37 Burst results for "Silicon Valley"

Fresh update on "silicon valley" discussed on Liquid Lunch with John Tabacco

Liquid Lunch with John Tabacco

00:35 min | 11 hrs ago

Fresh update on "silicon valley" discussed on Liquid Lunch with John Tabacco

"Cut by someone else. And I'm out there cutting my grass and Tennessee man, I come autographs. You know what? Everything you dream. I actually enjoy it and everything, And it's not a cheapskate. It's just you know, my neighbor comes out. There he goes. What do you doing? What? I'm good. McGrath. We look like I'm doing. Only cuts the grass around here. We have people to do that. I said Yeah, but you gotta pay him. So you know, but people, that's it, and we live in but place like much of retirees and everything. But you know that zoo name of the game now they so We get on well, and I think you know what they could bring The grill has him in our burgers, huh? Okay, Well, I don't know. I just read something about uber today. They have actually launch something. Now we're you know, normally you schedule like the person to come Pick you up now they're doing I think like 30 days out, So you can like schedule like, Hey, I'm gonna be taking a flight in like 2025 days or something like, Have you seen the commercials on TV for uber? How about the people? You make extra money in one gasses are make $362 a week morning, said. There's actually more than that. You know, like there's like an Olympic athlete who's training and he said I couldn't do it if one for uber, you know, but I mean, he has. He has like a There's like a ritual. And, you know, he pedals around and everything s be short distance. And yet we were that certain. Really not. But Lori. Yeah, but I think that's where you know we we were talking about sports with or we were talking about the other day. But you just going out of business, which is just mind boggling to me. Here. They like, spend all that money on the Denver's Bronco Stadium last year, But that was the Super Bowl. Every one of them probably. But the whole thing is, it's like they're like we can't compete with the new competitors. And like the Lululemon and the What's online, too? Well, that's part of their big stuff is Amazon just I mean, and I love it. I mean, I was talking to my cousin the other day, and she even orders diapers off of it, which in Atlanta? You get. I mean, you get stuff like dropped off in my hand it in two hours. My baby is crying and I need ever because that type market to me. Yeah, There's some bigger cities were launching ring. Get it with this, But I mean like the prime, the prime is awesome. And so people love that, and that's where I think A lot of things were going so like this mobile stuff, and you know this online stuff and like we're making it easier for people just like It's very big, like even in New York, in the cities where people like when they order groceries online, they don't have to get out and go with the grocery. But you're just not a new thing for for, you know, for decades and centuries. Store delivery, baby. It's just my thing about writing. Endorse their technology order in, you know, been there, you know, blonde here right here, But it doesn't matter. You know, blue eyes going at it that way you put you on. And how do you think we got you? Don't make it someone they mix the order of when they sent you. I can't say that. I think I'm from Mother. But you I don't really understand that one, actually. Okay. You know how earlier you doing it? Can we move up? You distort koto about? You need to have a lot of questions for mother now. Okay? She did. You have a lot of questions for single on answers for you to remain on here. Probably not. Um, You know what? We're talking about a little about being prepared. You know the things they have a small businesses only read you the story. Not all of it. Belleville, Wisconsin Drive past a dairy farms, cornfields, horse pastures here, and you will eventually rabbit at Kate Machine and Welding Ah small town business run by Jean and Lauren Kate and her sons. 46 years decades have welded many things for a lousy things, jet fighter parts, cheese moans and even the farmer's broken glasses. So they're pretty well established. That's right. And like many small business, they have a dusty old computer humming away in the back office. Well, this machine has been taken over by Chinese hackers. They have people come in the door. One day I said, We're gonna tell you something. These Chinese hackers. Have used it to play in the stage attacks. They staged attacks like in Silicon Valley startup, um, the movie industry and all these different things where they have used the major corporations. And when they first course when they first told the case, they said, no way. Yes. Oh, it's.

Jean $362 Amazon New York Lori Super Bowl Atlanta Silicon Valley Last Year Olympic 30 Days Lauren Kate Tennessee Two Hours Uber Today Mcgrath Belleville, Wisconsin Drive First Single
Land of the Giants: The Google Empire

The Vergecast

01:46 min | 3 d ago

Land of the Giants: The Google Empire

"In nineteen nine hundred. Nine marissa mayer was sitting in the most important interview of her life. It was at a startup called google. That needing was at their conference table in the main conference room at one six five university which also happened to be a ping pong table. Meyer would go on to become one of the most prominent executives and silicon valley from two thousand twelve to two thousand seventeen. she was. ceo of yahoo. The back in the late nineties. She was still a student at stanford about to graduate with a master's in computer science and google's cofounders. Sergei brin was not going easy on her sergei did all the talking and quiz mutants. We allow different computer. Science topics had me draw out. Like the graphing of k means clustering and and centuries and how to find the differences in the centers. And things like that. Meyer was a star student so she answered those questions problem. But there was another interviewer in the room and she noticed something was a little off with him. Larry seemed quiet and truthfully obviously somewhat distracted. Larry page the other founder of google. The pair wrapped the interview utterly. They had something else on their minds and the the door opens like you kind of hear. What's going on her side. Then i heard the call and say okay like who's going with us for the kleiner. Pitch kleiner is kleiner perkins the legendary venture capital firm. And i heard a lot of foot traffic heading out the door and then heather horns. The office manager reappeared and said i'm sorry. Larry and sergei had an important venture capitalist pitch this afternoon and they have taken the the majority of the company with thumb. So i think you're going to have to come back tomorrow.

Sergei Brin Marissa Mayer Meyer Google Stanford Yahoo Larry Page Pitch Kleiner Kleiner Perkins Larry Heather Horns Sergei
Fresh update on "silicon valley" discussed on WBZ Midday News

WBZ Midday News

00:43 min | 13 hrs ago

Fresh update on "silicon valley" discussed on WBZ Midday News

"A community is demanding justice after a beloved grandmother and mother is shot and killed on the front porch of her home and Dorchester over the weekend. Ma Brown was 73 years old. Daughter says the shooting happened right in front of them. The acting mayor of Boston, Kim, Janey, and the D A. Rachel Rollins, attended a community prayer vigil over the weekend, vowing to seek justice for the family. Go Fund me page has been set up to help the family cover funeral expenses and arraignment today for Worcester Man after a violent crime. WBC's John Bay back is in the Wister Bureau with more two men wounded, a suspect facing charges following a double shooting and Worcester over the weekend. Police telling us the Troy more van accused of being the shooter that wounded the two and a parking lot off a John Street Saturday night. The two males are in their thirties rushed to the hospital there conditions still not known. Police have not come up with any motives yet more than is facing two counts of armed assault with intent to murder and other charges or details during the arraignment session in the Worcester bureau, John Bay back WBZ Boston's news radio again the murder trial for former Minneapolis police officer Derek Sheldon. Now entering its third week, Chopin faces 2nd and 3rd degree murder and manslaughter charges. In the death of George Floyd Miles away from the show open trial. Tensions are high. A 20 year old African American driver was shot by police officers and then died. Protestors clashed with police overnight outside of the Brooklyn Center, which is about 16 miles away by car from that courthouse in Minneapolis Theeighties Julie Walker with more A large law enforcement presence remained in Brooklyn center early Monday. With the unrest spilling to neighboring Minneapolis. There are more national guard already moving into the city to supplement the ones that were already Here in Minnesota. Department of Public Safety Commissioner John Harrington also says the shooting investigation is ongoing. We will use the body cams will take statements are B. C. A Forensics team did go out and do a crime scene survey and take care of of evidence. Lisa. They stopped on tape right who had an outstanding warrant, and they tried to arrest him, but he drove away. That's when he was shot. It comes as the community is already on edge from the trial of Derrick Show been accused in George Floyd's death. I'm Julie Walker. All right. It is 10 38 and Joan Doniger is in the house. The Bloomberg House. Good Morning. Good morning. Glory will soon the pizza delivery guy may be a distant memory. You know, it's not just happening around here just yet. But Domino's is testing pizza delivered by robots in Houston. The pizza giant is teeming with Silicon Valley startup. Neuro tow launch robotic pizza delivery this week in the Texas City. It's looking to capitalize on rising online orders caused by the pandemic. Nure Oh uses small, low speed self driving vehicles to carry packages instead of people. It's calling the dominoes deal a long term relationship. Wall Street is backing away from a relationship with more records. Right now we've got mild losses. The Dow down 99, the NASDAQ 98. P. S and P. 12 those air losses of about a quarter to Three quarters of a percent. I'm Joan Doniger Bloomberg business for WBZ, Boston's news radio or Joan coming up in just a few minutes. The offer from FEMA to pay for covert funeral. Stay with us. You're not talking to yourself. Wow, you're telling you're smart speaker to play WBC news radio on my heart radio. All of my concerns are disappearing. Thank you. I absolutely loved my dog. But the constant shedding not so much, But then I got a Swiffer sweeper, Pet kid, And it is amazing. These super thick cloths pick up a crazy amount of hair. Just look at all that. And that was from just one swipe and the best part sweepers so much easier to maneuver than a broom or a vacuum easily getting around chairs and under the couch. Your rights Now I can focus on you Not you're shedding Swiffer sweeper, pet kid. Because shit happens. Liberty Mutual insurance company presents Doug,.

Derek Sheldon Joan Doniger Houston George Floyd Minnesota Fema Texas City Brooklyn Center Lisa Chopin KIM Liberty Mutual D A. Rachel Rollins Two Males WBC Nure Oh TWO Julie Walker Ma Brown Silicon Valley
Expand - 18:21 - Big-File-NA-1116-#-2019-02-28-Final - burst 28

Audio Upload 01

02:19 min | Last week

Expand - 18:21 - Big-File-NA-1116-#-2019-02-28-Final - burst 28

"Maybe some things we hadn't learned yet from the media but also a wrap up of no agenda no jr independence the knowedge independence. Meet kids. Who have the you have. The event has right. Event will be saturday. We'll talk about it on sunday for that. Look up no agenda dot com and come to you from downtown austin texas capital the drones star state marine number six in the government of maps the five included in the morning. Everybody i am adam curry silicon valley where indeed than suffered did not go by jesse devora. And we thank. Marco garcia dave new leo puke bo. Vdb and place bowling for our show mixes until sunday. Remember us at divorce dot org slash na until then audio smo- a alot. Everyone i think it is during tax rates as high as sixty or seventy percent cost estimate ninety three trillion dollars fox news version awesome the american form of random organization. Who don't care on time at least try. The power is the person who's trying to regardless of the success. You try came to still have shelter new deal for ninety three trillion dollars. You can have bread your not. That's their problem not ours. Look at that. The trigger gone in and triggered people

Jesse Devora Marco Garcia Dave New Leo Puke Bo Adam Curry Austin Texas Bowling Fox News
Expand - 04-05 - 16:43 - Big-File-NA-1116-#-2019-02-28-Final - burst 27

Audio Upload 01

02:31 min | Last week

Expand - 04-05 - 16:43 - Big-File-NA-1116-#-2019-02-28-Final - burst 27

"But somehow if it's a radical it seems to me which they claimed it was. It would be eradicated i they reintroduced it and i say that because there's a number of news stories that came out recently where the kids got the measles vaccine and then got measles and then there was a bunch of other kids who had the vast settled science by the way but not yes but not the booster and they got measles. When did a booster become a thing for measles. So i i most of the opinion that go by especially if he can't get sued you take this and i don't want to sound like a conspiracy nut but from a business standpoint your big meet you make these these vaccines and now you're noticing in washington state in particular people aren't taking this shot right. Although it's a shot. I'd recommend but under these circumstances i may be. I'd wait because the people up there that's where it started to break out and again is reported that it was a kid who just got the shot got measles started spreading it around as a radical disease eradication. They start spreading it around now. Everybody has get all freaked out. They're going to get them back on the shot in the bandwagon for shots. I just find the something scammers about this whole measles outbreak. That if you're if you can't get sued. I can put live virus in the thing injected to a few dozen kids some areas where we know. There's not a lot of vaccines being taken. It would be. It would be great to find one of our under creep by do it one of our earlier earliest shows. I should say we re i in particular really became very interested in this was an away a lot of awakening for for both of us. I think back in the day ten years ago there was a j. p. morgan chase investors conference and we had the You had to slide show had the slide show and it was. I forget which pharmaceutical company was over was. Maybe just one one. Ceo talking about the industry and it had it right. They had their hockey stick. It was off the charts. Vaccines are the next revenue source. This is the gold mind and since that we've seen we got hpv gardasil. All this stuff came in then. We had the swine flu. We you know the the flu viruses an ongoing

Morgan Chase Washington Hockey FLU
Investors Are Throwing Money at mRNA Technologies

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

01:26 min | 2 weeks ago

Investors Are Throwing Money at mRNA Technologies

"We've been talking about all. The potential for 'em are innate. Technology means virus detection for all kinds of diseases. Now let's talk about the money because the rush is on to invest in marin a and the whole field of synthetic biology which approaches the body in natural systems as programmable platforms like computers however. The history of silicon valley and medical tech is mixed. You remember theranos and just last week. The founders of a hot biotech firm called you buy ohm were charged with fraud in a similar fashion. John chambers is the founder of syn bio beta a network for entrepreneurs engineers and investors interested in synthetic biology. He says billions of dollars are flowing into the field. Now what you're seeing is a new generation of investors and entrepreneurs coming in who are looking at a whole new set of tools around reading writing and editing of dna and designing and building and testing of biological systems. So you've got to look at the potential for these technologies to do a lot of good in the world not just in healthcare or quantified self or in this case irony vaccines but also for climate change for food production for chemicals and materials. So i think with any technology that the power to do good. And there's a powder do bad but i think with this technology the power to do good in so many different parts of the lives is just huge.

Syn Bio Beta Marin John Chambers
Prince Harry lands executive position at tech startup

What A Day

00:47 sec | 2 weeks ago

Prince Harry lands executive position at tech startup

"Another sign of the recovering jobs market work. Do prince harry finally got a nice gig working as chief impact officer for a silicon valley life. Coaching startup called better up. Congratulations serve in that role. Prince harry will be involved in product strategy and charitable contributions. his move to an executive role differs from the way most high profile celebrities during companies. Which is to get a seat on their boards. Harry has long been open about his struggles with grief and mental health. Which is by better up. Says he is a natural fit for his new role presumably. He'll be the one on slack reacting to every message with a crown emoji like him. If i know the guy better up didn't say how prince harry would be compensated. But it's doubtful that they can match his salary from his old boss. Every person who pays taxes in england. Yeah i'm gladys first. Job is as a c. level executive. Good for

Prince Harry Harry England
Prince Harry joins coaching startup as chief impact officer

the NewsWorthy

00:22 sec | 2 weeks ago

Prince Harry joins coaching startup as chief impact officer

"Prince harry is now a tech exec. He's been hired on his silicon valley startup. It's called better up inc and he will now be the company's chief impact officer. If you're not familiar better up is an app that gives coaching and mental health supports. It works with employees of major corporations like hilton warnermedia and chevron just to name a few prince. Harry has apparently been coached by better up as well. Moving

Prince Harry Hilton Warnermedia Chevron Harry
Prince Harry Gets Job at BetterUp Coaching and Mental Health Business

Tim Conway Jr.

