18 Burst results for "Sigrid"

"sigrid" Discussed on The Daily

The Daily

05:20 min | 7 months ago

"sigrid" Discussed on The Daily

"Adopted. Johnson said yes. Smith asked was.

"sigrid" Discussed on The Daily

The Daily

05:54 min | 7 months ago

"sigrid" Discussed on The Daily

"True ancestry. Whatever it really is had never changed. I started to look into. How reliable all these numbers were. And how transparent the companies were about their methods. Here's my story. From twenty eighteen. Sigrid johnson was black. A dna test said she wasn't read.

Sigrid johnson twenty eighteen
"sigrid" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

08:29 min | 11 months ago

"sigrid" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Performance of that Aria from Aida. Is. Th really example of why people who love opera it's so much. One of the ideas underlying all grand opera is the possibility that great beauty contri- over great loss. Leontyne price was a master of conveying that idea. Lord Schwartz is the Frederick Troy professor of English, emeritus at the University of Massachusetts Boston and the poet laureate of the city of Somerville Massachusetts he reviewed a CD set called Leontyne price at the met. After, we take a short break John Powers will review the new Netflix series the queen's Gambit this is fresh air. This message comes from NPR sponsor. IBM when deciding how and when to safely return to the workplace you need to be informed. That's why IBM Watson is helping businesses prioritize employee safety, managed facilities, and trace potential exposures with Watson works a set of a infused capabilities. Your Business can help protect the health safety and productivity of its people. Let's put smart to work visit. IBM Dot Com Slash Watson works to learn more. The new NETFLIX series. The Queen's Gambit, which drops this. Friday. is about a brilliant young woman who crashes the traditionally male world of chess are critic at large John Power says that the series offers the kind of heroin we seldom see. Good novels the saying goes make bad movies. But you wouldn't know that from Walter Tennis, a skillful novelist whose books have been turned into memorable movies, the Hustler, the man who filter earth, the color of money. That's why ever since has published the Queen's Gambit in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, three fans have been waiting for someone to adapt this addictive page Turner a troubled female chess prodigy. The. Queen's Gambit finally arrives on screen this week as a seven part miniseries from net flicks. Frank a crack down of novels. He's scripted out of sight and get shorty among others and the writer director of the Western godless. Although. I. Wish it was directed with a bit more flair. It story is a good one. The action begin early. Nineteen Sixties Kentucky. When eight year old orphan Beth harmon that's Isla Johnston is put into an institution that keeps the girls in line with will liners. A quiet loner Beth has two unlikely allies Joe Lean shoot African American orphan played by Moses Ingram and the janitor played by the reliably superb built camp. He teaches her to play chess and though he starts off gruff he soon off by the gifts of a child who can play out entire chess games by watching them unfold on the flickering shadows of the ceiling. When Beth is thirteen and now played by Taylor joy she's adopted by the weeklies and unhappily married. Lexington couple. Her home life is dominated by new mom played by film director Marielle. Heller authorities musician, an alcoholic who largely ignores her. Then, Beth begins winning tournaments and prize money. Soon. This wonder can is jetting from Vegas to Mexico City to Paris to Moscow self-destructive cooling her overheated psyche with booze and pills. Her whole life keeps building to a final showdown with the world champion. A daunting Russian who seems soviet-manufactured or Beth's are true. American Moody Improvisational? Solitary. You'll see her aloneness and innocence in this early scene when thirteen year. Old Beth hands over five dollars to enter the Kentucky State Championship and has met with condescension. Clock. We've o'clock sharing system. If your opponent doesn't have one come back to the desk, we'll loan you want play starts in twenty minutes what you're reading. I don't have. Have you ever played in a tournament before? I assure you WANNA do this. We don't have a women's section. Beginning not beginning doesn't matter. If you're an unrated player going to begin with the people in our sixteen hundred. Twenty what about the other section first prize in the open is one hundred? Is it against for me to be in the open? Out exactly in the open. There are three guys in there with ratings over eighteen hundred and Baltic may show up they will eat you alive. I don't think it's a spoiler to say that Beth is smarter than those guys. Now Tell US tells the story with a bristling economy that mirrors best attacking chess style. To make it work on screen you must either make a stylistically compressed art movie or play everything out. Frank does the ladder and while I, kept wishing the series moved faster seven episodes. Many I admire how he pulls off the trick of portraying chess the internal of games but cooking ever changing styles to make each match feel different and fresh. Frank enriches best relationship to her mom transcending stage mother cliches to help us see how Mrs Wheatley is just one of the millions of frustrated women back in the pre feminist days. And he wins nifty turns from the men and best life most notably Benny the cocky young US champion who carries himself like a gunslinger he's played by the sensational Thomas. Brodie sangster. With her wide set is a mask like features, Taylor joys, one of those actors like Keanu Reeves who was born to play other world characters here she's a double outsider for starters. She's a female chess mastermind which makes a unicorn in a subculture dominated by strutting male egos. Beth hates being called a great woman chess player. She wants to be the best player period. She's also A. Genius this makes her a rarity in our storytelling. It's not that there aren't as many intelligent women men heck. Oprah's as much a genius Steve Jobs ever was. But ideas of genus or gendered or more bluntly sexist. Even as our pop culture is overstuffed with stories about men celebrated his geniuses be at Van Gogh Ray Charles or Stephen Hawking plus fictional dude like Sherlock Holmes. They're almost none about women. You have. Virginia Woolf Hours Katherine Johnson Hidden figures maybe the girl with the Dragon. Tattoo. We can add Beth harm this short list. Although her story doesn't escape the usual trajectory of onscreen geniuses to triumph over the psychic costs imposed by once great gifts. The Queen's Gambit does offer something exciting. What makes the heroine? The heroine isn't that she's lovely charming or likable. Whatever room she walks into she's always the most brilliant person there. John Powers reviewed the queen's Gambit, the new netflix series that drops Friday. Tomorrow on fresh air my guest will be Nina Totenberg NPR's longtime legal affairs correspondent. We'll talk about the Amy Coney Barrett confirmation hearings how trump has transformed the supreme court and the federal appeals courts Nina's longtime friendship with our BG, and being a founding mother of NPR. Hope you'll join US Fresh Air's executive producer is Danny Miller our technical director and engineer is Audrey Bentham, our interviews and reviews of produced and edited by Amy Salad Phyllis Myers San. Brigger Lauren Crendall Heidi Simone Theresa Madden end rebuilding auto they challenge. Seth. Kelly and Kayla lattimore. Our associate producer of digital media is Molly Seavy Nesper. Roberta shorrock directs the show I'm Terry.

