going to speak to Shahida on his award winning photographer and activist. He's documented human rights abuses, and political changes in Bangladesh for many years. So he was arrested at his home in Dakar in August last year and was charged the next day after criticizing the government's handling of student protests against unsafe roads, he was granted bail in November after being held in custody for one hundred and two days. He's just about to pick up the prestigious 0 award from the international center of till graffiti in New York and she Allen joins us live now. And thanks for your time. Congratulations on this award. Well, thanks for having me. I'm looking forward to it. And I know the legal case you're continuing to fight it. But as you how'd you reflect now on those hundred in two days in prison. It was very different. Obviously to what I'm used to that. I if I reflect on it, I think it gives me an insight. I I never had before. And certainly it's an aspect of Bangladeshi life. I'd only known from a distance being inside. I miss the foo came up with this situations, which gave me a very very different perspective. Firstly I was treated with huge respect by all the inmates. They really went out of the way to make sure that I. Did not feel threatened. I was comfortable if you like start it also meant that I had unprecedented access that I was able to talk to people pretty much from all walks of life and find out about why people are there and how. The system maltreat some really now you were charged under an accent in the court from the Antes for provoking people in spreading false information and propaganda against the government. What did you make of that charge? Well, firstly I was reporting on things that are happening. So they could be no question of me actually, having provoked. They didn't itself. I was documenting the event. Idle time machines, I could have gone back in time. I see myself as a citizen of an independent nation, and I will continue to exercise all the rights. My constitution gives me if others have a problem with that they need to deal with it. I I live in Bangladesh. I'm a citizen of the country. And I will do everything that my nation gives me the right to do. And where are you at with you legal case? Now, I'm Bill and. There has a huge resistance took six months for me to get fail. And right now, there has been a stay on the cooled because the quilt is actually off the government. Why the case should not be considered illegal? But that to as being challenged by the state, though, the court has referred to a high bench. Now, this has gone all the way to the top has now is reading some quotes from the prime minister, shake Asena interview. With Reuters news agency back in October and being directly critical of you. What did you make of those words when you saw them will referred to family connections firstly? I don't see what I have to do with what? Earlier generation somebody done, but it is very selective. The very idea that, you know, someone who has spoken his mind should be considered mentally sick for having done. So tells a lot what about the rest of the journalistic community in Bangladesh has your case had an effect on them. There is a climate of fear undoubtedly uncertainly my arrest had was intended to excessively. However, I think. The way people rallied ran the creative ways in which they found methods of protest certainly gets by come across young people constantly who come up to the industry that tears in their eyes say use FOCA office needed you stood by us, and there's a huge sense of solidarity. So while this fear exists, I think the results scope for hope, and I I take great pride in what the youngsters in my country. If they did they have shown us what we have failed to do. They have taken a very responsible position they have not feed down, and they have not sold out while that's there. There's always one thing. I was wondering just before we let you go with you in prison for one hundred days, you're someone who expresses yourself through the photos, the take we without a camera for that time. And was that hard. I was without a camera, but I actually found it very interesting. I'm not working on a new book on what I want to look at is how a photographer sees without a camera. Also, just the smallest side the prisoners drew a mural of water five pictures on the walls of the prison. So while out the published all across the globe that perhaps is the image. Most proud of thanks for speaking Swiss Shahida alum who's an award winning photographer and activist and eventually pick up a prestigious award from the international center in New York..

United States Bangladesh BBC Tommy New York Egypt President Trump Mueller Cairo Darby Twitter Janine Van Dyke telecoms Borg al-arab stadium FOCA Britain socia Trafford Shahida Philip
"silicon valley technology" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