02:45 min | 2 weeks ago

Prince Harry Gets Job at BetterUp Coaching and Mental Health Business

"That thing. Meantime, Prince Harry has a new job and a new title. Get what I did. He gets to be chief impact officer at a startup called Better Up, which is a fast growing coaching and mental health firms. The company's planning to it's a Silicon Valley Volley valley. Uh, start up. No, I haven't been drinking at least not yet. And so, according to this new story, he is going to help people's lives, Prince Harry said in an email response to questions about why he's taking the job. Proactive Coaching provides endless possibilities for personal development, increased awareness and an all around better life. So in his better up position. He's expected to have input into initiatives including product strategy, decisions and charitable contributions and advocate publicly on topics related to mental health. Well, the last I can understand because his wife said, toe Oprah that she, you know, contemplated suicide at a time after they got married, and things were going so badly in the in the in the palace, and he has also have been open about his own struggle. In the past, Given the early death of his mother, I'm not sure what input he could have into product strategy decisions. But one reason why he has to work is because he has to work. Here's some of what he told Oprah. Your family cut you off. In the first half of the first quarter of 2020. But I've got all my mom left me. So he's no longer on the Windsor Dole by the Windsors air on the UK Dole So he and Meghan Markle now have to make their own way. And they've signed this deal with Netflix, which is reportedly worth $100 million, and I'm not sure how Netflix expects to make. $100 million with Megan in Harry and also I think they have a deal of podcasting deal with Spotify or something like that. But now he's going to be working for this company called Better Up and the head of the company Now this company better up. I guess it's like it's coaching and The health of your employees. You hire them to make your employees happier. And, um, the head of the company is being used by sales force and some other things they had. The company says that it wouldn't say how much he's gonna pay the Duke of Sussex. Bond that he will not manage employees or have direct reports. But he's likely to spend some time the company San Francisco headquarters once it is safe to do so to participate in all hands meeting so basically, he'll come in once in a while and Participate in strategy

Prince Harry Silicon Valley Volley Valley Oprah Dole Meghan Markle Netflix Spotify Megan Duke Of Sussex Harry UK San Francisco
Prince Harry joins Silicon Valley mental health start-up

Colleen and Bradley

00:32 sec | 2 weeks ago

Prince Harry joins Silicon Valley mental health start-up

"Prince Harry has reportedly taking on taken on a new job as an executive of a Silicon Valley startup. It was confirmed to the Wall Street Journal that Harry will become chief Impact officer of Better Up Incorporated, which is non ling coaching and mental health firm. Conveniently, Harry Cities personally been using better, uh, paps and coaches for a couple of months Now thing secret Sting, as advised by the people are like Hey, wanna come hurt for us? Try out our app. Yeah, well, the CEO of Better up, says Harry's new gig. Is meaningful and meaty. No word on the

Better Up Incorporated Prince Harry Silicon Valley Wall Street Journal Harry
Prince Harry joins coaching startup as chief impact officer

The KFBK Morning News

00:15 sec | 2 weeks ago

Prince Harry joins coaching startup as chief impact officer

"Has reportedly taken a job. As an executive of a Silicon Valley startup. Recently out spoken Royal confirmed to The Wall Street Journal. He'll become the chief impact officer of Better Off incorporated an online coaching and mental health firm,

Silicon Valley The Wall Street Journal Royal Better Off
Biden picks former senator who flew in space to lead NASA

Silicon Valley Insider with Keith Koo

00:31 sec | 3 weeks ago

Biden picks former senator who flew in space to lead NASA

"President Biden has selected a new NASA administrator who's John Scott. It's the former senator from Florida who flew on the space shuttle 78 year old Bill Nelson grew up near Cape Canaveral. He was a Democratic congressman when he launched aboard space shuttle Columbia in January of 1986 right before the Challenger launch accident. His commander was Charles Bolden junior who later served as NASA administrator under President Obama. Nelson was elected in 2000 to the Senate. Where he served until

President Biden John Scott Nasa Bill Nelson Cape Canaveral Charles Bolden Florida Columbia President Obama Nelson Senate
Bidding War for Laser Maker Coherent Intensifies

MarketFoolery

04:17 min | 3 weeks ago

Bidding War for Laser Maker Coherent Intensifies

"Coherent is back in the news. Coherent a company specializing in equipment to make an measure lasers back in january. Coherent agreed to be acquired by lament him in a deal worth five point. Seven billion dollars. Stick with me here. In february s. instruments came in with an offer of six billion after that to six came in with an offer of six point four billion which leads us to this morning and coherent saying that lou mendham has increased their original bid to six point nine billion and oh by the way. Shares of coherent are up seventy percent year to date not in the past twelve months. Just here in twenty twenty one different ways. I wanna go here. Let me start with this because at when we talked about this on market foolery back in january. One of the things you had said about coherent was look. And i'm paraphrasing. But you said look. They do some interesting stuff they do. Some things that lament doesn't do but coherent businesses kinda struggled over the past year. So i i guess my first question is are you surprised by this bidding war for this business. It is. yeah. I must say. I'm a little bit. I'm a little bit surprised by it. I i would pay money for for dan to insert like the as the world. Turns music into this. This intro because i really. This is like the soap opera of two thousand twenty one thus far right i mean this has been pretty fascinating to watch i. I have recommended lamentin and two six as a stocks for for members over the course of the years. And i i think i mean i didn't see this coming it really felt like with the initial lamentable tie up. Both parties were happy. They kinda came to an agreement. Initially that transaction was valued at around five point seven billion dollars in stock holders would get one hundred dollars per share in cash and one point one eight five one shares of lamentable for each coherent share. And then as you as you as you noted i mean this went back and forth with a few different companies in really it all boils down to what coherent does well. The business hasn't performed All that great recently in a part of that is just due to market conditions. But this all boils down to getting coherence laser expertise and that's lasers and photonics represent a big opportunity in that something that lamentable does. But it's a very small part of their business lament. Dems bigger focus. As i've mentioned before is on that vertical cavity surface emitting laser technology. I know it's a mouthful but that's ultimately sensor based technology. That's going gonna play more into our lives as we see five g in sixty connectivity. Get faster so so then you fast forward to today now. I mean coherence stockholders will receive two hundred and twenty dollars per share in cash in point six one shares of lamenting so they really sweetened the deal by amping up the amount of cash as opposed to the the percentage of shares that you would get in elementary stock and i think another. I think another reason why this deal. This is probably the last tango. I think this probably will wrap it. Up is because you have a tech investment firm there silver lake which is really Is really supporting this deal. They're going to invest one billion dollars in new business And they've got something like eighty billion dollars in assets under management today ten focused so so they have a lot of expertise in a lot of these different areas So so again. This is about the laser business. Lamentable clearly wants it to six understand why they would want it as well It is not cheap. I mean this is this. Is something where you're going to be paying around e abbott sixty times that's a little bit Reflective of less than normal times given the current state of affairs distill. They're paying for it and it must be feeling pretty good right now to be a coherent shareholder knowing that in such high demand

Lou Mendham Lamentin DAN Abbott
Mark McGuinness | Thriving as a Creative in the 21st Century

The Unmistakable Creative Podcast

04:06 min | Last month

Mark McGuinness | Thriving as a Creative in the 21st Century

"Mystical creative. Thanks so much for taking the time to join us thank you. It's lovely to be. Yeah it is my pleasure to have you here. So i've actually known about your work for quite some time. I remember often reading your blog posts on a copy. Blogger thinking yeah. I love everything this guy has to say. Because it's so practical. Which i think finding that sort of blend between practicality and creativity is something that a lot of people overlook But before we get into all of that I wanna start asking where were you born and raised. And what impacted that end up having on the choices that you've made throughout your life in your career. Well actually. i was born. Just down the road from where. I live elvin bristol in south west of the uk. And i was. I was born in bath by any lift in. This area is about three. And then we moved to north devon which is even further south and west and rural. I'm so if you can picture a very green and lush an wet and rainy and hilly part of the world with lovely beaches. That's the environment. Where i grew up set was certainly not as the center of things. Even for brew england In terms of the impact. That had i guess. Maybe i mean i thought about this brady until you ask me but maybe there's always a sense of in these out of the way places that you know. We're not quite what we're outsiders. When not quite at the center of things we're not the mainstream And actually come to think of it. It was a real leap for me two years later. Make the move to london. Because i had this idea that i was. I was not going to go to london and some wind decided a stupid mental schal put in my own way So yeah i think lots of great things about growing up in a rural outweigh place. Lots of nature tattoos. The uk poet laureate live just down the road from us. I never met him. But some of his poetry describes in particular book will more town describes the landscape. I grew up in almost supernatural vividly. Remember reading that book in thinking. Well that's that's just literally just down the road from us that whole landscape and that was one of the he was one of the first public sira who inspired me to start writing poetry. So it's interesting you talk about being sort of outside. In on the fringes it makes me think of a cr- isaka the investor who basically when he started is capital instead of setting up shop in silicon valley. He set up shop three and a half hours away from silicon valley. Despite being let google. And i remember him saying something. Along the lines of united paraphrasing here that that gave him a real edge in terms of how he chose investments because he said you know if i knew that somebody was willing to drive three hours to come and pitch me to invest in their company. Those were going to move very serious people In it also kind of kept him out of the echo chamber of being in silicon valley where everybody was talking about the same things and and wonder. Do you feel that gave you an advantage in any way at all in that sense to you to stand out with your own work. I like to think so Yeah i certainly think it gives you a different perspective on things because maybe if you have grown up at the sentra things. It's easy not to see the bubble. Whereas i was always very much aware that i was coming in from the outside Another westcountry it Well cues wasn't westcountry back. Thomas hardy was certainly a westcountry poet and he was used to he very much had the site as take on things and apparently even when he was at dinner parties he would imagine that he was a ghost and he had died and he had come back to haunt these people and he said not gave him a very unusual perspective on the conversation which i think helped his novel writing. So so yeah. There's always been that sense of you know there is another world to the one that we're looking at and there's a wide frame to this

Elvin Bristol UK Silicon Valley North Devon Isaka London Google Thomas Hardy
Does Google Actually Want to Hire Black Engineers?

Slate's If Then

02:16 min | Last month

Does Google Actually Want to Hire Black Engineers?

"The way. Google goes about hiring. People is the stuff of silicon valley legend. There are entire websites dedicated to helping applicants. Ace google job interview. The company used to do its own rankings of undergraduate schools and the whole process which was built around hiring a certain kind of engineering talent reverberated throughout the industry. You really cannot overstate google's influence in these categories because the way that the technical interviews are set up at tech companies. That really stems from google the white boarding process where you have to go in and code on a whiteboard. Those like puzzle questions. How many tennis balls can you fit in a ub christians or legendary like you can look them up online. There's a cottage industry of how a lot of it's on youtube of how to pass these interviews and google was so influential in getting the top talent that others have really copied that approach. I wanna take a moment here and have you described the difference between engineering and everyone else because it can be hard to understand. Why the sort of technical team is treated one way and everyone else's different. What's the what's the crux of that difference not to overstate google's influence. But the of that difference very much started with google in a way. I mean they are the ones who built a whole ethos around this framework of an outspoken engineer. Who is a first principles thinker. It's it's very flattering to if you go inside a tech company hierarchy on whether or not that companies secret sauce is really their marketing or their product design. Engineers are just paid better. They are catered to their opinions are valued and the fact that we have seen a particular lack of racial diversity in technical. Workforce's is Is really alarming. Because you know that that means that when there's a discussion in the room the people who hold the power are generally going to be white asian and mail.

Google Tennis Youtube
How I Built Resilience: Shan-Lyn Ma of Zola

How I Built This

05:47 min | Last month

How I Built Resilience: Shan-Lyn Ma of Zola

"Everyone and welcome to how. I built this resilience edition from npr. I'm guy is each week. On thursdays we invite entrepreneurs and other business leaders to come onto the show. Live to talk about how they've been building resilience into their businesses this year. And today my conversationalist jianlin mop. Ceo and co founder of zola. Zola is a one stop shop for couples. Planning a wedding from creating a wedding website. Finding local vendors making registry even creating a photo album of the big day with the wedding industry completely hammered by the pandemic last year solely focused on releasing new products and features for couples like a homegoods marketplace and even hosting virtual weddings on its platform. We aimed couples from that first aid. Get engaged through their entire wedding planning journey into their festivals of newlywed life with the tools and technology that we build to help them plan dream and bring to life bear fantasy wedding so basically you go on the website and you can do everything like from finding the person to do your flowers to a you to the caterer to the registry to the invitations. Everything yes wedding website. you'll save the dates and then you'll album of you're beautiful photos with photographer that you found on seoul ios chicken out the website earlier today. It's super cool. How did it. How did it start had it. I know it's you start in twenty thirteen And i think at the time you were working at guilt which is a the gilt groupe g. I l t nut gui. Tell me how how this idea came about well. I always dreamed about starting my own company. One day but i had never felt ready until really working for many years in product management which is really working alongside designers and engineers to build digital websites and mobile apps and so had gone that experience and in twenty thirteen That just happened to be all. My friends got married at exactly the same time. Everyone has that year where you're going to a wedding. Every weekend spending a lot of money. I was buying gifts from my friends. Women registries and found that the experience that i was going through their registered was just one of the worst shopping experiences i had ever seen. I was talking to nobu. Who is my co-founder zola. About how painful was and he's married and he was complaining about it from the couple's perspective. It's just terrible and we looked at each other and we said you know we've been working together to build great products when it we attacked this assets. We think we can do a much better job. And and that was how zola was born. I'm wondering you know. I mean this is twenty thirteen so this is still you know. The the ancient early days of of of web two point zero which is unbelievable Did you have initially when you went to people. I know a little bit your backstory. You grew up in australia. And then you came to the us business school and you had a bunch of Jobs in sort of adjacent kind of industries right. You worked at guilt and another an and also worked at another who. You're actually growing up in australia. It's a very remote country in that is literally on the the side of the world. And i had always can read about what what is happening in the world. And what is happening in the tech revolution that we all living through right now and i felt very removed from the action. So i moved to the us to really be a part of this Tech revolution underway and my dream was always to be like an entrepreneur. Like jerry yang. Who found yata. I had a picture of him on my wall. And because i'd never known really anyone else who worked in tech apart from the people that i read about in magazines you may dream actually came true in that i moved to the us. After business school. I was able to get a job at yahoo. Which jerry founded. And i think one of the best days there was when i walked past him in the hallway. Wow that as a result of working that. I got to learn from great product leaders. Who with some of the best in silicon valley. Who really told me. How do you think about creating a product that customers love and that they want to share with all their friends when you came up with the idea for for what is now zola and you started to talk to people about it. I have to imagine that some people said oh this industry saturated they're already. There's you know the not. There's a bunch of other sites that you know. There's a bunch of other people doing this. You don't want get into that business. That is exactly. I think there was a lot of from many places and for many investors. Who said like what you said. It's not possible to build a big business in weddings. Because there hasn't been one yet all. Do people really spend that much on weddings. All it's it's highly fragmented as an industry so then must be a reason for that and that sounded crazy to me. Because i knew how much my friends were spending tons of time and money i think weddings is one of the only times in your life where you spend on average in this country thirty thousand dollars on one day because we want to create a special memory inexperienced for yourself and your friends and so i knew it was a lot of business opportunity. It was an undeserved need. That was a passionate customer base and just because investors didn't feel personally connected to the pain point did it mean it to thin exist