Beth harmon Netflix IBM NPR chess John Powers Frank US Kentucky IBM Watson director University of Massachusetts Bo Aida Nina Totenberg Queen Watson Leontyne Lord Schwartz Frederick Troy professor of En
"sigrid" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

06:52 min | 11 months ago

"sigrid" Discussed on Fresh Air

"You as as a writer? Will I I met Susan Santiago because I was an editorial assistant to the New York review of books and that was in between college and Grad School and so I met her in passing there but then after I graduated from. Grad School. She had had her first bout of cancer. and. We lived very close to each other. You know just on one, hundred, six streets us at Riverside drive I was. Know just a few buildings away. And she wanted she had hers hers her surgery and she wanted she wanted to some help because she had this great big pile of correspondence that had built up while she was in the hospital. She just wanted somebody to sit there and type while she dictated and she asked her friends at the New York review of books if they could recommend somebody and since I lived so nearby they said well, why don't why don't you do this? And I did I mean we only did it for about twelve hours two to three two or three occasions but during that time I met her son. David Reef and yet we ended up a couple and at that time David was living in the same apartment as his mother and and also in Princeton where he was in school he was dividing his time between those two places. I. Ended up moving into the apartment with them at three forty riverside drive, and so we were living together as a little family. Now, her impact on me as a writer was was enormous. I mean enormous is something that I to day extremely grateful for and I guess the main thing is I've I've read her work and had read some of it before I met her in the course that was an influence because a lot of it is important. But But to meet her. And have her in my life. It was a different thing because. She she was somebody who made me feel like even at that point in my life where I never published anything where I didn't have any idea what I was doing really that you know that it was perfectly perfectly good idea and a right thing to do and even a noble thing to do to take myself in my work you know totally seriously and to think about making any kind of sacrifice I might have to for it. And that everything matters that you must read everything and just you know that kind of that kind of attitude and she just introduced me to so many different books and movies and just everything because she was a great sharer and she she She liked to be a big influence on anyone who was in her circle or you know she she She'd read something and thought it was great. She wasn't happy until she got in all these other people also to read it. Yeah. So the way I write the way I think that my attitude towards what it's like to be a writer all of this was influenced heavily by the time that I knew. Susan Sante. Was it important to you to have a mentor like that? Who was a woman? The weren't as many. Well, known women writers at the time as there are now absolutely. Yeah. I. Mean that was also a really important part of it because that was you know because the the idea was part of her mentoring was also don't let people influence you in such a way to make you think that because you're a woman, you can't do this or that or You're a woman writer in other words a lesser writer you know and don't don't be afraid to not. Look Feminine All these things are very important to her. Let me reintroduce you here. If you're just joining US my guest to Sigrid Nunez, her new novel is called. What are you going through? We'll talk more after a break I'm terry gross and this is fresh air. Support for NPR and the following message come from May dwell their experts use premium fabric and the latest denim technology to make jeans and Fitz and styles for everyone whether you're looking for a super comfy pair that really moves with you or WanNa, keep it old school in one hundred percent cotton near-shore. To find jeans you're going to reach for again and again go to made well, dot com and use the code NPR Denim for twenty dollars off your online jeans purchase terms apply please see made well, dot com slash promo for full offer details. Let's get back to my interview with writer Sigrid Nunez her new novel. What are you going through is about a woman whose friend is dying of cancer the friend wants solitude in her final days but once the narrator of the story to live with her during that time in case everything goes wrong part of the dying woman's plan is to end her life with pills when she feels it's time the narrators x is a famous writer who's been writing about how the threat of climate change a pandemic terrorism corporate power far-right regimes and more are leading to the end of civilization. Nunez's previous novel the friend when a two thousand eighteen national book award. When we left off, we were talking about her mentor and Friend Susan Solid Tag. You have said in an interview that you figured. You didn't want to be famous watching how fame had affected Susan Sonntags Life and the responsibilities that came with fame. So, we're some of the things that you saw. They're convinced. You didn't really want to be as famous as she was well I. Don't think I ever expected to be anywhere near as famous as she was but what gave me pause? was. How much of a distraction fame can be and what I saw sh she handled fame very well, I mean, the thing is that she she was able to do a lot. And she always wanted to do a lot and I'm someone who always only wanted to do one thing well. And I have this great new need for solitude. And she was the exact opposite. There's nothing that she hated more than being alone. There were so many demands and so many distractions and she didn't have any trouble keeping up. But I looked at that and I thought well, if this, if this is the writer's life that's not going to work for me, I could never handle anything like that. But of course, I knew that there was a whole other kind of writer's life obscurity. Left quite alone and you know and I knew of were new other writers who even though they were publishing and they were successful they didn't have anything like her celebrity and therefore they also didn't have the kinds of demands and plus the public of it. When you're as famous as she is you attract a certain amount of negative attention as well. She was able to handle that well also, but I if I tried to put myself in that position I thought it was actually quite quite.

writer Sigrid Nunez New York review NPR Grad School Susan Santiago Susan Sonntags Life cancer. Susan Sante terry gross editorial assistant US Susan Solid David Reef national book award Princeton David Fitz WanNa
"sigrid" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

07:54 min | 11 months ago

"sigrid" Discussed on Fresh Air

"I, learned that there were a lot of orphans. it came out of the great flu and then William Maxwell of course lost his mother when he was just a little boy and never got over it and everything he's ever written. You know has that as part of. The emotions of the book. So I you know it was really that I mean I wanted to have a certain amount of science in it I wanted to. Say What would happen in the world if there were such a flu so there's that but I I wasn't trying to write like an apocalyptic story or a dystopia. Novel I really want to focus on a boy. who loses both parents in the flu who becomes very sick himself and who isn't a place Where you know where things are very chaotic where things are really falling apart. I want to quote something that you write in the book and I feel the same way you write. It amazes me now to think back to when I was an adolescent and to remember how little attention my friends and I paid to one another's parents and grandparents. What could they possibly have to say these ordinary people most of whom if they weren't housewives or retirees went to work everyday jobs we couldn't imagine being the least bit interesting was only later it occurred to me that these were people who'd live through some of the most dramatic events of the century they had come of age during periods of upheaval had endured. All types of hardships had escaped heroin. In foreign countries are in the deep South become homeless the depression fought in world wars been held captive in prisons survived death camps mean that amazes me to especially like my grank parents. They were immigrants from Cheryl's in eastern Europe, and Russia, and displayed a minimal amount of curiosity Why do you think that is that you and I probably a lot of other people when they were younger or when they are when they're young now? Aren't really interested in what their parents or grandparents or other. Older people in their lives experience. I think it's pretty much universal I. Think it's about being young person because I cannot think of anybody. For whom this wouldn't be true I mean you know when you think back. Just not just about yourself but think about your your girlfriends or you're you're a little circle. In High. School Junior. High School. No one among your friends was not like that what you were interested in exclusively. was what you're what you're best friends were doing what they had done on Saturday night. What Kinda hair they were wearing, what they were reading, what what they'd seen on TV, whatever it might be that was fascinating. You know and you could talk forever. But what you're what their parents had been through, what what, what your friends parents might have to talk about or their grandparents. You know it would've you would've died if you were sitting in their kitchen, you know and they had started in about some experience from their past, you would try to be polite but you would not have been really interested I believe and I'm not really sure sure why that is but it is it is. It is a question of feeling you know that that it's it's just not your world. It's that ration- gap I guess and in fact, if you if you if you knew someone a very person who was the opposite of that, that would have been the class. Weirdo. That that would've been a person like how strange that? Why does he do that? He always wants to talk to these old people about what they did in the war and You know and I guess it's also comes from the idea. That for young people, older people are boring. Your new novel what are you going through? Starts with a quote from Simone Weil and the quotas the love of our neighbor in all its fullness simply means being able to say to him, what are you going through? But the original French has a slightly different meaning. Tell us what the original French says. Good. She was French and and wrote in French. And then tell us why why that quotas meaningful to you. Will in French she wrote cal. Tone talk, more. which was literally translate as what is your torment but of course that doesn't make sense in English I mean you know that you don't translate things literally. and so in English At least in the translation that I've seen that has become, what are you going through, and in fact that what we that is what we say to people I'm really sorry about what what you've what you're going through. So I guess I I can't remember when I first read this quote, but it seemed to me to be you know absolutely true. And meaningful, and since this book was going to be about people talking to the narrator and the narrative listening. To their stories which were often sad stories or stories of trouble. Of different degrees it just seemed to me. You know totally apt to to have that title into us this quote as an as an epigraph. Quote Henry James the writer as having said, there are two kinds of people in the world those who upon seeing someone else suffering think that could happen to me. And those who think that will never happen to me. The first kind of people help us endure the second kind make life hell. Your thoughts about that. Well I lied actually Henry James didn't didn't say that. What I, what I have in the in the text is that The narrators been thinking about something else that Henry James had said. And then she thinks what you what you just read and so the narrators says someone maybe. Or maybe maybe Henry James or maybe not. Henry James, said and then you're quote what you quoted. I think whoever said it? I think it's absolutely true and it it goes back to the simone the Simone. Weil quote. Because her idea about loving your neighbor in the way that she's talking about enough to say, what are you going through meaningfully and then want to listen that depends on your seeing. This is in her essay that quote comes from that depends on your seeing that person that afflicted person as an individual and identifying with that person. You know in in a full way. So I think it's absolutely true. I. Mean They and and and and that kind of person. Who automatically dismisses other people suffering with that? No, that will that won't happen to me. So why should I be concerned? Yeah, I, find that kind of person you know really really really quite terrifying. I want to ask you a little bit about your relationship with the writer Essayist Intellectual Susan Song Tag who was really as much as somebody can be celebrity intellectual. She was in the seventies and eighties and nineties, and in the sixties to should we say and you knew her you worked with her and then you also. Were a couple with her son David, reef for a while. How did you first meet and what impact did she have on.

