35 Burst results for "Sierra Leone"

"sierra leone" Discussed on Pray the Word with David Platt

Pray the Word with David Platt

04:45 min | Last month

"sierra leone" Discussed on Pray the Word with David Platt

"Pray the word with David Platt is a resource from radical dot net. Daniel chapter 9 versus 22 and 23. He made me understand, speaking with me and saying, oh Daniel, I have not come out to give you insight and understanding at the beginning of your pleas for mercy, a word went out, and I have come to tell it to you for your greatly loved, therefore consider the word and understand the vision. Oh, those are two awesome verses. And I wish we could spend a lot of time talking about Daniel chapter 9. This is quite a chapter on so many different levels, but in the beginning of the chapter, Daniel turns his face to lord God seeking him by prayer and pleas for mercy. Fasting and sackcloth and ashes. That's Daniel chapter 9 verse three, and then the later inverse 20 three, this messenger from God comes and says at the beginning of your pleas for mercy a word went out and I have come to tell it to you. Did you hear that? I Daniel's prayers, his pleas for mercy triggered activity in the spiritual realm. Can I just say that one more time? When Daniel prayed, it triggered activity in the spiritual world, like his prayers mattered his prayers affected what was happening in the spiritual world was happening in the physical world, like wouldn't we pray. It matters. We're not just talking into the air. We're not just saying words alone in a room or with a small group of people when we gather together with a church, just going through religious motions. No, we're talking to God and God is acting in response to our prayers, and how easily we can forget this. Like we can pray and just in the back of our mind almost unconsciously thinking, just kind of saying this, is it really doing anything? Yes, it's doing something when we pray because listening in God is acting in response to our prayers. Is that an awesome and obviously we immediately think, well, I've prayed for things and I've not seen anything happen before. Isn't that the beauty of prayer, though, that when we pray we're praying to the God who's all wise, who's all powerful who's all good who knows better than us, what is good and wise just and best, and he will answer, according to his wisdom, not according to ours, he will answer with his power, not with ours and according to his love, not with our imperfect love. So God teaches to pray with confidence with faith with joy. What an opportunity that right now, oh God, you're listening to us and you answer according to what we say that you move heaven and earth, according to what we say, who are we to privilege what an honor what a great sort of mercy God help us to break continually. Can I freshly convicted even right now? I need to pray tons more. I need to play so much more. If this is true, which it's true according to your word, so God, there's so many things that we could pray for right now and need to pray for right now. Even when I say amen in a moment, may we just all start praying for all kinds of things knowing that our prayers are triggering activity in the spiritual world and the world around us, but we want to join our hearts in prayer right now for the susu people of Sierra Leone, 201,000 of them you know every single one of them got. You know, every single man, woman, child, among the susu of Sierra Leone, and you know that most all of them have little to no knowledge of Jesus. So we pray, right now, God, we ask for your Salvation to be made known and to spread among the susu of Sierra Leone God we unite our hearts right now. We ask for this. We pray that even right now, while we're praying, would you cause the gospel to go to them when you raise up laborers to go take the gospel to them. Maybe there are some laborers among them. Would you give them boldness right now? We ask God to proclaim the gospel. Would you open eyes of some susu people right now in Sierra Leone to trust in you God we're asking, move, heaven and earth for the Salvation of the suzu in Sierra Leone. We're boldly going before your throne God expectantly confidently with faith asking you deserve their glory. You want them to know your love. You desire their Salvation. You are worthy of their worship lord Jesus. Make your glory. Your Salvation known among the suits of serially owned. We boldly humbly ask in Jesus name. And we boldly humbly ask in Jesus name for so many other things. God, help us to pray continually and lie to this reality in Daniel 9 22 and 23. Jesus name we pray. Amen..

Daniel chapter Daniel David Platt Sierra Leone
"sierra leone" Discussed on The Maverick Paradox Podcast

The Maverick Paradox Podcast

05:00 min | 3 months ago

"sierra leone" Discussed on The Maverick Paradox Podcast

"I think it's universal as long as you have the desire to do it. You know, spoken to many coaches before who love working with their clients in person and that's what they thrive in and that's what they want to do and they don't want to do the online. And if that is true or if that is the case, then that's a 100% fine. But if they do have the desire to go online, then taking the leap as soon as you're feeling that nudge is what is what I would encourage people to do. So before we go, is there anything that you would like to share with the audience? I mean, I would say, I'll just say from my own experience, you know, running an online coaching business is, to me, it's like the best thing ever. You know, I was personally able to scale into the millions in just two years and have gone on to achieve multiple millions per year. And for me, my highest value even above that is definitely the location freedom. And I love to travel and I love to be able to set up and work in different places and I have like a bunch of trips that I've planned coming up and I took my dog to Switzerland for 5 weeks last year and we went hiking every day and just to really be able to have a must admit. It was amazing. Yeah, she's been all over the world with me. And you know, just to have the location independence is so important. And then of course, from my experience, I believe that there's more earning potential in the online space. And so, you know, when you're making more money, it's kind of like, well, what good do you get to do in the world? I'm pretty heavily involved in an organization networks with blood diamond victims in Sierra Leone. They're called male posh mission international.

Switzerland Sierra Leone
"sierra leone" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

06:57 min | 4 months ago

"sierra leone" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"Series of French children's books, leprechaun, and with over 100 cover drawings under his belt, sempe had made more New Yorker magazine covers than any other artist. Those are the days headlines back to you, Andrew. Thank you, Paige, Freetown has been under curfew much of this week following violent protests, at least 27 people have been reported killed, including 6 police officers. The protests have been animated by a range of grievances among Sierra Leone's people, which boil down to a combination of dramatically rising prices and non rising wages. Sierra Leone's president Julius mal de Beau, who was out of the country when the protests began, has returned, and is invading grimly against what he has described as acts of terrorism, stirred up by overseas agitators while joined with more on this from Freetown by the journalist Umaru farfa Amari, first of all, bring us up to date. How does Freetown feel this lunchtime? Well, it's much karma, the shops have started reopening. A good number of them are up on. I've driven through the city center and part of the west of Freetown. It's much, much karma. Some shops remain family shots for fear of the unknown. The police are still visible and the government has invoked what is known here as magpie. Does the military aid to civil power when the soldiers deployed alongside the police to shut up state security? I've also driven to the east end of Freetown, which was the real epicenter of the weapons the protests and skirmishes. And it's all clear. Some players were burning up to yesterday, but then the streets have been cleared up now. And it's much comer today, even if people are still unctuous, not sure what may happen in the next day or two. The violence was obviously serious, 27 people have been reported killed, but was it widespread, or was it concentrated in one particular area? Well, it was concentrated in areas that are opposition heartlands, so to speak areas in the north of the country as well as in parts of the capital of Freetown, which election in election out will vote for the opposition order of Congress party. So those were the areas that had the protests, but it had been building up. In the days leading up to it, there have been threats that there would be protests and they had called on people to come out, but the dichotomy of Sierra Leone and politics is such that those areas we are the ruling party has its strong goals. We are quite quiet. Nothing happened there. Life was normal. And those areas where the opposition has its stronghold, where the areas where people came out and protested. So in that regard, it could be referred to as having happened in the north of the country, as well as in parts of the western area, which is where the capital is. And the even in the capital, it's all concentrated in the east, which again is dominated by opposition supporters. It's often the case with protests like this that it's large scale discontent that's built up for a while that gets ignited by a particular thing, was that what happened here was there is it possible to identify something that set it off? Well, it's a very obvious that in the last few weeks and months, people have been complaining about the current economic situation. Prices of essential commodities have been soaring, virtually every other day you go to the markets, the prices have increased. So clearly, there have been all those defense in the last few weeks and months. But also the increase in the price of petrol and products for which the government has cited the situation in Ukraine in about people that once the price of petrol goes up, it affects virtually every other essential commodity. So yes, clearly, there have been this content building up. But then from the protest and the protesters, some of them carried banners or posters or flyers, virtually every placard that I saw, hard to do with calling for the president's to go. You didn't see anything having to do with the economic hardship prices must come down. I didn't see any of those, not in the videos that circulated on social media, not on the podcast that I saw myself some of the protesters carrying, which has led the government to say that it was all politically motivated. And the government has blamed it on demand opposition party. The party though has come out and vehemently denied any links to the protesters. I'm saying that denounced violence in all its forms. And they feel that if for any reason they should come to power, it should be through the ballot box. The president, as I mentioned in the introduction, has also been blaming what he appears to think is a network of overseas agitators causing trouble for him. Does anybody believe that or is that him playing to his own supporters? Absolutely, there has been a particular Sierra leonean in somewhere in Europe, who for the last year or two has been sending what many here regard us incendiary messages. It does videos and even audios and sends them through the social media platforms that exist here. And consistently, he's instructed or even insights that people to come up and demonstrate. He did it, I think, two years ago, which by coincidence or not, led to an attempted prison break, which led to once and loss of life again, there are a lot of the prisoners we are going down because of what the government said that it was the attempt to kill some of the prison waters. And I think at least one of the prison workers was killed and it led to serious violence. He also had issued some audio asking people across the process against the state. And it led to protests again in efficient community just outside free zone. And again, before witness this event, you have since audio messages from Europe, asking for people to come out and surround the office of the president. So yes, there has been some influence in managing from those social media messages coming in from at least one individual, but also from some of the people in some way in Europe who are Sierra leoneans. So beyond that though, as there been any indication from the government that they have any ideas about how to address those grievances that you mentioned specifically, the spike in petrol costs, which as you correctly point out, does end up causing a spike in the price of pretty much everything else. I mean, the government has consistently said that it's beyond its control. The fact that the war in Ukraine are the reason for the increase in the price of petroleum products, which they say is beyond their control. They've suffered COVID, which are before the events of Ukraine saying that all of those two external factors influence the increase in the price of petrol and products, but then critics have argued that, yes, you are elected to deal with this situation. Find ways of mitigating the impact on the people of Sierra Leone. The government has argued that it has introduced some measures safety net project, which it says have affected or has impacted people, the low, particularly low income earners or even the unemployed disabled.