Zola NPR Australia Jerry Yang United States Silicon Valley Jerry Yahoo
Biden Administration Gears Up For A Showdown With Big Tech

Morning Edition

03:26 min | Last month

Biden Administration Gears Up For A Showdown With Big Tech

"Up for a big showdown with Big Tech. He's reportedly hiring too outspoken critics of Amazon, Facebook and Google for influential roles in the administration. They've both pushed for the government to get much more aggressive at reining in these tech giants even break some of them up. NPR Tech correspondent Shannon Bond has been following this, Shannon. What are these critics? A big tech that Biden is bringing on board? Who are they? So Biden has reportedly getting ready to nominate antitrust scholar Lena Khan to the Federal Trade Commission. And just last week, he added a lot of pressure Tim Wu as a tech policy advisor, who has advocated for breaking up Facebook and Scott, It's really hard to overstate just how big a deal these names are intact policy circles. They both have these very progressive views about monopolies and competition, and now they're potentially moving into these very influential roles as the government is investigating and suing the tact Giants. So we worked on tech policy in the Obama administration. He now says he thinks the tech giants have helped create a new gilded age, much like the robber barons did with their railroad and oil monopolies. Khan is just 32 years old. She made her name when she was still a law student for reading this groundbreaking paper about Amazon, and she's become the face of this approach that sometimes jokingly called hipster Antitrust. Okay, I think you're going to need to explain his hipster antitrust a little bit more. No con is critical of the current way that the government deals with monopoly power. You know, this is idea that the rules are really focused on when consumers like you and me get hurt. When we have fewer choices, we have to pay more for products and services. Tom says, you know, in the case of a company like Amazon. That doesn't address concerns that focus on other harms like those to the independent sellers who rely on the platform to make money, and she thinks Amazon should not be able to both operate this marketplace and cell is a competitor in that marketplace. Here's what she told NPR back in 2018 about the bind that puts sellers in that dependence means that Amazon gets too often call all of the shots. And I think that is often I'm quite harmful because that means Amazon can extract more and more from these cellars and that can affect the quality. And Khan has already been influential in Washington. She was advising this Big House panel on antitrust last year. They did this investigation. It found Apple, Amazon, Facebook and Google all have really unfair powers monopolies. And we should note that all four of those companies are NPR supporters. I mean, this approach is just so different from even a few years ago, compared especially to the way the Obama administration Treated big tech cozied up to Big Tech when Biden was vice president. That's right. I mean, I think cozy is exactly the description for the relationship the Obama administration had with Silicon Valley. You know, it wasn't that long ago, these companies were celebrated as innovators. But you know things really have changed. Of course, the Trump administration was hugely critical of these big companies. It sued Google and Facebook for antitrust violations that something we're expecting the Biden administration to continue and we're seeing criticism of tech from both sides of the aisle. Of course, there are some people from the Czech world taking positions with the Biden, an administration that happened under Obama. But you know the choice of people like Lena Con and Tim Wu, I think signals a tougher stance toward Silicon Valley and that the era of scrutiny and skepticism what we call the tech clash is far from over the tech clash.

Amazon Obama Administration Big Tech Biden Giants Shannon Bond Lena Khan Facebook Tim Wu Khan Federal Trade Commission Government NPR Google Shannon Scott Big House TOM Trump Administration
Are You On Clubhouse Yet?  No? Here's What It Is And How To Get There.

Talk, Tales and Trivia

07:31 min | Last month

Are You On Clubhouse Yet? No? Here's What It Is And How To Get There.

"What is clubhouse. Well clubhouse is a new audio social media app well on this episode. I'm gonna tell you what i feel about clubhouse and how it has impacted me and so many. People clubhouse is big and fast growing and making continual headlines and yet it is still private. What do i mean by that. You have to be invited by an existing member of clubhouse to get and so just being on it remains something of a status symbol and some circles forbes dot com has an article titled have you joined clubhouse yet. We'll have you here says that clubhouse is a social media platform and has been sweeping the internet but with it comes an air of mystery and confusion that comes from one thing scarcity. Yep like i said you have to be invited. You can't just join clubhouse you have to be invited by someone may be a friend who has already a user much like a country club. Somebody who can recommend you who is already a part of clubhouse has to say come join me on this wonderful audio social media platform by way of texting you a special link but did you know that. The podcasting industry is expecting to pass one billion dollars. This year and the creators of clubhouse decided to turn podcasts on their head and make them into an interactive experience through clubhouse the writer of the forbes article goes on to say that one of the favorite things to do on the clubhouse app so far is to just join rooms with people you don't know and listen in on what they're talking about and that is fun. If you are on clubhouse you may have heard everything from the technical challenges to be faced on. Moore's the best for ai to take over the stock market and the best way to make grilled cheese sandwich. Why the civil war happened political views. Make tips dating advice and the list goes on and on etc etc. Some of the rooms get downright racy causing me to blush. But i have to admit that's really not too hard to do. Think about what talk radio is or used to be. And you'll get a glimpse into what clubhouse is all about and bonus you can potentially join the conversation or end up needing the conversation as a moderator but later in the forbes article the writer does say it's a lot like a podcast It is not podcasters. Keep the listeners. In a controlled setting and the podcast has a filter as far as editing goes and unlike the moderator in clubhouse the podcast or knows his guest and they talk about what can and cannot be said ahead of time and so it is clubhouse takes a little getting used to and might i add a lot of courage to raise your hand to speak. Oh yes you can speak. And here's the deal on speaking to be able to speak in a room or in a club. Two things must happen. Besides being in that particular room you must raise your hand by pressing the hand emoji on the right and the moderator must pull you up on stage to speak where everyone can hear what you have to say. Yikes sometimes i am just there to listen or contribute to the conversation it's still a little nerve racking and sometimes the moderator will automatically invite you on stage by sending an alert pox as soon as you enter the room. Don't worry you can always say maybe later and bonus there is a leave quietly button that you can push just in case you. Don't wanna be there anymore and you don't want tell anyone that you're leaving but keep in mind that if you go on stage there is no one to filter what you say. There was no bleep button. No editing there is no nothing and a recent issue of entrepreneur india. I found this freshly valued at one billion dollars. After a reported. One hundred million dollars funding for the clubhouse app. The audio chat platform has been a hit with silicon valley investors. I bet unexpected appearances on clubhouse from elon. Musk and mark zuckerberg to anthony hopkins as well as tons of entertainers and celebrities. And so it is all the entertainers politicians. The celebrities. the musicians have made clubhouse participants notice and become part of this incredible app the live clubhouse room five thousand people and was getting so overloaded with someone like elon musk that some individuals reportedly created secondary listening rooms on clubhouse as well as other platforms such as youtube so everyone could enjoy what the celebrity or entertainer was saying a few days later. Musk tweeted that he had agreed to do a clubhouse with american rapper and record producer kanye west ee. Leon also invited. Russia president vladimir putin for a conversation on the platform the kremlin described this proposal as Very interesting but added that they would need to understand what it was all about before committing in january clubhouse said that it was working on introducing a creator grant program. That's so cool. It's too monetarily. Support emerging clubhouse creators and unlike the large social networks that we all are common with which have monetize their audience by selling ads. We all know that clubhouses monetization features have tipping paid rooms or premium features for power users. Clubhouse is about a real time exchange of ideas and beliefs an off the cuff commentary. Who doesn't like that and fans of clubhouse are converging to it because they want to see the unscripted off-camera interpretation of the people they look to for news entertainment politics or anything else they care about but right. Now here's something in the clubhouse app you can make yourself or your company known a room schedule events ahead of time or do your podcast from your club. And ps by the way this even a way to record it do a little marketing. Find your like minded people by joining a room. Invite a well known guest to speak. Make connections isn't that where it's all about anyway and as of right now i have invited six friends. One responded my niece. Undoubtedly most people are still finding out about the new audio social media app clubhouse. Hey if any one of my listeners here would like to be a part of the clubhouse community. i want to invite you. I have two or three invites still hanging around waiting for that special person. Maybe it's you

Musk Confusion Moore Kanye West Ee Anthony Hopkins Elon Elon Musk Mark Zuckerberg Vladimir Putin India Leon Youtube Russia
Leading during COVID-19 with Ellen Kamei

Model Majority Podcast

06:42 min | Last month

Leading during COVID-19 with Ellen Kamei

"Ellen kamei. Welcome back to the majority podcast today. Thanks for having me back kevin. Of course you were one of my very favorite guests ever but you were here on our podcast back in march twenty eighteen which feels like roughly twenty years ago since then a lot has happened to you. A lot has happened in the world. I want to start with you first a sense that you ran for a seat in the city council of mountain view. Which where you were born where you're from you while your seat. And now you're the mayor of mountain view and just a quick plug for your city. My personal way of characterizing mountainview is the most important small city in the world. Because you have these incredibly monumental companies like google like other institutions intact headquartered there so everybody knows where mountain view is the world and i love to hear first of all about. What was your experience like. We're running in a local election. Really going through the grind and now transitioning to serving on a city government. Well thanks so much again. Kevin for having me back. I couldn't sell my city better than you just. Did you know the way i describe. A mountain view is being in the heart of silicon valley so much of the tech innovation about we discuss now actually was bursting in the city of mountain view Matthew mentioned yes. I iran in twenty eighteen in one actually wasn't my first time running for for office for city council mountain view. I run in twenty fourteen loss and really had to make the decision about you. Know did i want to pursue my passion for public service or or not and four years later decided to to run again Happy to share a In got to move from being on the planning commission to a member of the city council so the transition to city council. I mean there's no other to describe it in fast and furious in my first year. We were discussing the really large policy issues that our city our state i think our country are grappling with which are you know housing affordability of that housing in the generation of housing transportation rates. Getting people to shift their mode of a transit instead of being car. Ranted and gino at the same time. How are we providing the best quality of life possible for all our residents so within the first year we're tackling those going into my second year became vice mayor and two months later we had a global pandemic. And and now you know as mayor. I am trying to navigate our city our community our residents To the light at the end of the tunnel of the pandemic so it has been you know legislating on the toughest issues and dealing with something we only typically have to deal with like once century pandemic straight. There are a couple of things fall on the first thing. I want to drill in and a little bit. More is actually the experience of right so a lot of what we do here on the modern majority podcast is to reach out to asia. Americans are the minority communities to build allah ship. But you really transfer know how i think knowledge about. What is it like to be a public servant. If that's what you wanna do what is it like to run an office. You rent twice. You say you lost the first time you won the second time as in like you came. I believe the first out of like six seven other people right and i think the merger victor is also pretty significant. I remember that night and like checking the whole county original bula alad crush everybody. I was very happy about that. But how did that happen. You think now you have a couple of years removed to maybe reflect that experience. What did you do right. The second time that you didn't quite do the first time that led you to your victory while i would say it's two different things. One is a took those four years. But i also took that you know that year of running Invested in myself which is really trying to build. The skill sets necessary to to run again. So i signed up for work through the public speaking coach and i had taken you know. I did feature debate in high school and took public speaking in grad school but being able to speak Forums for sixty seconds or less than being able to adequate we express who you are the candidate. Your policy ideas in under a minute is really tough so i would say that. That was pretty instrumental in being able to formulate a good communication plan. And then the other is. I got some time off of work so i went from fulltime work. Two part time works. That could really get knocking on those doors because they knew that having that face to face interaction is still key to winning a local election so those are the kind of two things they did to invest in myself which is like make the the true commitment to to running giving everything i could and then the other was i would say really committing to the residents and and that is to say you know having his door to door conversations but also trying to meet people where they are which is really trying to be on every social media platform really trying to. You'll be out there in other languages as well as a multi-lingual Being able to have forums where people could ask questions. In their native language i think created inaccessibility. That hadn't been there before over. Thirty percent of our population in the city of mountain view identifies as asia and so that really competed opportunity for me to reach out to the asian american community to make sure that their voice was being heard and twenty teen. I think that there was a lot of policy issues. That were happening both nationally locally. Where the i could see that. Api community getting engaged. In a way that i hadn't seen before

Ellen Kamei City Council Of Mountain View Mountain View Silicon Valley Ranted Kevin Gino Matthew Iran Google Asia Grad School
Elon Musk - The Man Behind Tesla and SpaceX

Talk, Tales and Trivia

07:44 min | Last month

Elon Musk - The Man Behind Tesla and SpaceX

"Well who's elon. Musk well if you don't know you're gonna find out right now. There is so much news internet entertainment on ilan mosque. And i want to tell you that this is only the basics of aeon. Musk who he is. There is plenty to find out about him. I will leave some of the links and the show notes. So don't forget to look but who is elon. Musk and how does he lawns story began. Well he is a visionary entrepreneur and the co founder of paypal and tesla motors as well as the founder of the new space x program which is very popular to day his astounding success has given rise to comparisons to the uniqueness of howard hughes and the tenacity of a henry ford but he did have an often difficult childhood like most of us kids his own age made fun of him from his own descriptions the years were lonely and brutal alon is quoted as saying they got my best friend to lure me out of hiding so they could beat me up and that hurt. That's when i realized that they were going to go after me non stop. That's what made growing up difficult for a number of years. There was no respite. You get chased around by gangs. These gangs tried to beat the insert. Swearword here out of me. And then i'd come home and it would just be awful there as well but not all was wasted. This difficulty cultivated itself into a relentless work ethic a never ending tenacious vision of the future. You see enron was born and raised in south africa and he spent some time in canada before finally moving to the united states thin and the united states. He was educated at the university of pennsylvania. A very good school majoring in physics. That's when ilan started to excel and experiment to soon. Become a serial tech entrepreneur with early successes like zip to an x dot com. He took on two majors at the university of pennsylvania but his time there wasn't all work with a fellow student. He bought a tin bedroom fraternity house which they used as an ad hoc nightclub will. Musk graduated with a bachelor of science and physics at all as a bachelor of arts in economics from the wharton school for ilan. Physics made the deepest impression. He is again quoted as saying and somewhat giving directions to boiling things down to their fundamental truths and reason up from their. Musk was twenty four years old when he moved to california to pursue at phd in applied physics at stanford university with the internet. Exploding in silicon valley booming. Musk had entrepreneurial visions on his mind and dropped out of the physics program just after two days but in two thousand and four. Musk joined to engineers to help. Run tesla motors. You've all heard of tesla motors right. Well this is where. Musk was integral and designing the first electric car. There's no doubt the electric car is the car of the future. But his first car the he designed was the tesla roadster as we are all aware of the tesla has become one of the world's most popular and coveted car brands and is still growing in popularity in the united states and in many different countries tesla and the electric car are taking over but we must never forget about musk's early interest in reading philosophy science fiction and fantasy novels and how that played a big role. I mean a huge role in the inventor that he is today. It is reflected in his sense of idealism and concern with human progress. He aims to work in the areas he has identified as crucial to our future specifically the internet. The transition to renewable energy sources and space colonization and. Ilan has been all over the media. Making three podcast episodes on the joe rogan experience while the first one in which he smoked. Marijuana was pretty funny but in a maximum article. I found this elon. Musk's third appearance on the joe rogan. Experience podcast the genius. Tesla and spacex. Ceo did reveal intriguing plans for a floating tesla. Musk revealed that the long awaited second generation tesla roadster could have a space x package that would allow it to hover at a limited altitude above the ground. Something that we have never seen before with all these new inventions floating around. Is it any wonder why everyone is watching. And curious about ilan's next big thing. Well at tesla fans are awaiting the cyber truck which will make an appearance at the end of twenty twenty one and the exciting numbers are in for ilan's wealth elon. Musk started twenty twenty with a worth of about twenty seven billion dollars and was barely in the top fifty richest people then in july of twenty twenty. Musk past warren buffett. The great billionaire to become the seventh richest person in november. Musk raced past bill gates to become the second richest person. Musk has gained more wealth over the past twelve months then gates his entire net worth of one hundred and thirty two billion dollars and according to cnbc elon. Musk just became the richest person in the world. With a net worth of more than one hundred and eighty five billion dollars alone recently had a new marker for his wealth and that is so cool because of all his inventions and his time spent caring and wanting the united states and the world to move ahead has made a name for himself. There is no doubt an increase in tesla's share price pushed. Musk past jeff bezos of amazon. Who had been the richest person since two thousand seventeen. You see musk's wealth surge over. The past year marks the fastest rise to the top of the rich list and history but why because he is investing in the future. It marks a dramatic financial turnaround for the famed entrepreneur. Because he cares about what happens in our future so with all his wealth experimentation and knowledge elon. Musk is our future and for those. That are young enough to dream about being an elon. Musk it must start with your curiosity with reading and learning more and more about new and different things and that i want for you and your children now and in the future.