Henry James Simone Weil flu writer William Maxwell heroin French Europe High School School Junior Cheryl Russia David
"sigrid" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

08:20 min | 11 months ago

"sigrid" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Today National Book Award Winning Writer Sigrid Nunez tax about her new novel. What are you going through? It's about the fear that climate change a pandemic and far right regimes will spell the end of civilization and the death of the planet. The novel is also about facing mortality as an individual and the relationship between a writer dying of cancer and the friend she asked to stay with her. Later. Lord Schwartz reviews it to CD set of excerpts of live performances by Leontyne price. The first black soprano to have a major career at the Metropolitan Opera. and John Powers reviews the Netflix series, the Queen's Gambit about a brilliant young woman new crashes, the traditionally male road of chess. My Guest Sigrid Nunez has written a new novel that's about facing the possible death of our planet from climate change while also dealing with our mortality as individuals, she wrote it before the pandemic but one of her previous novels was set during a flu pandemic that results in anarchy. The narrator of the new novel is a woman WHO's. Is a well known professor and author who's been writing and giving talks about how climate change terrorism cyberterrorism the threat of a pandemic far-right regimes and corporate power or a threat to life liberty and civilization. He angers audiences by suggesting maybe it's time to stop having children. On. A more personal. The narrators old friend famous writer and intellectual is dying of cancer and wants her final days to be spent in solitude, but once a friend to be with her. She asks the narrator to be that person part of the dying woman's plan is to enter life with a euthanasia drug when she feels the time is right. In New, York, Times Book, Review, Janice Lee, wrote in what are you going through? Nunez tells the simplest of stories about a woman accompanying a terminally ill friend through her last month and expanded into an exploration of the largest themes nothing less than the realities of living and dying in this world and how we feel about both. Suge Nunez received a twenty eighteen national book award for her previous novel the friend she started Princeton and Columbia and currently teaches at Boston University. Sigrid Nunez welcome back to fresh air. I love the novel. Thank you for writing it. So I want you to do a short reading from the book, and this is one the friend who's dying from cancer tells the narrator that she wants to go somewhere else to die and the narrator thinks. Friend, is just ask her to help her find a nice spot to go to but her friend describes which you really means what she really wants. Would you read that excerpt fourth? Yes sure. What I really want is to find some quiet place. It doesn't have to be far away in fact, it shouldn't be too far and it doesn't have to be anything particularly special just somewhere I can be peaceful and do the last things that need to be done and think my last thoughts she adds as her breath runs out whatever they might be. I relaxed my grip on my glass. So all she's asking is for me to help her find this ideal place. I asked her whether she sure about wanting to be in a strange place rather than home. I think it will make it easier. She says so long as it's a comfortable safe attractive place I've done a lot of my best work. My best thinking away from home on visiting fellowships, for example, on meditation retreats in Hotels. I think it will be easier to prepare to focus on letting go if I'm someplace where I won't be surrounded by intimate familiar things all those reminders of attachments and so on. Of, course I could be wrong. She says, and this could turn out to be some kind of fantasy but I've thought a lot about it and it feels right to me. Am I, making any sense? I think. So I say and you need my help finding a place or helping you get settled in. No she says I can do that myself. I've already started looking. She lays one palm flat on the table and presses her other hand on top it to quell or hide the tremor. What I need is someone to be there with me. She says I'll want some solitude. Of course, is what I'm used to after all what I've always craved dying hasn't changed that. But I can't be completely alone I mean this is a new adventure who can say what it will really be like what if something goes wrong what if everything goes wrong I need to know there's someone in the next room. People think of a good death as death surrounded by family and friends being lifted up by them. Being spoken to you have your hand held being sung to. The idea of needing solitude a place that would be peaceful but not be surrounded by things you're attached to or by people you're attached to just by one person who's there in case of person who's a friend but not family you wrote that did you understand the sentiment that you were writing? I did I believe I did I felt that I felt that this was a way that a certain kind of person would feel you know this this character, she has a daughter, but she's estranged from her daughter and she's single at the moment and she has. Asked her closest friends if they will be with her at the end and they've said, no because they do not want to be there if she's going to take her own life much as they don't want to hurt her to suffer much as they understand why she wants to choose her own moment to die they know they would not be able to do that. So she calls on this old friend who at least at the moment isn't very, very close to her. They were closed when they were younger and they've always stayed in touch and there's a thing about her about this character is that she's In a sense she she wants things to be as As orderly as possible as peaceful as possible, and also to be as little trouble to anyone as possible. That's just just that's just in her nature but I think that if she were dying without having the idea that she was going to use these drugs then maybe she would. Have other people around her and holding her hand and so on. But there is that idea that if you're going to take your own life, not everybody is going to want to be there and is going to allow that to happen. So part of your book the part of it, that's about how the world is on the brink. Know possibly the end of civilization the end of the planet because cyber terrorism and bioterrorists resume and climate change global warming pandemic. You actually wrote the book before the pandemic. Yes and it's published just as numbers are really going up again and have an earlier novel about an influenza pandemic. What made you write about that before we were actually. In the middle of one, I mean, it's not the flu, but it is a pandemic. There were a COUPLA things one, I, am someone who always thought. From what I knew that sometime in my lifetime, there would be another great flu. That you you always knew that. I always knew that I mean I. I knew that because I was aware of the science that said that it's not a question of if but when I mean I that that that that has that's that's been well known and you know I I would come upon things that were you know that were said by Dr about this well, before the the new pandemic, the pandemic that we're living through and I knew that Mary McCarthy had lost both of her parents in that flew and I remember when I learned that as a as a younger person I thought that was so terrible but then.

