22 Burst results for "Sierra Nevada Brewing Company"

The Story Behind Santa Cruz's Mountain Route

Bay Curious

01:57 min | 4 months ago

The Story Behind Santa Cruz's Mountain Route

"Today. Reporter peter cooney and i are taking you on the journey of how a cutting edge railroad became mostly rumbling tunnels to nowhere support for bay. Curious comes from sierra. Nevada brewing company family owned operated and argued over since one thousand nine hundred eighty proud supporter of independent thought whether that's online over the air or in a bottle more at sierra nevada dot com so peter. Were not the only ones intrigued by these tunnels right. Nope turns out. There are a lot of folks obsessed with old railroads local historian. Derek really is one of them. His obsession began in two thousand twelve when he stumbled on a piece of lost history. A southern pacific station book which is literally what sounds like. It's just a book that lists all the stations dated from eighteen ninety nine it just fascinated me because it had all these stops at before towns like oma rights laurel that despite growing up in santa cruz county he never knew existed. Anti just started looking for them. Derek two books about the twenty five mile stretch of track known as the mountain route align that once connected los gatos. And what's now silicon valley to santa cruz by traversing the rocky peaks and lush forests of the santa cruz mountains. So those are the same crumbling. Tunnels that we visited earlier. Exactly here's how author h s need ler described the journey and his eighteen ninety-five book through story land to sunset seeds. The ride is one which rivals anything up the chester division or over the sierras. For though the mountain groups are not so massive. The effects are equally fine. How did this beautiful ride come about. We need to go back a little and introduce you to a wealthy entrepreneur named james graham fair.

Peter Cooney Derek Sierra Nevada Sierra Southern Pacific Nevada OMA Santa Cruz County Los Gatos Santa Cruz Mountains Santa Cruz Chester Division LER James Graham
"sierra nevada brewing company" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:00 min | 11 months ago

"sierra nevada brewing company" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Sitting in the dressing in mind to make the greens more tender. So the wind delicious. Yes. Okay last but not least what you do about dessert? Well, I think you want to balance the work again. So if you've chosen the easier route with your main course, then maybe you want to do something a little more elaborate for your dessert. It's still keeping it easier. Something to feed a crowd like a great sheet cake as opposed to, you know, a layer cake that Yeah, a lot more work and doesn't feed as many people. Um, we have Ah, great chocolate. She cake with a milk chocolate frosting. That's fantastic. Or we just recently published a book. That's the perfect pie, and we have a whole chapter on slab pies. Which are big pies, large format pies that are baked in a sheet pan. And there's still love the idea of a large format pie. That sounds so good, right? Does. They're great, and you cut them in squares, and you can get 20 to 24 servings out of one of those so You know, it's everything you like about pie, but it Confia crowd easily. That's a great idea. And you could do a savory 1 to 4 for the appetizer. Yeah, it's a great idea. So you know what you're doing? Don't Kristi. Thank you so much for coming in with all these ideas. Thanks for having me, Sally. Christy Morrison is senior editor of Special Projects in America's Test kitchen. You could find a bunch of their recipes for a crowd, including roasted whole side of salmon with arugula and almond pesto. And, of course, their bacon Ranch cheeseball. That's bloody table. Coming up, Chef coming and watching and I trade some catering war stories. Francis Lam and this splendid table from Support for cake comes from Sierra Nevada Brewing Company No matter how people enjoy the outdoors, Sierra Nevada wants you wants to help. Make sure their voices are heard. Sierra Nevada supports protect.

Sierra Nevada Sierra Nevada Brewing Company Francis Lam Christy Morrison Confia Kristi Sally senior editor America
"sierra nevada brewing company" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"sierra nevada brewing company" Discussed on How I Built This

"<Music> <SpeakerChange> having a great <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> company <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> that's Ken Grossman. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Founder <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> of Sierra Nevada Brewing <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Company <Speech_Music_Male> ongoing pandemic <Speech_Music_Male> won't <Speech_Music_Male> be the first crisis <Speech_Music_Male> it impacted <Speech_Music_Male> the company and <Speech_Music_Male> the community <Speech_Music_Female> at the end of <Speech_Music_Male> two thousand eighteen <Speech_Music_Male> campfire destroyed <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the town of <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Paradise California. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Which is <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the next town over <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> from Chico <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and about sixty <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> employees of Sierra <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Nevada lost <Speech_Music_Male> their homes <Speech_Music_Male> can responded <Speech_Music_Male> with a relief fund <Speech_Music_Male> and Sierra Nevada <Speech_Music_Male> brewed. A <Speech_Music_Male> special beer <Speech_Music_Male> called the resilience. <Speech_Music_Male> Iba <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> All proceeds from that beer <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> donated <Speech_Music_Male> to long-term <Speech_Music_Male> relief effort. <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> And thanks <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> so much for listening to <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the show this week. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> You can subscribe <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> wherever you <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> get your podcasts. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> And by the way if <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> you've got a business as <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> working in ways to <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> tackle the global <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> economic and health <Speech_Music_Female> crisis <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> please let us know <Speech_Music_Female> we may feature <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> it on her how you built <Speech_Music_Male> that segment <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> go to build. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Npr <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Dot Org. To <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> tell us your story <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> you can also <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> write us at H. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> E. T. NPR <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> DOT org. <Speech_Music_Male> And if you want him to <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> tweet it's at <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> how I built this or <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> at Cairo's is <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> our show. This week <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> was produced by Neva. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Grant and Rachel Faulkner <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> with original <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> music composed <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> by rump Tina. Bluey <Speech_Music_Male> thanks <Speech_Music_Male> also to Kansas <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Limb Julia Carney <Speech_Music_Male> Casey Herman <Speech_Music_Male> and Jeff Rodgers <Speech_Music_Male> are interned. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Rini toll <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> on Deraz <Speech_Music_Male> and you've been listening <Music>

"sierra nevada brewing company" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

02:49 min | 1 year ago

"sierra nevada brewing company" Discussed on How I Built This

"So we know what happened right because today. Sierra Nevada is the number three craft brewery after a sems- Boston lager. Boston Beer Company. That makes him Adams and Yanling Base in Pennsylvania. New when you can when you think about I mean the the just incredible journey that he no you took right and the unlikely maybe not unlikely because clearly you were motivated and you you were learning about different things chemistry and machining and brewing. You're these things all you know a very deliberate way. You were talking to people. You're finding mentors. You were going to visit breweries and reading technical journals But still I don't know if I met you in Nineteen Eighty when you were twenty five working on Sierra Nevada. I Dunno I would have thought. Oh I don't know about this guy I don't know if I don't know if I would give him a part with my money for To invest in his company. you you built. The third largest craft brewery in the United States accompany would has an enormous valuation and I mean do you. Do you think that this happened because of all those things I mentioned because of your work ethic and commitment to to the craft or do you think a lot of it just had to do with luck The hard work part. I think That was a good component in when I opened I mentioned I think there were six of us and the five other craft breweries. That opened in that. Same era have all failed today on the last man standing so We all sort of had equal shot at it. I guess yeah timing. I think we were at the right time. In a sort of American culture when people were looking for better unique different distinctive there were coffee. Roasters popping up and bakeries and the scene was starting to grow and the worst part of it It's been A lot and you know it was a lot for Me But a lot from my family I mean we might kids grow up in the brewing industry. I have two children still active in the industry. My son's out North Carolina and my daughter Sarah's here in in Chico to it's been a family business but it's not an easy business and even though a lot of people think being a brewers romantic It's been hard and it's going to stay And I think You know we're still around because we were passionate about beer and passionate about.

Sierra Nevada brewers Boston Beer Company Adams Boston Nineteen Eighty Yanling Base United States North Carolina Pennsylvania Chico Sarah
"sierra nevada brewing company" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