Musk Tesla Ilan Mosque University Of Pennsylvania Wharton School For Ilan United States Ilan Elon Howard Hughes Alon Joe Rogan Henry Ford Enron Paypal Stanford University South Africa Silicon Valley Roadster
"silicon valley" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

NASA In Silicon Valley

11:07 min | 1 year ago

"silicon valley" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

"More. Yeah we have a Joseph. Urban here says well cargo air-taxis be allowed to Flatiron Asli before four passenger taxis so Maybe Joey and I will tag team this one but all start. I think As autonomous applications come forth north Certification I go back to that because that's also part of this. How do you certify an autonomous system right? So that's a question that we have And we're doing research to explore what that means generally folks do believe you know. Flying Cargo may come before flying passengers right just as a natural progression but there are still lots of questions. Even if you're a cargo autonomous flight Yeah no I totally agree. I think the cargo stuff is where we'll learn a lot probably before the passenger stuff but that's a somewhat separate question from how autonomous they're allowed to be in the airspace. How do they prove that they can still stay safe? You know you have the benefit of not having people people onboard. But you still can't have it doing bad things in the airspace or anything on the ground rate So there's a lot of questions to answer but I would guess yeah. A lot of the things in cargo would happen prior later to passenger activity. You make sense. I think it goes back to what you said. Joey is performance based solution right. So let's understand the performance of these vehicle and then how do we integrate them into. Who are national airspace? And those are still questions that need to be resolved. Always the same goal. Here's a cool idea from space. TV Net they're asking. We'll augmented reality. Holiday used to display virtual roads in the sky. Could you that yeah definitely can we. We sort of have we've seen it and we've done a little bit here as well and the roads road. You know it can be as simple as you know cylinders that you know you have to stay within but again we're getting to these beyond visual insight things And there's not necessarily a pilot on board for the small drones owns. Obviously it'll be hard to carry it You know it. It is more about. How much can be an autonomous operation? Right visualizing leising your plan visualizing the airspace structure visualizing a different aspects of your operation Augmented reality could be a key. Part of that We actually tested some of that in Texas as well. We had folks with the Goggles on looking at the data from the air traffic side as well as the management side of that and interacting with the aircraft in the air in terms of Zooming in on them and saying information that's available digitally So you can see folks managing and dense environment. Maybe just being aware of everything that's going on Could have a lot of value so yeah some work is actually going on in that direction already. That's awesome that. Seems like a perfect use for that kind of psychology seems really helpful We have a question. Here from mega man be X.. Are Do you think draws play a bigger part in crime prevention. I E monitor the streets streets overhead enroll time etc.. We are now that a lot of public safety organizations are looking at using drones more and more And Yeah and if you think about safety and security one of the big things. We've seen a lot of success on you can just see it in. The news is search and rescue operations. Cities are able to buy these drones can actually see heat on the ground so at night they can be flying and see a lost child in field right And and then send folks to that location You know obviously you can do a lot of good things with drones right. Yeah One of the other cases a fire department wanting to send a drone out ahead head of the truck because it can get there faster to survey the scene before the people get there to fight the fire That's another use case. That people envision again the airspace has to be ready for that right rates. Go back to the the hotdog drones. You have to get out of the way of that. That fire zone coming through right so without a unified a system to share that the information you you can't really make that happen cleanly But yeah there's a lot of interest in in from police and fire and and other agencies to to use these for are the things that they already do. I think we already see a lot of emergency response. Application say I think with the recent fires here in California we saw some of that here as well. the the tools provided a great insight for some of those for example firefighters to fight the fires that were were blazing and then also for Like volcanic eruptions. There's been there's been a whole host of other use cases For Surveying and providing emergency response but like Joe was saying we need the rules of the road there right how these aircraft are gonNA operate or these are gonNA operate to really enable them to do their missions and we think about public safety keeping the public safe but these drones can actually keep the first responders safe as well right so they can send a drone to the top of roof to see bad guys or whatever it might be or someone that might help with actually putting people in harm's way I right so safety does go both ways So there's a lot of really good uses for this In in the police and fire realm right and in some cases like in a testing in Corpus Christi. We had the fire department there with their job as well so working closely with Exactly yeah we got the fire department as well Corpus Christi Police and fire great partners. They're organized by the FAA FA test site in Texas And again they had drones already in their inventory. They're participating with us in the flight testing getting some feedback on the concept as a whole and US understanding how they already used their drones and make sure that the traffic management system and the concept still accommodates what they would like to do. It's really really important to get that feedback early and often So yeah we're we're already seeing these agencies do that. The police were interested in using it obviously to identify drones right like if in the future. There's more of these in the air. They want to know that they're supposed to be there. They're allowed to be there. They're doing something good and not bad. So police who have an interest in knowing the space is safe around the public as well. Of course. Yeah I of course making me picture of the Fifth Element Scenario Asks with drones. You can have many many small missions starting starting an ending constantly. So how do you ensure efficient use of airspace with an unknown number vehicles entering the airspace. At any time it sounds like a lot of unknowns is a lot the potential drones. Yeah and I think you do want to Stepped approach right gradual approach to build the system right now to handle twenty thousand thousand operations a minute than a city block right. You don't have to have that system ready today but how can you start to enable Thirty forty fifty operations over a city at once. Right and then you'll start to see where there are some issues with them sharing the airspace or information so that they can all accomplish what they wanNA do and slow. You can build up those densities and that's kind of been our approach in the research. Yeah and we see that approach being adopted as an industry right as they come up with standards around this based on our research to help inform the airspace They're not looking to solve the problem twenty years from now they want to enable more and more operations today and tomorrow and it is that scaled. Approach So we'll come up with solutions to make sure that the architecture and the concept will support them. I'm in the future. Don't box off any solutions. And and it's it's going to work it's GonNa work and I would even up level that complexity right so you can have drones operating below four hundred feet and then above that you have these electric Urban Air Mobility vehicles flying across Urban Centers men above that your commercial air traffic so so. How'd you have interoperability across all of those layers and that same density of operations and that's actually where where the real Fund research. Where where some of our work comes into play is how do you have that air traffic management system to support all of these new entrance? And all this Density of operations we expect in the future right. I raise you one up level right when you go sixty thousand plus traffic and then you have folks that Wanna fly over sixty thousand feet. Maybe you know maybe autonomous vehicles. Maybe not but how do they show that. Airspace up there with autonomous vehicles. How did they get up there? I in the officiant way such busy Inter operate and you know Work well together the whole space for you online. Do you think maybe one more question question are there and throw out. Well we have a question. here what was the biggest barrier for you personally getting hired but we always get questions like this and people want to know. How did you to get started at NASA and Yeah Yeah Rebecca Louis? Sure so Often they'll start so I'm an aerospace engineer. So that's what I studied in school. That's what I got my bachelors and my masters in And to be honest I've always been passionate about Aircraft and flight and specifically flight controls. And that's how I got started but I think there's a whole host of opportunities and avenues I don't think you have to study aerospace engineering nor necessarily even just the era. So there's there's a whole different set of feels undisciplined. That make our researcher reality right. We have people who are psychologists engineers You you know analysts people who work with data. So there's a you can really do anything so I think it's all about the passion if you're interested in seeing how we can push the bounds and bring in all all of these new entrance bringing innovation and into air traffic management. I think there's so many ways you could come in and play a role here definitely and just to illustrate that with the the Stroh and Traffic Management Project that we had We had folks that were Aero. Engineers are very important to understanding the system and how the equals work and all of those sorts of things I'M A computer engineer. So I'm not an engineer by training So that's important and kind of building systems a lot of computer scientists computer engineers helping with this as well And then you do get systems. Engineers and physicists and other folks that really matter in doing these human factors people right that understand again. chevrons Louis was talking earlier about. What are these new control systems? Look like how two people interact with them. It's a completely new system. We're talking about so we don't really know how the human needs to interact and impact the exactly. And what makes we'll make their job easier or harder So all of those kind of folks are really important in building out a system like UTM. And that's what we had in our team. It sounds like it makes sense you've talked. What about so many aspects of this work different facets different layers you kept saying different layers of The system you need so many different perspectives on that. So that's awesome so that's good news. News people out there. Yeah it really does take a team. I think you have a team with whole wide range of disciplines that really allows some of this technology to come to light. Sounds like it. It's a great place to solve hard. Problems aeronautics really offers what it brings a lot of people. That's what brought me in a good place to solve really hard problems that make an impact fascinating fascinating awesome. Well this has been awesome. Thank you guys for joining us today. We have just about run out of time. But thank you for being here and thank you to everybody who joined joined us in the chat on twitch will be back in the New Year so follow NASA on social media to hear about upcoming shows and to see past episodes of this show you you can check out. NASA dot Gov slash aims slash NASA in Silicon Valley. Live right. Things are watching. We'll see.

engineer NASA Joey Flying Cargo Texas Rebecca Louis Flatiron Asli Joseph Corpus Christi US Corpus Christi Police FAA Urban Air Mobility California Wanna Joe Urban Centers
"silicon valley" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

NASA In Silicon Valley

11:21 min | 1 year ago

"silicon valley" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

"Who has the right away in certain scenarios and and how do you share that information and make sure that everyone's aware of the same rule set and things so that is a lot of the research we do as well? So that's really the traffic management system. It's you know defining those roads the procedures Making sure everyone's checkout on all those things to enable all these operations to happen. Yeah yeah that's a good thing and you know you and you have on your phone. It tells you when there's a traffic jam ahead. Let's the next couple of services right and that would be part of the system as well. There is whether ahead or there is a lot of drones over here so maybe you should go for their sharing data so that you can make those decisions awesome. Yeah that's really clear cool We have a question here from Chen Dane Will Jones have an option for multitasking. For example all the junk could be delivering a kidney also acting as a traffic camera in routes so they have like different. I think the person waiting for the kidney new hope. Maybe it's it's focused on the kidney but in general. Yeah it's all about the vehicle capabilities. What did they design the vehicle to do and the idea with our research with traffic management and and and all those sorts of things? How do we make sure we don't cut off any of those use cases? How do we make sure we enable folks to do the things they need and want to do in the airspace safely really So yes And we have looked at drones being re purposed en route. You may be doing regular traffic surveillance. But then maybe there's a search and rescue go to happen and that drunk could be re purposed in-flight and and take off and do something. So this idea of repurposing definitely out there and I would say for whether it's single task or repurposing multitask tasks. You know what you need is the secure communication navigation platform right so you have to be able to communicate to that that vehicle that drone or that you am and be able to have that communication nations secure and that's I think as you have multiple tasks that still is a foundation is how do you have safe and efficient operations right. Yeah cool the So this year you guys actually had a big milestone year right. Tell us about what went down right. I mean we've been doing this since two thousand fourteen you know Researching this drone traffic management system. And we've been kind of building up in complexity of the kind of cases that you can handle so when we got to this summer We actually executed executed a A flight test to demonstrate the most mature version of the system. We have and we did that in an urban environment. So we flew in downtown Reno and we flew in Corpus Christi. Texas exists With the help of the test sites at those areas and many many partners doing that with us right And showing how the the system would work in an urban environment and find out where the limits are where the gaps are and where it works. Really well That's what we did this summer and that was a really exciting time for US awesome. Yeah you guys got video of that. Didn't you all right. Yeah we probably have some tell us about if we can assure so. Yeah you're looking at Reno here. Are you looking at a couple of drones Taken off from the top of the building and you can see. They're flying lying near the casinos and they're coming really close to each other actually more space than you can tell from the ground here and the key thing is that the two pilots for those vehicles know what the other one is is doing. Because they've been sharing information. You can see one holding up here all another one passes by again. That's the rules of the road stuff. We were talking about Testing all those concepts and here. You're seeing kind of a mission control centre with folks from NASA as well as the Nevada test site working together to execute these these activities interesting. So you're not the only one there joey you guys have you. Yeah I had the chance to go out and observe the UTM test both in Reno in Texas and I would say seeing the drones flying in the urban environment Really makes it tangible right. This is a reality. That's coming fairly soon to see how how it's a combination of software They they leverage cloud services plus the drone technology plus the interplay of the folks on the ground. You really see what Joey was referring. During two as earlier as kind of the national airspace kind of in a miniature version running in these field trials which is great to see and it really lends itself to help us understand and what are still some of the major questions that have to address. So all the data that's collected from these Demonstrations is really I think very valuable. Oh Yeah what was your experience like tiffany. Well so I seem to remember into near anything like that so I I was going to cover and help them apply you know the research that they're doing for the public but I mean I would say Reno was code and then Texas was very very hot I would say you know. It was really a great experience to see the team kind of just Ev. Ethnic every day was different They learned something one day and they applied it the next day and even when their challenges to see them all kind of come together fix come up with a plan fit. The next day was was really great to see and to have covered this project for. I don't know if he for years. Now it's kind of great to see see you know. They come together this accomplishment with them it was really cool. That's awesome. Yeah so what. What would you say you learned in the end from these tests in downtown? Yeah you know I mean it sounds kind of silly to say aloud but it's really important to know that we learn that the system works. We're actually you can actually do the things we thought it should be able to do right. It helps Jones say separate again. It's not the only layer of doing that. It's a key layer of doing that You can make sure you have access for priority operations you can actually identify. The drones owns in the airspace digitally and and in other ways So all of those pieces were executed in that in that airspace and the other key thing is finding out more about what it takes next to fly in that environment right like kind of what kind of things makes this hard right. Let's go there and fly that and it's not again. It's not flying drone right. A lot of folks can demonstrate something with with one drone and a lot of folks have done that with a lot of cases but bringing a full system out with many stakeholders trying to collaboratively manage. This airspace and execute missions is really important to do and finding we're we're more work needs to be done and where things look like they're solved right and that's what these flight tests do for us. Perfect and so. What's next for the Drug Traffic Management Project? So so a lot of this you know we've been continually handing off to the FAA. We talk about a partnership but it really is a partnership we we meet with them often. probably more often than they would like. Yeah we're we're talking with with them quite often to make sure we understand what the FAA is thinking about where this is going to make sure that what we're we are research tracking with that and maybe leading it a little bit if we can But they're going to be executing a pilot program as well as a second part of a previous pilot program and we WANNA help them in that execution and really. That's about taking the technologies news that we've been developing with the FAA and our industry partners and making them real in the space. It's a it's an important step in that direction. So we're going to. We're going to keep going in that way. All right. Excellent Great We have a question here from resonated. Games is there any fundamental concept that those in the private or commercial Sector Hector testing of the drones should be paying attention to there are so many pieces to this rate so a lot of folks are specialized in a certain area might be on the platform itself building. You know a detective avoid censor. How do you actually see things in the airspace and get out of their way And I think that continuing to put all of those lanes is important. I think understanding the ecosystem as a whole is also really important. I think folks that Do work on important sensors and it's important platforms. It's important for them to also understand the ecosystem in which those drones will operate so just trying to keep pace and understand where the research is heading where the FAA is signaled. Things are going Just trying to to stay abreast of all that stuff is really important. Yeah Yeah Here's a comment on the traffic management system. Maybe can respond twisted. Did metals asks. The pilot will be watching a movie just like now. Ninety five percent of the time so drone pilot will be watching on screen. We'll I would love to watch movies. Ninety five point five percent of drone pilots. I understand okay. Are they watching their flight. ONSCREEN are they physically watching the aircraft or are they watching some representation of their operation on a screen. I guess that's the question I think it's more the latter right again. Because we're we're trying to build a system so that these vehicles can go beyond visual line of sight of the operator the pilot. Oh yes all right. So they're not gonna be able to just wash it and dry And that's how you enable all these business cases you can't have someone watching the drone if you're going to go deliver that thing you know Five miles away. You know you can't have someone or a line of someone's watching that. So how do you build a system that allows that so yeah there would be some representation of the operation occurring that the person that's in charge of that operation would have access to. It might might be as simple as a moving map with some alerts that are coming onto it right. Something like you'd see on your you know For for your regular driving right something that's letting you know where you're going or it could be more advanced right. It could be a three D. view it could be a first person view really depends on the mission and the environment. You're flying in what the future rules actually are to do that. So I guess yes. Yes I would add. Regardless of whether it's a drone pilot or a pilot on board with these new types of vehicles there's going to be different ways of interacting with the vehicle and and controlling the vehicle just as automation increases and There's changes in how those vehicles fly. I think there's GonNa be some changes in that traditional pilot flight deck or cockpit cockpit relationship. And how you interface with that is going to change and that's also another interesting area of research All the way from you know human computer interface logic jake that goes behind that as well as do I push to to land or take off or is there an easy fly button right. So there's all kinds of new ways to engage with with an aircraft whether it's a drone more some of these new vehicles that's a really interesting area now. I think one of the key. Things were a lot of research on from industry as well as the NASA society is out of these pilots. Maybe control more than one of these right. Does it have to be a one to one relationship between one pilot and one active operation for. Can you extend that further further. Can you actually have three people controlling eight vehicles or it'd be one controlling to like what are the limits of that and what tools need to exist in order to make sure sure that again happens very safely. Yeah for sure. Your question here from Tom Oh no. One is there any corporation With autonomous car research. I expect there would be similar challenges and opportunities for with communication and control. So I think the same Principles of of autonomous car autonomous vehicle. Self driving cars. Are we wish to call it now. Some of those same principles are I think. Important in in aviation as well also What can I understand what my environment is presenting to me right so do I have some awareness of what my environment is for airplanes that would involve where aircraft often drones it would involve weather Knowing how strong your communication signal is to your base operations all of the same types of of questions about communication indication safe communication reliable communication Understanding of the environment around you being able to react appropriately to the environment around you knowing the rules of the road that Joey kind of reference. Whether you're actually on the road or flying flying in the air those are all the same principles. Yeah.