Freetown Sierra Leone New Yorker magazine president Julius mal de Beau Umaru farfa Amari Paige government Andrew Ukraine Congress Europe COVID
 Ship with Ukrainian corn anchored off Turkey for inspection

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | 4 months ago

Ship with Ukrainian corn anchored off Turkey for inspection

"The first cargo ship to leave Ukraine since the Russian invasion is anchored in the Black Sea awaiting an inspection Russian Ukrainian Turkish and UN officials will check if the grain shipment is in accordance with a crucial agreement signed last month by Moscow and Kyiv to unblock Ukraine's agricultural exports and ease the global food crisis The Sierra Leone flag rizzoni loaded up with 26,000 tons of corn set sail from Odessa on Monday Its final destination Lebanon

Ukraine Black Sea UN Kyiv Moscow Sierra Leone Odessa Lebanon
First ship carrying Ukrainian grain since Russia invaded leaves Odesa

AP News Radio

00:31 sec | 4 months ago

First ship carrying Ukrainian grain since Russia invaded leaves Odesa

"The first ship carrying Ukrainian grain has set off from the port of Odessa The departure of the Sierra Leone flagged cargo ship the rizzoni laden with corn is expected to finally allow large stores of Ukrainian crops to reach foreign markets and ease a growing hunger crisis Russia and Ukraine have signed separate agreements with turkey and the UN clearing the way for Ukraine one of the world's key bread baskets to

Odessa Sierra Leone Ukraine Turkey UN
"sierra leone" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:36 min | 9 months ago

"sierra leone" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"From the center for investigative reporting and PRX this is reveal I'm outlet Today we've been telling you about Doctors Without Borders and how the global organization is deeply divided Staff members say the organization is plagued by a two tier system that favors foreign staffers also known as expats They make up a tiny fraction of the workforce just 10% They're paid based on French salaries where the organization is based Food lodging transportation and daily spending money are also routinely provided and sometimes Doctors Without Borders throws in cushy benefits like private school for the kids National staff who make up 90% of the organization's workforce are paid local wages often a fraction of what expats make But the issues the organization faces run much deeper than that Doctors Without Borders acknowledges that bias inequality and institutional racism are problems they need to wrestle with Throughout the show which first aired last year we've been following doctor indira governor She's worked on both sides of the organization At the beginning it was her dream job But indira has grown disillusioned reporter Mario kart is Nelson worked with indira at Doctors Without Borders in South Africa about a decade ago and has the rest of her story Indira still thinks about her experience fighting Ebola in Sierra Leone That experience was one of the most incredible experiences of my life.

center for investigative repor indira Mario kart Doctors Without Borders Nelson Indira South Africa Ebola Sierra Leone
"sierra leone" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:31 min | 9 months ago

"sierra leone" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"They offer medical care to national staff based on national laws and availability of care in country And that they have a different level of responsibility to people on international assignments We're focusing on MSF because it's one of the biggest players in global health And because more than a thousand current and former staff signed that letter last summer demanding change But this two tiered system is baked into a lot of global health organizations and some say it's directly linked to colonialism Many of the early western hospitals in Africa were set up by missionaries That language has endured even though MSF is not a religious organization it sends out expats on quote unquote missions MSF says its mandate is to provide medical care where it's needed most and it says national staff are paid according to minimum pay requirements for the countries where they work But critics say that MSF is exploiting labor conditions in these countries And look it's really complicated Foreign doctors already take pay cuts to work for MSF If they made local salaries and had to live like locals they might not come to Sierra Leone at all But 90% of their workforce is national staff And people in the global health community are asking Should organizations like MSF and others reinforce existing inequalities Or be part of changing them.

MSF Africa Sierra Leone
"sierra leone" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:22 min | 9 months ago

"sierra leone" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Were taking a risk but indira thought it was worth it So I went in and I started putting up trips and it made it made a small difference at least people were not dying of dehydration For the most part though patient care is limited There's only so much they can do Kinney and indira give patients food and water keep their fevers low and make them as comfortable as possible Endear says sometimes all they can do is move two beds closer to each other So that the two relatives that were lying on those beds dying of Ebola could hold hands or something In the red zone endearing Kinney are living the same experience But outside of that zone after they take off their PPE that changes Indira's life in Sierra Leone revolves around the guesthouse MSF rented out the best lodging in kylo Olive endears meals come from there Breakfast and dinner are served before and after work Even her lunch is delivered to the treatment center When it arrives the national staff noticed that the expats go off and eat together India says yeah that happened And that was never addressed And you know maybe it was just something that happens with people in groups and that everyone just kind of gravitates towards their community Because Ebola is so infectious MSF has a strict no touch policy Staff members aren't supposed to touch anyone without PPE But why look as I can give a living in their expert Kinney and other national staff aren't Kimi has to find his own lunch And that often means leaving the treatment center It's a hustle And it's also put him in a situation where he might have to touch people That's a huge infection risk He complains to MSF a few times but he says the tell him there's a small stipend in his salary to cover it One day can he so hungry after working in the red zone That he eats a plate of food.

indira Kinney Ebola MSF Endear Indira Sierra Leone India Kimi
The Biblical Response to the Great Reset With Pastor Jack Hibbs

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:21 min | 9 months ago

The Biblical Response to the Great Reset With Pastor Jack Hibbs

"Charlie, where do we begin? We're talking about the great reset. Yeah, I mean, first, this is an intimidating topic for a lot of people. And I have done a lot of research and study into this for the last year, year and a half in particular. And it's intimidating because when you just read the website of the people that are trying to execute the great reset, you feel like you're reading a conspiracy theory. And I think that's actually part of the strategy is that they lead with the stuff that you won't even believe. And then they're able to say like, oh, it's not even a conspiracy theory because there's no way they could actually be real. And this is affecting all of our lives in more ways than one. And Jack you and I were texting back and forth, I think, right near our turning point USA America fest right near Christmas. And I said, Jack, I really want to do something special when I come back to your amazing church. And you had the idea to talk about the great reset. And the dive into it because it could be really complex, but it doesn't have to be. And the way I want to start though, Jack, is to kind of frame the players that are behind this. So we've all heard the term globalists. These are people that do not believe in the sovereignty of nations. These are people that don't believe in borders. They don't believe there should be any difference between America or Brazil or Sierra Leone that the world needs to come together in a borderless society. Jack, you're going to go into depth of how the scripture is actually prophesied this in amazing detail. So the globalists, they look at themselves as trying to micro engineer your behavior, the world, your decisions, and in particular, unless just be blunt, they want to play God because they don't believe in God. And so everyone here tonight believes in two things. And you might have different politics. You might have different ways looking at the world. We believe there is a God, and you are not him. Is that right? We believe those two things tonight. Good start. That's a nice starting point, right? Absolutely. At the World Economic Forum, the globalist setting they believe neither of those things. That's right. They do not believe there is a God, and they believe that there was a God, it's me. Titan of industry. Jeff Bezos, Hollywood actor, head of state. So that's a huge difference, right? So we start from the philosophical approach of one of humility and one that is waiting for God's grace to come down to us. They look at one as one of will. I am going to make the world as I want it, and I am going to be in charge.

Jack Usa America Charlie Sierra Leone Brazil America World Economic Forum Jeff Bezos Hollywood
"sierra leone" Discussed on WCPT 820

WCPT 820

02:08 min | 10 months ago

"sierra leone" Discussed on WCPT 820

"And so the reality is that if you look at the first American rebellions they were not slave rebellions over colonial rebellion to their typically African slaves again to receive famous treatments being from different nations and European indentured servants who were seen as humans being from different nations the there was no penalty no special penalty back then for say what would now call a black man or black woman have your baby The early days of the Virginia colony the penalty for premarital sex interracial couple was the same as it was for any other couple This is all pre 1620 1630 when they started problem getting those racial laws in Virginia correct Yeah This is all like pre 17 like mid 1700s At mid 17 Like mid 1700s And so I think that's where we have to understand that fundamentally there is a gravity to the human condition that pulls us back towards understanding that we have more in common than we don't and that this race is ultimately a lot based on a lot It racism is a lot So are you suggesting Ben and just a heads up we got about 50 seconds before we're going to hit a heartbreak I can't control Are you suggesting that this racial construct that was artificially put together by the Virginia by the Virginia back in the day Could evaporate We're going back to the original state where different people are seen as from a place rather than as above race Yeah I think that we are I think that things like DNA will accelerate us back towards that When I was born what we knew about our families that we were black black main and meant that you were at least one 32nd of African descent in the Virginia context Now we know that my grandfather's side we primarily come from Sierra Leone and my grandmother's side of the originally came from Madagascar There is a complexity There is a.

Virginia Ben Sierra Leone Madagascar
"sierra leone" Discussed on The Holistic Health Podcast

The Holistic Health Podcast

04:39 min | 11 months ago

"sierra leone" Discussed on The Holistic Health Podcast

"Microbial mess, you know, so but what happens when we see inflammation up regulated in the body like that is one particular enzyme called aromatase increases its activity. And aromatase actually converts testosterone into estrogen. And what happens when that occurs is we see testosterone drop, and that can be more obvious in men than women, although certainly libido and women can be impacted too. But then we see high estrogen symptoms in men and women occurring. So even if you're progesterone production is healthy, we start to see estrogen climb higher than we would like it. Now exposure to airborne irritants also drives up histamine and you know I'm sure we'll talk about this again. We've talked about it before. Histamine drives up estrogen levels and in a catch 22 estrogen drives up histamine or sensitivity to his domain and mast cell activation. So it becomes quite an ugly feedback loop actually if you continue to be exposed. And then because any toxin is stressful on the body in a physiological sense, we also see a rise in stress hormones, which in a secondary way will drive down FSH and therefore follicle development, healthy eggs and progesterone production, so the end result of the high cortisol and adrenaline is low progesterone. So it really messes up so much of the ordinary enzymatic unfoldings in our body. But the other element to it is that there are micro toxins that are zero estrogenic or have endocrine disrupting properties. And to give you probably the most researched example is Sierra Leone and it's a mycotoxin produced by the fusarium species. And interestingly, in industrial agriculture in certain countries, it's been used to accelerate the growth of animals and increase their development and drive sexual development as well. So the profitability. But that really just points to the impact that it has on proliferation in the tissues and also the way that it influences our reproductive organs and cycle..