Sigrid Nunez cancer national book award writer flu Netflix Lord Schwartz John Powers Leontyne professor Mary McCarthy York Janice Lee Boston University Columbia Princeton
"sigrid" Discussed on Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

06:31 min | 1 year ago

"sigrid" Discussed on Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

"And I it was it was in. Tanzania, and this dentist amazing was telling me that he's on Youtube learned that you'll Malcolm's toxic. So he stopped in during composite and the patients in. Basically, a chair and he has a bucket next to him and he drills out the cavity and and then he acid ashes and the girl sits up rentis fits in the bucket linked back. Then he puts on the bonding agent cures it and then she rents his spits in the bucket and then he puts on the composite and I'm just like Oh my God. This is just So much better because the Malcolm that you could just put it in their and it would've just worked in. This Amalgam Haas been very, very good filling material and I'm convinced that it saved a lot of people's teeth. So going forward howdy how do you get global policy when you have eight billion people where you have everything from a high speed opera with high-speed evacuation a dental assistant under a rubber dam versus probably Well. Yeah. Because I mean, if you take the eight billion people and you convince them down to three one has a smartphone one as a cell phone that's not connected to the Internet it's just a cell phone and one has nothing. So if you're one of the three people who lives in a village without a cellphone or a smartphone. They need them album. Do you agree. Yeah. Yeah I mean. But my colleagues would kill me if. I never cared of my colleagues kill me because they're always the keep it dental. You know what? I mean that the device say if they disagree that aren't going to say you know well, that's because you're short fat and bald there they're just they'll just say, well, we just disagree that's what I love about dentists. They can completely disagree and then go fish and chips and drink beer till three in the morning. So. Did the health authorities he will. I can't even by Monday load. Can't get developed this for X-rays I saw to do eletronic x-rays. And that's amazing and the people who always are leading those charges. You always know who they are because they're always flying around in jets and staying in resorts. It's like they they fly in a jet the way to a conference to ban Amalgam for some poor person but internationally is they're just like one person that kind of is in charge with the International Organization for Forensic. Metrology is that the APEC? Leader of forensic dentistry it's it's more on the BRILLO GONNA sation. Umbrella organization Yes but it is the international organization Yes so Then you have to be memorable national organization to be member of the international the National League. So I believe the American board of Frantic. Policy is the member lyles. Okay. So so that website so if you're listening to this and want to learn more. One. Website would be the I o f. o s for the international organization Forensic Ozone Dante, stomatology So Dont`a that's what Greek for dentists and G Yes. So what's ever seen a Dantonio? odontologist install Matala share those just synonyms ones lights in the night but they wanted to clued stomatology was used too much in eastern Europe at the time when they organizations formed. So they wanted to include that group as well. And is this is. Is the word. Macaroni which you can say. So. So, are you Are you is your group successful in getting the young kids? I. Mean Out of every dental school classes there at least one kid that's interested in learning more about this normally more than one. Normally more than one. Yeah. An eye contact i. Ask. Because I don't have that many cases. And Woodham what do you think attracts them to a why? Why did they get instructed in dead people instead of bleaching bonding and Veneers Yes, sometimes, they want to do the things. I suppose the same way as I did expand my knowledge within the field and just dentistry. I love an I tell you I love the international cooperation among Dennis in my favorite meat is the clone meeting. For International I, mean you go to Cologne it's only every other year, but there's usually a hundred thousand dentists and their from all two hundred eight countries I mean it's it's crazy. Fund is this Do you guys have a yearly? No Nice is it biannual researcher? Every thirty we have the meeting and it should they Sierra been into rich? But of course, as any everything else it was canceled. And I wanted utilization you check spoke coming up. Later on India. Which I- office put together. Inference equal not. So you mentioned a word earlier that a lot of people might not have ever heard of or thought about but you mentioned Interpol and and on the website, there's Interpol disaster victim identification I. When I was studying to talk to you I thought Inner Interpol was. To pick up a criminal like I, I did a crime in Norway I'm catching a flight to Paris and inner pick me but I do not know they had an Interpol disaster. Victim Identification Program. Because talk about this is. The same it's a police international police organization. I don't think America is part of it up I'm not absolutely certain about it How are we always? Who Hope, but it's land Scandinavian countries it's the police is responsible for identifying unknown persons.

Interpol Malcolm International Organization for I Tanzania APEC stomatology National League India Woodham Europe researcher America Norway Paris Dennis Sierra
"sigrid" Discussed on Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

07:47 min | 1 year ago

"sigrid" Discussed on Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

"Thousand five, she has been registered as a forensic medicine expert in odontologist by the Ministry of Justice and police and the Commission for Forensic Medicine Norway since two thousand and one member of the Norwegian Identification Commission and the president she is responsible for Enza on holidays for the national team she has been a teacher on the. International Organization for Forensic Odun stomatology courses in forensic ontological since two thousand and one for the Norwegian Armed Forces Medical, services, she has been project coordinator for dental age estimation of. Unaccompanied unaccompanied asylum seeking children. Teaching Forensic Dog odontologist an ethics to dental students, as well as general and oral path. She's also a clinical instructor at the Institute of Clinical Dentistry. My Gosh, she's been. Brutally Dentistry for forty two years, and of course, you probably already know all about her because she was the very famous woman on solving a forty year old mystery with odontologist techniques about a mysterious death in nineteen seventy, the woman from. Ice. Valley had several gold crowns and bridges on her teeth which were not typical Norwegian dental work We posted that on dental town forensic dentistry, and most of the comments are like, wow, and and I asked her to come on the show and I'm so excited. You US. You know there's so many people that we're GonNa talk about fillings root canals and crowns, but there's hardly anybody in the world that does what you do. What was your journey that led you to forensic dentistry? Just consider I wanted to seduce a more than just drilling and filling semi contacted that the faculty here in Oslo. On. The full I wanted to do surgery but time. In for anybody else. So I try to do look at polity and the professor in pathology said I want you to do forensic work. Now, I? Well. Since we have so many kids listen to show a quarter of our viewers are still in dental kindergarten school so that they're not even old enough probably to remember when you were an international. About this case. So just for the kids, will you review that something a forty year old mystery tech that went viral No I haven't sold it and nobody has sold it. Thinking of the definite smelly. The mysterious death in one thousand, nine, hundred, seventy. Oh, that that that is still unsolved to this day still unsolved but BBC the beautiful podcastone eight on just looked at it. It's still available on BBC you just Google in Iceland. So. It's BBC World Service Death in Ice Valley was that. was a cooperation with anarchy, which is the Cleveland knew each know PBC. Yeah BBC. Amazing Journalism. Did you like the journalism of the BBC? Yes. It's pretty professional way professional. And that's in fact they put Costco. Price. Is that what we'll? We'll tell us about the podcast we'll We'll put the podcast in the link. When we push this out So so they can listen but how long is the podcast? It's H. Nine episode. Some someone one Six, one. So, for no, that must be four if tell pay tooth, so it must be about that. Okay, we'll lay tell us about the case. They sold Safaa a facebook page to tweet unlocks sliders is coming up on the face. So, the unidentified woman from is Dhillon and and you said is Dylan was a valley in enormously s Stalinist violent way a when they found her. that. This is something like this. What they think she's She's found in November nineteen seventy. I'm had all Herreid. Items. allied entity removed. On she traveled with several different identity and all the fake. And this what I found, she was partially burned. It's difficult to sort identify women from this. But this is a picture of the I style in on the west coast of nowhere near to Bergen, which is the next biggest town in a way. That also found. some biopsy, some slides. On they were unable to get some DNA from that. But this is a teeth. So so is Levine that's real that that's the most northern Norway? No, no, no, no, no no, it's. It's just a value on the west coast. Not Very. Far From Bergen eight seventy popular walking area, a close to book and it takes I suppose between twenty minutes off now but also tobacco from bugging. Wow. So he was enough still have killed by bus. So whoever killed her was tried the burner and your identity and was really trying to well, we don't know when she was killed and okay I haven't been able to establish stock or whether they will Susu side. But Points point to the fact that she was murdered but. That hasn't been clearly established. On identity has not been established our teeth on the pictures taken in nine hundred seventy. On this. program. which lie Professor Bong, didn't Burg in nine hundred seventy MRIs crown lots of crowns and bridges. Some pictures about, but I I will show you the XRAYS. At. Normal Standard. Period collects race Salama I said she was traveling with. Full identity in the suitcases will ensure left on the railway station. They her fingerprints, but the Reagan by discloses Classes Without Correction. Seven fake all-sports. And coded letters and five hundred Deutsche mark, which was the currency in. Germany. About time. Lisa, one of the coated lettuce. And we think it's their way she channels. On this is the map or where which way she did travel. She did travel around no way and nobody really knows why should travel derive no way this is how she. From hotel. She signed in. And the the pig excess that they Harare handwriting look crawl French Roll It on German. Newspaper cutting from the police, but that's all in the region. So it doesn't say it was on the front page of the local paper when she.