Reno FAA Joey Chen Dane Will Jones Texas NASA US Nevada Tom Oh Corpus Christi
"silicon valley" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

NASA In Silicon Valley

11:21 min | 1 year ago

"silicon valley" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

"As NASA as well as industry and other research institutions they are looking to. Did you understand what are the infrastructure requirements and their sensor requirements but then also things such as lighting requirements right. What kind of procedures are needs to be developed for the that type of infrastructure So there's a whole host of information that would come along with the infrastructure that that will be needed for these vehicles to land or take off from from locations near US right. There's lots of interesting research there. Yeah Yeah the research. Can I lead the way to those answers discovers the questions and AH yeah. That's interesting Maybe just one more and this question came in a while ago from Hobbs Fifi Five. So maybe it's been answered but I wanNA know is this like flying cars was the question. Can we call these flying cars or is that something else well so if you if you want to call them flying cars you technically can i. I mean some of these vehicle configurations do have wheels right for landing full. Some do some. Don't right so if you have wheels and you can actually do taxing. I guess technically if if you can do all the flying car You know people do call them. Urban Air Mobility vehicles due. To the fact they can perform a number of different functions and have slightly different operations perations than what we're used to today right so the terms you use can change but essentially. It's like an air taxi flying car kind of whatever you wish to call it. The car car implies a lot of freedom right and that's that we were mentioning earlier. I'm so most of these. Initial vehicles are probably more like the air metro honestly was mentioning earlier right there. Kind of designated resonated. Where they're going to go if you wanted to call that a car sure you could? But in general it's more like a subway or yeah. It's going where it's going to go and you can help you get there quickly quickly to start us off. Yeah okay cool all right. Well let's move on to our next topic so that we don't run out of time but we're GONNA come back more questions later. So I know that NASA has already done on a bunch of research or several years that really helped lay the groundwork for this urban mobility. Work that you're doing so joe you're a big part of that. Can you tell us about the system. You're works on yeah so For the past five years or so we have been working on How do you manage small drones at low altitude at kind of a big go? How how do you have thousands of small drones flying over the state of California? Taking care of things So again that's the current air. Traffic Management System was not designed a to handle that kind of traffic. So how do we enable those use cases in those business cases to occur without overloading the current system and keeping everything as safe as possible. So that's what came about Our research was called. UTM US traffic management and again US traff managers means or. How do you manage drones? Right how do you draw the. US is the drone. That's right. I know favorite news we get bonus points compounding. Yeah Yeah We. We were focused again on small drones trying to fifty five pounds and under okay. And we're talking about low altitude to believe four hundred feet and under but again you can accomplish a lot of things just in that airspace space with these kinds of vehicles and it made us ask certain questions and develop certain systems and certain things with partners and the FAA that lays the groundwork for some of the still open questions Sion's for urban mobility that we have been talking Yeah yeah that sounds familiar kind of work. You're doing You mentioned of applications. What are some examples for small drones? There there are a lot Usually the you can actually classify them into some of the more interesting ones into the threes dirty dangerous and Dole jobs. Because a lot of job you can do with these drones that can actually keep people safer that are doing them right infrastructure inspection for example. You know looking at a cell tower taking pictures and making sure it's working correctly People die climbing those towers every year right and and other kind of power line inspection. These jobs aren't always the safest jobs but you can make them safer by using drones thrones for agricultural applications as well taking pictures of your field in doing analysis on that as well as public safety things fire and police agencies are using these a lot more at a local level large companies talking about delivering things to your doorstep again. All this can happen with drones under fifty five pounds and under four hundred feet. So there's a Lotta things you can actually do with them right. Yeah for sure. And how do you let everyone do all those things simultaneously and keep the airspace safe. That was kind of the research that we were looking at us. Because that's that's always the key right there. Yeah what was your role exactly. So I was the chief engineer for the project so it was really about kind of coordinating a lot of the technical aspects of it I did focus a lot on the software aspect of it so we talked about automation earlier. In the airspace management. How automated in the future to handle all of this traffic? So how do you build a system that enables all this stuff to happen. You know. It's it's cloud based and it. It leverages a lot of best practices in the software industry With our knowledge and expertise at NASA for air traffic management things. And that's really what what we were looking at and Joey won't admit this but he was the brains behind the the UTM project. And I would say that Joey in his team most recently won the NASA software of the Year award. So that's actually kind of a big deal so we'll give joey shadow for that. We we have a lot of brains on the project which is great right. That's how you make successful unique perspective having a lot of people with a lot of different backgrounds to come to that is how you kind of get to these innovative solutions. Great Place to kind of allow that to happen. Yeah Awesome congrats So what are some specific Abilities you gave the drones or the system Like you want to keep them. Keep them separate specific examples. You know we had sort of clean sheet to begin thinking about how to get this done a clean sheet with the understanding of how the experts works vehicles work right so those bounds. What what do we want this to do? One of the key things is how do we help. Make sure the drones don't run into each other some that helps them stay safely separated Some degree Also to keep them separate from traditional aviation how do we make sure they don't fly into other aircraft right. Can you build some system that helps helps with that process. You know one layer of this isn't going to be the end all and be all of these answers. But how do we start this process of keeping the airspace safe. Yeah also. How do we allow folks that are doing these operations on the vehicles that are doing his upbringing identifiable right we don't want just rogue unidentified flying around the in your space right To keep the airspace against safe. There's kind of security aspect to that as well And then you have some priority for important Morton operations right so for example Recently there was actually a drone that delivered a human kidney transplant. That was actually transplanted into a person. Successfully excessively right So that was demonstrated when when important use case for drones. Yeah how do we let that happen. Without being hindered by drones that are delivering hotdogs to people. They make sure the on drones get out of the way right and let the kidney drone. Come through you know. That's just one example. These priority operations need to be taught of his important in the system as we designed it out. There's a lot of the important class of operations you can you can. You can think about but they D- is how do we make sure that that can actually occur right that all of this can occur right. You'll get your dogs. After the kidney gets delivered thirty seconds later and I would actually add that services that Joey just slade out they are extensible and applicable for any new entrant right so joey was talking about how they were applied for Drones you can think about for these larger urban air mobility vehicles vehicles for any new entrant Zeppelin. These same tenants can be applied. So it's actually a really great foundation for us to build off of an extend for new entrance into our national national airspace. Yeah Yeah it's a clear how supports the same thing as working in China in the end. The key thing. Is You know the current system again. Air traffic controllers don't want to be controlling controlling a forty pound drone. Two hundred feet right they. They're not have enough to do with your credit rating. They don't WanNa hire ten thousand more operators to you you know all of these journalists. This is the automation of the airspace and allowing these entrance and again a lot of these things. We'll translate over to This this air taxi urban world. Yeah finding out how much of that transfers over much to change a little bit But we have a foundation to start with totally. Yeah so they. Kind of enters genesee twenty-five question here management will be Thomasson Mason. Yes it will be a time as it will have autonomous aspects. Doesn't end you. Just push a button and the airspace is completely free to go And the autonomous the the autonomous nature of it will increase over time right. You know when you get started you only have so many operations and you might have a good amount of human supervision but the thing scale out how much of that can be automated and making sure you do it again in a safeway. It's more of a continuum right so it's there's going to be pieces of it. That are automated some functions ends. And how does that can continue to grow as four-time yeah makes sense building upon it right exactly. Yeah so The German traffic management system. What does it looked like or feel like for a user a pilot like if I want to fly drone? What am I gonNA see? Yeah in the future hopefully it would be very transparent. It shouldn't be a big burden to actually use the system So there's actually a layer between you and the airspace and it would be kind of a service provider to get into the airspace. Almost like a cell service provider. You want to make phone calls. You have a service service provider and you can talk to other service providers cleanly So you would have one of those providers that get you access to the airspace right. You would tell them what you WANNA do. Maybe your intent. I'M GONNA fly from here to here ear and I'm going to do it about this time. The ideas that the service providers share that information amongst each other they do what's necessary to keep the space safe and de conflicted and messages flowing that I need to flow and you as a pilot. Just take care of your mission right you just fly your operation. How much of that operation is automated not automated? You know that depends in the future how far you go uh-huh But a pilot would be in charge of that operation and would do it cleanly and receive information back from the service providers about any changes in the airspace or things. You need to know right like there's a storm coming up exactly. There's an emergency operation since right. Yeah but kidneys coming through right now. Something nothing now. I was just GonNa add that I think there's the whole host of different types of operations Kind of lends itself to setting up different missions right and then I'd also add that the tools and technologies and the integration with the partners That was built up under. UTM I think is a great model They interface with a whole host east of Industry partners along with the FAA and that same model of collaborative innovation is what we're aiming for and I wanted to go back to earlier you somebody asked about Like traffic lights. There's I forget what the question was saying. There will be digital traffic lights not physical things up in the sky but but you told me that we can think of the traffic management is like rules of the road that we win driving right. Yeah you know we we think about driving today the folks that are driving living in general you hope and expect that they knew the rules of the road right. They know what a red light means. They knew what to do. When you both come to a stop sign at the same time? They know how fast you can go on the freeway. And how to change aims lanes those kind of things don't exist for drone traffic right. So how what are those procedures. What are those rules?.