11:12 min | 1 year ago

"sierra nevada brewing company" Discussed on How I Built This

"Enough equipment to use that bigger house so it actually sat there for years. I think almost four years in a row and we just Came up with every way. Possible to expand production so we knocked out walls. We took over other metal buildings in the little street and put tanks outside and brute around the clock so we eventually got the production up to But twelve thousand barrels or a little less than twelve thousand barrels in eighty seven. Were you just would be between nineteen eighty and nineteen eighty seven or maybe even longer where you just working like. 'cause you were the beer brewer. Right you were actually the guy making the beer. Yeah I did all the Boeing and all the packaging In the beginning so I would brew three days a week and package two days a week and then as we got a little bit bigger I was starting to focus on how to grow On expansion so I was building tanks and welding pipes and adding things and so I started to hire some broers And then hired somebody to run packaging so I could free myself up to to do all the expansion side of the business was was your day like I know. What time does your day start early as a boy Four to five. Wow you had to start brewing. That early dark dark. 'cause I in particular as we grew we needed to brew as much as we could and so it was almost twenty four hours a day. I mean we. We typically have operated twenty four hours a day so something that we haven't discussed yet but There was I guess. Probably Fair from fairly early point Quite attention between you and Paul Community or CO founder Fr- from what I understand like there's tension over work Were commitment he. You felt like you were working ten fifteen hours a day and and he was working fewer hours and An attention seems to kind of continue What what happened between the two of you. The there was certainly when I felt and I think everybody around us who were involved in the business you know saw as well that you know. There was a disproportionate amount of effort being put in. I mean my days were always longer than his and more physical and so at one point it became a critical issue between us and we did end up adjusting compensation so I was making double what he was making an so we we try to address it but you know as the business grew and the value of the business grew and We were fifty fifty partners. It started to feel that I was doing a disproportionate amount of building value in the company. And so we started to have discussions in the late. Eighty s of the something. I'm not going to continue doing for much longer and we've got to come to some resolution so as we moved into the new brewery In the late eighties and the nineties. It became a bigger and bigger sticking point and The two of you Was it uncomfortable at times? I mean imagine it was yeah. It grew uncomfortable at times. Yeah I mean early. On he was he lived in our house him. He was just to save money. He was a roommate But then as As things went on it became a bigger and bigger Friction point. You would go on to buy him out in the late nineties and I think You had to you to really take a bunch of loans to do that. Because by that point the business was worth a lot of money. So how did you do it? Well Initially I didn't stick. That was a possibility. I didn't have any money and the thought of going into debt at the kind of dollars that we were starting to have the company valued at was just A. It wasn't in my thought process that you know I can figure out how to do it. What were they value the company at that time and in the in the nineties nineties the valuations cross industry were absorb all over the place but also were going up pretty steadily And you know thirty million. Forty million fifty million in this me. Buying all out took years to work through with attorneys. And so you know as time went on we were still growing and so the value of the business was growing and I had a really tough decision do I. You know hamper the growth of the company in order to not have the number get bigger and bigger so I could participate for that or do I do. I think it's right for the business and and continue to grow and so that was a really challenging time for me personally We were In market that was sort of exploding from Some of our competitors were making big moves and We were becoming hampered by our facility Why what what what was going on with that. Well the brewery that I had designed in eighty seven hundred eighty eight when we moved into the new facility. I had designed for sixty thousand barrels worth of annual capacity. You know if I think back to to that time. That was more than anchor was producing. And they were the oldest of the sort of winners in the craft world and we had Produced a little over eleven thousand or twelve thousand barrels or so in eighty seven. And so I thought you know these if we could grow four times that bigger or more than that that would be an amazing achievement and sixty thousand barrels seem like a pretty lofty Projection and so our first year in the new facility brute about twenty thousand barrels or next year thirty thousand barrels or next year forty five thousand barrels and the next year we are out of capacity and so we started doing whatever we could. We put tanks outside. We added brewing equipment. We started growing multiple times around the clock. And I think we got to a point He goes nineteen Ninety seven we brood. Three hundred and sixty three days twenty four hours a day. We Christmas and Thanksgiving off. I think can just Other than that just kept going now. And that's right when I was trying to figure out how to bipolar out so Very very challenging period. Did you have to go into the into serious debt to make that happen? Well so we explored And I didn't think it was possible for me to buy him out and so We met with every group. You could imagine You know bencher lots of venture funds and had lots of dinners with groups that You know told me they were going to be my best friend and But I got cautioned from other people saying watch out You know things go south. You'll be in trouble and so I started having real angst about okay so I'm going to have a an investment group in my partner. They're going to have some really Tough metrics that. I've got to give them. The returns are looking for. And then they're gonNA want out in five or seven years and I'm GonNa be right back where I am today but in a worse place so I really got cold feet about doing adventure Dale. So what'd you decided to instead? So I had a really great attorney in San Francisco and we started looking at Alternatives and he brought in a friend of his who was very experienced with working with banks and structuring deals and It was at a time when money was relatively easy to get Compared to how it had been and We got Couple proposals from banks and put together a deal that it was As much leverages I would ever want to have on The company And sort of just rolled the dice and said you know if this goes well. It'll work if it doesn't Pity I gave it a good try and that was right when I if you look at a graph of the trajectory of craft brewing in It was that year that we did the deal that the bottom fell out and the growth weight growth rate had been slowing but essentially went down. I think to one percent growth across industry the next year. Wow in one thousand nine In Ninety eight ninety eight ninety nine what explains that I mean. We're we're sort of their today again. And who knows how will come out of our current situation with the with the industry will will look like but no there were starting to be a saturation of of craft players but the the imports really probably sort of reasserted their place in the market and craft had been somewhat the darlings during the late eighties and mid ninety s But then I think the the imported beer started to realize that they You know had a place in the market and pushed in I guess the craft industry also lost a little bit of credibility some of the bigger players back then were contract brewing meaning. They weren't brought their own bear. They were going to one of the big brewers and having their beer made and there was sort of an expose From some of the big brewers saying. Here's WHO's really brewing. Your special craft fairs being brewed at A. You know at a Stroh's brewery or whatever so there was some negative industry. Pr That also probably hurt the industry a bit so you. You're super leveraged beer sales kind of kind of Kind of fault we act Came out of that in a pretty good place. Compared to a lot of our appears in in the reason was you know as we were Bruin. Three hundred sixty three days that year we were starting to ration and not shift to all of our markets and not chip all of our brands and we had some pent up demand so when we came out of that. I did do a big expansion right during that period of buying Paul out which also added stress and debt to the picture But we really double the capacity that you're ninety seven and we were able to sort of immediately Go into some of that. Pent up demand so We grew I think double digits When the rest industry was flat.

Paul Community partner brewers Boeing Stroh CO founder Dale attorney San Francisco
"sierra nevada brewing company" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

09:16 min | 1 year ago

"sierra nevada brewing company" Discussed on How I Built This

"And I guess you could think of like Chili's and they're basically leaves they're like miniature leaves that grow looked like a berry where it's actually It's like a flower Claro. Que Guy in the fast is the bitter. Acids in those aromatic oils are geographic in some cases so a variety that's growing in Oregon may be different Same bright than it. It tastes in Yakima Idaho showing in France or Australia in this country. There wasn't really a aroma signature from the US hop industry Until I said a few other brewers started to focus on a new variety called cascade Which was brought up in Oregon state it was Piney and citrusy in had some real distinct character but it wasn't what the German brokers who worked at big breweries we're used to using and so it really didn't find favor in the US bring industry until Sort of our wave of craft brewers started to punch things up with AROMAS and characters that were way different than what beer had been before. These beer brewed in America. All right so you get this beer down this Pale Ale beer down. And how do you? How do people respond to it when they try it? I mean obviously. I'm sure there are some people who who sort of were sophisticated and were there. People who are not just you know super sophisticated and they tried it and thought it was like. Yeah well really. Most people didn't like it now again. If you're used to drinking an American light lager style and you're hit with a very aromatic -ly hoppy and bitter balance in your beer and and you know just a a reference point in numbers are sort of going to be meeting this but just as a melody number. Today Domestic Lager Beers might be in eight to ten bitterness units And there's there's outliers to that but that's about the range are Pale when it came out and still is Is AT THIRTY EIGHT. Bitterness units and so You know if you quit that. Sort of Chile's. It's you know it's quite a bit more than what people are used to drinking and again we were trying to feature very Aramaic POPs pine and citrus always other nuanced. Roma's at come out hop so when we were producing a beer that was polarizing to sit. At least yeah I mean but it's interesting because Y- we've had founders on the show who say who said In the past you know if the thing you're producing is polarizing might just be might just be on on the right track which obviously you were but I mean this was going to be the the backbone of Your Business and and lots of people most people were saying. Oh this is this is A. I don't know about this. So how did you? How did you start to sell it like what was your first we were I mean? Did you go to bars that you were going to sell it on tap or unit Celta shops? What have you can have people to buy it? Well You know we looked at How are we going to go to market we? We couldn't afford six pack cares. That was sort of out of our budget. So he had individual bottles and we started out in all returnable bottles. That we would charge nichols deposit on so we. We would buy used bar bottles at eighty five cents. A case from a bigger breweries who had surplus bottles are willing to sell us and we would charge a a Nikola bottle so a dollar twenty a case when we sold the bear and we give them a nickle back when we got the empties back and we pretty much loaded our van up. We bought an old van from a A friend of ours Took the seats out. And that was our delivery Van I hired An old high school friend of mine. Steve Harrison. Dvr Our first employee and salesperson He would help bottle during bottle days and he would drive the van around and tried to sell beer. If you go back to that era there wasn't a lot of options for draft beer so if you went into a normal bar and they might have one or two or maybe three taps but it was normal just for one or two taps so we actually did not go into the bar. Trade at all initially. We've at least not on draft. We just said there's not enough money. They're not enough tab right. So we priced ourselves at the highest price without me get by with. We did know market research. We just was the price. Eighty five cents a bottle and that was at that time in one thousand nine hundred eighty one. That was expensive for about that. Was what the you know. The higher priced imports or selling for on the shelf. So we thought well we're GONNA price yourselves and stylistically try to be like a unique import beer and you were just going like. How were you destroying this? I mean he was presumably. He was just you guys right Yeah our man we just drive around and go knock on bars. Restaurants supermarkets wherever and try to convince them to buy a case of twenty four bottles and were most of then dismissive or most of them like interested or what was reception. You got in our hometown. We got at least a quite a few bars and restaurants to take a case so in the hometown since we had been in the press. A couple of times about this little borough putting up We were able to get some placements Once we started leaving Kiko and went to the barrier it was a real slog You know there was no craft knowledge that no Internet. You know there was not a a way for a business. That didn't have money to get much Notoriety we couldn't pay for but We were really fortunate that there were a few writers who were intrigued by the whole startup of this craft beer scene and and started to write stories including in the when like the San Francisco Chronicle or San Francisco Examiner. Actually there was a I think five page color spread on the burri Little Chico Aloun that was just an amazing shot in the arm. We got this huge amount of publicity and we are also very fortunate. There was a beer buyer for one of the large grocery store chains whose daughter was going to Chico state and so he would come up to visit his daughter and he was into beer and so he can buy the brewery and have a beer with us and so he started to run some promotions for us with is really being involved or knowing about it. All of a sudden we'd get a bunch of calls from distributors with You know wanting beer and And then the grateful dead actually They somehow early on got hooked into the beer in so when the dead would travel around We'd have to watch where their concert series where we get all these orders for bureau ahead of them hitting town and how were you able to produce enough beer. I mean you pray if the demand was was starting to lap well some of my business plan called for us to brew hopefully twenty five hundred barrels of beer year I was able to brew twelve ten barrel batches a month so three bruce a week That was sort of far are phase one and we had planned in an expansion to go up to thirty five hundred barrels ear doing some Some more modifications of the facility. So we did that. Pretty quick and our business model was so flawed that We couldn't survive at Thirty. Five hundred barrels of a barrier just was was not enough things cost more and there was always some financial need. We hadn't planned on so we pretty quickly realized we better. We gotTA grow. We figure this out quick and so I went over to Germany I think in eighty two eighty three and I bought a defunct Brewery over there was just a a shutdown brewery. You just bottle their equipment out I bought their whole brewing side so didn't get their packaging equipment but but the house and paid basically scrap value Fifteen thousand dollars to buy all equipment and we more more than that creating it and keeping it back to the US. I I went over with high school buddy and we spent three weeks in Europe Helping dismantle equipment and getting out of the building and and brought another business plan and could not borrow money still so we had this equipment sitting there in a crate But we needed what we thought at. The time was like a million dollars to sort of move into a new facility and to equip with.