09:54 min | 3 years ago

"silicon valley technology" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The headlines this morning and his first rally since the end of the investigation. President Trump has accused his opponents of seeking to remove him from power illegally. And the Chinese telecoms company while way made a large profit in two thousand eighteen despite espionage fears voiced by the United States at eight fifteen in London. Let's get some sports needs. Matthew Kenyon, coach. Now, let's win the title. That's the headline on the back page of Britain's times newspaper this morning. I've read photo of only gonna socia- holding Manchester United scarf after he got a three year contract as manager at all traffic. First test for him home game against what for Don. Saturday coverage in sports world here on the BBC. Elsewhere just thirty fans are going to be allowed to go to the biggest club game in Egypt's season. L athle- against symbolic the Cairo Darby continuing security restrictions on domestic games in Egypt main that the eighty six thousand seater Borg al-arab stadium will effectively be empty for the game. On Saturday athlete can go back to the top of the table above symbolic if they win that game. And this doesn't strictly qualify of new as news. I have to tell you it is it is great because I I saw this yesterday. And well, it's a bit of flimflam Janine van fight the captain of banana banana South Africa's women's football team who are going to the women's World Cup. You remember has posted a photograph of herself on Twitter filling up her car with petrol. She spent four hundred grant and as a consequence she was told she was given the opportunity to win a ticket to go and watch the women's well cap, and she was able to tell the attendance. Thank you. But I'm already going, and they said what you already want our competition. Now, she said, I've got a VIP tickets at Berlin patriots. Look, perplexed. But very happy. Matthew Kenyon with the sports time. Now to look at the business news and there's considerable excitement in the United States over the stock market launch later today of a Silicon Valley technology company is losing millions of dollars AJ. What's this all about Philip is here on the business debts lift it's all about left lifters listing its shares on the NASDAQ market in the United States company was valued at seventy two dollars a share giving a market capitalization to twenty four billion Tommy stolen seatac entrepreneur and startup investor. And I asked him is this a good price for lift. Well, it's beaten expectations a couple of days ago. People were talking about sixty dollars a share. And I think everyone is very excited now about left beating expectations because we've got so many ideas coming up this year and technology. What do you think people are so keen to get into this company given last year it lost nine hundred eleven million US dollars? But that's right heavily loss-making. I think investors are making it back that lift. Can't through technology drive down costs in the future. That's always the controversial. Because what does that mean? It means driverless cars, potentially. It means all of their current workforce potentially not being in a job. Lot of our listeners will have heard of Uber. They might not have seen lift in action though, because it's only in the US and Canada is that a particular choice. They've made I think it reflects the fact that just much less. Well, capsulize than Uber. Uber has had a very effective strategy -vivor launching around the world or taking very significant stakes in their competitors around the world. And I think that's a bit of a concern for left because of the scale and the machine learning data that will enable Uber to have that's a potential advantage for revival left. Does a lot of competition in this particular space? So how do investors go about picking winners and losers? Well, this is an interesting market. It looks like it's either going to be a GOP Buber and left or in the long term when things go down the route of the driverless car. Ause which requires all of that machine? Learning data, some people think that this will become a winner takes all market and over will eventually just win the whole thing. So you have to believe that there's room for competition in this market. If you want to invest in left, Tommy stolen. Entrepeneurship? Thank you very much. This is Newsday on the BBC World Service next. We're going to speak to Shahida Alan, he's a award winning photographer and activist. He's