BBC Commission for Forensic Medici Bergen Institute of Clinical Dentistr Norwegian Armed Forces Medical Norwegian Identification Commi odontologist Valley clinical instructor Costco US Enza Ministry of Justice coordinator Susu side professor president Oslo PBC
"sigrid" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

TIME's Top Stories

04:17 min | 1 year ago

"sigrid" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

"Sigrid Nunez Nunez's new novel paints a beautiful portrait of pain and loss. By Annabelle government. It's September twenty seventeen and an unnamed middle aged writer attends a lecture at a college. Her ex boyfriend and author is speaking about the bleak future of humankind. He presents the growing threats to civilization cyberterrorism climate change global jihadism, and offers no sense of hope. It was too late. We had dithered too long. He says, our society had already become too fragmented and dysfunctional for us to fix in time the calamitous mistakes we have made. When the lecture is over the writer stumbles out of the auditorium in search of drink, which she finds at a local cafe there she over hears a father and daughter discussed the recent passing of the daughter's mother. The writer is a fly on the wall listening closely to their intimate conversation. It's these moments that fill the first pages of Sigrid Nunez's new novel. What are you going through which follows the unnamed writer as she recounts a series of Interactions Of subtle importance among the people, she describes her pretentious acts with the doomsday attitude, the airbnb host whose cat died before her stay and a woman from her Jim who's obsessed with losing weight. As the novel explores this tapestry of daily life it comes to emphasize one specific thread, the writers friend WHO's dying of cancer while sitting at a bar, they used to frequent use ago. The friend tells the writer that she dislikes the word terminal. Terminal makes me think of bus stations, which makes me think of exhaust fumes in creepy men prowling for runaways. The friend explains this is when she reveals that she's obtained a euthanasia drug, she wants to die and she asks the writer to be her companion through her final days. It's unsurprising that Nunez his latest book is concerned with death in friendship and the vocabulary we use to describe it all her last novel. Twenty. Eighteen national book, award winner, the friend followed a woman in the wake of her best friend and mentor suicide. The protagonist took in the man's great Dane who was too big for the miniscule New York City apartment where they learn to live in grieve together both books ask how we remember the most meaningful relationships in our lives and do so without relying on plot. In what are you going through? Nunez Leans on the writers introspective tendencies to the point where the novel veers into Sa Territory she begins one section with the proclamation women's stories are often sad stories then shares the separate experiences of two women. One contemplates what it means to grow older while the other has an inappropriate interaction with an elderly man. Individually, these moments may feel unrelated to the writer, but together, they create a larger portrait of the pain she endures and how she tells stories to make sense of. This becomes important for the writer as she witnesses the suffering of her dying friend though the situation is steeped in sadness, it's never melodramatic. Nunez describes the friends plan in declarative pros and find the space for humor just when it's needed most after the writer tells her friendship accompany her to the end. The friend says, I promise to make it as fun as possible as their plan is set in motion the question that connects the pieces of what are you. Going through it becomes clear at what point is the pain too much to women don't know the answer. They're both finding it difficult to categorize what they're going through the friend doesn't know how to describe her new relationship with the writer and simply refers to it as all this the writer remarks to herself all this, the inexorable, the inexpressible it's a sentiment echoed throughout the book sometimes the only words we have are insufficient to express what we really WANNA say..

Sigrid Nunez Nunez writer New York City airbnb Jim
Marcs Wild InfoSec World

Down the Security Rabbithole Podcast

04:18 min | 1 year ago

Marcs Wild InfoSec World

"Is what's covert brought to us and the economic destruction that brought with it What's new? What's going on? Where to begin I. It's being nuts. So. One of the things they mentioned before but everyone's probably now I'm security researcher. So I'm also looking at security vulnerabilities all the time and breaking into style and and just watching the security research landscape is bonkers the last two and a half weeks I've seen over thousand vulnerabilities draw. Well I mean. It because people are homeless board I don't get it I think a little bit of all of the above so. Thankfully like most of these pitch being responsibly. Okay. Which of course begs the question how many went Well. But they're beans and doozy's I. mean you know the F. Five hundred not where suddenly we're dealing with Dr transversal that give you root again like what like I thought thirty years ago that was done we're seeing DNS, abilities Microsoft's Sigrid, which apparently is being the code base for seventeen years. which can my? Like You know. It's it's new it's new to somebody. Listening. Until had a whether, you want to call it a flaw or A. Nicely available feature in their code that somebody discover Oh crap. You can do bad security things with. You know your your teachers my. My functionality. Hey, I've been like I've grown up believing anything that makes mankin break. It's just a matter of time and resources. and. So I'm not surprised to see stuff, it's just the sheer weight of it coming out and there was some special challenges wall because like all of those phones pretty much where against infrastructure product. So against VPN products against firewalls against load balances, etc. That's bad news because like right now is when we want our infrastructure to be defended wool and so within the League, which is. For those now, it's a loose collective of law enforcement and security researchers. About fifteen hundred or so from eight different countries working to protect the healthcare industry The League's infrastructure team basically just INS and look to these one abilities looked where things we've honorable and try to assess what's the risk? How do we notify companies etc, and some of it was was pretty scary because some of the impacts the were coming out to the advisories where not really that will that you know that miss some really obvious. Severity points that missed how they vote could potentially be manipulated and given the fact that everyone sort of sitting around at home PFC's dropped for some of these in a matter of hours by the F. Five on there was a pse on twitter within about four to five house. Yeah. So I think this is a discussion that's been ongoing for since I've industry probably since you've been around too where the severity and impacted all those all those pieces that make up the how the criticality rating have seemingly been up for debate. For forever right we we've had We've had an a rating system that's been developed deck. We've probably had at least two that I can think of. Right And there's been frameworks and there's been. Lots of discussion across industry luminaries and and and everybody else alike. Where do you like? How do you determine where? Where are you? The discussion of how do we determine something's I know you've already got the face like I'm going to punch you if you out his lesson but. But the question is that I? Think it's legitimate is how do you get to a point where we all speak the same language on? This severity and impact the criticality of anything we drop vulnerabilities either in in an inner product in a in a company's infrastructure in