NASA Joey US Urban Air Mobility FAA California chief engineer joe Dole Sion Thomasson Mason China
"silicon valley" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

NASA In Silicon Valley

09:58 min | 1 year ago

"silicon valley" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

"That's got a plane with a telescope forty seven size telescope in it also reveal even I built a spectrometer for that one and that was all about understanding the chemical fingerprint says twin and understand the makeup of the universe and the communities very excited about the most ambitious infrared space as telescope to be launched in about a year and a half from now James Webb Space Telescope the James Webb is a successor to hobble I didn't mention Hubble Hubbell's amazing observatory right now and transform the way we understand the universe that is worked in the ultraviolet and visible with a little bit of infrared but it's been most sensitive and the show demonstrated the power of putting telescopes and Space James Webb is very different and James Webb is going to be the biggest observatory we have put in space wow a collecting area almost seven times larger than Hubble with a sensitivity a hundred times more sensitive than hobbles crazies Hubbell's already incredible images it gives us but what's GonNa to be what gets me excited about James Webb it's the first time we've had a telescope to look at the birth of galaxies we have never had an observatory that can look that deep into the universe because of its sensitivity and also exploiting eating the infrared to peer deeper into the universe that will potentially catch the birth of galaxies for we will see this baby Ellie's baby galaxies the deepest we've gone with Hubble with that wonderful image the Hubble deep field Hubble stared I heard a piece of the sky for over a month yeah and revealed that there so many billions of galaxies there those are quite a toddler galaxy uh-huh galaxy that have worked themselves out the baby or the birth of galaxies is very unknown one of the biggest onion questions is how did the galaxies four and one in particular we now have observed over the last couple of decades that all the large massive galaxies are fueled by a supermassive black hole these are black holes that are thousands to millions to billions billions of solar masses teaser incredible beasts we have no idea how they four nor do we know whether you need a supermassive black coal to form a galaxy or whether the galaxy has got massive four and the supermassive black hole wow we have chicken and egg yeah dilemma James Webb is GonNa tell us that black holes come first right or did GAL Jeez wow I didn't even realize that we didn't know these things excited so much to learn yeah I think we have an animation do James Webb Yeah I don't know about this is a Most the going to be the largest space telescope ever launched me launched in March of twenty twenty one you see a eighteen segmented primary mirror that's coated in gold. The diameter is six point five meters about the height of a draft the the bottom part that looks silvery purple is a sun shade the Sun Shades about the size of tennis court this is going to be launched just to an orbit around the sun a million miles from earth I mean Hubbell right now is at three hundred seventy five miles from earth so this is a very different way uh of running a space telescope with his large aperture and its ability to look in the infrared it's cooled on this gives it a lot more sensitivity uh-huh and yes it's going to really reveal the dark universe excited we've never and not to play up the star first thing it is going to bring galaxies far far away very much closer to home really an observatory about the first stars and the first Kelly's wow amazing yeah what a good start we can't wait now I always love and Kimberly uh-huh but before we have to let you go let's get a couple of questions in here a valid sparkle asks what's The coolest thing you ever saw looking into space how how can you name just one is it's difficult I was very privileged to work on the new horizons mission that flew by Pluto in twenty any fifteen I was one of the deputy projects is there and to actually see a world that had been just ten pixels in the Hubble Space Telescope Camera Very Blurry and have it come into life and to full-color showing glaciers snow was the most unexpected phenomena that no one had expected to now I know it's closer to home rather than the black holes in the exotic dark matter dark energy that is shaping our larger universe but the fact that we have a lot yet to discover in our home backyard yeah so that was just phenomena I we don't expected this amazing your sciences this is taken you near and far as well we studied the universe we wanna understand and plus when we understand that there are more planets than stars stars hosting lots of these EXO planets on it and trying to understand our solar system in context I mean we have a laboratory here to send our own solar system but then we have thousands and now millions of solar systems yet got to be explored they so much more to do all right well I guess our last question for you is how could we recreate your look for Halloween alouine well go to fabric store make a black with Luke for my dress I just looked for constellation address online it's been great at parties for the lightsaber barred one off of friends teenage child if you wanted one at home just take clear plastic tube and attached to a flashlight with some duct tape and I've learned that if I if I sanded the outer side of just to make a little bit more opaque I created some diffusion effects and I was able to scattering affect and got to see my lightsaber just a tube been a duct tape and a project for Halloween totally doable all right well thanks for the tips and also the wonderful stories about your I love it and exploring the universe and may the force be with Oh things are just about the dark universe first fabulous thank you and we will bring you back out later when it's time to vote on our costumes thank you Thanksgiving really when you could just listen to Kimberly all day I mean really you really could yes yes and just being mesmerized you know you almost feel like you're actually sitting there looking into the sky I can't believe I I could picture it all yeah L. Ever Passion yes yeah she's wonderful well we have two more fabulous yes people coming up now all right right L- get ready for this here's their intro set your phasers to fun. This pair bully goes through their workday advancing the science of flight at our flight a simulator facilities come on out Sumita and emily caused playing as starfleet command. Hello very nice yeah hey don't look so good and I love you have these costumes to of course own star trust startling perfect so espn tell us your name and what you do I I'm Sumeida and I work at the flight simulation labs as outreach and communications and Dan my name's Emily Lewis I'm a simulation engineer contractor at the SIM labs at Sim's all right you're gonNA tell us more about that I know I know what you're wearing star trek uniforms but tells why because I know there's a connection here yes so as a kid I watched star Trek Trek Growing up with my dad the reruns and I was really inspired by Lieutenant Harare Communications Officer and so my costume is is similar to that and you know of course Star Trek with its mission to do discovery and explorer is on you know very similar to kind of what our mission is at at the simulation facilities to advance science for that increasing yeah makes perfect sense and I'm wearing a next generation in star trek costume and I fell in Love Star Trek when next generation was on when I was in college so I watched it in college and I found the vision of Star Trek and its positive approach to space exploration and technology really inspiring and that's one of the main reasons that I decided to study aerospace engineering and why also I'm really happy to be working on NASA Medicare and one other connection that we have between Star Trek and we work at the Simulation Laboratory is star Trek has holiday of you're familiar with it the whole check Zack is kind of a really cool high-tech virtual reality simulation facility and you know we don't have a holiday but we aren't thinking about including Vr the are sometime in the future but we are advancing aerospace technologies and we are supporting.

"silicon valley" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

NASA In Silicon Valley

08:42 min | 1 year ago

"silicon valley" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

"Oh wow okay I have not seen music for pull up a chair and kids have you you gotta love the matching Yes sir word needed so tell surname and what you do here yes my name is Nettie reuss boom I am an aerospace engineer here and I am Jennifer Burien I'm also an aerospace engineer and Nettie and I both work in the unitary tape plan wind tunnel here aims tunnel yeah all right tell us I wrote what you're wearing and then have on coveralls there's nothing really to the colors I also had different kinds of respirators on important part is to protect our lungs and is from the paint that we're using okay yes some UV glasses because we we also use UV lights going to have to hear all about bring your respiratory ass wow that's that's full face respirator serious yeah okay so this is to protect you while you are painting yes what are you painting aerospace engineer not expected right now it's not normally aerodynamic amick models but specifically I think we have photos of we are painting rockets hat cool tell us about how that works so you're painting models of rockets ready to go in a wind tunnel why don't you yes. We die paints scaled models of rockets so we put it in the wind tunnels in wind tunnels are these these facilities that can be small they can be really large as we build scale models we put them in these facilities where the air moves over them if we could we would launch these rockets yes were aircraft and we all the time I we have to first semester model them and we put them in a controlled environment like the wind and and we blew air over them and we measured the pressure distribution across the model that's at the heart of what we're wanting to do most wind tunnel tests okay right before anybody builds it and tries to fly it it you're going to test it all out on a little model yes meet understand better over the the model yes understanding how it acts under these controlled environments environments we have several tunnels here right and when we have the biggest in the world doing yes yes several in tunnels yeah and we had the the world's largest but also the one that we work at it was built in the nineteen fifties before even NASA was NASA under the NEC has a very rich history of the aircraft craft that are predecessor. Aca was responsible for and then all of the the space missions that have had launch vehicles and of course crewed missions have been tested here historic place okay so you guys are in their painting about the paint because that makes no sense anybody the special kind of paint called pressure sensitive paint it is a characteristic pink color because of the chemicals in the paint it makes it really special is when you expose it to UV light it emits midst or fluorosis its own light as well it goes we have a picture of one of the rocket models painted yeah yeah yeah I'm not sorry Hashtag NASA power of pink yes as you can see in the photo the the model to our is is pink you see also so the blue light that's coming around it and that's ginny highlighted so that we have these UV lights Look kind of blue or purplish that's me there in the test section so as you can tell us as a scaled model of rocket this is the rocket that is project artists this is GonNa take the first woman in the next man to the moon and on on that picture Syrian there's a place where the crew will sit and so understanding how that model is designed and how it will be controlled when it is launched is very important into this why we do extensive studies extensive test and now with the pressure sensitive paint you know we're syncing that pressure over the whole vehicle that's that's the new state of the art on what we're applying to wind tunnel testing how long does it take you to paint the model usually a couple of hours and we use spray spray guns than that he has modeled over here and we apply primer a base coat that's white and a red topcoat that's very light which is why gets Nice Pink Color Awesome I have some comments here verified amy I'm in awe of all of you relevant rj the new have you tested tested any models for the future artemis missions to saying and yeah that's what we're doing right now is testing both for the crude artists missions but also so the cargo so the maybe a few images that you'll see on the Internet there are very different vehicles that you use to move people because that has a much higher level of safety eighty that works to keep people safe but then we also move satellites we we're GONNA move rovers we're going to move habitats we're gonNA smart landers unders yeah cargo so there's different rocket no sparing shape that we test and and we actually did very recently yes yes and so that's that's the rocket you're talking about cold yes this is this is Sim One but this is also part of artists and the rocket is the space is launch systems have time love so you guys let's see that and you can tell us where to show this as you can see that's our respirators on on their and we're moving around the tunnel the those small cylindrical sections that you see there at the left is are the boosters boosters that you know and this is you see animations you see two boosters and his corps and this is GonNa lift off up into space so we take those off for painting and then we'll put them back on but yeah a lot of work goes into that you know getting a wind tunnel model even just to that point and so I think it's a really beautiful beautiful because it gives you a really big appreciation for you know when that model is on the launch pad just knowing how many people had a fingerprint on that model on who was involved in all the facilities of NASA and you know what what rich facilities technology and people that we have awesome we have some more questions some to to review and clarify wordsworth that's what makes it pink eye there's different colors so we have the white base coat that goes on and then there's a Taco and the main chemical and there's actually a red red color okay so it's a very light coat though and that's why it ends up being pink and not Red Oh yeah yeah all right scary crazy butter knife again forget that yeah right yeah is there anything special about the paint to keep dust and condensation from accumulating on it while in space so let's clarify do you use the paint only for testing I'm here yes okay very particularly it's just to help us see how pressures are distributed on the model the actual rocket will be painted with real paints okay not this special pay yeah hi tech tool right so it's a pressure sensor basically it is a pressure sensor and yes so traditionally we've had these pressure sensors that are on the on the mind aw yeah they're they're fairly fine but in respect to the area of the model they really course and they're only in these discrete locations so we know the pressure really well there but but like I said at the heart of a wind tunnel tests you wanna know the pressure distribution everywhere on the madrasa that's what the the pain is offering that's really where the state of the art is moving like how do we know the pressure across the whole vehicle in between those sensors right yeah can't figure out what's in between yeah because the sensors are so expensive ends of and you can't put them everywhere there's not enough room and certain type models use this paint to kind of fill in those gaps yeah yeah yeah makes sense sinful seven within cg these models that you're testing for the mission are they simulated in areas other than the wind tunnels painted models. No I would say it's mostly the wind tunnel technology certainly could work here on the benchtop but Yeah it's I would say the main application is in a wind tunnel and of course we we apply as much hardware as we can't we have multiple high speed cameras we will mount for we will start mountain eight high speed cameras emmers around the that's that's what we're capturing so the paint respond to pressure so it's either brighter dimmer.

"silicon valley" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

NASA In Silicon Valley

08:56 min | 1 year ago

"silicon valley" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

"Them there's very few microbes on it and it keeps keeps all of your microbes on the inside and human factually will omit about a million particles per hour and that's like after showering we're really yeah exactly we're just shedding shutting off bacteria and organic molecules all the time so you can imagine if you're studying a sample that has maybe only a few hundred thousand als is going to be like totally overwhelming you don't WanNa take that back to your lab and then analyze yourself like my own so look here okay let's see if you can give us a number for this ballast sparkle asks is there a percentage of how much less microscopic life there is in that desert desert compared to an average environment yeah so in an average environment like if you took like the same amount of seawater you'd probably find about a million bacteria and compare that to the drives nice place in the Atacama where you'll only find about one hundred so it's significant ridiculous well we have a question here from Z. Track how did you get a degree in this did you joining to become scientists scientists. I've loved Geology Edgy since I was in first grade and they loved space too and I actually got an internship here when I was in high school and then I went to college and I studied geology she and Planetary Science and then I went on to get my Phd and Earth and Atmospheric Sciences with a focus on biochemistry. Oh yeah but I think a lot about being a students about being being self motivated and coming up with the set of questions that you're really interested in answering and then learning whatever you need to learn to pursue those questions whether that's geology physics or chemistry history or biology or even English and Gosh I'll tell you being at NASA a lot of what I do is writing yes yeah yeah so there's no one right path it's so now there's follow what you WanNa do and do whatever you need to do right exactly let's take a couple of quick ones and demand says working at NASA as awesome it certainly sounds it if you're married Ian is a D. bag so she's wearing her work outfit is his question so Oh to clarify yes indeed you do work in this yeah so this is what I wear when I'm doing fieldwork in the Atacama but actually I did do some work once in this ancient DNA laboratory Tori where people have to wear suits like this probably even more restrictive with complete coveralls on every day while they're doing extractions from really precious samples they don't want to contaminate okay okay all right so yes this is Mary that's real work outfit but if you want this to be your Halloween costume can you help us figure out some ways we could recreate this look absolutely I think it's going to take a good trip to the hardware store some drill bits overall yeah a lot of what I buy is actually from the hardware Oh really really yeah yeah it makes sense those same stuff yeah yeah can you hands dirty out there for sure right well awesome thank you during his answering questions we're gonNA bring back later on for the voting's but thank you for bringing your samples and your tools and we we will see you in a bit thanks guys hey super cool pretty impressive yes yes you know doable I feel like I've could put together that costume for one day why not don't you research wanted to be married bath me Halloween is awesome lawn to our next contender up next we have chuck come on out Chuck Oh excellent hello as you love Lakota some gloves and dirt some gloves and feel free to come on up table chairs are hard to Tuck in so what does that tell us your name and what you do here at my name is Chuck Cornell Listen I'm a mechanical engineer and I work in the ballistic ranges here at Ames the research center quite interesting we'll hear more about that in a second personal tells what you're wearing I'm wearing basically the standard attire we wear air when we're conducting experiments in the ballistic ranges it's a it's a fun place to work but can be quite dirty so we typically wear lab coats protect our clothes we have typically handle explosives and and various hazardous material so we have the safety Aku trauma you know all these things You WanNa go home with the same number of fingers browser you come in with so goal so this is standard list of grange attire approved by Ralph Lauren I believe designer lab coat see your dirty and you work with explosives what exactly is going on range ballistic ranges there's actually two facilities bility's within the ballistic range complex are currently active one of them's called the Ames vertical gun range and what we do there's we use a large gun to shoot high speed projectiles into the targets to simulate what happens when an asteroid Ra- meteor impacts a planet or moon's surface we observed the formation of the crater where the debris goes etc and fact I've got a brief video that demonstrates that video there you go there is the blue chambers workplace are targets and adjusts the environment according to whatever conditions were trying to simulate the Orange section was our our gun beam there's an impact you see the the the create the debris curtain evolving his materials being excavated as soon as the smoke clears Wallah there you go there's the crater I see it I see it yeah yeah sure regular gun no no no it's not not a typical gun it's it's what we use what's called a two stage light gas gun and the way it operates as you use gunpowder to shoot a piston down a tube that's filled with hydrogen and as the Piston traverses the tube compresses the hydrogen too extreme pressure tens of thousands of pounds per square inch and we then use that high pressure hydrogen propellant medium or what we used to launch the bullet out of our gun barrel and the reason we do that is you can get much higher velocities than you can can with the standard gun our guns in the range complex top out at about eight kilometers per second which is roughly eighteen thousand miles per hour or in this way if you're traveling that speed you could fly from San Francisco to New York in about ten minutes Oiseaux little fun fact where we are in fact the fastest gun in the West a am yes that's that's okay and I know you have you have another one we have some clothes for you you just jump into the chat here as DAS- X. through chuck caps big too low speed razor to sixteen those mechanic's canucks gloves I love those gloves we have various types of gloves off you know depending on what we're trying to do some of them have this you know Geico Geico Gecko like texture and additional working in the ballistic ranges I can save you fifteen percent on your car it's we have subtext to improve manual dexterity depending on what what you're doing okay yeah and what sort of chemicals you're working with because you WANNA protect your your skin and whatnot from Acetone I cool sleepy underscore jerry so cool and I know we're GonNa hear more about the other facilities so let's do that first service if you answered some of these questions the vertical gun that was ranged number one hyper velocity impact testing the other facilities call the hyper velocity free flight facility we use the same sort of gun technology but rather than looking at the impact we shoot small scale models of planetary entry vehicles down a long long flight corridor we take a lot of pictures of them as they fly to to map out the trajectory from that information we can infer the aerodynamic characteristics of of these planetary entry vehicles and I have one right here yeah this this is a picture of one of the models that we've we've shot out over the years now it may look like some sort of drawer pull that you would buy at home depot you know for five bucks but I assure you this is actually a precise scale model of of the Orion capsule and so we do have a video of of one of these tests these Arrow ballistic. Let's see that there you go there's the test section notice all the windows that's one of the reasons you get dirty of sixty four window soclean after every test we launched the models here's here's a video of a model flight and we take three to still images.