US Oregon brewers Chili Yakima Idaho America Chile Germany Chico Europe Van I Nikola Australia Little Chico Aloun Roma France San Francisco Chronicle Steve Harrison Kiko
"sierra nevada brewing company" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

05:15 min | 1 year ago

"sierra nevada brewing company" Discussed on How I Built This

"From. Npr.

"sierra nevada brewing company" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

07:12 min | 1 year ago

"sierra nevada brewing company" Discussed on How I Built This

"Is an important point and I want. I want you to explain this to me because I I think that people are going to be confused and think that I hope they're not that you just kinda figure it out as you went along which is partially true. You actually did a lot of research like you actually went to. Uc Davis which is a huge. It has a huge agricultural department and you like met with professor there and and went to the research library to learn about brewing. What what like. What did you do that so yeah we were fortunate so UC Davis had one of the only university brewing schools in the nation. It was started. You know they have a big wine program as well but they. They started writing a beer program Quite a few years back. And we availed ourselves of both their library and I would go down with stacks of quarters. I would either read their or photocopy everything I could get my hands on like scientific journals. Like like scientific academic papers and boxes today and there were a couple of really important scientific brewing texts available and they weren't. They weren't homering text. They were if you're a brewing scientist Four or five hundred page Tomes on You know every aspect of of being a professional broher and I read them cover to cover and so I was a fairly Learned brewer from at least the literature side As we went into into bring commercially and it also sounds like in the two year period because it was like really two years. Right seventy to eighty. When you were working ramping up here and really going public I mean selling it to the public that the other guys like the other folks in in the craft brewing industry. We're really collegial like Fritz. Maytag ANCHOR STEAM. Like you went to these folks advice and they were really they were like yeah. I mean I'm I'm just wondering why were they? Just good people like it gives you early twenties. I mean they could have just. I duNno looked like. Why are we taking this seriously? But what what explains because they were right. There was a lot of like asking for tips and stuff right. Yeah and I and I think that You know Fritz was probably the first one I leaned on bit. And and he had Had the same experience so when he was starting out when he bought ager. He didn't know anything about brewing. Or the brewing industry and he would go and visit other brewers and he was shocked at how open and supportive. They were but We did have a really open relationship with pretty much anybody in the brewing industry. I joined the master Brewers Association which was really the big brewers technical group over early on. But you could call up A technical person at another berry whether it was coarser anheuser busch or Miller and ask a question and they would talk loud and while the commercial guys. The guys who are selling beer in the streets they. They didn't have the same relationship but the the technical side of growing Brewers tend to stick together to help solve problems so in this two year period of ramping. Up Right what does Katie thing? We've got a daughter baby girl at home it was. She Likes Katy ever ever like gay. Can like this is not doing. It was tough and We made a lot of sacrifices. She made a lot of sacrifices You know we didn't have any money and I was working all the time so If I wasn't studying wasn't welding if I wasn't working because I was still having to work on their job If I wasn't building at the brewery I mean I was. It was seven days a week. twelve hours a day and I had the I guess the early opportunity right when I was committing to build the Burri taxi by one of the bike shops I had worked in. The owner was Getting out of the business and He would have sold it to me. Probably preferentially if I said I wanted to do that. And there was a point where I thought I could buy this bike shop and probably make a decent living And it's a sure thing but I was. You know in my mind thinking you know am I gonNa then question Could I've ever really pulled off building a brewery and being a broker for my livelihood instead of a bike mechanic? And so we had a a thoughtful discussion. Kadian I about what should we do? What should I do and came down to you? Know I think you've gotTa Follow Your Your Passion and See if that's what you WANNA do. You should do that. I've read that you you you even a book about about these really. These new wrote that By September nineteen eighty. You're running out of money quickly. And this is a quote from your book Psychologically we you and Paul were starting to break down. What what. What do you mean just from the stress of of watching you know nothing happened money going that like? What was the breakdown there were a few Points of desperation and we were getting there We were out of money for. I don't know the ten th time and and had gone to family and said you know we just need another five thousand or two thousand or whatever and we can get the doors open. We did that a bunch of times and so we were out of point where it's like we can't go ask for money again. We've we've told them. This was the last time like five times ago. We'd spent everything we had and they said we borrowed enough that you know not going forward with a certainly been big failure so it was like no. We gotta do this. We just You know didn't have everything together to start brewing and I needed a cold box refrigeration system for where we're going to age the beer and I remember a friend of mine said why. No of this Backyard Butcher shop that the county shutdown. That's got a old refrigeration system the coil on it and you probably have it or get it for a few bucks. So when over there and in his backyard he would butchart chickens and hogs and things for for neighbors illegally and There was a little cold box there so I took it to the burry started. They clean it up and it was covered in blood and feathers and Was just completely corroded. And I'm sitting there cleaning it up and I just thought to myself you know. We're down to this desperate of situation. We've got no money making Making beer still a few weeks off. WE'RE NOT GONNA. Make it when we come back. Ken finally brewed his first batch of beer to sell to the public and how people began to buy it not by the KEG. Hide even by the six pack bottle by bottle by bottle stay with US garage and you're listening to how I built this.

Brewers Uc Davis Fritz anheuser busch brewers Maytag master Brewers Association professor US burry Burri scientist Katie Ken KEG Paul Miller
"sierra nevada brewing company" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