Researcher Microsoft Twitter
"sigrid" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

06:53 min | 2 years ago

"sigrid" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Back Sigrid that is great the new singer pop singer that's gonna be a lot of blues the tomorrow and she's gonna really interesting voice kind of creative and different so I like people like that so gets more things coming up in August so we just want to mention Jeff fast we're talking about August second through the fourth is that this weekend it's at forty eight twenty two north long Avenue right have you been with us before do you know about this I've got a bit of it but I've heard good things okay it sounds something like kind of like the the block party several block party that happens every year in Hyde Park okay seems like does this plate US citizens of Jefferson park come out and hang out there's stuff for kids to do plenty of fooled games does a nice community or you know yeah so they can kind of get away from all the craziness downtown yeah yeah they can just like have a good time yeah only gosh that's on so relaxing it does I wish I could actually be around for a lot of these festivals yeah there's so much yeah it is especially towards the end once like July August September hits everybody's person to get their events and everybody had a picnic a festival a reunion a something yeah yeah absolutely yeah the north coast is going to be coming back up the EDM festival that's the has the new location at Huntington bank pavilion and that's August thirtieth through thirty first that's couple days with EDM acts like based actor major Lazer and I just ate EDM stuff so what a crazy dancing so that's coming up also like right for us but that's not for a little while so we'll talk about that next time did you get a chance to go to pitch fork I didn't I thought I was in LA well did you go and I didn't go I didn't get to go this time I have some good people yeah I saw a white side I have heard this pitch fork it was really good yes this year was better than the last one of the rain though on Saturday or something I thought some flooded pictures it was robin was the was the headliner people like her there's some there's some different groups there too was idly brothers I think get the allies the brothers were there there are some some older groups I'm I'm playing it Isaac brothers and what's her name zero six thirty in the Mavis staples that was there now now I don't think is a stable the second matter today I like Charlie XCX who is there she's coming cool and help they yeah unfortunately I was out of town I can do it all I was covering the banana away and they had a big Film Festival than I was at so no he just can't be everywhere at once now we have sort of any has got some shows coming up Chicago the band Chicago if you guys like that ban on August tenth and eleventh thermic Lachlan's coming August twelfth and then sting is due in two days there August twenty third and twenty fourth seen get your tickets at Ravinia dot org come out for revenge I have not I did one little pre party I went to Tony Bennett who I thought was you know I was worried that it was just not going to be I wasn't expecting a lot honestly and he knocks out of the park that man has been from his ninety something years old he was doing standing ovations one after he knows how to milk a crowd and get them going and I was blown away I got from him after and I was just really really surprise with him I mean I know that I knew he was classic I knew he was like the Frank Sinatra and everything of his time but he just keeps it going I could not believe I need to get out more men yeah you got I always miss the thing that was missed the good performers you know that's why I love Chicago I honestly I moved up here from Tennessee back in ninety three and I've never looked back I love it here I have been here for so long you would go anywhere else I don't wanna live anywhere else I love my my condo up in Andersonville I just I love my space I won't have parties there and the two that two bedroom two floors I have just it's livable you can you know Chicago always has a great job you can always get a job in Chicago I believe that you can always find work here that you can always find something to do no matter what you like and that is why I love it so much I love people Midwest Midwest people are so much better like going tell a I just was I think I could live here I liked it but I couldn't live their activism Ellie is definitely a different type of monster the people they are not as straight forward with you yeah as we are here in the Midwest and what as well we used to have that think that their day because of Hollywood and all of the other things that they're pretty much forced upon them yeah you know they don't live for real people's lives in LA yeah there's some kind of weird vibe there and I you know I have some really great friends there I have friends from high school and college and and so I try to get together with as many of them as we can it is just such a different vibe I went to parties that they had for the Film Festival and it's something about how people were like how they look at how they are and if it wasn't horrible or anything it just it just didn't work for me I was just I like downers people I like the people that are that are here and I would I mean I think I would be more tempted with New York if I was you know from Chicago that I could fringes this whole other yeah it is definitely different months I lived there sold two thousand seventeen I live in LA all that year I did okay I lived in that what they call the jungles but I worked over on on Bundy right like not far from Santa Monica beach okay and the differences were quite fast but it it does definitely give you a perspective because there's so many people to go out to a lady chasing a dream willing to deal with the bottom of the barrel the worst of the worst for an opportunity yeah that they're just bear disconnected from reality yeah so many ways you are so right you've told a federal now had because you were there yeah I was there yeah is there is just something about it and I don't want to bad mouth I think it is a lot yeah the LA is beautiful things I mean the the fact that that they can go to the beach or go up and go skiing in the mountains in the same dad because amazing it just tell a lot about the land you know and then what California has to offer as well as you know it's one month's time yeah but I don't have kind of like the seasons changing I do it I don't I like I like what comes with each sees it.

Sigrid one month two days milk
"sigrid" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

03:20 min | 2 years ago

"sigrid" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

"And I mean off the of the monoplace alone, Christina, the Queen Sigrid, Charlie Xia ex all three two of the three main headliners women have twigs is in their mile lease playing. It's yeah. And look at it Higo twenty twenty five fifty fifty kind of grand plans for years in the future, and always strike. Ms. Is unbelievably kind of pessimistic as you say, just do it now. Yeah. Paucity of female artists clearly Booker festival. Do you want to do it? Just do it. And I think it's amazing. These guys have done it. It's one of the biggest festivals in the world and they're like, hey, we've done it. So now you buddy welcome to will you beginning terrible foam not to be there this if Alfred is going. So she'll raise world. Cholerae jepson. I'm going to take the first of may, okay, robbing Carly Rae jepsen and Miley Cyrus. That's my day. Well, bill. Thank you for that, as always you there down. The speakers listening to the Monica weekly on, Monaco, twenty four in a moment. We'll be hearing from class strand. We'll be talking about photography, and more. Stay tuned. Photography, not est class. Trans work has set among collections and institutions ranging from the museum of modern art New York to the centre Pompidou in Paris, and he plays not only with imagery, but also the very format of a tariff itself, who owns it how to excess it, and what is all the say about us. Her latest project is Zine published by Norwegian publisher multi press. It's negatives for fun with classrooms, for trophy as the title, suggests it collects clothes images in negative form. They're no longer strictly hers. She's offering this collection of negative images to the public to do with them as they please. She joins us now took about it, welcome. Claire. Thank you so much for coming in. Maybe you could just tell us a little bit about the background this project and about how you came to work with Monty, Preston Zinser. Well, actually, I was asked to make one of the angles, one of the scenes with multiple by a curator has to Kaiser who is based in the Hague in the Netherlands. She put me forward for the project and basically the multiple stew, four Zemes year. You can do whatever you want with disease for me is an artist is every opportunity, I confined to make a comment on things. So even if it's something quite small for me. It doesn't have to be a grand piece of work, or lots of money or something. I'll take the opportunity, where I get it. And I thought this would be the perfect their coffers some of the things I'm interested in. I came up with this idea, and I'm interested in distribution of photography. I'm interested in the kind of edition, limited edition ideas. If a fee and about how it shed as you say, who owns it who gets to work within it. So this was in very nice opportunity. Kind of comes about really nicely. It's Zine is a form, which is such a DIY thing and part of this kind of coach. I mean, what's becoming almost like a remix coach? You know, Radiohead, surpri in all of the different instrumental tracks, so that people can make their own our and it all kind of I don't know..