"silicon valley" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

NASA In Silicon Valley

08:39 min | 1 year ago

"silicon valley" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

"Hello Everybody Eddie and welcome back to another episode of NASA in Silicon Valley live I'm your host Abby Taber and if this is your first time tuning into the show NASA in Silicon Valley live in a conversational show out of NASA's Ames Research Center where we talk about all the nerdy NASA news you need to know about so today I have with me my friend and officemate tiffany hey everyone I am your co host Tiffany Blake if you didn't know we are live on twitch Youtube facebook and periscope but if you want to participate in the chat and ask guests questions there's only one place you can do that and that has at www dot twitch dot TV slash naphtha right and we are excited today to be holding our second annual NASA themes Halloween costume and 'cause play contests I'm excited I'm flight if you're a fan during last minute Halloween outfit you're in luck we are going to show you a collective NASA inspired costumes and tell you how you can recreate them at home right and if you do end up using any of our species themed costumes for Halloween or some other NASA inspired costume we want to see it so you can share there those with us on social media using the Hashtag NASA costume yeah so before we start how about you remind people about Colo clock okay okay yes so this is our moon countdown clock that you see right here and that is because five years from now in twenty twenty four we are planning to send humans to the moon as part of our program so this clock right here is counting down the days hours minutes and seconds until the next man and the first woman will will set foot on the South Pole of the moon so to learn more about that you can go to NASA dot gov slash artists so should we get right into it yeah she'll we see some guidance yes okay so our first category is every day NASA looks so the the going to see are things that are researchers and engineers where her day to day doing their work doing special tests you'll see them around the center wearing these things so let's bring out our first guest come on out Mary Beth best pay now yeah come on they're excellent we'll give you a minute to get you tools there get all tucked in and you might might have to take off your gas mask does well so why don't you start by introducing yourself to the audience I'll tell us what you do so my name's Dr Mary Beth Wilhelm and I'm a research scientists here at NASA an astrobiologist which means I study the origin of life the evolution of it and then I search for it elsewhere in our solar system so tell us about what you're wearing all right so this look is what I aware when I'm collecting samples in a Mars analog environment on earth so because Mars is so far away and it's so expensive to get there we often go to two places on earth that are like Mars so we can study certain things about it and take things back to our lab studied them what kind of environments on Earth are actually like Mars or is like what are you looking for there right so right now I'm studying this place called the Atacama Desert Chile and it's one of the driest places in the world it it only rains in the region that I visit once per decade that's absurd drives count the number of plants I saw on one hand during our field trip that's so strange and because of that it has some of the lowest levels of biomass on the entire planet so there's very very few living organisms there and US humans are very dirty yeah and that's why I'm wearing the suit because when I'm taking samples I don't want to contaminate the samples I'm working with with your own skin cells and whatever it might be unfolding off we have a photo don't we think so yeah Mary best in the Comma all right tell us what we're seeing here right so this is a me taking a sample from one of the driest places on the planet and here I'm trying to study the extreme limits of life and then trying to understand whether any remnants of life get preserved in the fossil record wow how so you're talking about life like bacteria and things like that yeah exactly microscopic life okay so we're looking for the chemical evidence of life that gets preserved in the rock record and specifically I'm studying type of molecule called the bed eleven bats which we love to eat obviously and the cool thing about lipids is that they're extremely well preserved in the fossil record so if you look back at the very oldest rocks on earth and you're looking for evidence of life you can still find some some of the lipid molecules from those organisms that lived in those environments the first life on Earth yet find traces of it that's still around and so like when we're we're thinking about what we want to look for on Mars we want to try to target these types of molecules they can live for can they can stick around for long periods of time because Mars used to have really nice conditions for life but like three billion years ago okay he used to have a sphere and it would water on the surface and so we I have to look for the remainder of what might have lived on Mar right right if there were any little microbes exactly what parts of them would survive long. That's what you're looking for yeah do you you use your tools here yeah okay so I'm kind of a cool hybrid scientist so I do a mix of geology and biochemistry so I have my Handy Rock Hammer um so I can break open the rocks and then for the really for the really tricky samples we have a this is a drill string so you can see like I have some of the Atacama still stuck on the red dust on there a few of these and then once we get the stuff out of the rock will put it in our sample jar desert being soil samples and you get it in the bottle there actually have a few samples from our last she brought samples from the Atacama among these are some really cool samples I collected from an ancient salt flat this is a probably about a few million years old and you can see some of that black stuff in there those are some of the remnants of the life that lived body of water that formed this how this is Salt Salt Salt Yeah Yep so this took a couple of drills to get out so what do you guys do with assembles when you bring them back acted lab right yeah so we take back all the samples were interested in and then I take them to my biochemistry lab here at NASA and we you dissolve the rock and we pull out all of the chemicals and then we study them with analytical instruments that tell us a lot about the sample like what who who it is what it might have eaten like really information so we'll spend years studying a particular site and did my phd in the Atacama they warned these things for a long time very familiar with buddy match you learn to love the heat I guess yeah I I like a few years ago when we went like the ground temperature's where like well over a hundred degrees so you're sweating inside the suit right you're dressed head to toe totally covered up man I have some questions for you all right willing to take some cushions from the chat. Yeah let's do all right how third is asking is there any kind of precipitation on Mars Arse Oh like precipitation of water so I don't I don't think it's ever been seen before maybe maybe a long time there may have been have to look back at the literature but right now no Mars is one big giant desert and actually comparison the Atacama is a thousand sometimes wetter than than Mars and it's the surface of Mars gave so the dryers place on earth place on times a winter sweater so it's like comparing haring driest place on earth to the Amazon that's the Delta Mars is extremely dry wow but but it's the best place you can practice on earth really likes to practice fence standing okay let me get through some more there's probably five in line for you speed racer to sixteen what material is the suit made of it does it keep cool so the suit does not keep cool at all and their special clean suits so like when you buy.

"silicon valley" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

NASA In Silicon Valley

11:02 min | 1 year ago

"silicon valley" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

"Play my favorite song it is it is that the <hes> it can be helpful on you know <hes> if they need to have a procedure brought up <hes> so <hes> you know help them with different tasks that they're doing and your personnel robotic assistant i can you know voice commanded yeah. It seems handy station what you need from it also check. I think we have another hair and blah. The most adorable herbals impo is built by the japanese space agency <hes> and it's meant to be basically a floating camera can and move around <hes> inside the japanese experiment module <hes> and take over some of the sort of videography chores of astronauts so a lot of times <hes> astronauts astronauts need two documents activities you know so they're filming other astronauts doing things and so <hes> this little robot can take take over that job. Oh some great yeah. I have a question here before we go to our rapid fire questions when we're gonna take as many as possible <hes> but sham family wants to know would robots on the international space station be controlled by houston or command here on earth or would they be in the hands of the astronaut aboard the station all of the above <hes> i mean i just like the there's no one perfect robot. <hes> you know for everything. There's not one specific way that any of these robots would be operated. You know they could be controlled. From from the earth they could operate <hes> you know autonomously or they could be operated also by astronaut so yes yes and actually spheres that we were looking at a minute ago. It does do some things autonomously on space station rate and turn certain extent we have video of docking and undocking no here's oh really okay spheres. Somebody experiments that we've done. What's is fears you know we've we've tried to allow to operate <hes> <hes> and fly around inside the space station by itself. It can be used to carry out things like <hes> interior surveys days can fly with various specific locations. Take readings locations and then fly on yeah do a video of that. Maybe that's what i was thinking of yeah. Let's see if we can get that video. Oh look narratives so there. You see smarts fears. This is yeah. This was a different smartphones so we worked with not just the next assess but this was a project tangos smartphone <hes> that we worked on in partnership with <hes> our friends next door over at google <hes> and here is a picture. This is a video here. Are you guys you see a smartphone on the front of spheres flying around inside of the space station <hes> it's actually going back and forth back and forth flying lawnmower pattern and this is what mission control sees even see video coming down from the smartphone cameras. You can see what looks like a video game on the right side. You can see the path. It's flying and the way points that it's going back and forth worth between so here's flying towards point seven <hes> at the lower right there. There's an image that shows the representation of what the cameras seen that kind of blue thing and this allows us to have a really good understanding of the robot in its environment and what it's doing at any given time yeah awesome. It's so cool so there's your answer to that. We have a comment from <hes> <hes> snow the end. I heart robots your to heart robots. Yeah there were awesome others. Go canada harm others. We jump right into our rectifier session session emphasis on the quick trying to get a lot in our eight tiffany. Yes i have one so let's say for fears fierce. How long did it take to actually create. The robot actually designed that <hes> well <hes> as i said this. This was a project that started m._i._t. With <hes> with an actually an undergraduate engineering class <hes> and so the students worked on that <hes> extensively that led to a number of different prototypes and eventually those were sent up to the space bay station <hes> but you know the reality is that it's hard to say exactly how long it takes to build something because you have to design it test it <hes> there are a lot of things for the space station that we're concerned about in terms of making sure things are safe right of course in terms of like materials and how it operates and all those kinds of things so <hes> a fair amount of time especially with that and then and of course once they get on the space station you know just because you get rain back every single day every single robot that goes up into space. We're still learning how to improve rueben and make them better <hes> a comment about into ball from airplane man nineteen ninety-seven so cute are- yes the j._p. Guy has a question about learning and training to do things. He's like. You guys do it. Is it possible to learn robotics by self study and tinkering with machines. What books or resources would you suggest yes. I would say i would say so. Robotics onyx is it's very broad field so you can contribute to a robotics project. You know with any kind of background. Almost <hes> product product designers per grammars <hes> electrical engineers mechanical engineers so really it's whatever you love to do you know what what would you i prefer to to do and then you know you can contribute then to a robotics team. That's awesome. That's good news could do a lot of different things yeah. I i think a great thing today which didn't exist a few years ago is there are a lot of online classes you can take in robotics and so i think learning by yourself is totally possible. They're even open source research projects that you can contribute to <hes> and so i think the important thing is just to get involved <hes> and not worry about whether or not this isn't a university or at home. I mean the robots at home. Get a little raspberry. Pi and legal set and get started. Yeah nice the more <hes> trick prime queer to your back. I saw the floating square robot assistant astor be or maybe it was the other one. I forget the name. The assistant robots testing on the international space station. You're.

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"silicon valley" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

NASA In Silicon Valley

04:51 min | 2 years ago

"silicon valley" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

"We've done several the x planes using the pressure sensitive paint to it's a new technology is uses optic. So we have the the paint which is interesting because there's the whole chemistry of the paint the application science of the paint, and then the data acquisition. So we use UV lights to excite this paint. It response to oxygen as I mentioned earlier. And so the oxygen is going to come in and quench these molecules. So the molecules they're shining really bright as we saw in the the picture earlier this fluorescent pink light oxygen molecules come in and make it shine really dim. So ox oxygen means higher pressures president if there's an absence of oxygen so lower pressure, then it's not. Serving the luminescent molecules of energy. So it's really bright yet, we use, you know, eight to twelve cameras mounted around the wind tunnel, and we will record the intensity that is being emitted by the paint. Right. So you can know the pressure every point. Yeah. Yeah. In a previous episode of Silicon Valley live if you my colleagues came on. And we're talking about syncing, the the PS P, and you know, we acquaint like young we use cameras that have one million pixels on them. And we use for some of these up to eight or twelve so you can imagine we have twelve million pixels looking at this vehicle. So that's essentially twelve million instruments that we're using to since pressure on traditional models. Maybe there's two hundred or three hundred pressure taps if there's a lot. Sometimes we'll do it even with just twelve pressure taps. But yeah. Using the the knowledge of and the technology behind high speed cameras, high intensity lighting that we used to excite this paint and the and the technology that's come along with the pain. It's really made this possible. That is so cool. Yeah. Want to give a shout out to you director of NASA, Glenn Janet Cavani? She had her start NPS p or she did her peach PSP chemistry did some of that very early wind tunnel tests involving using PSP here at NASA Ames, so very cool. Tender woman questions you have to boroughs what if the tooth? Yeah. This is the base coat, and this is the top coat. So we need both of these for the paint to work on and and often with painting. This this is where all my stress lies is that I take a lot of pride in that in the paint job. And that's one reason why also of ESPN like, you know, there's this Artistique. Learned art behind it that you don't just slap it on. Like, I wanted to do also that the paint responsible. Cool to all long. Does it take for you to to paint and to prepare these models using your pressures paint for some of the larger models? Like we saw in the photo. Go ahead and get that brought back up on screen yet. You know that since we do several different layers, and then we actually have to cure it. So I will bake the solvent out of the paint that that took about eight hours to paint. So, you know, this pain is toxic. So we wear respirators. So I would say that's one of the more like the two physical parts of the job crawling around this wind tunnel and amounting all the cameras and lamps, which is a lot of fun. You get to use your hands and use mechanical skills and think of ways to design lent mounts camera mounts to to make things better. But yeah. And then the the painting wearing that hood for eight hours and finally coming out and taking a breath of fresh air. Do a lot of different things in your. Cool. All right. Well, I think we should keep going can grow. Put your says object. Parts of this. Look familiar to me. But I don't actually know what they amount to. Thus. Yep. So these supercomputer note. One of the eighteen hundred sun, the breach notes we have in the plea supercomputer eighteen hundred eighteen hundred. And then so each of these Huste sixteen processors, so yes need to multiply. And the thing is we all we don't only have sandy bridge. No to have a bunch of e b breach knows roadway. Lows Hosoi note skylight, not Jessica. I don't know any of those things a lot of it. Yes..

president NASA Ames NASA Silicon Valley sandy bridge Glenn Janet Cavani ESPN Jessica director eight hours
"silicon valley" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