09:20 min | 1 year ago

"sierra nevada brewing company" Discussed on How I Built This

"Of people who are used to drinking. You know regular lager beer and it was even that way. When we first started the brewery you'd go to a tasting and ninety percent of the people were like. Wow this is way to better I I. I can't drink this or I don't like this but then you'd find somebody is like. Can I just loved that bitter character? And so the you know the Human Palate Certainly interpret those flavors differently. And I think as a craft brewing and as beer culture evolved I think people became much more appreciative of beer styles that they have a lot of character. All right. So you've got this little storefront. At what point did you think you know? Maybe I should actually make beer and sell beer was like a conversation at somebody encourage you to do this. Was there. 'cause you've got the store and presumably like you can make that your career like we could be talking today and you could have started the chain of of homebrew supply shops right. But but at what point did you think maybe I should just sell beer. Well I Actually went down to a conference in Oakland And on that trip we arrange tour to go see. Fritz maytag anchor buried. Fritz Maytag was the guy who founded anchor brewery which makes anchor steam He didn't find it so he he Purchased it so because an old brewery he purchased it. Yes an old brewery. But he kind of kind of revamped revamped. It made it into what yeah revamped it right so he helped Sort of create. What is now the craft brewing industry by realizing that? If you're going to be a small boutique brewery in this country. You better one producer unique product and in to figure out how to charge enough of a price that you can survive as a small producer. So you meet him. You meet him at this at this conference in Oklahoma. I didn't meet him. The conference actually went overdose brewery and he gave me tour me and a small group of folks and Pretty primitive at that time It was Lot No automation and not a lot of sophistication the berry and I was fairly sophisticated sophisticated as Humbler Culturing some of our own decent and doing things like that and making twenty gallon batches. I think at that point he was making maybe fifty barrel batches and that sort of inspired me a bit that you know. Maybe you could do it as a as a startup as a homebrew her and then I went and visited new albion which was really the Sonoma's Jack McCall of that parade and he had sort of gone pretty much homebrew and opened up a commercial brewery with all home built primitive basic equipment Very small batches About forty five gallons per batch and after seeing his operation realized that it was feasible to do as an independent Glorified homebrew set up and sell beer commercially. So you were actively kind of exploring the possibility of doing this when you contacted you know Fritz or when you went to go visit new albion did you say hey. I'm thinking about doing this myself can I? Can I come talk to you or did you? Just say Oh. I got this shop where we saw equipment. Can I come check you out like what was your? What was your approach? Well You know thinking back then with Fritz. I don't think I yet had the notion that I wanted to try to go commercial When I went and visited jacket was starting to Gel that This is maybe something I can do and I got together with one of my humber shop customers Polka Mosey and he was buying homebrew supplies for me and for from other Homebrew suppliers and you know. We decided Let's see if we can raise some money and open a brewery. Wow so that so basically that all right. This guy seems to know what he's doing and you knew what you were doing because you were like twenty three twenty twenty two twenty three at this point and I read that you you guys sat down and wrote a business plan like a pretty detailed business plan And you figured it you figure that you need fifty thousand dollars to actually start a a beer company a brewing company She went to the banks right. And what are the banks? Say when he shouldn't plant I made I guess. In hindsight it was not a pretty detailed business plan after seeing. You know more formal business plans. Those who we thought was a good business plan so we had You know printed off articles of of sort of the trends that were happening in beer one on Fritz maytag and one on sort of what was happening in the import space starting to grow in the US and the demise of sort of much choice in the Baroness Dri thought with. Give us a small slice of of the Pie. That was rapidly being cut up so I think we wrote several drafts of that business. Plan the original one. I think called for fifty thousand dollars total and went to banks and we. We actually started so we started pool our money. I started a bike Whitman. I started to build equipment. I enrolled back at the junior college at Butte in. Welding classes machine shops Anything that that gave me. Access to use forklifts andro presses and welders and everything else needed to weld. All the pieces together took some business. Glasses took Refrigeration repair it. Took a couple of semesters of that. Started to build skills and started Bill Equipment as we were trying to raise money The bank's pretty much said There's no way and if you were Ah Banker of of any sort back then and you researched the US bring industry. You would have seen that. It was pretty rapidly Declining small brewers were you would not have given a loan a Donnelley to a crafter incoming but till like two guys in their twenties. Tried to start a crap. Reagan who had no experience no experience in the brewing industry. You know we'd never worked a day for a brewery or a beer distributor meaning like that so yeah not very Likely investment to make Verma banker standpoint. Got It so you need fifty k. How much money did you in Paul have between you so we had assembled seventeen thousand dollars and I between the two between the two of US I had sold my homebrew shop for three thousand or four thousand dollars And I had some savings in. My grandfather gave me some to go to college. I cashed all those in and Paul had somewhere was sort of all his savings not a lot of money. So how did you get the rest of fifty k? That you still need like thirty five K. Went to over family and eventually some friends and got Five Thousand Dollars. Ten thousand dollar investments and thought. We had enough money several times but kept running out of money and we were so low on cash that we did not hire pretty much any thing out so we did the framing. That sheet rocking. I did the plumbing. I Did. All the electrical. I did other frigerator. Yeah where was the location? Where was where was the site that you found? We found a little metal warehouse building three Thousand Square Feet Empty. Shell Had Been. Ah a sheet. Rock warehouse Chico and Chico right and so we came in and in order to keep sanitation and quality in a bring world. You need floor. Drains and you need separation between the rooms and the fermenting yams and So we went in and Unbeknownst to the landlord we Jack Hammered Through the floor. Saad and put in drainage and then poured sloped floors on top of that and But we did all that ourselves and it took a really long time. I was taking my fifty seven Chevy and driving up and down the Sacramento Valley up into Oregon and Washington and looking for old pumps and pipe and tanks and and things that we could scrounge for basically pennies on the dollar to us to build the brewing equipment out of and I I got pretty lucky. The daring industry was also sort of a tough point. Where he's little family dairies were closing. And there were hundreds of them scattered throughout that would have won milk tank and it was sort of a side job. I get a lead that you know. Go down this road and you might find So and sold sold dairy so knock on the door and asked if they had any old equipment and picked up the barn and their be dusty pile of pipe and maybe a pomp and occasionally I get a tank Three hundred bucks or five hundred bucks. Buy It all from. This.

Fritz Maytag US producer Jack McCall Paul Oklahoma Chico humber Jack Hammered Oakland Chevy Saad Bill Equipment Oregon Whitman Donnelley Butte Verma Reagan Baroness Dri
"sierra nevada brewing company" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

09:20 min | 1 year ago

"sierra nevada brewing company" Discussed on How I Built This

"And And I was transferring to Chico State and We connected and go river since all right. Katie will factor back into the story later on and we just mentioned here that she met her and I think to day does not drink alcohol. She's a teetotaler right. Okay okay important. Important point to note the The third largest craft brewery in America Founder wife doesn't drink. Okay all right you Katie. seventy-three your cash. Because your baby you're like eighteen years old It's Great. I mean you were so young and I guess I I guess you You got a job in that area. Iran Chico to tackle oroville managing a bike shop For a while. Yeah I had Ma Fbi parents got divorced You know I didn't get a lot of support. I think I got a one hundred dollars a month Go go into school and so I had to keep working so I kept a part time job as I went to school and then Eventually I I got the opportunity to go manage One of the bike shops the owner and Chico had recently purchased in the talent word Bill. And so the two of US got a dinky little one room house Sort of in the foothills of or bill and I ran that shop for a few years and our daughter was born. Sierra and Born at that House et home we had Albert gets home. Birth and then I had a neighbor who loved my homebrew and convinced me that I should open up. A Homebrew supply store. And it's your neighbor Ron. And what was his name? Jesus Jesus okay. So he's your neighbor. And I guess just pointed that you are like twenty twenty one still home brewing presumably. You've gotten better over the five years six years you've been doing it and you Most people probably in nineteen seventy six seventy five or drinking like a mass produced beer right in America. There raises like the Big Budweiser. Most people drank. Yeah it was pretty much the approaching the low point of the. Us Brewing Industry. The the breweries that had survived prohibition that you know the family owned regional breweries were in very difficult place with trying to compete with the national brands and so the the beer industry was consolidating very rapidly. Through the really since prohibition but fifty sixty seventies hundreds and hundreds of burris went out of business and it got down to write about the the year we started in one thousand nine hundred eighty for the bringing for the brewery got down to the low point of forty three independent. Us amazing that included the biggest end. The small amount of small brewers that hung on there. So but going back to this time in the mid seventies right brought like one ron to Jesus when your neighbor like when you met him he would have before he met. You just normally been drinking like budweiser probably or want one of those people. I'm probably not even anything that expensive so You know again. We were young and didn't have a lot of money so we were probably drinking. Buckhorn and the Spring beer out of maier burned company and in Los Angeles. I mean there were a handful of cheaper beers that were probably what our age group would be drinking and these were not high quality beers. It's just like They were certainly not interesting beers. I got you okay. All right I mean the. Us bring industry has had a history of making you know generally good quality products but they're not necessarily products that have a lot of character so he he meets you and your brewing this beer and what was the style of the beer. You were brewing at home I I was probably fairly advanced by that time so I was doing a little bit of roasting my own grains in the oven and Sprouting my own week to make wheat beer and and so I was pretty experimental and at that point my wife and I were sort of back to the landers we had A small her two goats We had chickens We were making cheese and Bacon Brad and so Making beer sort of fit into our lifestyle. So your neighbor Ron says. Hey you're you're disappears. Great you should Sell it And I guess that's sort of what I from what I understand. It's sort of inspired you to open up a like a home brewing business like little shop or you could sit like supply. People is that is a right now so we found a little teeny building in an in what had been an old downtown hotel and Chico that was being converted into a bunch of little shops and studios and so for. I don't think it was about sixty dollars a month rent. We could rent this little room. And it was just a bare shell which we ended up doing all the woodwork. And finishing up turning into just a little shop you know next to us was a potter and a used record shop and jewelry store and a little teeny antique store and just a bunch of little artists and crafts and shops up there sound so idyllic especially from from two thousand twenty where we couldn't we couldn't pay the rent some months and so we worked out a deal where we'd be the janitors for the for the Place and Lou grant so Getting night did that. For couldn't you couldn't sell sixty bucks worth of homebrew supply was You know we could tell. Sixty dollars would be really big day but out of the sixty dollars you made maybe twenty and then you had to pay the lights and share a little bit of money to take home and so now. We didn't make a lot of money. Homebrew supplies and and what were homebrew supplies in nineteen seventy six So it was you know. Malt Syrup primarily Although we were pushing and and teaching classes and trying to get people to actually grew from grain which is the back to the beginning of the process you buy malted barley which is barley that's been soak sprouted in germinated and dried a monster and that creates the base for then converting the the Maldon sugars and then sugar boiled with hops. And and so we stocked hydro meters and Crocks and tubs to Bruin Glass car. Boys submits the beer beer. Here's here's what I'm wondering candidate in in the late seventies right. This is still a subculture like like craft brewing today. Right like half have had the staff of how I built. Us GOES TO CRAFT BREWING festivals. Right like it's just a very cut mainstream thing. Every bar worth its salt has craft brews on tap or in bottles right in nineteen seventy six. This is a this is a subculture of people like like like dungeons and dragons. Yeah so I'm just trying to understand something because obviously you proved everybody right but when people said to you can't this is just like gross. I don't what what do you like about this. Why do you like the taste of this? What would you say well Yeah there was. No Knowledge of craft beer and homebrew was You know not necessarily viewed in a positive light and and you know bay sort of on what most people had tasted if they ever tasted homebrew. It was highly alcoholic Acidic in look murky and Which today is and again but back then beer was supposed to be clear and so most people were pretty put off by it but I made pretty decent beer and I started to have a following of friends who wanted my homebrew. Well what did you like about it like a? Here's that's what I wanted to like when I talked to somebody who resilient to why right. There's just a the complexity and the different flavors and the it's almost like It's like it's like somebody who's WHO's really interested in in like mysteries there. They love the nuances. Is that what beer was like for healing making it harder but I think was the allure of the alchemy You know just the ability to take things such as disparate as you know a bitter leaf off a plant but the hop and the sweet malt from barley and eastern sort of see that magic happen of of converting those basic raw ingredients into something that has lots of nuances in character and flavor and can bring joy and social setting and So I think the process was as intriguing as the finished product. Because in then late seventies it would have been unusual taste right like our taste. Buds were not attuned to you. Know Multi hoppy beer. No they weren't and You know I don't know what percentage of my friends actually liked the beer. The that told me they did but I'm sure it was off pudding for the majority.