Sierra Leone
"sierra leone" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:00 min | 11 months ago

"sierra leone" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"Cost of its other exports goes up. It's one source of income at the cost of another. In Africa, what's surprising is that it's been going on for decades and basic textbook economics isn't enough to explain that. So I tried to Sierra Leone and then within the country up to the far east near a town called and I went out there to talk with men who were working and what are called artisanal diamond mines. Kenley salmon is an Africa correspondent for The Economist. But in reality, having scrambled through the brush after a long drive on rutted roads, there wasn't much that moment might think of as being art as in a bad instead groups of men without shoes often in pretty ragged clothes. Whacking these basic shuffles into red earth. And you just do shovels. Yeah. You were benefit for this stuff. Why? It's difficult to buy. These men who labor are long hours at the minimum, 6 days a week, told me that they worry that they may not earn enough from digging for diamonds to send their children to school and their children might end up working in similar conditions. One in particular told me that he was the third generation to be doing it. And these men and many others like them in parts of sub Saharan Africa that rely on raw materials for the living are in a way quite representative of a number of African economies more generally, which also rely on commodities and raw materials to pay their way in the world. So how widespread is that? How dependent are African economies on commodities? Well, the United Nations defines a country as commodity dependent if commodities make up more than three fifths of that country's physical exports, about 60% and fully 83% of African countries meet that threshold. Despite some efforts to diversify, that's up from 77% a decade ago. Some of these countries are producing agricultural commodities like tea, but most of them are relying on mining or on pumping oil. And what's wrong with that if that's where the money is? Well, that's right. There is money, of course, in minerals, but unfortunately, often that comes with problems. One, for example, is that there's more to fight over in countries that are rich in gold or diamonds or oil, and that can encourage politicians to grab power or keep ahold of it throughout authoritarian regimes. And resource rich countries also tend to have more and longer conflicts and civil wars. At the moment, jihadists in the Sahel are using control of some gold mines to help fund their fight. And in Sierra Leone, diamonds fueled a bloody conflict that lasted for 11 years. But there are other more economic problems too. Commodity prices tend to leap in four, quite dramatically leading to booms and busts. And that can make economies really difficult to manage for governments in the regions. And sadly, oil one and minerals in particular don't tend to create a lot of jobs in Sierra Leone, which is a country of 8 million people, only about 8000 people work directly in any of the commercial minds. So if the benefits are few and the risks, as you say, are so great, how has this reliance become so widespread? Well, one of the explanations is relatively straightforward economics. When countries export commodities, that can push out the exchange rate as money floods in and that makes other exports much less competitive in international markets. As that makes just very difficult, almost mechanically for countries to diversify their exports. But of course it isn't just the economics. There are a number of other factors back in colonial times many countries in Africa were treated primarily as sources of resources, and that set a pattern that's both been perhaps hard to break, but also which plenty of leaders have followed. And then more recently we've seen really high commodity prices from the early 2000s until about late 2014. And that spurred exploration and some big discoveries of oil and gas in places like Ghana and Mozambique and Senegal, other minerals like gold saw an exploration boom as well. And this pattern isn't finished. Africa was relatively underexplored compared to many other parts of the world. Right, but it doesn't have to be a dominant part of the economy. You mentioned there had been efforts at diversification. Yeah, that's right. The importance of natural resources to GDP for the continent as a whole has actually fallen over the past decade. And the share of commodities and goods exports again for the continent as a whole has come down a bit as well. And of course, broad averages can obscure some of the other progress that's been made on diversifying economies in Malawi and Botswana, for example, services have grown as strongly and many island states in Africa have strong tourism industries, and even manufacturing is rebounding. And there's a really big priority for a number of countries everywhere from Ethiopia to Senegal. But there is still, I think, really a long way to go to break free of resource dependence. A long way to go presumably because it suits the leaders of some of these countries just fine, that there's all this mineral wealth coming through. Yeah. I mean, of course, there is wide variation and some leaders as no doubt are trying very hard to diversify. But I think it is often overlooked that some African politicians simply aren't that keen on diversifying. Commodity revenues tend to go through state coffers, that makes skimming cash off easier. And with oil and mining in particular, there are usually only a few big companies involved. So dodgy deals can be a bit easier to manage. And then in a sort of less corrupt sense, rely on commodities is also just a bit easier even for lazier governments. Mining and oil companies know how to dig and pump and more often pay up front for licenses. So there are alluring source of quick cash, whereas diversification may have longer term benefits, but is likely to be harder in the short run. But as you say, the full diversification is a long way off. I mean, how should governments set the compass? Yeah, I mean, that's right. It is a challenging process, but one basic principle, especially for countries that export commodities that run out like oil or minerals in the ground is to try to turn those riches under the soil into wealth of another, such as educated people or highways built infrastructure. The World Bank now argues that even if a country's exports remain commodity heavy, if it diversifies its wealth from nonrenewable resources under the ground into things like educated people, then that too has real progress. And Sierra Leone and I think it's fair to say that at least among some of the people in government there, there's a strong recognition that if the gains from almost a century of mining had been invested in its people to a greater extent than has been done, then the country would be in a lot better place today. Thanks very much for your time, can we? Thank you..

Africa Sierra Leone Kenley salmon Saharan Senegal United Nations Mozambique Ghana Malawi Botswana Ethiopia World Bank
"sierra leone" Discussed on AP News

AP News

01:40 min | 1 year ago

"sierra leone" Discussed on AP News

"We just want justice Hundreds of demonstrations and marches are taking place around the world too Charles De Ledesma London Authorities say over 90 people are dead on around 30 others critically wounded after an oil tanker exploded near Sierra Leone's capital in Africa No one's before the explosion People crowd round the oil tanker to collect leaking fuel after it had collided with another vehicle video obtained by The Associated Press shows a giant fireball burning in the night sky and charred remains of some victims laying strewn at the scene awaiting transport to mortars President Julius madam bio in Scotland attending the UN climate talks deplored the horrendous loss of life while Sierra Leone's vice president visited two hospitals overnight He said the nation's national disaster management agency and others would work tirelessly in the wake of the emergency I'm Charles De Ledesma of climate protests are going ahead for the second day running in Glasgow Police helicopters bus over the city as authorities prepare for more protests by climate activists demanding faster action to curb global warming despite some rain and strong winds tens of thousands of people are expected to join the rally while inside the conference hall negotiators knuckle down for a 7th day of talks to finish draft agreements that can be passed to ministers for political approval next week among the issues being haggled over by almost 200 countries are a fresh commitment to the goal.

Charles De Ledesma Sierra Leone President Julius madam The Associated Press London Africa UN Scotland Glasgow
"sierra leone" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:59 min | 1 year ago

"sierra leone" Discussed on WTOP

"Those who died and everybody affected deserve answers as to what took place last night and that's why I'm calling for an objective independent investigation A federal appeals court issue is a temporary halt to that Biden vaccine mandate It said businesses with 100 or more employees had to have workers vaccinated by January 4th Loyola law schools Lori Levinson who's also a former federal prosecutor The judges who issued this temporary stay have serious concerns about whether the Biden administration has the power constitutionally to mandate the vaccinations and tests CBS News brief on that piper 6 32 an oil tanker exploding in Sierra Leone West Africa today killing at least 98 30 others critically wounded happy near the capital happened when the tanker collided with another truck as it was pulling into a gas station at a busy intersection near the capital of Freetown and angry President Biden today amidst the celebrations confronted about payment to families of children separated from their parents at the U.S. Mexican border It happened during the Trump administration If in fact because of the outrageous behavior of the last administration you coming across the border whether it was legal or illegal and you lost your child you lost your child It's gone You deserve some kind of compensation no matter what the circumstance What that will be I have no idea Biden earlier said his administration was preparing to pay separated families up to $450,000 per individual to that Biden said it was not going to happen The president today said he was referring to the dollar amount not compensating families entirely The navy launching a ship named for a gay rights pioneer The replenishment oil or USNS Harvey Milk slid down the shipyard ways after a bottle of champagne was smashed on the bow in a christening ceremony The ship is named after the late senator navy vat The first openly gay elected official in the history of California U.S. Navy admiral Michael wet laffer I am certain.

Lori Levinson Biden administration Biden President Biden Trump administration CBS News Sierra Leone West Africa Freetown U.S. Harvey Milk U.S. Navy senator navy Michael wet laffer California
"sierra leone" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:01 min | 1 year ago

"sierra leone" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Have survived Honey it's all right It's survived No Yes they survived And they even produced honey Not much He handed me a piece of honeycombed taste It's really good I've never had honey out of a directly out of the hive before What we see right here is pine honey Some of the last pine honey from this village and in general from the whole of northern navy I feel angry I have a lot of anger inside me because I didn't expect this catastrophe to happen Every year in August hundreds of beekeepers from across Greece would bring their beehives to the pine Woods of avia for the honey harvest But now a third of the forest is gone Ilya Sirius is a forest fire expert from the world wildlife fund The fire of heavier it was the biggest in the historical data of the country It's a big island that one third of it was affected from this first fire We must secure that these people are going to work again to their forests to protect their force in the future Alexandra cacao shows me around her honey workshop which she runs with her husband Although she lives in western Greece miles away from avia she always used to take her beehives there for the pine tree pollen But that's no longer possible We used to go to avia There was plenty of honey there Around 60 to 70% of our total production came from avia In her stone shop lined with honey pots Alexandra told me she's hoping to pass on her business to her son and his family But she says their future looks bleak As the norm was there they actually said We are sad Because the bee is I see the bee as I see my children The beehive is like a second family to me During the day I'm at the beehives and at night and with my children How was Alexandra kakaru ending that report from the Greek island of evia by Bethany bell You're listening to the BBC World Service this is news hour coming to life from London with James Kamara Sami In the West African nation of Sierra Leone at least 99 people have died after an oil tanker collided with another vehicle late on Friday at a busy junction in a suburb of the capital Freetown The tanker exploded shortly afterwards sending a fireball shooting through the surrounding area Bystanders including some we were trying to collect leaking fuel from the tanker stood no chance Our correspondent Umaru fasana was at the scene of the accident earlier today There.

northern navy Ilya Sirius Alexandra cacao Greece Alexandra kakaru avia Greek island of evia Bethany bell James Kamara Sami Alexandra Sierra Leone BBC Freetown London Umaru fasana
 Oil tanker explodes in Sierra Leone; scores feared dead

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 1 year ago

Oil tanker explodes in Sierra Leone; scores feared dead

"Authorities say over ninety people on dead on around thirty others critically wounded off to an oil tanker exploded near Sierra Leone's capital in Africa the explosion people crowd around the oil tanker to collect leaking fuel of ticketed collided with another vehicle video obtained by the Associated Press shows a giant fireball burning in the night sky and charred remains of some victims ang strewn at the scene awaiting transport to mortuaries president Julius Maada bio in Scotland attending the U. N. climate talks deplored the horrendous loss of life well see Williams vice president visited two hospitals overnight he

Sierra Leone President Julius Maada The Associated Press Africa Scotland Williams
"sierra leone" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

02:39 min | 1 year ago

"sierra leone" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Has to fire because at that point it's his life or mad arbor's life A nearly all white jury is hearing the case testimony resumes Monday Debbie Elliott NPR news Brunswick Georgia There's been a massive fuel tanker explosion in the capital of Sierra Leone more than 90 people confirmed to add dozens injured the BBC's Mary Harper has more details The explosion happened when a fuel tanker smashed into another vehicle footage on social media shows huge fireballs rising into the night sky as the burning fuel spread across a wide area It set nearby cars ablaze causing more explosions jarred bodies are strewn across the ground dozens of others have been injured hospitals are overwhelmed The head of the national disaster management agency lieutenant general brassica described a terrible scene He said he'd never seen anything like it This is NPR news The justice departments as a federal jury has convicted a Chinese man of plotting to steal trade secrets from several American aviation and aerospace companies The man is believed to be the first Chinese operative extradited to the U.S. for trial NPR has learned that former president Donald Trump's payroll tax deferral directive last year for federal employees has created a $7 million accounting mass at the U.S. Census Bureau In Paris hansie lobang reports of bureau is now trying to collect unpaid taxes from former 2020 census workers The Census Bureau was one of many federal agencies that Trump administration ordered late last year to stop collecting certain employees share of a payroll tax that helps fund social security Former president Donald Trump said it would get bigger paychecks to working families during the pandemic but it's also giving the bureau an accounting challenge Months after like a hundreds of thousands of temporary census workers if yours says it's deferred some $7 million in payroll taxes and some of it it's no longer trying to get back because it would cost too much Bureau has sent letters and emails to some 28,000 former census workers who have until the end of the year to pay off their debt NPR news a group of four astronauts now aboard the International Space Station are set to begin the journey home tomorrow they are to depart the orbiting outpost and spend some 20 hours in a SpaceX capsule before splashing down Monday morning The problem is the capsules toilet is broken and NASA astronaut Meghan mcarthur says the situation is suboptimal but manageable I'm jail.