NASA In Silicon Valley

05:40 min | 2 years ago

"silicon valley" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

"All right. Teams that we have again run out of time. And while we would love to spend the rest of our show with you guys. We, unfortunately have to think you and sake. Thanks, guys. So remember, you guys are watching us in Silicon Valley live today. We're celebrating national stem day by talking to some of the amazing wonder women of NASA. And if you have any questions for our guests, fill free to write them in the chat. And if you wanna learn more about women at NASA, you can go to women dot NASA dot gov. All right. So let's go now to our fabulous 'aeronautics crew. Let's bring out Nettie Patricia and Sarah come on out. Share having way too much fun. So I think I can you ladies introduce yourselves. And I know you guys are all aerospace engineers, but what exactly do you do? Okay. I'll start. My name's Nettie route. Airspace engineer, and I lead our pressure sensitive paint technology here at NASA Ames. Okay. Three seven through two. I'm gonna space in euro. So. Supercomputing supercomputing awesome. My name Sarah Sousa, and I designed guidance and control systems for spacecraft. All right. Should we find out where you go from? Origin stories have how did you know you wanted to do this? So I will claim that I knew when I was eight months, eight months. Kid when I was why kid is because when I was a freshman in college are sorry sophomore in college. I was able to get a internship at Johnson Space Center and work alongside astronauts who were on the space shuttle and many years later. My sister was going through our photo album. And she she sent me a picture as a picture of my mom, holding me when I was a baby and with a picture of the space shuttle in the back room, and I just I just think everything I've done throughout my life has been influenced by my family, and what we did as kids. I've always space, and it's always been something. I love your parents did. Copy of the day. My dad took the picture. Dad is very much a space enthusiast and a dreamer. And I definitely get that for my dad too. Pretty cool. So what about you Patricia? I remember took me to the planet Tanya when I was like four years old. And then so surprised but all stars you could see. And so I thought that Boeing that I wanted to something space today to and then when you know, when they always ask it's what do you wanna do when you're like a grownup? I was always saying, but then when I was in high school, I was pretty good in math physics. So I decided to go for engineering well like with space outerspace space engineering. Okay. So we have a photo of a young you can we get that front. Well, he's not old voting. Yeah. That's two years old. He's a was thinking, I think one moment after I started my internship here names on the first time, I visited this computer on. I was so surprised he was so big unload. Super Peter happened to have a name that we may know about. Yes. So this super computer. But yet anes we have another supercomputer that he's called Electra. We're actually building a third one Lewis cool those platies and electro rate. So what about unity like, what's what's your origin story? Yeah. I grew up in Tennessee. Remember going to see a see the Saint Louis arch. And I remember driving across the bridge and going to the Saint Louis arch. And I just you know. Lifted both of these things that are studying drafting in high school, and how these are extremely impressive. I wanna do whatever it is that can produce something like this. So I went into college started studying mechanical engineering, and then found fluid dynamics thermodynamics. Wow. You're speaking, my love language, the world made sense at that moment and just kept. We're going my way that had an internship as well here at NASA. Ames we go my way over to the Winton divisions. Wow. This is really cool. Yeah. These giant compressors radiators and all the things that you had studied there in your in your textbooks. We here in life and huge. Yeah. And then I found my way over to pressure sensitive paint, which which was just a a great melody like hardware-software wind tunnel. So really my happy place. A photo of young Nettie..

Nettie Patricia NASA Sarah Sousa Johnson Space Center NASA Ames Saint Louis arch Silicon Valley Boeing Peter engineer Ames Tennessee Lewis eight months four years two years
"silicon valley" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

NASA In Silicon Valley

04:43 min | 2 years ago

"silicon valley" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

"I'm I'm jumping one more time just because this is a good question and attended topics. I know the Abby wants to talk about. This is this comes from Higgs bacon. Awesome. Between Celani Saul titan which moon seems more promising for life. Two for a NASA mission and sell it versus titan. Yeah, I want to be only one I wanna go to and sodas is wonderful because it's going. And giving us sample that's coming out of the planet without us having to dig. But when you look at titan, it looked so earth like it looks so familiar. So titan certainly at least has prebiotics chemistry going on. And maybe there's some kind of lifelike process. We have no idea. So I wanna go to both greedy, and I want to go everywhere. Refuse to choose refuse to choose. Yeah. Do you have what I, I have so many questions. It's quite insane, but I'm not going to be. Things that we definitely want to talk to you about before we go to fly. Abby files, the vials are interesting. Okay. You're sure might let you tell us what's the deal with hydrothermal vents, keep, Dave. We'll zoom in on it and your caves, right? Why do we talk to our buddies who work in the ocean? I think the essence of the question is an, it's because amazingly enough the micro organisms that live in the bottom of the ocean are doing amazing things. They're tunnelling through volcanic glasses and other rock types. And a lot of the organisms that we have in caves are also doing something like that. Okay. So even though they live in what we from our human perspective thinker wildly different environments. But man, their lifestyle is very similar, and we even see genetic relatedness between some of our cave organisms and deep sea, hydrothermal vents. And we've known that within our research group for the last twenty or more years, I think. So we think they're deeply connected mystery of life. So the things you study on land in crazy caves, right? Those crazy microbes and those crazy. Yeah. Right. Compare these different habitat, then that sort of thing tells you, sorry, what you might look for in the solar system on the moon's people were just asking about, obviously, obviously, really interested in how life did all of its stuff on earth. Yeah, but we use this as a template as a as a pattern for. How do we figure out where to look on these other amazing places. Because when you look at our solar system, we got one of everything very kind of body got hot, we got, we got small yet we got dry. Yeah. The shadow for Dave from TD waffle. He's saying Dave's zoom in on the violence. Also LeBron James headband is like saying, let the man speak. 'cause I got questions for example speaking. That's my question. FOX, Tango typed in the chat just like you can. It was asking penny, what are the chances of finding DNA based life elsewhere? And, oh, man, that thing is going too fast, and I completely lost the chain because the chats moving too fast. So anyways, well, it was kind of with that like DNA by base is one sort of way of coding living information. I can imagine a whole lot of other different ways. So since we already understand quite a bit about how how DNA works here we for sure. Gonna look for that, but. I know that nature is amazing and may have great ways to make living things out of other stuff. So we're not just hedging our abouts on one chemical system. People have done work on alternative DNA's where they're sorta similar, but you know, the details are different and we know that maybe there are ways to put carbon together in different ways. Of course, people have long suggested silicon, and we're right here in Silicon Valley. So let's go. Speaking of nature is amazing. Let's leave Valley. I know depart the nice warm temperatures, Silicon Valley, and let's head to Hawaii. We're gonna see if we can get the Skype up and working. Yeah. How's it going..

Dave Silicon Valley Abby NASA Higgs LeBron James leave Valley FOX Hawaii penny
"silicon valley" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

NASA In Silicon Valley

03:23 min | 2 years ago

"silicon valley" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

"And in fact, keep aviation an export for our country. Yeah, we ask one question. Okay. This experimental aircraft you, but I'm not a pilot. What are here is because of the way it's built. It has a really, really long nose, I guess, does it doesn't work to have windows for the pilots look out and you're going to be looking at screens. Does that sound weird and disturbing for pilot challenge? Everything. Again, these are investments made by NASA for the purpose of of retiring risk to do to kind of really important work. Now. This is not really. It's not actually new. We've we've done this kind of work before and at the end of the day you're, you're looking at images from, you know. And I think on the x fifty nine. I don't know how they do it on the x, fifty nine. But on other aircraft, you're looking at images from cameras to alternately, no, no, your trajectory. But but the the last time I flew an x fifty, nine simulator wasn't a simulator anywhere near as nice as the one that about to get in. But the last time I flew on, I can tell you this, it's it's built to go fast. It is not built to turn. Oh, it turns like a pig, try spinning. I hear that's drawing this thing would not turn it was it was, yeah, it was difficult to turn it out now. It's also true that it owes. It can depart pretty easily as well as an aircraft, which is why flight control computers are an important part of it. By the way, those flight control computers going back to the nineteen seventies originated at NASA. Nice. And of course, I. Do those same flight control computers that were in the twenty nine at the time in the f. eighteen hornet when I was a pilot in the navy. So we're coming up on all the time that we have left with Jim. You have a flight to catch do a simulated flight, but a flight nonetheless catch it. I'm gonna fly. We're gonna fly feed. And so there's a ton of questions in the chat, a bunch of comments in there, but I'm sure that they can also direct those questions to. Lutely. Absolutely. And that's be r. s. t. I n. e. thank you so. It's been fun. Always. We'll do it again maybe next time I'll get a whole hour. We'll see. We'll see. Watch your career was very interesting important for your audience to see these. I guess these test tubes with nasty things and it looks like somebody urinated in a tube, and now we're going to talk about it, but we are, but I'll be gone all in the name of science that I'll be gone penny. I'll look forward to watching this later though. All right. All right. Thank you. Appreciate it coming folks as as we take it by Jim, and we're going to welcome our new guest penny, I'm going to sort through some housekeeping and Jim get head on the back and he's gonna come on up. It's okay. Everybody on the show. Everybody who's watching knows this is how the set goes. So. Okay, just a little bit of housekeeping. If you are just joining us, this is NASA and Silicon Valley live a conversational show out of Nasr's Ames research center with the various reach researchers, scientists, engineers, and all around cool people here at NASA where we talk about all the nerdy NASA news that you need to know about. So if you like that we are simultaneously live on twitch YouTube and Facebook. But if you want to participate in the chat, you're going to have to go on over to twitch dot TV,.

NASA Jim YouTube Ames research center Silicon Valley Facebook Nasr
"silicon valley" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

NASA In Silicon Valley

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"silicon valley" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

"I i took our by the intro to computer sciences like an 1999 like for your a college in fiddled around making little like windows and programs and stuff and i was a good thing that struck me was like how similar of felt till like learning another language learning like spanish and french them and they can i quickly realized i could follow instructions with it it quickly went to the point where i'm like i don't even have the vocabulary for this and so um the ah that that was about vows he had to buy computer science that's so came at uh back to selfdriving cars nick gaurs asked what do you think the adoption rate for selfdriving cars will be in the next decade and will they ever reach the price point of manual cars well so twopart question there are forever nears by shin read adoption rate i think it depends on where you live in the us might think that uh if you're in an area where you have the good weather is like silicon valley um it's a lot easier because you know there's a lot fewer things we have to deal with light thunderstorms in snow and stuff like that so i will be easier to to have selfdriving cars out in places like california arizona new mexico first um will they get down to the price point of normal occurs well i mean it depends uh a lot of cars these days are just really becoming you know software platforms i mean you know all the tesla's out there are these days i mean they get software upgrades flip a switch and they go from manual driving to selfdriving so as not by even so much a question of like an ad on i mean the cars themselves are going to be ready to be selfdriving oh yeah all right that's interesting cool dan a quick yeah wordsworth asks what is your favorite science fact were theory there were a pressure the.

us mexico tesla nick gaurs california arizona selfdriving
"silicon valley" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

NASA In Silicon Valley

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"silicon valley" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

"Fell my way here oh nice met people at a conference ends came gave a presentation receive an offer awesome so we'll go volvo more into some of the stuff that you're working on of the terry's working on an of course will get the questions from the cia but folks if you are just joining us your watching the second ever episode of the nasa instead of nasa in silicon valley live this is a conversational show go on twitch tv i with various researchers scientists engineers and all around cool people at nasa net specifically here at masses ames research center in silicon valley so as i mentioned at our premier episode we are trying something new here we're basically taking the audio podcast in doing it live on twitch it's the last time we had a lot of fun talking about the moon and today we are talking about selfdriving robots planes and automobiles so first and foremost a shout out to the live audience on the chat uh we're going to kick things off by talking with our guests and we're gonna try to answer as many questions as possible from the chat and based off of last time we're going to try some rapid fire questions at the very end so don't be shy send in as many questions as you can or just feel free to descend a modes and spam that at us nonstop in the czech because we're going to be looking at it so i'm your host matthew buffing ten and this time my host abby taber i see is going to be looking in taking the questions from the chance that could look with that i thank you very much i.

terry cia volvo nasa matthew abby taber
"silicon valley" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

NASA In Silicon Valley

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"silicon valley" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

"I i took our by the intro to computer sciences like an 1999 like for your a college in fiddled around making little like windows and programs and stuff and i was a good thing that struck me was like how similar of felt till like learning another language learning like spanish and french them and they can i quickly realized i could follow instructions with it it quickly went to the point where i'm like i don't even have the vocabulary for this and so um the ah that that was about vows he had to buy computer science that's so came at uh back to selfdriving cars nick gaurs asked what do you think the adoption rate for selfdriving cars will be in the next decade and will they ever reach the price point of manual cars well so twopart question there are forever nears by shin read adoption rate i think it depends on where you live in the us might think that uh if you're in an area where you have the good weather is like silicon valley um it's a lot easier because you know there's a lot fewer things we have to deal with light thunderstorms in snow and stuff like that so i will be easier to to have selfdriving cars out in places like california arizona new mexico first um will they get down to the price point of normal occurs well i mean it depends uh a lot of cars these days are just really becoming you know software platforms i mean you know all the tesla's out there are these days i mean they get software upgrades flip a switch and they go from manual driving to selfdriving so as not by even so much a question of like an ad on i mean the cars themselves are going to be ready to be selfdriving oh yeah all right that's interesting cool dan a quick yeah wordsworth asks what is your favorite science fact were theory there were a pressure the.

us mexico tesla nick gaurs california arizona selfdriving
"silicon valley" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

NASA In Silicon Valley

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"silicon valley" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

"This is the nassan silicon valley podcast will technically this is nasice in silicon valley live but we're a podcast were not the only nasa podcast gravity assist houston we have a podcast is one is out of johnson's fate senate work a lot with them um there's a youtube in audio version of this week at nasa that they are still go in its shorter like four or five minute little segments so a lot of content out there for people to grab this has been the mass in silicon valley podcast huge thanks to jim green egg schmidt for joining us and be remiss too we have eric is in our audio studio we have him on the the voice of god you over there and if we go to the cloud the cloud cam over on the far left we have jesse and dave casey dominique is it over there clive it brian sitting there so huge things guys have been way fine for folks who are listening are watching on demand for fuel listen to this on your audio like too bad you can't see everybody wave but trust us that they are well if you're watching on demand or on all the major social media platforms under nasa aims we are using the hashtag mass in silicon valley and we've gone analog so uh we have a phone number if you have any comments questions you can also call six five zero 604 one four zero zero call we're not going to answer the phone but leave a comment or a question and then we'll try to figure out how we can wrap that into an episode if you you know huge thanks everybody who participated live and participated in the chat we're gonna keep doing this a not next friday but the friday after that we're working on a fun show we're we're talking some the early days of vr development also atanas vehicles systems stuff like that uh we're we're trying to solidify that up so not next friday but the friday after that if you haven't already go ahead click like shares subscribe every button on the screen or podcast app that you can think of uh how you can find us.

johnson dave casey dominique nasa houston senate eric jesse brian social media five minute
"silicon valley" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

NASA In Silicon Valley

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"silicon valley" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

"Hey folks thanks for joining us we're gonna jump into an intro in a little bit while we for some people to jump online but don't be shy jump in the cia and we're going to be looking for your comments but wanted to started off we were chatting earlier jim we've we talk about like the nazran silicon valley podcast jim has his own podcast so there is a plug for that i called gravity assists and the thing that i get a kick out of it is at the end of the show you always talk to the people have like what was your gravity assists 2 landing at nasa were working on space so now it's i'm going to pay for the question to you what was your gravity in assists how did you end up at nasa we you know i was always good math and science and i actually was watched all those star tracks from the very beginning noses would william shatner and leonard and and really enjoyed that but i ended up working in an observatory i ended up having a twelve inch album clark refractory my beck and call i was able to the instruments on the back end of it and i started doing a lot of astra photography and then developing my own film and and and the high school chemistry teacher was just opened the doors i had i had the keys to the school you know i was trust at here's the guy he's the school go down observe whatever you wanted to cetera and then you know some of the stuff i actually got published in the sky and telescope so when i left.

cia jim astra photography nasa william shatner leonard twelve inch