Chico America ron Katie Iran Chico Fbi Founder Katie. Ron burris oroville Los Angeles Sierra Buckhorn Lou grant landers Bruin Glass House Albert
"sierra nevada brewing company" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

09:22 min | 1 year ago

"sierra nevada brewing company" Discussed on How I Built This

"So just a few days ago. Ken Grossman and I were supposed to be sitting side by side on stage at the Sydney Goldstein Theater in San Francisco for a live. How I built this show to hear how he built. One of the biggest craft beer companies in the country but instead that events like every other event was cancelled. But we didn't want to miss out on getting a chance to hear Ken story because too good and to inspiring to wait until we can all go out again so we asked Ken to record himself from his home just outside Chico California and by the way that's how it's going to be for a while because our staff our guests me probably many of you were all at home now and starting to adjust to this very weird new reality. I'm gonNA confess something here. I feel a little bit conflicted about doing a show that celebrates building and creating when so many businesses are in trouble now. Somebody people are worried but I also think of this show as a place of hope and possibility this is GonNa be a long challenging journey for all of us and we're going to need stories of people who can inspire us with the challenges they've overcome and the battles they've waged the odds. They've defeated to build something truly special. Sierra Nevada. Now before we even get into Ken Story. We wanted to hear from him about how things are going with managing the crisis so far and of course in one way the company is in better shape than most because lots of people are in need of a beer these days so in places where they can get it they are buying it. They're buying a lot of it. And when I spoke to Ken a few days ago he told me his production facilities are still open but he has no idea how long it might last a lot of the businesses that we depend on to sell our products are severely challenged right now and you know having this kind of financial disruption happened to tens of thousands of small family owned and run bars restaurants With the stores across the nation is going to have a huge toll on the lives of those people. The economy's in those communities so it's it's been one of the most difficult and stressful weeks in our existence I've had a lot of them over forty years. It was a lot of sleepless nights but this is sort of the pinnacle of of things for us to have to work through an and to make decisions about and yes over the course of building. Sierra Nevada beer can has had a lot of sleepless nights starting with trying to build a craft brewing company in his twenties with barely any money. When people didn't really know a craft beer was in fact when can introduce his now legendary Sierra Nevada Pale Ale to his friends in one thousand nine hundred most of them thought it was undrinkable but today his company is the third largest craft brewery in the US. After Boston. Beer Company and yelling in Canton and his family owned one hundred percent of Sierra Nevada but making money and becoming rich from beer was far from Kansas at his core. He is a beer brewer. Not a businessman totally obsessed with the process with the hops and barley in the mall to the strains of yeast and his interest in brewing and fermentation actually started when he was a kid growing up. In La's San Fernando Valley. We had a a small neighborhood group of boys Growing up through elementary school. So I met my neighbor I think it was second grade and his father was a you even back then was making home. Beer and wine and Was a Super Very progressive person for the time. He's into cooking and baking and for Manning and culinary arts as well as Being a cyclist so he was into bikes. Which later got into cycling and touring and also was a scientist? He was a meddler just in work for Rocketdyne and so he sort of had all those passions of Of Life and and I guess it really appealed to me so I was around fermenting beer from probably the age of Seven or eight or so And seeing things boiling on the stove every weekend when he would brew and his Senate. I were best buddies for many many years. I ended up moving up to Chico when he attended Chico State. What was your friends? what was it? What was his dad's name must name the cow Molar County since passed away But Calvin Molar He was this a very early adopter of of the. The science of brewing mortem brewers back in that day. You know. We're using English old sort of crude books on how to make cheap beer but not necessarily You know how to make great beer and had a had a do it at home with sort of a science based yeah so He approached from a scientific side. So here here's what I'm wondering you are in high school and I guess from from whatever you bought your first home brewing Kit Around that time Which I think a lot a lot more high school juniors today would put in in the early seventies certainly not early sixties. Early in common Did you did you WanNa make beer because you liked it and wanted to drink beer? Or what was the? What was the thinking behind buying a home Brooklyn When I was young so I couldn't buy beer and so I just wanted to experiment with making bear. That was it. Yeah and he'll today if you want to brew beer you just go on the Internet and order the hops come in pellets and you know wherever you need and then you just do. It was it. Was it a little more complicated than nineteen sixty-nine It was so there were actually some Homebrew supply stores just getting started. And you could buy beer and wine. Making supplies at that. Point pumping was still illegal but They did Nobody got arrested for providing mulder hops. But if you think back to that era there was still a bit of a carryover from prohibition brewing and so you could buy malt extract even at hardware stores and it was You know sold with a crock and packaging east and a little block of some pretty lousy hops. But there there were ingredients that were still available. During the prohibition era and no good information on how to make great beer home there was just For those people who wanted to brew Abacha Cold Brew. And how how? How early batches I mean were. They terrible terrible. You put them in a closet and your house. Where did you go? I had to hide. 'em Hide Him from my mother and Actually made a batch of wine. I which was pretty tragic. Which was out of welches cantwell just grape juice and some bacon east a can of grape juice cans anymore And then I got some all extract and and being. A bunch of me did a plastic bucket and and started bruin a little bit. How did you? How did you know you weren't making like you know Botulin Eum or anthrax or something? I guess one of the things about beer making is that Things like that don't grow in Beer. I got you okay. alcohol the P. H. Hops are all inhibitory to Toxins not that you can't make bad beer but it's pretty impossible to make beer those kind of toxins yet. All right so you. You're you know doing home brewing and and I guess when you Graduate High School in Nineteen seventy-two You decide that College is really going to be. You're saying that you you you WanNa Kinda just get out. La Move Up to northern California. And you go you end up in Chico California a small town in In the foothills of the Sierra Nevada the idea was that's where you want to to be for a while. Yeah I got a job at a bicycle shop which was a family owned business With the father and two sons working there in a pretty frictional environment the dynamic was not great and after less than a couple of months I sort of had to change your heart and say well maybe I should go to school and so I applied at the junior college to study chemistry and ended up eventually transferring to Chico state and continued to take science classes I met my girlfriend and then later wife Through a mutual friend about the same time this is. This is your wife. Katie that you met you met her at Butte Community College matter. She was going to Chico. State.

Sierra Nevada Chico State Chico Chico California Ken Story Beer Company Ken Ken Grossman San Francisco Sydney Goldstein Theater US Boston La California Rocketdyne Graduate High School cow Molar County Butte Community College scientist
What's the Real History of El Camino Real?

Bay Curious

07:39 min | 1 year ago

What's the Real History of El Camino Real?

"If you live or work on the San Francisco Peninsula you probably spent a lot of time on El Camino Royale Road that runs from San Francisco to San Jose through the center of many towns. Along the way. It's one of California's best known roads. And if you grew grew up here you probably learned about it in school. The story goes L. Community out is an ancient road built by the Spanish to connect the twenty one missions along on California's coast. But here's the thing that story. It's not exactly true. This big curious. I'm Olivia Allen Price Today. We're bringing you a story that first aired on our show back in twenty seventeen about the real history of El Camino real support for bay. Curious comes from Sierra. Nevada Brewing Company family owned operated and argued over since one thousand nine hundred reminding listeners to think for themselves but drink with others. SIERRA SIERRA NEVADA DOT COM K. Committees Rachel myrow senior editor of the Silicon Valley Newsdesk hit the trail with this week's question. Asker we met at mission in Santa Clara because this story dates all the way back to the Spanish colonial era in California. My name is Debbie Tori. I live in Campbell California Tori aspect curious the question. What can you find out about the El Camino real history? My name is Robert Cinco. wits professor of history at Santa Clara University sank quits is the man who can answer that and then some starting with the perhaps surprising truth that there were many El Camino rails all over the land. Spain used to control in the WHO world from seventeen sixty nine to eighteen twenty one royal roads. That was what you would call the main roads in any particular area because technically all of us belong to the King of Spain but wait. I read on wikipedia that this El Camino real but one in silicon valley is part of the historic mission trail on ancient fro that connects the Spanish missions. Like a string of pearls along the California coast. Also I'm pretty sure I heard somewhere possibly in school that the distance between each mission. It's supposed to be about a day's journey. What happened has to do more with southern California than it does with with Northern California a by about the eighteen seventies? As you get more and more Anglo Americans coming in the southern California and the the angle population really increases With the arrival of the railroads in Los Angeles listen the eighteen eighties now in America. There's a rich tradition of just got here yesterday. People concocting romantic origin myths and a number of influential fluential southern Californians wanted one of their own. They looked around and saw crumbling. Spanish missions twenty one of them stretching from the Mexican border all the way north to Sonoma's. Here's the story is told in Nineteen Fifty one promotional film for Greyhound buses called Freedom Highway Bridge the same road. The Spaniards followed almost two hundred years ago. Only they call it El Camino real kings highway. China imagine how was on horseback. Of course what was really going on here was the enslavement of local tribespeople. who were reeling under? The impact of European diseases forced religious religious conversion and the destruction of their entire way of life. Not that our question Asker Debbie Tori or I learned much of this in the fourth grade which is when a lot of California school. Children studied the subject. You're right they did glamorize it thinking it was a wonderful. The mission passed that they've construct was a fantasy past ROIC missionaries happy contented. Indians Fandango is all over the place. You know the Spanish mich- often enough you read and textbook that they blazed trails but they didn't blaze trails. They follow trails. That had already been developed by the indigenous people up and down the California coast I but at the turn of the twentieth century few people wanted that version of history. They wanted something fun. Happy Exotic groups like the landmarks club and the native daughters of the Golden West pushed to reframe collection of dirt roads into a rediscovered king's highway and the Automobile Appeal Club of southern California kind of sides. This fantasy past is a great way of getting people to buy drive automobiles and so what they do. is they begin. The push the notion that there was one central road which they named the commuter rail that connected the missions they began to push the notion commissions were located A day's journey from each other. You know which kind of when you think about. It makes them motels rather than what they actually were. Agents of simulation immolation of of the native peoples so wind in northern California. Play along with this southern California Fantasy Sanca wits says the concept caught on with wealthy Californians leg Jane Stanford wife of the Real Road Barren Lewin Stanford and wealthy Catholics like San Francisco. Mayor James Phelan Eland. They wanted the Spanish missions restored to something like their former glory. Lot of them were in really sad shape. If you look at pictures from the eighteen sixties exceeds eighteen seventies. The missions are crumbling. Consider this if the Spanish revival movement had not happened we might be looking at a string ruins along the California coast standing inside the sumptuous renovated mission. Santa Clara on the Modern Day campus of Santa Clara University Tori agrees. I'm actually kind of speechless. Listen here it's it's just magnificent. I feel like I'm in Europe. Then we hop in a modern day car and drive a half an hour to mission San Jose which is actually in modern day Fremont think of it as a mini mission road trip focused on the South Bay and here in Fremont we find one of the most historically accurate restorations in the California commission system and the on site museum is not to miss. debby Tori grabs a fact based map of the missions from the gift shop. So so debbie do you see yourself going on a mission tour. After this as a matter of fact yes. Tory took her kids on a mission tour like this years ago but told them a lot of Steph. She genuinely believed the turns out to be bunk. Her grandkids will get the truth. But Rachel I still have a question so every now. And then. When I'm driving along El Camino scenerio I will see a shepherd's crook on the side of the road and from the Crook hangs a bell that I have been told Marks this historic historic trail. Are those what's deal with spells. I guess those also stem back to the same period of time when people I came up with El Camino Rail There was a wife of a foundry owner in Los Angeles who conveniently suggested that she could manufacture these handy bells that were sort of reminiscent. I'm a nuisance of the Spanish era. Up and down the new route that they had just created Mrs Arbitrage C. E. Forbes and and in one thousand nine hundred ninety six cal trans decided to resurrect the bells So you'll spot him one or two miles apart on a variety of state routes because of course there isn't one route reality fantasy. Don't quite match up REX payer dollar's have helped to feed this fantasy fans. Yes well the taxpayer dollars to feed it the first time too so people are making money off of this. Yes this is a a two million dollar testament to the enduring appeal wheel of a made up version of history.