NPR Debbie Elliott Mary Harper national disaster management a general brassica justice departments Census Bureau hansie lobang Donald Trump Sierra Leone arbor Trump administration BBC Georgia Paris U.S. International Space Station Meghan mcarthur
"sierra leone" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:05 min | 1 year ago

"sierra leone" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Fully immunized against the virus. The lack of vaccines has been the biggest barrier to getting shots into African arms. But there are other challenges as well, including keeping doses cold. NPR's Jason Beaubien reports from Sierra Leone. In the capital Freetown. The parking lot of the Ministry of Health Medical Supplies Warehouse is littered with broken down vehicles abandoned ambulances donated by China and Japan. Sit with their doors splayed. Open four by fours list on flat tires, cars coated in duster strewn willy nilly, but at the back of the compounds inside locked beige building, industrial walk in refrigerators and freezers, beep and hum. 40 routine immunization backsies and the covid. This is where we keep their send. A memo is the assistant logistics officer at the National Warehouse. Three of the shipping container size fridges are set to keep vaccines it just above freezing to others, which are also used to make ice packs for shipping. Medical supplies are set to minus 20 C in a separate building. Another smaller freezer holds the Ebola vaccine. Which requires ultra cold temperatures similar to the fighter Covid 19 vaccine for the Ebola, the order building there they have the refugees which minus 17. But there's only that one functioning freezer in the whole country capable of keeping vaccines at minus 70 C close to 100 degrees below zero F outside of major cities in Sierra Leone, Even keeping vaccines that only need to be kept at normal household fridge temperatures is a challenge. Access to refrigeration is very limited. In C. Williams is a Sierra Leonean biomedical engineer, particularly because there's very limited access to electricity at least stable electricity in most parts of the country. Sierra Leone has one of the lowest rates of electrification in the world. Only about a quarter of households have power in the rate drops down to about 6% in rural parts of the country, according to the World Bank. And the issue isn't just limited to Sierra.

Jason Beaubien World Bank C. Williams minus 20 C Sierra Leone minus 70 C Ministry of Health Medical Sup NPR minus 17 Three National Warehouse Sierra about 6% four 100 degrees below zero F 40 routine immunization backsi African Sierra Leonean about a quarter Ebola
"sierra leone" Discussed on EN TIJUANA HAY ROCK RADIO

EN TIJUANA HAY ROCK RADIO

04:07 min | 1 year ago

"sierra leone" Discussed on EN TIJUANA HAY ROCK RADIO

"Is Seattle has both defy Amazon music am youtube music. An income contrast video stymying. Kate what i i won't begin your shutout flappy. Las personas commend. You cancelled stam. Be the book gave israeli me when manorial soup better than Only is handled. Thoughtfully chaplains ants. Okay but my Glad spin initially. He said he's gonna the illustrative il. Primo pro yeltsin liberal me. Aloisio believe me some music homeless meals at keybase ghost kids have seen it either. Grills for sierra leone's let's instruments from one thousand is fan low decision. He's supposed to west on. He stood me. Okay existed in talk in. May i mean it's a Video cam.

Amazon Aloisio both sierra leone one thousand Kate Seattle youtube music israeli
1,600 vaccinated in Guinea

UN News

01:18 min | 1 year ago

1,600 vaccinated in Guinea

"More than sixteen hundred people have received ebola virus vaccinations in guinea where four have died in a new outbreak but more life saving jobs are needed to contain it the u. n. health agency has said to date eighteen. Ebola cases have been reported in the west african nation. Fourteen confirmed and four deaths according to the world health organization. Who only thirty thousand ebola. Vaccines are available out of a global stock of half a million a ring. Vaccination strategy has been employed to inhibit these spread of disease by vaccinating. Only those most likely to be infected but there are concerns that if ebola spreads outside guinea which shares a border with six other countries. they're only limited stocks of vaccines to respond his doctor. Ibrahima four assistant director general of. Who's emergency response. Unit millions that you're letting the context of cases the context of context context so this saturday. You are able to control the stables outbreak but in the future really more sis guineas last. Ebola outbreak started in two thousand fourteen and quickly spread to liberia sierra leone. It was the deadliest ebola outbreak since the virus was first detected in nineteen seventy six with twenty eight thousand cases and eleven thousand deaths

Ebola Guinea Ibrahima World Health Organization Liberia Sierra Leone
New Ebola Outbreak Declared in Guinea

UN News

00:50 sec | 1 year ago

New Ebola Outbreak Declared in Guinea

"The un world health organization. Who thursday that. There's a very high risk of the ebola virus spreading in guinea after. An outbreak was announced last sunday in an update. Whol said that its concern was based on the unknown size duration and origin of the outbreak. It has led to five deaths so far in the southern region of missouri corey which borders sierra leone liberia and cote d'ivoire the first confirmed victim was a nurse from rural health center. He was initially diagnosed with typhoid and malaria. While her known contacts include a traditional healer and their family are potentially a large number of others and limited capacity to respond cautioned the agency guinea was one of the three most affected countries in the two thousand fourteen to two thousand sixteen west africa ebola outbreak which was the largest since the virus was first discovered in nineteen seventy six

Whol Missouri Corey Ebola Rural Health Center Guinea UN Sierra Leone Cote Liberia Typhoid Malaria West Africa
"sierra leone" Discussed on In Search of the New Compassionate Male

In Search of the New Compassionate Male

07:38 min | 1 year ago

"sierra leone" Discussed on In Search of the New Compassionate Male

"The united states are under the program mandela washington fellowship. There i had Ideas profession has caused there with at the university of beckley. And there. it's a privilege privileges that you are having their. I've seen a the other of our law and other and they kind of outdoor. I did but actually live in the united states. Do you have difficulties. You have challenges. Do you have time but like you are. I don't think anyone fewer. I've ever encountered a situation. We are in. You heard twenty four hours. Don't sound the shirt bombs around you bitch here an upper erin. I personally what i saw. What i say is so terrible. We you work on dead bodies we are in you. Walk around with a film that you can ask. Any woman have been in this situation. Where if you find yourself allies ever did. It's like you have a chris. You have a privilege because like everyday people that you can be sitting somewhere and all of this at that so are send counter lives and my advisers are gifts to people for us to put aside our differences our heads differences and like have the spirit of diversity like sheikh diversity ethnic diversity religion et cetera. So come together and jud awards we are in would have no cost of fear we are in. You'll be my brother and you'll be my sister berta sister you can make this top one. You can change that you wish to see. You'll voice can dress a word. I'm so anchorage and i'm so touched it by the treadmill does work that you do so Let's during with the organization compassionate near this is so so so wonderful wonderful. Give keep in it. Despite that you've heard you've heard actually there many around actually looking forward. Who really need this will really wants to be true. Some panel per albin wounds. That nate's here in house done through struggles that nate's hidden so keep it up bands I wish you all the best. And i wish this vision. Ob oliver not forget all over the world we keep looking did can everything in the fashion. The compassion and see how the they can revive de combustion and then sabat a kind of solution to the dying words. Thanks very much. If i have or that the question. Thank you so much for sharing what you've shared. It's it's i don't know what to say. It's so very powerful. Their win fill up. When you were growing when you see the being in a ninety five percent muslim majority country how how are you seeing the the opportunities for women and women to get into political power and because we're seeing this as has a in our work with the inserts of the new compassionate mail. We're seeing that women coming into and being treated equally and being given political power and this is an important component of that. Are you seeing women. Getting an opportunity to get into political power in the feature. I'm saying we man in the feature some of them get him into Powers our word is picked up the on like shut up and they're actually getting confident that gave the less privilege the whitman light. That is our tradition also based on the release germ this. You not like we pass. Show goes through the time when a woman is outspoken. She'll be called different names. Went a woman stein's to speak the truth. Maybe a right and i would be suppressed and families come around her. Hey whom are not supposed to like and speak over man. You're a woman is to stay on its own and look children so that is what i try out a trumpet. It is here in getting no. We have a number of women who are very proactive or reality and the system. But i i could see. Eighty editor around ninety ninety. Three percent of women are reality deprived from being active or maybe get themselves involved in politics got power like the reality marginalized under the support. My work is to empower the children in and for them to educate empower education. Like this cool project. That i'm working on haba's cool that can accommodate student. Huge number of students like children. All that's.

Three percent ninety five percent twenty four hours mandela washington Eighty editor united states university of beckley around ninety ninety muslim
"sierra leone" Discussed on In Search of the New Compassionate Male

In Search of the New Compassionate Male

07:39 min | 1 year ago

"sierra leone" Discussed on In Search of the New Compassionate Male

"Boy centers loretta Sean is growing rapidly and some of them are forced into this situation because they have nothing to do. They have most games and to have that they can do to be like A deal that feature so they are forced to bring to things like Talk with a pastor pat but later. I started working which far to ten thousand nine i used to buy condie's biscuits and little things cherry two children within this i i came out. I i missed a man who also had a passion for children. His core gabriel cabral away into united states. So he was a friend. He tried to like help. Man my vision so find he adds to establish care for dram guys issue on organization that reality kids for children around the community. Like identifies children. Sometimes he hit those have so that also is looking for people that may have the digital here and so sometimes e hundred dollars for red we see community children and and also we. We buy a bit of cloth and give it to straight children. Children do not have and sometimes we buy books for children so be able to go to school because there are communities here There are formulas here the children when they're vandals school. An exercise book this up because they do not have the support their children. They'll share this exercise. They cut the middle this year it so their children. A child is entitled to one exercise. luke copied nodes and. Whatever he or she's been taught in school but because of the rates of poverty and the offering and the i through they cannot afford one of these exercise book. so what do they when they have. The sharon may be wanted that they have to the other end after so they are good is asian. Here we identify those children. We provide free or them. Sometimes we we manage so like for some of their tuition like we've because we can awesome. I'll meet audience so we're planning and protect like Established to the english cooler here and get an for this has also sorted francophone children. Who have special to study english. Because english has conquered. The world like english is the language that you can speak anywhere in the war so darius destroying interest and in didn't hear for anguish school so like we want to this year this coming academic year according to this school with like fifty two andre children to be able to take care of support them give them free education and some who can for soft who cannot is would be attrition. School cannot afford. It gives them free. Education provide books and also with did during community bike. We've been hiding two hundred three hundred four hundred we plant. We prepare food for like Maybe the children that we cannot afford maybe andrea children windows. We can afford won't believe we will have over thirty children. It is free me. you see. Children come in from all angles and so but like this. We've been throwing actress. It's so it's so really it the way children are living here and getting and the way we man out for themselves into prostitution and the way guys young men are going into drug addiction and a wig people alad in poverty s horde of of communities air so we want to reach out. We want to be our solutions. We wanted to create a mystery which we empower people young bears and children for them to be able to envision feature support something to alaska to live on their own by not dependent on someone. But i have a skill you can use your skill like Transform your life and you can also use scale make a this. What we are working on or banks are very much end. What i also said. I'm so sorry that you said that america has going through this time Divide in a car. I can say america is. The father of the world are most countries are looking forward very wars in for mary rich on that i things go to expand things walk. Walk are it is some kind of also against it because some of the people like but still be tired. And i try to here so if i can say something also in light so You live in over there. You're fortunate you're a privilege yes you. You are really kind of distant because like i've been to.