Miley Cyrus Cholerae jepson Carly Rae jepsen Higo twenty Christina Charlie Xia Sigrid Radiohead Alfred publisher museum of modern art New York Monica weekly Netherlands Claire Paris centre Pompidou Monaco Preston Zinser Monty
"sigrid" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

New Jersey 101.5

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"sigrid" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

"Forty eight. I'm Jeff from New Jersey, one point five make this spring with the jersey cash code contrast time. New Jersey one on one. Point. Five thousand dollars. Weekdays at ten fifteen fifteen or fifteen Sigrid code word aging, one five dot com for your chance to win. Spring with five thousand dollars on New Jersey, one point five. This Memorial Day kickoff summer with something very cool up to forty percents off appliance special buys, like a whirlpool, freezer. Refrigerator now for just five hundred ninety eight bucks. Big eighteen cubic foot capacity has plenty of stores base, and that price with everything within reach summer's here and today's the day for doing with Memorial Day savings now at the Home Depot. More saving. More doing US only possess for details about June. I'm ready to make my credits. Can I'm ready to classes from university that will help me build a my experience. Prepare me for the future. I feel supported encouraged an connected click this ad or go to online dot EDU today. Hi, I'm Jay Farner CEO of loans thirty percent of Americans who are planning home. Improvements of five thousand dollars or more pay for those renovations, with a high interest credit card that may not be a great idea. A better idea may be to take cash out of your home with a Quicken Loans. Thirty year fixed rate mortgage, the rate today on our thirty year fixed rate mortgage is four point three seven five percents, APR four point six five percent. Call us today at eight hundred quicken or go to rocketmortgage dot com. Call for cost information and conditions. Equal housing lender. Licensed in all fifty states MLS number thirty summer's almost here. An old navy's got thousands.

New Jersey Quicken Loans US Home Depot Sigrid Jay Farner CEO five thousand dollars Five thousand dollars six five percent thirty percent Thirty year thirty year
"sigrid" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"sigrid" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Man. Who? Sigrid wizard himself. Mike. Herbie player. Oh, Hainault.

Sigrid Herbie Mike
"sigrid" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

13:21 min | 2 years ago

"sigrid" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And if you're just joining us, my guest is writer Sigrid Nunez, her latest novel, the friend won the national book award for fiction in late twenty eighteen and it's about to be published in paperback in early February the novel is narrated by a woman, whose longtime friend and former mentor has committed suicide. I spoke with you in one thousand nine hundred eighty six. Yes. One of the things you said is I've never been married, and I'm not going to marry and I said, how can you be so certain, and you said, well, there isn't anything I could have a marriage that I don't really have do you still feel that way? Well, I never did marry just as I said, and that isn't something that I regret it. I think at the time what I was referring to also was that. I was with someone. I wasn't a relationship we were living together. I didn't I didn't really see why we had to get married and we didn't. Now, I am not in a relationship. I'm not living with anyone. But I I, you know, I, I I guess I understood it then it was just marriage was just not going to be for me. Because. I don't I've just I do not I have not shared that desire and need that. So many people seem to have. I just I've up when I was very young when I was a teenager. I think I had you know, fantasies of wedding and romance and marriage, and but but an and children, but but I don't have children, and I I I knew quite a long time ago that I wasn't going to have children. So again, I mean that makes a difference too. So I felt that I could be in relationships. I could have full meaningful relationships without getting married, and I did. I think as in your first book that you wrote time and time again, I discover that I have not completely let go of the notion that salvation will come in the form of a man. That's true to do. You still feel that way? I'm losing. Yeah. Oh, I've given that up. I've given that up Terry. I don't feel that way anymore. Okay. Have you thought about the difference being single in the latter part of your sixty s where you are now compared to being single when you're younger? Oh, of course, it's it's much easier. When you're older, I think it's easier to be single. I think it's easier because well, I guess it depends on what we mean. What what what I what I think it's very hard. It's very hard to be single when you're young because there's so many opportunities do not be single. You know, I think there it's it's both romantic relationships and friendships there's you know, when when when you're younger. You get into these relationships fairly easily, and the people that you meet who are, you know, your peers. They want those relationships and friendships too, and it's quite different. When you when you're older. I mean, I I know people. Actually, feel melancholy about this that it's it's harder to you meet people when you're older and used feel like you have a lot in common. And you really like that person that person seems to like you. But you just don't you just don't form the kind of friendship with that person that you did with people when you were younger, and so in that sense it's easier because you know, you you you accept a certain amount of being alone and not seeking out people to date, of course, everyone's different. But for me, I just I just feel like I I. I'm I'm not distracted by the idea of dating or meeting someone or finding someone the way, you know, the way I was when I was younger the way I was for most of my life. Okay. Then the thought comes up what about when you get older if you're single van and your health fails or something? Yell Leeming who's going to take you to the vet for the two injections. Or at least for the care. Yeah. Right. Well, it's something that you know, it's something that people just have to face it. Certainly it certainly something that that, you know, I think about and worry about, but, but you know, this is this is this is what you know. This is the way my life is I will just have to deal with that. When I when I have to did people used to warn you if you don't have children, you'll regret it when you're older. Yes. And I think that that's very reasonable. I mean as far as I'm concerned. Missing. Having had children is enormous is enormous. I Don, I don't you know, I did what I had to do our at you know, my life turned out as it has. But it's never I've never not been aware that in not having been a mother in not having had a child. I have missed one of life's greatest most interesting most meaningful experiences. I did. I did. And that, but you know. You can't you don't do everything you can't have everything. So is that a trade off you feel like you willingly made or do you have any regrets? About the choice that you made. I don't it's it's it's exactly that. I don't re-. No, no matter in spite of the fact that I know exactly you know, what a huge thing. I missed. I also don't regret it. Because it was you know, other women are different other people are different. I knew myself well enough to know that I was not going to be able to have the life that I wanted as a writer and be the kind of mother I would hope to be. That's just me. I you know, I it wasn't. It wasn't going to work out. I was not going to be able to work that out. And I most certainly unlike any number of women, I know I most certainly was not going to be able to be a good single mother that I know I would have not been good at and you know, I was not ever in a position. Where I felt real confidence with someone. I was with that we could do this. And he would be there, and I would be there. And and he would make a terrific father that just didn't happen. I want to end with the quote that opens your book, it's a quote from Nicholson Baker. And the quote is the question any novel is really trying to answer is is life worth living. Now, that's a great quote to open a novel that has a lot to do a suicide. But does that also some up your idea of what? What writers really are trying to write about? Yes. I was so struck by that quote, and I found that quote, that's from his Paris review interview. The book was finished when I found that. And I, you know by chance I just happened to read the the interview. And I thought it was so so perfect so perfectly expressed and a bit shocking when you think about it. But I think it's absolutely true. And I'm so grateful to him for having said that. Sigrid nunez. Thank you so much for talking with us. Thank you for having me Terry and congratulations on winning the national book award. Thank you. Thank you Sigrid, Nunez, speaking with Terry, gross, Nunez novel. The friend won the two thousand eighteen national book award for fiction. It comes out in paperback February fifth coming up. Justin Chang reviews, the fantasy film the kid who would be king based on the legend of king. Arthur this is fresh air. This is fresh air. The kid who would be king is a juvenile fantasy film rooted in the legend of King, Arthur it set in contemporary Britain as a preteen boy and his friends fight to save the country from an ancient evil. The cast features Patrick Stewart and Rebecca Ferguson, the movie was written and directed by. Joe Cornish who made his feature debut with the two thousand eleven action movie attack the block film critic Justin Chang has this review of the kid who would be king eight years ago, the British comedian Joe Cornish wrote and directed attack the block a scifi horror comedy about a bunch of rowdy south London teenagers warding off from outer space. It was funny scary and also touchingly sincere and its belief that children are the future. The fate of the world really does rest on our young people's shoulders. That conviction hasn't flagged a bit in Cornish is long overdue. Follow up the kid who would be king a delightful modern day riff on the legend of King Arthur and his knights of the round table as you might guess from the title. This one is aimed at an even younger audience. Cornish was a co writer on Steven Spielberg's animated caper the adventures of Tinton, and although the new movies and live action. It has some of the same cheeky family friendly sensibility. It also has some of the irrepressible spirit of the goonies ET and other popular eighties adventure movies that bear the Spielberg name. But if the kid who would be king hasn't affectionately retro vibe. It's also very much in tune with its moment. Although the word Brexit has never spoken it hardly needs to be given the none too subtle references to Britain that is fearful divided and need of a true leader. Enter Alex a spirited twelve year old played by Louis Ashburn circus who lives with his mother and Lund. And has a deep love for our theory and lower Alex shows, his own courage, and purity of heart at school, bravely defending his best friend betters from two nasty bullies named Lance and K one night while being chased by those bullies Alex takes shelter at a construction site and stumbles on what else a sword in the stone. He pulls the weapon loose not yet realizing that he is holding the legendary Excalibur the sword has come to him for a mighty purpose before long, Alex is visited by the great wizard Merlin who takes on many different forms. Sometimes he's played by Patrick Stewart in a Led Zeppelin t shirt, and sometimes he transforms into a computer generated Al most of the time, though, he is inhabited by the Gumby limb young actor Angus Imrie who brings a witty sense of showmanship to the role in one scene Merlin performs some magic to prepare Alex and betters for a forthcoming battle and finds out that better. Himself is an aspiring magician. Learn the basics of assault craft. You will need a weapon each a simple duplication spell for metallic objects, should suffice. What are you doing? Boy. I do magic tricks for a hobby, but I'm not good at you, occasionally, Asians video. What you do try and copy I'll be most impressed if you succeed. Wow. Now, you have an army to fight demon to slay country to save. So let's just begin. The demon in question.