California Asker Debbie Tori El Camino El Camino Rail Santa Clara San Jose San Francisco Peninsula Santa Clara University San Francisco Rachel Myrow Los Angeles Campbell California Northern California Spain California School Nevada Brewing Company Real Road Barren Lewin Stanfor L. Community Sonoma
An Eyewitness to Extinction

Short Wave

08:30 min | 1 year ago

An Eyewitness to Extinction

"Today a scientist who found herself in the middle of disturbing bring scientific mystery. It's the early nineteen ninety s and Karen Lips is a graduate student studying frogs in in the mountains of Costa Rica. And I had set up camp in this little shack that had no running water or electricity so this is in old growth both oak forest cloud forest. So it's moist and there's Moss everywhere and Amphibians love it. Karen lived alone spending her days studying the reproductive behavior of its Mahala Calypso. A tiny tree frog the color of emeralds and then a couple of years into her research Karen found some dead frogs and seven is not very much. She wasn't too worried about it but she couldn't figure out why they died so she sent the frogs off for essentially a frog autopsy. Then she headed home for Christmas break and when I got back I expected to see the beginning of the rainy season season. which is usually when you see the greatest number frogs and I kept waiting and waiting and the rains came and there just weren't very many frogs at all and so i? I started questioning myself like well. Maybe I disturbed them. Maybe the flashlight for two two years one little flashlight bothered them and they went away. Or maybe maybe maybe it's not raining enough. I just simply could not imagine what could have caused them to disappear. Yeah it was not the flashlights fault. Not According to the FROG autopsy results. They said we don't know why they died. They seem fine. They got something weird in their skin. Now at that point there was nothing known that would kill a frog. Doug that was something quote weird in their skin. Coming up on shortwave. Scientists untangle scientific mystery of the Amphibian World the one that goes from kind of weird to devastating support for this. NPR podcast comes from Sierra Nevada. Brewing Company family owned operated and argued over since nineteen eighty proud supporter of Independent. Thought whether that's online over over the air or in a battle more at Sierra Nevada dot com. Here's the thing you need to know right away about Infineon's there's a lot of them and that's important because they live right in the middle of the food web they are food for all the mammals and the birds and the snakes and the predators and they are the predators predators of all the insects and flies and mosquitoes. So those two things mean that they are really like a key linchpin in the entire ecosystem so when in groups of Amphibians start disappearing scientists. get nervous by the time. Karen had noticed those dead frogs in Costa Rica. They're already been these reports of frogs disappearing being in large numbers around the world and reports kept coming but nobody knew what it all meant. Nobody knew why are they disappearing. Where are they disappearing disappearing from? how quickly do they disappear? You know what what's the cause of it years. After Costa Rica Karen set up another field site in the cloud forest Panama. At first it was wonderful. Hundreds of frogs every night all kinds of different species and then it wasn't two or three years later later I went back and They would be acting very weird frogs that were supposed to only come out at night. We'd find them during the day. Frogs that would you sit. We're supposed to sit only on the leaves and the plants we see them on the ground until we pick them up because we always measure them and identify them and then let them go and a lot of times we'd pick these things up and they wouldn't struggle. They wouldn't try to escape. And oftentimes they'd make one jump and then they dead. WHOA and this happened? We were there for like three weeks weeks and in three weeks we found fifty some dead or dying frogs. Had you ever seen anything like that before. No the scene part is important written because typically researchers would get to a field site and all the frogs would just be gone nobody really witnessed them in the act of dying. Rarely even saw the the bodies but this time Karen had a front row seat more importantly she had a lot of evidence to work with and so on the one hand it is horrible horrible and sad on the other hand. You're like this is it. We have evidence no matter what we've got something we can take back. We can collect then we can preserve them we can send them to a lab and they can look at them and see what they have. Karen said the dead frogs off to a pathologist to be tested and again the vast majority of them seem to have something weird in their skin and he said that I said I have heard this before but Karen Still L. had no idea what the weird skin thing was and she wasn't alone. Scientists from all over working in countries thousands of miles apart. Were also trying to figure it out they didn't realize yet. Just how connected it all was. And this is where the media comes in a New York Times reporter interviewed Karen and some other scientists about the disappearing Amphibian problem and the report published a picture of this weird thing in the skin and then a team here in. DC at the National Zoo saw the picture and they wrote us and they said we have the same thing and we know what it is it took a bunch of scientists from all over the world help from the media and several decades needs to figure it all out but they finally had it. The culprit is a fungus kindred fungus. We're not talking like mushrooms. We're talking infectious fungus. This that burrows into the skin of an amphibian and messes with their ability to breathe and stay hydrated and regulate their body temperature. The infection can be passed directly from frog frog or it can travel through water today. What we know is that there is at least one kind of kitchen fungus almost everywhere in the world? Wow we know that globally something like like forty percent of amphibians are in decline. Now not all of that is from the kid trud but I suspect that probably quite a bit of it is in fact from kindred. Because it's many of the extinctions have occurred in Amphibians are recent like in the past twenty or thirty years which is win this kindred we believe sort of emerged spread around the reason why it's spreading now isn't entirely clear. Karen says it's probably because of us. Humans worshiping things from one place to another faster than ever before which makes it easier for organisms like kitchen fungus to hitch a ride and infect vulnerable habitats hundreds or even thousands of miles away this year the journal Science published a report estimating that has resulted in the greatest recorded loss of biodiversity diversity. Ever caused by a disease. The sad truth is there's no feasible way for us to get kicked out of the environment and that's a tough pill to swallow So how do you wake up every morning and do work on this knowing that you are fighting a losing battle. Well yeah I mean after a while it's incredibly demoralizing moralising to know that you've spent twenty five some years on something and you have not actually saved a single frog on the other hand you know for me as a a biologist. I know that evolution works and having studied human attempts to intervene and save things. Were really good. Would it sort of really discreet. Problems like saving the the condor or things where there's a discrete problem. We can attack it these diseases that are invisible so and spread. Globally are very difficult. And so what what gives me peace is knowing that things evolve off whatever made it through epidemics. They are survivors and they have something that allowed them to to get through the worst of it and so- evolution happens and I suspect that the frogs will figure it out before people do

Karen Lips Scientist Costa Rica Frog Infineon Sierra Nevada Graduate Student NPR New York Times Doug Brewing Company DC Reporter National Zoo Three Weeks Forty Percent Two Two Years
Fire Starter: John Leonard Orr