two hundred andrea gabriel united states three hundred hundred dollars two children alaska loretta Sean america condie four hundred one exercise over thirty children ten thousand nine this year english centers luke fifty two andre
Seattle nurse to serve on Biden-Harris COVID-19 advisory board

America in the Morning

00:27 sec | 2 years ago

Seattle nurse to serve on Biden-Harris COVID-19 advisory board

"Been selected to join President elect Biden's covert 19 advisory board. Jane Hopkins is a nurse who specializes in mental health. She's worked as a nurse for more than 20 years, most recently at Harborview and Stick Wami Hospital. She currently serves as the executive VP with S E I U healthcare and serves on our state's covert Tests Force and Safe Start Advisory board. Hopkins was more in Sierra Leone and immigrated to the U. S in 2000.

Jane Hopkins Stick Wami Hospital Biden Harborview Safe Start Advisory Board Hopkins Sierra Leone
Powerhouse Marketer Ana Valdz on Using Media to Create Change

Latina to Latina

03:12 min | 2 years ago

Powerhouse Marketer Ana Valdz on Using Media to Create Change

"Ana you were ten years old growing up in mexico city the first time you witnessed the power of marketing. Take me back to that. yes. I would remember perfect. He i was driving with my mom and we knew that there was a huge problem in with water and we traditionally unfortunately at that time didn't have a lot of good experiences with efforts from the government and suddenly a hero the radio vis campaign that was called sierra and sierra leone's in english means i actually doesn't have a real great station but it means turn it on right and it meant that people when they are you know watering when they are brushing their teeth. Or whatever. just turn it off. you don't need to keep it open all the time in that. Remember thinking this ad just changed the way. I do everything. I cannot even imagine what it's doing for the rest of the country and extremely that happened. Two years later we were out of the prices and through the power of media have changed the way mexico was meant to suffer and avoided that huge drought at the some of the consequences of the drought. So i said you know what for me visit. I'm using media to create change. Whatever happens in my life. That's what i'm gonna do. When did you actually realized that marketing could be a career. So in mexico marketing as a career didn't exist and i actually begged my dad to let me go to this specific school but them on the ray because it was the only place where i could find marketing as a career and i did go and i loved it and i was lucky enough to get amazing professors. The people that were developing marketing at that point in mexico where my my professors and they gave me internships. I worked for them every summer. And that's how he ended up being a fanatic. Your first job. You worked for nielsen. Global marketing research firm for four years in mexico and you were one of the first women that they had hired. How did being among the first show up in your experience there. I come from a family of men that love strong women so i always loved being a strong women. Even though i had to pay prices you know being a strong woman. But i loved it and so when i asked for this job i remember thinking it doesn't matter who was before me or who they want. I'm going to show them. How much good for them in the process was very very rigorous and you had to interview with each one of the managing directors of the partners. And you had to interview with Every one of the heads of the teams. And i remember thinking every time using my marketing skills right. Who's my audience. What did they want what we need to get them. And i remember at the end of the process. When i was lucky. Enough to get in one of the people interviewing me told me for me. There was no difference that you were a woman. And that's exactly what i wanted to here.

Sierra Mexico Mexico City Nielsen
Interview With Yasmin Of Yasmin Tells

Black Women Travel Podcast

05:06 min | 2 years ago

Interview With Yasmin Of Yasmin Tells

"Thanks so much for joining us today. Can you please tell us your name where you're from your location currently and the name of your business a k. Say hi my name in. csm. Don't sam i am from the uk. I'm sierra and my current location. Freetown sierra leone and the name of my business or businesses is yes men tells. I'll go into the other ones we into the conversation. So tell us about where you got your for travel. So i think it's because a young age excess traveling. Luckily that was introduced to us by my mother. My first Was to texas to see family melba. I remember i was young but my fetch trip to sierra fan. I was a is old. And then i came consecutively from the age of a safe full team. Yeah age of fourteen to twenty around. That spina came every year and my love for i think came. When i didn't intend ship in dakar senegal. I was just blown away by not only the way of living the and the rich list of the country but i was just getting a lot inspiration volt while i have options as other things in places i can go to your grandma's actually from the gambia right next door. As she is like our most gambian. I went to visit her in two thousand eighteen but she spent a life aaron in return saturday. So are your parents then. Both from sierra leone or where. You're also born yeah. Sierra in is my country of origin surf my parents from sierra. Dan how they met in the uk. Yeah i decided to come back in two thousand eighteen i. It's funny how they come back. Because i'm not born him at school. I was never never originally it. But here's here's the place that feels like home to me so let's karbi y subconsciously. Say back when it's not bad. I just relocated to just. Is that like a. I dunno part of your reckoning your identity because you come from people who are from there and you were raised somewhere else so culturally. How do you identify how identified successful supplements the oscar. Why you from. I would say sierra in those the same when i was in the uk working from upstate. Sierra i wouldn't necessarily say the a just because i think they're insinuates in july. Make that a. We'd like worry really from you. Know the expression when people ask you like. Oh where he really from semester say sierra in a without a doubt i identify more with being sierra than i do in british. If you think about it is wall. I've been introduced to fuss regardless of location. Where i'm situated bus was my household that was the culture of these amounts of languages. Hearing prio so yeah i definitely identified strong with being a sierra again. What has been like being back so it's been like two years now. Craig via the suspension will make it to years. It's been interesting. It's been a challenge but Unexpected challenge expects be easy. It's been either regret by me. I think it was timely. And a good thing. I did i also have a family business. Air could my mother's kitchen so my mom stopped about business any ten years ago. Two thousand eleven so we provide authentic. Saturday and snacks kills all sourced from syria. And the ingredients used. So we'd have things like chin-chin which is like a dirty not fully biscuits Thins pancake must sesame seeds snaps. Grandma's cake bus peanut butter birtles would make lows of snacks. That's my mom's business. She's made loses slacks and be some onto. Supermarket stood bands. The i'm really proud of how far she's taken the business so it was. It was good moving known that had that cushion. 'cause i didn't move thing can occur. I am going to go work for somebody. I knew i had a family business where i could implement. Myron skills are Earning

Sierra Leone UK Freetown CSM Dakar Senegal Gambia Aaron Texas DAN Upstate Oscar Craig Syria Chin Myron
Two Youngstown State University students from Sierra Leone killed in car crash

Sean Hannity

00:20 sec | 2 years ago

Two Youngstown State University students from Sierra Leone killed in car crash

"Youngstown State University are dead after their car wrecked on I 76 in Portage County last night. The Ohio State Highway Patrol says the driver Muktar Kamara, and one of his passengers were killed. The two other passengers were not seriously injured, all of them from Sierra Leone Grove City Man is

Sierra Leone Grove City Man Ohio State Highway Patrol Youngstown State University Muktar Kamara Portage County
Learning How to Forgive

Criminal

08:59 min | 2 years ago

Learning How to Forgive

"I don't subscribe to the idea people a- bad and I I don't subscribe to that because I believe that these inherent good in everyone. I think that crime It's all to be honest with you. Very relative What might be criminal in. Some communities are excused in other communities. Delia Muna was born in London and raised in Nigeria. Her mother is Nigerian and her father is from Sierra Leone. She went to college and Law School in the United States and then she became a public defender in Washington. Dc main motivation for me is that throughout my time as a public defender. I and as a Christian I operate from the presume that if Jesus swear on earth today he'd be a public defender. He was always defending people who were accused of various Nefarious activities Tax Collectors and you know Prostitutes and and and people that we will consider unsavory but as a public defender. I got to learn and appreciate that. Each person has a story and that my role as an advocate was to tell that story in a way that will shoot to the lead experiences to give voice to them I learned to appreciate the fact that but for the grace of God Right. and fat Human beings have the capacity for change today. We're talking about forgiveness. I'm phoebe judge. This is criminal I'd like to ask you about where you grew up in Nigeria and and how growing up. You saw forgiveness injustice Criminality in differently than than we do here right. So we're very very communal society and so compared to to the US where It seems that we exist in silos and a very much individual pull yourself up by your bootstraps sort of mentality in Nigeria we. It's sort of those mentality that if one person is going astray we all collectively are going astray. And so the idea is You know we rally people will rally around you to make sure that That you don't go astray and that if you do that there are resources particularly human resources to help you Sorta recalibrate Your life trajectory And that's really critically important. I guess it's kind of a flip the whole idea in on the head which is in other communities when someone does something bad it it looks bad upon the community. Exactly as opposed to here. Where if someone does something bad when this person must be intrinsically bad or evil and let's remove them from the society? Oh yes absolutely. You absolutely correct here. It's you did something you something that you did and in other communities. It's like well what? How did we fail? How could we have prevented this? And now that you have indeed some done something. What can we do to restore your humanity? What can we do to make sure that you become one of us The question becomes. When is enough enough? When is punishment enough? When can we say you have paid your dues? It's time to welcome you back into society because we still think you've got value. We still think there's much more that you can add to being a productive member of our community in two thousand eleven a twenty five year old woman Nimble Shonda Armstrong drove her car. Into New York's Hudson River with her three children inside later. Leshan to Armstrong's neighbors came forward and said they knew she was in trouble. The often heard yelling. Her landlord leader said that she asked him twice in six months to change the locks on her doors. Delia Luna wrote about Louis Armstrong and other women who'd committed similar crimes she asks how is it that American society bears no social responsibility to support. Its most vulnerable members. In raising their children she proposes that we watch out for each other not just watch each other but really look out and offer help as she says communities in Nigeria. Often do she writes. It's imperative that the legal system take steps to foster a sense of communal obligation towards the most vulnerable members of our society single mothers and their children in two thousand fifteen delia. Muna was made clinical professor of law at Harvard. The law school's first Nigerian professor. She's also the deputy director of Harvard's Criminal Justice Institute where Third Year Law Students under supervision. Essentially work is public defenders. We asked her to tell us about the cases that stay with her the most and she says it's the ones where children are charged with crimes. She told us about representing a nine year old girl and she was charged with assault with a dangerous weapon and she was charged because while Throwing ten from classroom. She picked up a book a textbook and threw it at a teacher. Miss the teacher. The book hit the wall The child was promptly taken to a The principal's office and when she got there she was then arrested put in handcuffs. She was transported at the back of a police car and brought to the courthouse. She had to be placed in isolation so in solitary because she was nine years old and I went into speak with her so she is tiny little person and I was trying to explain to her. What my role was as her attorney and advocate and she had no idea Just even process in what that meant and she looked at me and she said where's my grandmother. And when can she take me back to school and then she said to me? Do you have any food? I'm hungry and so there. I was trying to figure out how to advocate for this child. In light of the very serious thing that she'd been charged with I mean assault with a dangerous weapon. book But clearly this child at other issues that we're contributing to Her behavior in class that day and he really will have been a very cruel and capricious thing for the legal system to continue. Its prosecution of her. It's easy to forgive a child and to consider all the social factors in play in their behavior. It's not always so easy to forgive adult. Well that's correct I it's easy when you paint a picture of a very vulnerable child but what about those evil adults and evil men and women who do such terrible things well. The truth is A An an an evil adult or terrible adult just didn't You know pop from just didn't become that way. They've had most likely a terrible childhood A childhood where they will likely abused likely neglected. And so you have children who wants. That's happened to them will indeed grow up to be adults who then Commit crimes I don't ever believe that an adult just takes actions without something being the catalyst for whatever it is. They that they've done and so it might be easier to forgive a child but if you delve deeper into the experiences the lived experience of an adult I think it makes it easier to forgive them once. You understand what it is that they've been through The prism through which they view life and sort of. What's happened to them?