documented human rights abuses, and political changes in Bangladesh for many years, she he was arrested at his home in Dakar in August last year and was charged the next day after criticizing the government's handling of student protests against unsafe roads, he was granted bail in November after being held in custody for one hundred and two days. He's just about to pick up the prestigious 0 award from the international sensitive till graffiti in New York and she Allen joins us live now. And thanks for your time. Congratulations on this award. Well, thanks for having me. I'm looking forward to it. And I know the legal case you're continuing to fight it as you do that. How do you reflect now on those hundred into days in prison? It was very different. Obviously to what I'm used to that. I if I reflect on it, I think it gives me an insight. I I never had before. And certainly it's an aspect of Bangladeshi life. I'd only done from a distance being inside. I met people came up with this situations, which gave me a very very different perspective. Firstly I was treated with huge respect by all the inmates. They really went out of the way to make sure that I. Did not feel threatened. I I was comfortable if you like. But it also meant that I had unprecedented access, and I was able to talk to people pretty much from all walks of life. Find out about why people are there, and how the system maltreat some really now you charged an accent from the atis for provoking people in spreading false information and propaganda against the government. What did you make of that charge? Well, firstly I was reporting on things that are happening. So they could be no question of me actually, having provoked the incident itself. I was documenting the event I don't own a time machine cycles have gone back in time. I see myself as a citizen nothing independent nation, and I will continue to exercise all the rights by constitution. Gives me if others have a problem with that they need to deal with it. I. Live in thunder dish, I'm a citizen of that country. And I will do everything that my nation gives me the right to and where are you at with your legal case? Now, I'm Bill and. There has been a huge resistance. It took six months for me to get fail. And right now, there has been a stay on via the court because the quotas actually off the government wide the case should not be considered illegal. But that too as the challenged by the state, though, the court has referred to a high bench. Now, this has gone away to the top has now I was reading some quotes from the prime minister, shake senior in a interview with Reuters news agency back in October and being directly critical of you. What did you make those words when you saw them? It referred to family connections. Firstly? I don't see what I have to do with what earlier generations somebody. But it was very selective. And the very idea that someone who has spoken his mind should be considered mentally sick for having done. So tells a lot what about the rest of the journalistic community in Bangladesh has your case had an effect on them. There is a climate of fear undoubtedly uncertainly my rest had was intended to excessive eight that. However, I think the way people rallied around the creative ways in which they found methods of protest certainly gets by come across young people constantly who come up to the industry have tears in there. I say you spoke out for this needed. You stood by us, and there's a huge sense of solidarity. So while this fear exists, I think the resources scope for hope an I I take great pride in what the youngsters in my country, if feed goods they have shown us what we have failed to do. They have taken a responsible position. They have not feed countdown, and they have thought sold out while that says, there's always one thing. I was wondering just before we let you go with you in prison for one hundred days, you have someone who expresses yourself through the photos, the take we without a camera. That time and was not hard. I was without a camera that I actually found it very interesting. I'm not working on a new book on what I want to look at is how a photographer sees without a camera. Also, just small aside the prisoners drew a mural of five pictures on the walls of the prison. So while out the published all across the globe, the is the image of most proud of fancy speaking tourists, Shahida alum, who's an award winning photographer and activist and I've pick up prestigious award from the international center of photography in New York..