writer Sigrid Nunez national book award Alex Joe Cornish King Arthur Patrick Stewart Justin Chang Britain Steven Spielberg Nicholson Baker assault Angus Imrie van Don Terry Paris Louis Ashburn Lund Merlin
"sigrid" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

02:27 min | 3 years ago

"sigrid" Discussed on Here & Now

"And she also tells me she's begun mentoring women trying to get off drugs. But she's interrupted by practical matter that gotta get this hair off my nose her barber quickly duster off for here. Now, I'm Natasha. Onomichi? On this day. When many people are morning, we thought we'd offer novel about grief that also happens to be a finalist for the national book award for fiction, but Sigrid Nunez is exquisite novel. The friend is about suicide. He's also about the writing world, which the author says is a sinking raft with too many people trying to get on. And it's about a dog a harlequin great day named Apollo after the suicide of her friend than aerator is asked to take his massive pet in and they mourned together. Sigrid newness spoke with us last March there were these three strands that I wanted to bring together into the same story and one was about the suicide of people that are very close to you. And another was my experiences as a writer and a teacher of writing. And I've always loved animals, and I have always wanted to write about animals, and I've always been interested in this human animal bond. Particularly the human canine bond. So I saw a way that I could write a story weaving all those strands together and did you ever end throwing in by the way along the way, suddenly there's Beckett and Flannery O'Connor and Kafka, and you're quoting other moments literature as is written in another book dogs do us the honor of treating us like gods, and we respond by treating them like things that is a quote from J M could say from his novel disgrace. And what are you trying to say about these not just overall noble creatures? But in this case a character named Apollo who's one of the largest dogs, you can imagine. But when he first comes into the narratives apartment his tail is lowered like a beast of burden. What do we know about whether dogs grieve, we do know that they do grieve because we can observe that. And we do know that you know, we can't explain to them. Oh, the person died because he was in a car. Accident or something I can't explain that to a dog, but they definitely do mourn..

Sigrid Nunez national book award writer Flannery O'Connor Beckett Kafka J M
"sigrid" Discussed on RobinLynne

RobinLynne

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"sigrid" Discussed on RobinLynne

"Sing blues for some happy news just smiled sigrid store heard before but the men said the music wouldn't play in the streets children scream the lovers cried and the poets dream not a word was spoken the church bells broken and the three men the father son in the whole post caught the last train the day and they was singing pie drove to was dry them risque be the this i was seeing two was got gopher.

sigrid
"sigrid" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"sigrid" Discussed on Recode Decode

"Not at sigrid convent of the sacred heart thing are linda gets here i don't know but i think you know oh but those are awesome yeah i mean i actually have to shout it out to the nuns i was educated by the i know something like bad experiences with the nil i'm doing you have that experience i dealt with nuns but never dealt with i'm sorry i'm the bad catholic sitting time and how could you have dealt with i just didn't topic but that's because anyway we could do a whole show on no it did and i think in the film and talks about how in the sixties there was a real stigma about any of these drugs and now there's not in fact it's the opposite it's so common everybody you know this a black market for it everybody's trading it and most importantly i think everybody feels certainly all the young people that i talked to feel like they can't survive out they can't be in the startup culture they can't be on wall street they can't be you know in any silicon valley without it because what we're expecting of people to work twenty four seven you know that extremely well and i think the film really talks about and i think puts a real focus on that all of us now our human capital and parents with their kids they see them at one and two and they're worried about where they go to school are they gonna fit in what is their i q what college are they gonna get into and i think you know the film kind of lays out that have you lost our money into that the u u declined in this your your initial was decline login your child.

sigrid convent linda