Nigeria Delia Muna United States Assault Sierra Leone Shonda Armstrong Harvard Delia Luna Hudson River London Washington New York Louis Armstrong Leshan Deputy Director Principal Attorney Professor
Disease patterns and planetary health

Second Opinion

03:27 min | 2 years ago

Disease patterns and planetary health

"Sars and Moore's Ebola in now corona link with animals what we call zoonosis. It's more complicated than animals simply spreading viruses and pathogens to humans. This bread is often less direct and can involve intermediate hosts and behaviors. But as I've talked this week with disease ecology experts they have increasingly blamed humans for our destruction of biodiversity this then creates ripe conditions for pathogens to come into contact with humans building roads deforestation mining logging farming with heavy water use population growth exotic vacations and heavy hunting have all played a role in these emerging epidemics around the world. Densely packed populations increasingly live in close proximity to bats and rats and birds and pets. This creates new opportunities for interactions for things to move from one species to another so does our tendency to capture exotic animals and put them in cages and ship them around the world to be used as pets or sold in wet markets and eventually be consumed as food all these activities disperse viruses that have existed for eons in one species often in one location and then spread them globally. Dr Brian Bird is a leading veterinarian. Epidemiologist and the associate director of UC Davis is one health institute he has worked on the front lines of the Ebola epidemic in Sierra Leone and other epidemics around the world. He has thought a great deal about these emerging epidemics at it quite clear that land use change and changing the environment chopping forest to plant crops. Things things of that nature are one of the leading risk factors for spillover buyers spillover of viruses from one species to another is increasingly common the CDC estimates that three quarters of new or emerging diseases that infect humans originating animals. It's not just exotic diseases like Corona Ebola and h one n one look at how we've destroyed forests to build American suburbs. This development disrupts the ecosystems enforces deer and rats and other animals to live in more densely packed areas or to venture outside of their normal habitat. This means that insects like ticks can more easily passed between animals. And then the ticks spread the bacteria borelli A- Bergdorf Ri- and there is a huge increase in line disease. Dr Bird reminds us that these changes have been going on since the industrial revolution. But he says that. Our interactions with that risk must change. We have to start to recognize that what we're doing as humanity in these wild areas is detrimental or taking the system out of balance into viruses. That all the other wildlife live in that ECO system and a sense of balance. It is this balance that has been ignored over the longer term solutions will start with awareness and hopefully that will lead to reason to action and more careful

Dr Brian Bird Zoonosis Ebola Sars Corona CDC A- Bergdorf Ri Associate Director Moore Uc Davis Sierra Leone
Acclaimed 'Beasts of No Nation' Author, Uzodinma Iweala, on Science, Power, and Race

Science Friction

09:45 min | 2 years ago

Acclaimed 'Beasts of No Nation' Author, Uzodinma Iweala, on Science, Power, and Race

"Living on the time of the Cova epidemic or corona virus. I just read something that made me laugh because someone said something like the Covet Nineteen virus which came out of China's an intelligent. It's not like he bowl which is rather dumb virus now. Obviously bullet comes out of the continent of Africa just like just think about that framework and that construct and what has been printed in a major magazine virus from Africa dumb virus virus from China. Smart virus you know. I say this about the corona virus like virus had emerged in the Netherlands. Just think about the way it would have been reported from the outset. Think about what would have happened. If it had merged in on the continent of Africa and the American President Donald Trump has been gratuitously coaling sods cove to the virus behind the current covet non epidemic the Chinese virus. Let's be clear your respective of what species and what place a virus might have been forced to take the dean pandemics. Have NO ETHNICITY. Science tells us that medical history tells us that but as we're about to explore xenophobic conclusions drawn from scientific observations can have an enormous impact on the course of history and on people's lives while is a novelist. He's a doctor a filmmaker and a whole lot more in his early twenty while still in college studying literature. He wrote the critically acclaimed novel baseds of Nine Nation which tells the extraordinary story of a child soldier. A little boy recruited given again and sent to wage a war in two thousand fifteen. That book was turned into a film. Don't like really look into my eyes since my nose picking is because I can't be explaining myself and leaving a damn not like be I am leg. Oldman try to talk to me about movies variances. I saw this an idea there would is. It would seem that some sort of this on Devon all this. I also having us I was really lucky to have the opportunity to write that novel diving. Into the stories of child. Soldiers around the world but mostly specifically in countries like Sierra Leone and Liberia which had just kind of come out of their own internal conflicts at the time and then of course going back and talking with relatives. My parents my grandparents aunts and uncles great aunts and uncles about their time during the Nigerian civil war from nineteen sixty six really sixty seven three thousand nine hundred seventy and trying to understand not just what it's like to experience that kind of turmoil from the perspective of a child but also what. It's like to have everything that you thought. You knew that you understood blown open tournament and and unfortunately that's an all too common and all to universal subject after painting beasts of no nation Dima went on to train as a doctor right more books including speak no evil and Al kind of people. He worked for a time as well in health policy in Africa and today he's of the Africa Center in New York City. A storm speak at last year's will conference of Science. Journalists Center. Really wanted you to have the opportunity to he him too. So he joins us from the radio art studios in the heart of New York. You had such an interesting childhood. Born in Washington to Nigerian parents mother a former finance minister of Nigeria. And growing up. I get the sense that you very much spent time on on both continents and I'm curious to know. Have that shaped your sense of self as a as a boy and a young adult. My parents took it upon themselves to make sure that we could always get back to Nigeria. That this was to be so much a part of who we were growing up and it really did actually provide us with a really interesting way of seeing the world. You're not from one place near not from another place. You're from both places. It's kind of a glorious thing to be able to grow up knowing that there are multiple perspectives on everything in the world. What someone sees for example in the village that my grandparents grew up in is necessarily going to be from what somebody sees in suburban Washington? Dc things might be a little bit more difficult in Nigeria. But at the same time everybody is still living. I think that's something that a lot of people who only grow up saying in industrialized if we WANNA use that term or you know United States type or western context don't have and therefore very afraid of the wider world beyond. We just grew up not being afraid because of exposure and I think that's so important. Oh that's such a potent comment about FIA holding back so much dialogue and possibility in the world. Why a medical degree trying to be a doctor? Why did you save that time in your life as a part of any decision? I think there are multiple reasons for why you do something and not all of them are the most. I will freely admit that I did medicine because my dad's a doctor and you can kind of see okay. This is what a doctor does. You see the stethoscope. You see the medicines. It's already very concrete. You know in the little kids mind and as as the kid of African immigrants. There's this thing where you do. The practical like you become a doctor. You become a lawyer and then you think that the way that you have impact is through those practical professions. I think of course. There's this idea that doctors save people and that you can have a profound impact on on a person's life and so you know with all of that. It seemed like a natural choice. I think it became clear to me that one of the things that was missing was for me in full form. Was that creative output that flow and that ability to render the world as I saw an as sort of my talent allowed me to and I think one person can have an impact in multiple ways. Interestingly in many ways you work and your books have connected with how history in politics and in Dade Science and medicine in Western societies read and interpret and Judge View African bodies. If we think of the base of nomination also your your book. Our kind of people sharing stories from people living with HIV is in in Nigeria. That lenses interested you. It strikes me in house and I. I think you can't grow up in a black body and you can't occupy the space as an African person. Occupies space in this world is offering person or as a black person without thinking about the gains that is upon you because in in many ways that gains does and has adversely affected the lives that we all live both again in a very individual way and also on the macro level and so understanding. How black bodies move through space are interpreted? I think is something that's really important to me. And I say that not just from the Games of the other but also from the the way that we look at ourselves and this is where you presented last year at the World Conference of Science Journalists in Europe and gave extraordinary address on racism at the heart of modern science and medicine. What did you want that audience of journalists and scientists and? I was one of them in that room to think about to interrogate. I think oftentimes we just assume that the structures we operate within our for one solid and somehow especially when it comes to signs that they're they're vetted and true and one of the things that became increasingly clear to me. As I wrote the book I wrote on HIV AIDS was just how much quote unquote scientific. Ideas were grounded in people's biases and prejudices about black bodies and how that impacted the quote unquote science or signs. At least that initially was dedicated to trying to stop the epidemic and in some cases may have done more harm than good. Initially I think back to a lot of the articles that when I was writing my book I read about HIV AIDS academic articles about sort of the linking of the spread of HIV AIDS and promiscuity. And the idea that Africans were having sex like monkeys where promiscuous like monkeys like which came up in published scientific papers and then is it makes its way into the journalistic mainstream this idea of like African promiscuity as it relates to the spread of this disease you know things about like Africanness and and being unable to quote unquote keep the time why early. Hiv treatments which required like large. Regimens of pills like wouldn't work for people. And that was you know story that made it into major publications impacted policy that impacted the way the epidemic was dealt with you know these are things that are important and people need to be responsible for the way these stories are told and need to think about the frameworks in which the stories are

Nigeria Africa China Washington Aids HIV Donald Trump Cova The Netherlands World Conference Of Science Jo Oldman Journalists Center Sierra Leone Liberia President Trump Africa Center United States Dima
Euro 2020 Championship postponed to 2021 over coronavirus crisis

BBC World Service

00:26 sec | 2 years ago

Euro 2020 Championship postponed to 2021 over coronavirus crisis

"Yesterday European football's governing body UEFA did indeed as widely trial decide to postpone your I. twenty twenty two euro twenty twenty one and the confederation of African football is put back next month's African nations championship for locally based players at the request of the organizes Cameroon elsewhere Sierra Leone is called a whole pool sporting activities with immediate effect I don't actually have a case of coronavirus registered in the country just

Uefa Football Cameroon Sierra Leone
Coronavirus Is Here. Will Quarantines Help?