United States Matthew Kenyon BBC Tommy New York Bangladesh Egypt President Trump socia Britain Don Twitter telecoms Manchester United Shahida Alan Philip London Cairo Darby Shahida Berlin
"silicon valley technology" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

05:54 min | 3 years ago

"silicon valley technology" Discussed on 710 WOR

"To one zero seven ten is Emma. Let's go to Joel in Virginia had Joel. Yes, I could morning was Mr. bar having been a member of the Bush administration. Apparently, also take a member of this off. Do you see him being any more effective? Mr. session was I don't know. You know, this doesn't sound right. A Bush guy as attorney general get somebody. You can really trust in there. But I don't know everybody said is a fair guy. He'll do the right thing. If you send in a Rudy Giuliani or somebody like that to just tear up that swamp system over there, there'd be too much resistance. So maybe a need a guy with some swamp cred to go over there and do this. I mean, hopefully, he'll start removing US attorneys who are getting into a little silly partisan nonsense. You know, there's a US attorney in Washington who's going to go after the inaugural for overspending wasteful. Spending for selling influence, that's every inaugural. That's the Obama inaugural the Clinton inaugural the Bush inaugural, they all do that. So, you know, you're you're you attorney concentrate on real crime. Go ahead go after that. So hopefully, he'll straighten that out the Muller report from what I hear is done. I know we've heard that before. But I think this time it's really done because you can see some investigators have left the Muller committee gone back to their old jobs. So the report will be delivered to bar. We'll see we'll see let's go to Lou and queens Hailu. Hey, Mark to talk to you. I've got a question for you. You know, only one newspaper the Wall Street Journal in twenty ten ever did a story about Hillary Clinton as secretary of state raising money getting venture capitalists, including Google Cisco and Intel to build Russia's Silicon Valley, which was so Cathal and later on courts split the United States said it was nothing, but to get advanced computer technology from the west to Russia, and it also had a lot of security risks to that deal. Yeah. We didn't have fake news. You'd see a real investigation of Hillary. And that, you know, the Clinton foundation getting a hundred and thirty five million from Russia. That's a hell of a donation, and obviously she okayed the deal for the uranium to go over there. And as you say olive, our Silicon Valley technology to go to Russia and the Clintons have a history of that they sold technology to North Korea that helped them with the guidance system for the missiles these Clintons do anything. For money. If the swamp fake news CNN complex wasn't there. You'd actually get this looked at somebody would do something about it. Hey, you know, one thing that fake news and the Democrats in Hollywood, you know, one thing they love is revenge porn. They do this all the time. You know, they they wanna make sure everybody hates Nixon even future generations. So they made that movie Nixon, and it wasn't about Nixon's long amazing career. It was all about the last two weeks when he was drunk and bumping into the walls that was the whole movie or they did it to Margaret Thatcher to here was a great world hero, Margaret Thatcher. But the movie just concentrated on the last year when she had Alzheimer's in the know where the hell she was. And there's a Cheney movie that just came out called vice now Cheney was not the greatest guy in the world. But this movie is just pure fiction. They made him look like the most evil. Brutal dictator ever in history. Revenge porn, they always do this Hollywood and the Democrats. So there's a new one Rodger ales they're making these Roger Ailes movies one is a a and E mini series. So the first one was Sunday night turns out it was the biggest ratings disaster ever in a Andy history. Nobody watched it. It's just revenge porn to go after Ailes to go after FOX. But nobody's interested who's going to watch this. And it's it doesn't. Look bad. You know, you. Oh my God. He made a little joke about somebody's rear end or turn around. I like looking at your, you know, that kind of make those flirtations men like an old madman nineteen sixties TV executive at seemed terrible until we found out about CBS and Matt Lauer and his little rape room office with the push the button lock the door. Matt Lauer one woman was being so brutally abused. She passed out an assistant at a drag or to a nurse Charlie rose with his bathrobe every inch of CBS being the worst metoo crap in the world, the chairman of the board rape accusation. So after all of that ails looks like nothing looks like a cute uncle making a little flirtatious comment. So no wonder the movie bombed. Hey, speaking of which. Guys might start getting mad at the bub. Kraft, Robert Kraft. Well, he exposed this. I told you got these places everywhere, you know, a lot of you women said what kind of places this a massage parlor in a strip mall. Why would he go? They all do all these old married. Guys, have these places they're all over the place. Look at this Greenwich, Connecticut. Here's the most beautiful, peaceful suburb Greenwich, Connecticut, in fact, it just one the most safe city in America Greenwich, Connecticut yesterday police moved in and closed down unlicensed massage parlor on water street. Now, I spend a lot of time in Greenwich. I know if you drive around Dave got these massage places these spas where all the fancy Greenwich women go it is the most luxurious spas you've ever seen with masseuses with everything you could ever want. So why would they be this little dingy unlicensed place there? Yeah. Wonder who would go to that? Well, these women at their six thousand dollars spas. The husband is at the unlicensed place. With two Bob Kraft type masseuses ten fifteen minutes of the police closed it down yesterday. So this goes on I guess it all of them. It goes on everywhere.

Greenwich Hillary Clinton Robert Kraft Russia Roger Ailes Democrats attorney Bush Nixon US Margaret Thatcher Matt Lauer Joel Hollywood Connecticut Muller Rudy Giuliani Clintons
The White House isn't ruling out another shutdown