True Crime Brewery

11:46 min | 1 year ago

Fire Starter: John Leonard Orr

"The shocking story of arson investigator John Leonard or began back in Nineteen eighty-four a fire in Pasadena California hardware. The store killed four people including a two year old child arson. Investigators examined the ruins and determined that the fire was caused by an electrical malfunction. All except for John or he was convinced that the cause was arson. Join US at the quiet end today. For the case of a fire captain and arson investigator John or with nearly two thousand suspicious fires over the next seven years a task force was formed to find serial arsonists. The task force called themselves. The pillow pyro task force and their methods of investigation. Were both fascinating and effective diff- so it should be a great talk today and this case was recommended to us by Cindy. Well Cindy's recommended a few cases for us. She's One of our most avid listeners. So we always like to hear from her okay so we have a California beer. I've never picked on. I'm from this brewery before I can't imagine my favorite brewers have haven't chosen anyway. This is from Sierra Nevada brewing company. It celebration fresh fresh hop. I P A Sierra Nevada brewing is in Chico California celebrations in American Ip with a six point eight percent Ab Victor. Nice beer are Jamba colour. Little Bit ahead some pretty lace kind of a spicy aroma. peppery aroma. Some sweet mall little bit of hops. And that's exactly how it tastes. He started out with the CARAMEL. Little Spicy peppery Steph and then hops at the end and it's a nice beer. It's not terribly happy. Not One of those hot bombs that are GONNA kill you. I think you to enjoy it all right. Well let's open it up okay so I was really surprised. This is your first Sierra Nevada. Ah Let's take it down to the quiet end. I don't know how I've missed Sierra Nevada. Anyway I had a ton of Beers from that company so if we have other California cases you'll probably more of them great so until the case this is a just a fascinating case to me. It really yes yes. Yeah so by John. Moore's own description. His childhood growing up in the nineteen fifties was a happy one. He lived in a two bedroom middle-class home home behind his grandparents house. He had two older brothers who moved away when John was a teenager. Went to join the navy and the other start his own family Alan China's sixteen his mother left him and his father alone with no explanation. She just took off one day. She called after few days but John didn't see her again for three years and she had moved back to her hometown of Missouri and she never did reconcile John's father. That's kind of a strange thing to happen when you're a teen share I'm sure it was pretty weird and a little disheartening for him. Definitely one Sunday. She's there the next day she's not and no real explanation. Though in nineteen sixty seven John. Join the airforce. After he completed basic training training he was in jet mechanics training then he transferred to firefighting school. He had wanted to be a firefighter for some time. So he's happy to learn. Learn how to operate the equipment as he put out training fires yet. He married his high school girlfriend. Jodi in nineteen sixty eight and they were shipped off to an air air force base in Spain which was near Commercial Airport and they were there for two years but John was kind of bored. He only got to respond to to air-crashes during that time and he really wanted to be more in on the action. When John was transferred to great falls Montana he fought only one fire then when he he was twenty two he was honorably discharged at this time? Jodi was pregnant with their first child. John was insecure and he came across as a bit of a Bragar in order to compensate for this he really wanted to become a policeman or a firefighter. The Los Angeles Police Department invited him to test for position mission and he passed the written tests the medical exam and the fitness test but he failed the psychological test. He was sent a letter telling him that he he was unsuitable. So this was a big thing for him. He had wanted to be a policeman very badly. Your that was his main goal to be a cop. Yeah so this'll be pointed back to. As a really huge disappointment mitch merely might have had an effect on who he became as a man or your. I think you could look at it. That we could also look at it as there is something in his psychological makeup that made him on high rable. Oh sure yeah I think it went both ways after getting past feeling hurt. He was very angry. The rejection letter suggested that he consult another psychologist so so he hired one that he found in the yellow pages. This psychologist didn't evaluation and found him suitable but remember. This is the person he was paying but now he had a second opinion so he took that back to the LAPD psychologist for an appeal of that decision. You know the LAPD psychologist couldn't couldn't tell John Anything specific about why he had been rejected other than the say that he might have been too passive. Police officers needed to be assertive but then the psychologist left John Alone in his office with the file. He said I'm going to go out and get a cup of coffee. I think he kind of intentionally left the father so John read the file and so that one of his co workers had been interviewed and told the psychologist that John was laid to work lazy and resentful eventful of another man being promoted over him so I can't see any other way that this happened. Then the psychologist was really giving him an opportunity to look at his file. Were were absolutely the final evaluation stated that John Needed a few years to mature. And then maybe he could reapply to the force now. John Though would never admit to seeing his diagnosis in that file but he had actually been diagnosed with a personality trait disturbance and emotionally unstable personality. His former supervisors had described him as both irresponsible and immature as well. So this time John was working for Sparkletts marklets bottled water company. He quit that job and entered the management program at a fast food restaurant. It was nineteen seventy three and John was going going from one fast food job to another before he quit and he applied next to the Los Angeles Fire Department. He was couldn't be a policeman. He can be a fireman. Yeah I think it was as backup plan. And he was really thrilled when he was accepted to the academy for training but it turns out he was out of shape and he wasn't up to the rigors of the academy physically. He was told that he'd also done poorly on the written test so he was just given the option to resign or he. It's going to be fired so he was very angry and upset when this happened. Yeah and part of his problem was probably his attitude his after all had been a firefighter for four years in air force so he felt like he didn't need to study your practice now his time in the air force vote. He's half a couple fires Chris couple crashes and he. It didn't have much training. But he thought he did. So he didn't participate in study sessions with other recruits and he hadn't practice handling the heavy ladders and equipment and they were heavy. These big wooden ladders. He apparently in the service they had the light aluminum ladders. So this was a whole all different ballgame per handed so after that failure John was absolutely despondent and by this time he had two young daughters and his marriage was on the rocks. That's when he applied to the Glendale Fire Department and they accepted him in their fire academy in the spring of seventy four. He completed eight weeks of training and he graduated with twelve other guys. He was starting his career as a firefighter and he was super happy about it. Even though the Pay Glendale was a lot at less than it would have been at the L. A. P. D. or the L. A. F. D. wasn't it Glendale lowest paying in the state or something like that at the the time it was. Yeah maybe that's why I got hired. Nobody wanted to work for them. I'm sure that was part of it. Because he really wasn't. The top of the picks no her psychological report from earlier says a lot doesn't it it really does and also at home things weren't improving. He was really bored on his days off so he ended up taking a part time job at a seven eleven as a clerk then he bought himself pickup truck and went on camping and in hunting trips on his own without his family he ended up befriending a woman at the seven eleven and other employees who is also unhappy in her marriage and the two of them decided to be roommates leave their spouses and apparently this was Not a sexual thing at all it was just a friendship allegedly anyway yes so. John left his wife Jodi leaving her just note as an explanation for what is doing a lot like what his mother did. He pay child support and he also began taking classes in fire science in police science. John believed that. The police didn't show enough respect for firefighters fighters and he examined the conflicts between the two groups and a writing assignment is still working at the seven eleven and he used what he was learning to help him spot shoplifters in the store yeah he got really into that his boss at the seven eleven was impressed at how good he got at catching shoplifters John would would watch kids who came into the store after school and he catch them making them empty their pockets and return things so this was a big thing for John. I mean to the point of weirdness really yeah very weird when example in nineteen seventy six. While he was out shopping he saw men running toward a car with his arms full of suits from Montgomery wards store so John or chased. The man knocked him down and helped the store security guard hold the man until the police arrived yet. He and he was clearly thrilled with this moment. He talked to the security guards and he actually asked them if he could get a part time job working in mall security but the mall said they only hired off-duty policeman and not firefighters. So there's another bruise to his ego. That's right he's already been told his second class this anyway. Because he's a Fire Department Dinata Police Department guy. Yeah and I don't know if that's really a thing but he definitely saw that way. He saw a lot of things in a slightly slightly off center. Way That's true he did. He wasn't quite right. We know that so. John was disappointed that he couldn't get a mall. Security John but that didn't deter them from doing other good deeds the same day. He saw an older man. Shoplifting hand tools. He told the cashier got the man arrested. So he asked at the sears store about getting a part time job with security

John John Leonard Los Angeles Police Department California John Alone Arson Sierra Nevada Brewing Company United States Jodi Fire Department Dinata Police Cindy Sierra Nevada Investigator Jamba Glendale Fire Department Brewers Steph Moore Montana Glendale
"sierra nevada brewing company" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"sierra nevada brewing company" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Others are in critical condition the accident occurred Monday morning local time in the Himalayan state of Jammu and Kashmir in northern India such crashes are common in that part of India because of its hilly terrain just last month a bus plummeted sixteen hundred feet into a gorge in a neighboring state killing more than forty people in both cases the vehicles were overcrowded adding to the danger such made a path back reporting from Mumbai a powerful explosion has injured several people in Kabul officials in Afghanistan say an apparent car bomb struck a densely populated area near the ministry of defense the Taliban have claimed responsibility this is NPR news support for NPR comes from NPR stations other contributors include Sierra Nevada brewing company family owned operated and argued over since nineteen eighty proud supporter of independent thought whether that's online over the air or in a bottle more at Sierra Nevada dot com it's the Ted radio hour from NPR and guy rise and I show today ideas.