Short Wave

11:13 min | 3 years ago

Coronavirus Is Here. Will Quarantines Help?

"The new corona virus is on the move from China to Europe here in Italy at this point the country has been divided into three different areas. There is the red zone the yellow zone and then the rest of Italy and the United States Washington state remains the center of attention as Karuna. Virus SPREADS QUICKLY RESEARCHERS. Say The virus may have been circulated in the area for weeks. Undetected and more cases are likely in New York. Experts warn the virus will spread their cases. Keep popping up and when they do. Some governments are responding with one of the most powerful tools they have quarantines doctor. He'd Padillia knows a thing or two about quarantine. You are a person not only under investigation for potentially developing a disease. But you are a person who's trustworthiness is. Now come into question you know. Will you follow the rules? And You keep them safe from you. She's an infectious disease. Specialist was quarantine twice after returning home from Sierra Leone during the Ebola outbreak there in two thousand fourteen sudden. Change that you see in people's faces it's like you are a human but all of a sudden you become a threat to them today in the show. We'll talk about what? Corentin actually gives why this virus is so good at reading it and what steps the United States might have to take to contain the novel Corona Virus. Dr Padillia is the medical director of Special Pathogens Unit at Boston University. And so she's been paying close attention to this latest outbreak of the novel. Corona virus and the efforts to stop it. I it's important to understand why this virus is hard to contain a lot of the symptoms. It causes are the same as what people experience when they get the cold or the flu on top of that. There's some evidence that people can transmit the virus before they have symptoms and perhaps even after they feel better and even if that doesn't happen often. It's still a problem when you're trying to track an outbreak. Because if you don't have symptoms you're not gonNA come to care and if not gonNA COME TO CARE. We won't know that you're sick and hence be able to do contact tracing which is basically looking for anybody else you may have been in contact with. We didn't really have a test for this virus until February and initially in the states. We were only testing people who had traveled to places with outbreaks or people who had been in contact with somebody who had the disease now. Public Health officials have expanded. Who can be tested? Which is why all these new cases are making the news. Yes I think that's playing a major role in the identification of some of the cases and I also think that's going to lead to new cases being diagnosed during this week in the United States though just to be clear Dr W. says that doesn't necessarily mean there's a big spike in the number of people who are sick. We're probably just identifying more people because we're testing more people. In when these cases appear local governments are taking action in King County Washington. The government is buying an entire motel to use for quarantines. But what is quarantine so quarantining Is the is the practice by which we separate those that we think may have had exposure to a disease of interest from the rest of the community and the reason to do that is because if they develop symptoms We want them to be separate at that point from other. So they don't transmit that disease to others. Gotcha Gotcha so individual quarantine obviously is a very different thing than mass quarantine which is trying to quarantine huge groups of people Tell me a little bit about that. There are temporizing measure rate. I mean if you have bleeding in your leg you can cut off your circulation to stop leading but that's just a temporizing measure Until you can figure out how to fix what's going on and it's the same thing with Corentin I think it works early on If you can sort of separate people in in a smaller outbreak becomes much more difficult as the outbreak of the epidemic becomes bigger. Because now you're talking about a bigger group of people. Can you talk to me about some of the costs of quarantine? Because you know. They're not all economic right. There are psychological and social tolls on a person were a community. Yeah I I'm glad you brought that up. But I mean I think even before I start with the sociological aspects in the psychological aspects. I mean let's just talk about the logistic aspects of it. The cost is a big thing because you now have a huge number of people. It's not just the direct cost of putting somebody in quarantine but you are taking them. If they are a working adult you are taking them out of the workforce. And if you do that for massive number of people you are basically halting entire economic sectors But then there is the logistics cost on the aspect of it. Which is if you quarantine people. There needs to be a plan to basically feed them. You know engineered to get medications that they need if they get sick. So there's that element and then then. There is the sociological and psychological aspects. In the stigma. 'cause what you're being told that you are potentially a threat to society and so there's the figuring out the logistics of how do you have you sort of survive you know within? Cro- close quarters alone for long periods of time and the second is the loneliness of it you know I remember for being. Thank you know I for both of my sense of quarantine. I was desperate for company NUMB. And so of course we recognize the importance of separating folks who may be at high risk of potentially developing disease. You know you have to take into account. What else is going on in their life. And what kind of support. They need psychological support that they need as they go through with it. What are some of the steps that we might see the? Us government take before or instead of quarantine so asides from having more information out there. I think some of the steps that you might see public health Officials do is cancelling delaying large events. Such as sports games or or concerts or conferences In areas where there is sustained number of cases The other steps that public health officials may take is is really encouraging if they have symptoms of their if they're worried about it to contact their healthcare providers or if they're in a state that has a dedicated hotline to really sort of go through whether or not they should come to care. Actually stay at home. You're healthy person has symptoms. I think the best strategies for you to stay at home until you get better rather than go to work or go to the hospital so I've also heard people talking about school closings which I think could be really tough especially on parents who may be can't take time off to stay home with their kids right. Yeah I think that for every step that we take the public health realm There's going to be consideration of how we can. We are going to mitigate the impact of those steps on people and that's what helps us ensure that there is adherence to recommendations right. An so school closings are are an excellent example. Because you're not only asking that student to stay home but you're asking that parents to stay home from work may or may not have the job security to be able to do that so thinking through how you support parents who are going through that in a district where we've closed. The school is GonNa Be Important. Right Right Okay. So as a person who works in infectious disease who works in hospitals has experienced quarantine themselves. Do you think the United States is prepared to quarantine large groups of people? I think we need a little bit of work on that. Whol actually has a wonderful guy that they released poor countries as they're thinking about mass quarantines and one of the things that I talk about this importance of community engagement and outreach to really explain to a wide as being done and the importance of it if it is being pursued and so if we are going to do it aside from the Logistics Readiness. I think one of the things to think about that the US may have to do is massive amounts of community outreach to ensure that people understand or sections of communities understand why this is being done. The other part of this is we have to see aside some quarantines if they are perceived we have to invest in behavior change and community engagement because that is more sustainable and probably in the end. What's going to help? Stop the epidemic. Yeah so I guess one of my questions is if we got to a point where we needed to do you know big quarantines in the United States would it really be effective here versus a place like China which obviously has a different government setup? I think whether or not The mask oranges United States. Work are it's dependent on a few different factors right. Anything can work if you throw enough. Resources added if you're not willing to put enough manpower to make sure that you know something goes. According to plan. Then the question becomes is that the most effective way of spending resources but regardless of whether or not we pursue quarantine. I think the important thing to know is what makes quarantine effective in certain communities I. It's not as the amount of effort you put into engagement without community and the people that you are quarantining education about why that's being done and ensuring people that there needs both economic logistic and ability to survive while in quarantine or Matt. Yeah so I know there's been some back and forth about whether or not Corentin has been successful or not in in this case whether or not global efforts have helped slow the virus at all or have been a waste of resources. How do you see that I think majority of the attention been on China on whether or not the very strict restrictions that they placed in travel and quarantining entire cities? Actually help As I mentioned earlier I think quarantine is always a balanced between individual taking away an individual's freedom versus the potential benefits. That you might get from taking such a step despite my own unease with with massive quarantines you know. I do think that there are people who would say that this roic efforts you really call it a sacrifice on on the part of the Chinese people because they didn't stick with that strict quarantine orders they were given by their government It did bias time. It didn't stop it nor do I think at that point would have been effective in stopping it Did it by as potentially more time to prepare here and everywhere else and I think it probably did but at what cost and did we more importantly did we take advantage of that time.

United States Dr Padillia China Corentin Italy Europe New York Sierra Leone Washington Ebola King County Matt Medical Director Dr W. Whol Logistics Readiness Special Pathogens Unit Boston University
Latest on coronavirus spreading in China and beyond

All Things Considered

03:28 min | 3 years ago

Latest on coronavirus spreading in China and beyond

"Super spreading offense public health officials tracking the covert nineteen outbreak are on the lookout for them the new corona viruses already considered highly contagious and spread from a single city in China to the rest of the world within thirty days super spreading events in which one person infects many others could make the outbreak spread even faster and yours King Kong explains why last month a British man went to a conference in Singapore and then on a ski trip to the French Alps what he didn't know when he arrived in the Alps was that he was infected with the virus behind the coded nineteen outbreak and appears that during his stay at the ski village he invited eleven other people the World Health Organization says some are calling this a super spreading event Max slough Emory University models how diseases spread an individual in fact much more profound than typical average person early estimates for the new coronavirus suggests that the average infected person usually only spends it to two or three other people the possibility of super sporting events as worried researchers since the new corona virus was discovered it's because in the past super spending events have triggered explosive chains of transmission and other outbreaks Jessica Matt Caffrey searches population and disease dynamics at Princeton University the poster child receives running event happened during the sars outbreak where a huge proportion cases was traced back to this Metropol hotel back in two thousand three there is a doctor treating patients who as far as another corona virus disease he checked into the Metropol hotel in Hong Kong at least thirteen other people on this floor got sick and from that hotel the disease spread to Canada Vietnam and Singapore in twenty fourteen at more than three hundred new a bullet cases were traced to the funeral of a popular healer who died of the disease in Sierra Leone Adam could try ski studies the dynamics of infectious diseases at the London school of hygiene and tropical medicine in a twenty fifteen outbreak of another corona virus in South Korea about two thirds the transmission actually came just two events in Austin to a businessman infected at least twenty six people and one hospital and a person at a different hospital second eighty two other patients visitors and staff both of those instances fast track to the spread of the virus so in that situation if you can avoid this to find happening you you got a nice yeah so why does super spending happen Jamie Lloyd Smith who studies how diseases spread at UCLA so the factors that cause it very alive it runs the gamut from someone is feeling perfectly well that happens to be spreading virus without knowing it to somebody's quite sick in the active trying to help them puts the virus into the air and exposes people starting events often happen in hospitals were very sick people get Hosp the procedures that might expose others to their blood are there long fluids what Smith says that so far super spending events may be happening with the new coronavirus but they don't seem to be causing explosive outbreaks as they did in the early days of sars the question is why is that a biological difference between the two viruses or is a consequence of you know we actually learned some things about how to deal with these viruses and infection control the man that spread then you can run a virus to eleven others in the Alps health officials believe they caught that situation before it ignited a chain I could have spread Kobe nineteen

What's A 'Super-Spreading Event'? And Has It Happened With COVID-19?

All Things Considered

03:27 min | 3 years ago

What's A 'Super-Spreading Event'? And Has It Happened With COVID-19?