Erin Burnett OutFront

07:16 min | 3 years ago

The White House isn't ruling out another shutdown

"Who say the shutdown. She'd be taken off the tip. I'm not going to get into the hypotheticals of taking that off the table. Okay. So that's not down as is on the table. The president thinks the odds of no deal are are high higher than the odds of a deal. And it came on the day, we found out that it is costing nited states three billion dollars for the shutdown. That's according to the CBO and only twenty percent of Americans actually support shutting down the government again that is a bipartisan and overwhelmingly resounding statement people don't want it Kaitlan Collins out front of the White House tonight and Caitlyn that is the big question. The president dangling out there again. Right. Are we headed for another shutdown? Yeah. And that's really the question here. But what it's going to come down to Aaron his largely two things one. Whether or not those congressional negotiators can find a deal, not just finding a deal, but also one that could pass both chambers of congress and get the president's signature now as you noted in that Wall Street interview, Wall Street Journal interview, he expressed doubt that they could come to a deal, but the president isn't the only one who skeptical here because both sides have drawn these red lines not only the president saying he dealt take anything less. Than five point seven billion. But also with the house speaker Nancy Pelosi being on camera calling the wall and immorality now. The one bright spot that White House. Aides have looked at lately who's on this committee. That's trying to find a deal, and it's none of the hardliners mostly you see these appropriators here who are used to finding a compromise. And have said they would like to do. So for this. Now, if they don't Richard deal, and they don't reach one that either Nancy Pelosi lights or the president likes. Then the president has said that his top choice essentially here is to invoke a national emergency therefore bypassing congress to fund his border will. So that's the question here. One thing we did learn today. Erin is that the president will get the chance to make the argument for his border wall during that televised prime-time address during the state of the union, which is going to be one week after it was initially scheduled to happen. All right Caitlin. Thank you. Out front tonight democratic congressman Roque Khanna. He's a member of the house oversight committee. And I appreciate your time. Congressman look the president is putting the odds at less than fifty fifty that the bipartisan group of congressional negotiators will get a deal before there's another shutdown. So so he he has the odds for a shutdown where do you put them? Very discouraging. I think we can get a deal done. The Democrats are willing to fund border security. We're willing to fund smart border security, even give more than five point seven billion dollars. We would give ten billion dollars, but we're not going to get money for the fifteenth century idea for wall. And I think the president if he can move beyond his campaign promises could easily get a reasonable deal. So I in the interview of the Wall Street Journal, the president said he would not rule out another shutdown. Right. His quote, certainly an option. That's what he used to describe another shutdown. Now, look we we know from the most recent polls Americans overwhelmingly don't want that outcome. According to Monmouth, right? That is a bipartisan take from people in across the country. Do you believe the president will go ahead with another shutdown? Does he think that that's a real alternative? I don't for two reasons one. The polling showed that it was unpopular for him. But more importantly, his own economic advisor said that it was costing the country point one three percent of GDP every week. The president knows that he's nowhere. If this economy falls into recession or tanks. I just don't think he's going to take that kind of risk again. So when you talk about being willing to give something for border security, but not a wall at this is this is what it all comes down. To sometimes words are not just words. Sarah Sanders today was asked about it. She said that you all Democrats need to give something here. She is. They don't come back with the deal. That means Democrats get virtually nothing that will make the president and force him to have to take executive action. That does not give Democrats the things that they want. Will you vote for deal, congressman content? That includes some wall, I will not. And I think the president is miscalculating his odds on executive action. Let me Senator Rubio Senator blunt have said that they would not support the president in declaring a national emergency. And as you know, we could invoke section five of the national emergency act and the congress capacity joint resolution to overturn it. Now, it would require veto proof majority. But the question is whether Senator Rubio and blunt and others would stick to what they said they would do. Well, of course, Senator Graham has already said he supports a national emergency. I mean, I guess I guess the reality of it is are you willing to take one? Well, I would vote to overturn it. And I think it's clearly unconstitutional. I mean Harry Truman when he declared a national emergency to nationalize steel for the Korean war the court so that that was unconstitutional. So certainly this is not going to be a constitutional exercise of the president's power. But here's the point. We're all for reasonable border security in the president. If he just gets passed the wall, and if you'd thinks about what's commonsense can get a deal. I mean, people say well road, you have you have security in your own house. But I don't build a wall around my house. I have an alarm system, I represent Silicon Valley technology solutions that are effective. And my hope is the president will see that. Now, of course, the president points at communities, you know, whether it's a layer San Francisco anywhere across this country and says, well, they have walls to and in fact when he gave in here, right? No other word for it. Right. He caved and the government reopened, and he didn't get any money for his wall. At that time. He was slammed by his. Base for doing that. Here are a couple of people. He promised something for eighteen months. And he lied about it. She has just whipped the president of the United States. He just reversed himself. That's a victory for Nancy Pelosi. Okay. When he hears that from people that he cares deeply about. He cares. What they think about him. He cares that they reflect what he thinks his base wants, do you think that will make him dig in even more? He doesn't wanna look like a loser. Unfortunately, they're calling the shots. And this is the base that he thinks got him elected. But leadership is about convincing your base to do something that makes sense for the country. The president of everyone knows has a lot of loyalty from his base his poll numbers are through the roof still with that forty percent of the country that voted for him. I think if he turned to them and said, look, I'm going to getting border security. We're getting funding for smart border security, and it doesn't have to be about a fifteenth century. Well, I actually think the vast majority of his base would stay with him. So I think he is over relying on the end Coulter's and isn't doing what would. The vast majority of the country wants all right? Well, thank you very much. I appreciate your time tonight. Thank you for having me on and next is the president trying to bait. Former Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz into running for president plus a longtime Republican lawmakers switching parties while he he's saying it's all because of President Trump and he's doing it. Now, he's out front. Remember to create an ad like this one visit pure winning dot com slash CNN. The first big test for Senator Kamala Harris moments away, she'll be facing voters in Iowa at CNN townhall in Des Moines, it is just one