Kashmir India Mumbai Afghanistan Taliban NPR Kabul Sierra Nevada brewing company Sierra Nevada sixteen hundred feet
"sierra nevada brewing company" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"sierra nevada brewing company" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"By Sierra Nevada brewing company crafted to be instrumental to your weekend. It bring it back down after Victoria. With a good ole instrumental pun. We're gonna turn it over to our, our drummer, Marcus Gilmore, first time on the show from markets. When when Moore said yes to the gig, I allowed myself a trip down a very deep YouTube, a whole of Marcus Gilmore videos, and I found a version of him playing this song, all by himself, by the way, I encourage you to check to go down one of the yourself. It's, it's very rewarding when it comes to Mr. Gilmore back on the Trump Tom this piece, so away. This is on that video that I thought was just you and, and the drums. And then a laptop, can you tell me what what's happening back there? Yeah. Well on that particular video. Yeah. Solo and I was basically controlling these sensors to the drums, so was basically almost one hundred percent electric, but I was playing with my sticks. So you train the laptop, I remember rehearsal yesterday. You were actually training since this isn't your kit. Right. Actually had to train the laptop to recognize the sounds specific sounds that this that these drums, make. Yeah. You have to train it to, to know what is like, when you hitting particular regions of the drum, what type of operation that will create so that the computer can can read it. Oh man. Okay. And so, so check this out, basically, the first the first few times, this corporation that, that Marcus road will just be him his, drums, and a laptop. This is called Phila wave..

Marcus Gilmore Sierra Nevada brewing company Tom Phila Victoria Moore YouTube one hundred percent
"sierra nevada brewing company" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:19 min | 2 years ago

"sierra nevada brewing company" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And that's behind the magic. Join us next time. We need to do an amazing stat man's east along well who's never broken the same bone twice. I still have half a spike tattoos. Mr Newman muzzle. This instrumental break is supported by Sierra Nevada brewing company crafted to be instrumental to your weekend. You're listening to live from here. You're listening to live from here here on ninety three point nine FM WNYC for the rest of tonight, clear skies. We'll have about twenty one.

Sierra Nevada brewing company WNYC Mr Newman
"sierra nevada brewing company" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"sierra nevada brewing company" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"Sierra Nevada brewing company created a special called resilience with the intention of donating all of its proceeds to benefit wildfire victims the company, which is based out of Chico near the devastated town of paradise hopes to garner. Additional donations by asking other brewers to sell resilience to their customers when the company launched the new pale ale in November they expected maybe three hundred to four hundred California brewers to participate by the time. The beer was made available to the public over one thousand five hundred breweries across the United States. Volunteer to serve up the liquid love. The initiative is expected to raise roughly fifteen million dollars for wildfire relief all of which will be donated to the golden valley community Bank foundation dedicated to victims of the campfire. Thank you. Sierra Nevada brewing company for brewing up some positivity and helping others. Janice. Dean, Fox News. Fox on. You would have the right to keep your phone? Locked a magistrate judge from California has ruled that authorities can't force people to unlock their digital devices with their faces fingers or irises the decision comes from a case involving a Facebook extortion crime in which investigators wanted access to certain devices. The judge said they were able to establish probable cause. But the request wasn't limited to one person or one device and therefore thirties would have been able to open every device from every person inside a house. The judge in the case stress law enforcement cannot force people to unlock their phones. Even with a warrant making biometric unlocks equal to pass codes, which means they're covered under the fifth amendment protections against self-incrimination. The judge also admitted that technology is outpacing law. But that in this case government could access messenger communication from Facebook with a proper warrant under the stored communication act. This decision could still be overturned with FOX on tech. I'm Brett Larson, Fox News..

Sierra Nevada brewing company Fox News Fox Facebook California brewers Chico Brett Larson golden valley community Bank f United States Janice extortion Dean fifteen million dollars
"sierra nevada brewing company" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"sierra nevada brewing company" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"Sierra Nevada brewing company created a special I called resilience with the intention of donating all of its proceeds to benefit wildfire victims the company, which is based out of Chico near the devastated town of paradise hopes to garner. Additional donations by asking other brewers to sell resilience to their customers when the company launched the new pale ale in November they expected maybe three hundred to four hundred California brewers to participate by the time. The beer was made available to the public over one thousand five hundred breweries across the United States. Volunteer to serve up the liquid love. The initiative is expected to raise roughly fifteen million dollars for wildfire relief all of which will be donated to the golden valley community Bank foundation dedicated to victims of the campfire. Thank you. Sierra Nevada brewing company for brewing up some positivity and helping others. Janice. Dean, Fox News. Fox on the right to keep your phone. Locked a magistrate judge from California has ruled that authorities can't force people to unlock their digital devices with their faces fingers or irises the decision comes from a case involving a Facebook extortion crime in which investigators wanted access to certain devices. The judge said they were able to establish probable cause. But the request wasn't limited to one person or one device, and therefore would have been able to open every device from every person inside a house. The judge in the case stress law enforcement cannot force people to unlock their phones. Even with a warrant making biometric unlocks equal to pass codes, which means they're covered under the fifth amendment protections against self-incrimination. The judge also admitted that technology is outpacing law. But that in this case government could access messenger communication from Facebook with a proper warrant under the stored communication act. This decision could still be overturned with FOX on tech. I'm Brett Larson, Fox News..

Sierra Nevada brewing company Fox News Fox Facebook California brewers Chico Brett Larson golden valley community Bank f United States Janice extortion Dean fifteen million dollars
Blockaded Qatar to pull out of Saudi-dominated OPEC

TED Radio Hour

00:52 sec | 2 years ago

Blockaded Qatar to pull out of Saudi-dominated OPEC

"Of students are going back to class today in northern California for the first time since the campfire left widespread destruction some of the more than thirty thousand students in Butte county will be relocating to different schools because of the fire damage and destruction that fire broke out on November eighth that left eight people dead. I'm Dave Mattingly in Washington. Support for NPR comes from NPR stations. Other contributors include Sierra, Nevada brewing company, family owned operated and argued over since one thousand nine hundred eighty proud supporter of independent thought whether that's online over the air or in a bottle, more at Sierra, Nevada dot com. It's

Sierra Nevada Dave Mattingly Butte County NPR California Washington
"sierra nevada brewing company" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:06 min | 2 years ago

"sierra nevada brewing company" Discussed on KCRW

"Now. We're actually doing pretty well. We're a lot a lot luckier than a lot of people. Tell us what happened to your family and the fire is your house still intact. No, no. We had. We lived in a duplex. And. About seven seven twenty. My daughter jumped up my grandson to be watched and the fired had already been blazing. Why we're out to let my dog relievers often solace smoke and asked my daughter saw fire anywhere. And she went outside we walked up the road. And we actually saw it jumped ridge and at that point to jump the radio six miles from our unit. About thirty thirty five minutes to cover that six miles of forest, and are you now staying with friends or family or in a tent? We were lucky enough to find an an ardine. And so we are in an RV park itself myself, my daughter, three grandkids and my son in law, three cats and a dog. And as the whole family, they're having thanksgiving dinner with all kinds of other people who've lost their homes and are there. The Sierra Nevada brewing company. Well, the Miami my family that I would Whitson bridges. They're still I'm here with my other daughter. We thought we just combined hopefully rain to people that we haven't seen. What's the feeling like there today? It's almost surreal. I mean, you see a lot of people. There's a lot of people. You don't know that you probably haven't even met and even though it's such a small community. But the stories are also similar. It's this is going to be something that. I can't even describe it. I mean, you never disaster movies. You see on TV? You never think that in real life. And this is some that everybody here has gone through. And it kind of just brings everyone together. The fact that they can share these experiences and build a vent. That they went through his island. This is my third fire that I've lost a house to oh, my f-. But even even having been through the house fires. This was nothing. Nothing. We could hear the fire coming to us and the fire. I just wish that there was some way to to convey to people just. What everyone here went through? And there's just no way to do it. There isn't on this Thanksgiving Day when so many people in your community have lost so much. How are you thinking about the things that you're thankful for personally, I'm thankful for my family. That's here with me. I'm thankful for. Did the community outreach? That's been here lesbian been for that emotionally physically. Materially the firefighters that are leaving their families. There are people here that that have lost everything that they had that are that are helping with the community. There's just an endless list of people to Bank leaving for for things to be thankful for and I just feel so bad for anyone who's lost any kind of live at all in this event. Tomorrow. Thank you so much for talking with us. Happy thanksgiving. Thank you so much. You have a great day. Thank you you too that was cherise.

Sierra Nevada brewing company Whitson bridges Miami thirty thirty five minutes
"sierra nevada brewing company" Discussed on Pop Culture Happy Hour

Pop Culture Happy Hour

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"sierra nevada brewing company" Discussed on Pop Culture Happy Hour

"Support for this podcast and the following message come from sierra nevada brewing company in one thousand nine hundred eighty with a few thousand dollars and used area ken grossman founded sierra nevada brewing company kins award winning ales propelled him from home or socratic grew today ken in his family still own one hundred percents of the company one of the most successful independent craft breweries in america more at sierra nevada dot com support for this podcast and the following message come from microsoft surface laptop at just under three pounds and with up to fourteen and a half hours of battery life surface laptop lets you binge watch your favorite shows whenever and wherever you want do more with surface laptop then light and beautiful welcome back to pop culture happy hour it is time for our favorite segment what is making us happy this week margaret hulahoop willison what is making you happy this week well very little is making me happy this week because i am in the middle of packing up an apartment i have lived in four ten years worst however a bright spot is that i've been checking in with a wbz podcast that i can recommend unreservedly it's actually part of a pair of podcasts they did a project last year called making oprah was a six part documentary podcast series all about sort of how oprah went from being a smalltime newscaster to lake basically second only to mary mother of god in the understanding of most american women's and that was phenomenal i knew very little about oprah and they share so many fascinating details and it was riveting they recently released making obama and i was anxious about starting 'cause i worried it would be a bit of a haggi yager affi because he's just a figure of such charm that it's kind of hard to approach him otherwise but upon listening to it really isn't it engages so interestingly with how he worked within the chicago.

ken grossman sierra nevada brewing company america margaret hulahoop obama chicago kins microsoft thousand dollars four ten years three pounds