President Trump Nancy Pelosi Congress Democrats The Wall Street Journal White House Senator Rubio Senator Blunt Congressman Senator Kamala Harris Congressman Roque Khanna Senator Graham CBO Senator Rubio CNN Kaitlan Collins Caitlyn Aaron
"silicon valley technology" Discussed on The Schmidt List

The Schmidt List

03:32 min | 3 years ago

"silicon valley technology" Discussed on The Schmidt List

"And now, here's your host Kurt Schmidt. Everyone and welcome this week. We're going to change it up just a little bit. My son Henry is here, and he's going to do the intro for the show this week. Okay. Ready to go. This is bizarre. Fifty seven of the Schmidt list today. We're talking to Jeff some snow, and we have to talk to him about the number one whole thing that trips up organized since and teams when it comes to adopting Adra principles and his concept of promise driven design. Thank you for coming to the show. I can't it like a renegade ball. Mr Susta, Jeff. Hi, thanks for joining me today. My pleasure. Oh, it's good to see you. So I wanted to hear a little bit about how did you get into consulting? You started Sussman associates was it seventy years ago eight years ago years ago, congratulations. Thank you. How did you get into consulting and doing the DevOps design thinking that I like in the speeding events like how did that all happen for you? I've been in the software industry for thirty years. And I my background is really broad. I've built systems I've led organizations across the entire development QA and operation spectrum. I've worked for startups. I've worked for Silicon Valley technology companies I've worked for enterprises, but it was about ten years ago that I discovered two things simultaneously that really profoundly impacted my approach to my work. The first was designed thinking, and in particular service design and the second was cloud computing when I put those two things together a lot of people do. I just want to point out. They seem very different. Well, they seem very different. But when you think about it, if you look at modern approaches to IT IT as a service infrastructure as a service software as a service. What's the word? That's in common service is actually a little liberal arts student college. So the idea of design and design thinking didn't feel foreign to me. In fact, the reason I got into softer in the first place was my advisor said go take a class that has nothing to do with what you're doing and I took an artificial intelligence programming class. And I went Ooh, I like this. Yeah. So I came into software through an unusual avenue. And I I did well at it. I mean I worked for apple. I worked for oracle. I did the dot com thing in the late nineties in San Francisco, but I always felt like I had a slightly different approach. I couldn't put my thumb on. And then I read Tim Brown's book changed by design and win. A ha this is me. I'm not a designer, but I am a design thinker. It's how I solve problems. So that led me to service design, and then I put that together with the cloud which was happening right about then. And I realized oh, this is about service also around that time, I was CTO for softwares of service startup and to be perfectly honest. I got tired of having my cellphone by my bed. I. Retirement on twenty four hours a day. And I also felt like my skills were really in not being operational, but helping people improve how their operational so I'm really kind of consultant by mentality. If you will. So I started my own practice here in the twin cities two thousand and ten and my focus is on bringing together agile and DevOps with design thinking in.

service design Jeff Kurt Schmidt Henry Sussman associates Adra CTO advisor Mr Susta Silicon Valley San Francisco consultant Tim Brown apple twenty four hours