"Super spreading events public health officials tracking the covert nineteen outbreak are on the lookout for them the new corona viruses already considered highly contagious it spread from a single city in China to the rest of the world within thirty days super spreading events in which one person infects many others could make the outbreak spread even faster NPR's King Kong explains why last month a British man went to a conference in Singapore and then on a ski trip to the French Alps what he didn't know when he arrived in the Alps was that he was infected with the virus behind the coup bid nineteen outbreak and it appears that during his stay at the ski village he infected eleven other people the World Health Organization says some are calling this a super spreading event Max Lao Emory University models how diseases spread an individual in fact much more profound and there should be co average person early estimates for the new coronavirus suggests that the average infected person usually only spent the two two or three other people the possibility of super sporting events as worried researchers since the new corona virus was discovered it's because in the past super spending events have triggered explosive chains of transmission and other outbreaks Jessica Matt Caffrey searches population and disease dynamics at Princeton University the poster child receives running event happened during the sars outbreak where a huge proportion cases was traced back to this Metropol hotel back in two thousand three there is a doctor treating patients who had sars another corona virus disease he checked into the Metropol hotel in Hong Kong at least thirteen other people on this floor got sick and from that hotel the disease spread to Canada Vietnam and Singapore in twenty fourteen at more than three hundred new a bullet cases were traced to the funeral of a popular healer who died of the disease in Sierra Leone Adam could charge ski studies the dynamics of infectious diseases at the London school of hygiene and tropical medicine in a twenty fifteen outbreak of another corona virus in South Korea about two thirds the transmission actually came just two events in hospitals a businessman infected at least twenty six people and one hospital and a person at a different hospital second eighty two other patients visitors and staff both of those instances fast track to the spread of the virus so in that situation if you can avoid this to find happening you you've got a nice yeah so why does super spending happen Jamie Lloyd Smith who studies how diseases spread at UCLA so the factors that cause it very alive it runs the gamut from someone is feeling perfectly well that happens to be spreading virus without knowing it to somebody's quite sick in the active trying to help them puts the virus into the air and exposes people super starting events often happen in hospitals were very sick people get Hosp the procedures that might expose others for their blood are there long fluids Lloyd Smith says that so far super spending events may be happening with the new coronavirus but they don't seem to be causing explosive outbreaks as they did in the early days of sars the question is why is that a biological difference between the two viruses or is it a consequence of you know we actually learned some things about how to deal with these viruses and infection control the case of the man that spread the new coronavirus to eleven others in the Alps health officials believe they caught that situation before it ignited a chain I could have spread coded

The Falklands War Explained

Brief History Podcast

16:02 min | 3 years ago

The Falklands War Explained

"This episode is on the Falcons will and so we get straight into the Falklands war was a ten week. Undeclared war which we Argentina and the United Kingdom in one thousand nine hundred ninety two over two different territories in the south Atlanta the focus on islands territorial dependency which is south Georgia and South Sandwich Islands. The conflict guy on the second of I pro. When Argentine forces invaded occupied the focus ORLANDS? This was followed by invasion of south Georgia the next day in an attempt to establish the sovereignty claim them over on the fifth of April. The British government dispatched a naval task force to engage each week the Argentine navy and Air Force before making them in February so come the island. This conflict lasted seventy four days and ended with the Argentine surrender on the fourteenth for June. Were turning the islands to British control in total six forty nine auditorium military personnel. It's now on two hundred and fifty richest personnel and three folklore owners died during the hostilities. The conflict was a major episode. In the protracted dispute over the territory's sovereignty Argentina selected our maintains that they were Argentine find territory and Argentine government. That's characterizes military action as the reclamation of its territory the British government regard the action As an invasion of in crime colony since eighteen forty one the folkman islanders who had inhabited the island since the early nineteenth century with predominantly descendants of British cyclists and strongly favored which is shocking Leave estate officially declared war. Although both the government declared the islands of warzone hostilities was almost exclusively limited to the territories UNDIS- disputes and the area South Atlantic where Louis the conflict had a strong effect in both cultures and has been the subject various books articles films on songs uh-huh patriotic sentiment ran high in Argentina. But the outcome prompted large protests against the military government hastened its downfall in the United Kingdom the conservative government boasted by the successful outcome was reelected increased majority the following year the the cultural and political effects of the conflict have been less than the UK done in Argentina where it remains a common topic for discussion. Diplomatic diplomats relations between the United Kingdom and Argentina were restored in one thousand nine hundred nine fallen meeting Madrid a which the two governments issued the joint statement. No change in either country's position regarding the sovereignty of the Falkland Islands were made explicit in Nineteen ninety-four Argentina's in times claim to the territory was added to its constitution in the period leading up to the wall in particular perform transfer of power between the military dictators. General Jorge Raphael Videla and General Roberto Eduardo Viola late in March nineteen eighty see what Argentina have been in the midst of a devastating economic stagnation and large scale civil unrest against the military Giunta that been governor the country since nineteen seventy six in December. One thousand nine hundred what there was a change in the audit time military regime bringing to office. It's a new GENTA headed by General Leopoldo Galtieri Acting President and Averick Adele Lameta an admiral. George Weah was the main architect and supporter of military solution for the long standing claim over the islands calculating and that the United Kingdom would never respond militarily by opt-in for military action the Galateri government hoped to mobilized choice along standard patriotic feelings of Argentines towards the islands. Their star the public attention from the country's current economic problems on the regime's James Ongoing Human rights violations of the dirty war such actions would also boast a dwindling legitimacy the new space last preceding speculated on a step-by-step plan beginning with cutting off supplies to the island and direct actions slate to nine thousand nine hundred two if the UN talks were fruitless ongoing tension between the couteau countries over islands increased the online from March where Military Group of Argentine scrap metal merchants. They actually infiltrated by Argentine Marines raised as the Argentine flag at South Georgia Island. A not that would like to be seen as the first offensive action in the war. The blow navy ice patrol vessel H- H must endure. It was dispatched from standing to South Georgia on the twentieth in response the Argentine Ministry Genta suspect in the UK would reinforce his Atlantic forces ordered the invasion of the fulcrum islands to be brought forward to the second-ranked The UK was initially taken by surprise by the Argentine attack on the South Atlantic islands. Despite repeated wouldn't wooden royal naval captain Nicholas Barker it commanded. They're enjoying anivers- Balka believed that the Defense Secretary John Not Nineteen Nineteen eighty-one review in which knots described plans to rejoin the joins. The Yolk case only naval presence in the in the South Atlantic at center signal not Argentines that UK was unwilling would soon be unable to defend his territories subjects in the Falkland Islands on the Second Night Nineteen eight thousand nine hundred. The Argentine forces mounted on Fabius London's known as Operation Rosario on the Falkland Islands the invasion was met with nominal defense organized by full. Didn't governor Sir. Rex Hunt giving command to Major. Might Norman of the Royal Marines brings the events invasion included end of life. Talent commander Admiral Sanchez supply. Thomas I'm fabulous commanders. Group the attack on Moody Brook Barracks. The engagement between troops of Hugo Santelli on bill trip at Stanley on the final engagement and surrender government. Government has worthy invasion. I reach the U. K.. From auditing solstice. A minister defense operative in London had a short tally tax. Conversation with Governor. Hunt's telex operation confirmed that Argentines on the island and in control later that day BBC journalists Lorrimore Golez spoke with an Orlando at goose green via average rage of who confirmed the presence of a large oftentimes entire fleet and the Argentine forces had taken control of the island richest military operations in the Fulcrum Wolf were given the code thing Operation Culpa and the commander of the Task Force was Melissa. John fieldhouse operations lasted from first of all April nineteen thousand nine hundred to the twentieth of June nineteen ninety two. The British undertook a series of military operations as a means of recapturing the fortunes from Argentine Argentine occupation the British royalty taken prior in second April invasion in response to the events on South Georgia the submarines henchman splendid and H- H Mess Fox and was ordered to South to south on twenty nine March whereas the store ship Royal Flea Cle- exonerate for Austin was dispatched from the western Mediterranean H Messengers North Carrington. I wish to send a third submarine but his decision with deferred due to concerns about the impact on operational commitments coincidentally on the second of March suckering suckering hikmet superb after broke up and it was just seemed was in the press to be heading south that has been since been speculation. The effect effect these reports were panic. The Argentine Genta into invading the Falkland Islands before nuclear powered submarines could be deployed the following day. Join a crisis. Meeting headed by Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher. The Chief of Naval Staff at Henry Leach advise that quote written could send Taskforce Skip. The islands were invaded and on the first April sent orders to a royal naval force. CARRINA LENA exercises in the Mediterranean to provide south-south Phony invasion on the second of April after emergency meeting of the cabinet approval was given to form a task force to retake the islands. This was backed in an emergency session of the House of Commons. The next day on the six by the British government set up a war cabinet to provide today political oversight the campaign this was the CRISCO instrument crisis-management to the British with his remittance to keep under review political or military development relating to the South Atlantic and to report as necessary to Defense Overseas Policy Committee. The Wall Cabinet Matt at least daily until it was dissolved on the twelfth of August although Margaret Thatcher is described as dominating the wool cabinet Lawrence Friedman notes in the official history of the Falkland Islands Campaign that she did not know opposition without concern of however wants a decision was reached. She did not look back and quote on the evening of April. The United Kingdom's nation's ambassador possums for a drop. The president of the United Nations Gertie Council the resolution which condemned hostilities in the media. Argentine ritual from the island was adopted by the council the following day as United Nations. WHO's not council resolution five? Oh two which passed with ten votes in simple when against ends up stations. China the Soviet Union potent UK receive fervor political support from members members countries the Commonwealth of Nations and the European Economic Community Australia Canada New Zealand withdrew that diplomats from bodice Ariz the e say also provided economic support by imposing economic sanctions on Argentina. Auden itself was politically literally backed by a majority of countries in Latin America of crucially knocked chilly and also some members of the Non Aligned Movement. The New Zealand government expelled the Argentine ambassador following the invasion Prime Minister Rob Dune was in London. When will grow finding an opinion piece published in science? He said quote the military rulers of Argentina must not be appeased. New Zealand will back Britain all the way and unquote will cost in on BBC World Service. He told the focus islands. This quote this robot mode do we all think Commu Given our full support total to the British government isn't this endeavors to rectify the situation. Get rid of the people invaded your Country Country Unquote on the twenty for May nine hundred eighty two. He announced that New Zealand would make H. M. S.. Concentrate prey lead. The class frigate valuable to use when the British were could fit to release royal. Navy vessels from the Falcons in the House of Commons almonds. Afterwards Margaret Thatcher said quote the New Zealand government and people have absolutely magnificent in support of this country and the Falkland Islanders just for the rule of liberty of law and quote the French president. Francois Mitterrand declared embargo home. Frenchamn sows thousand assistance to Argentina. In addition from allowed UK act craft warships use of his poor field facilities. That car in Senegal Frans provided dismisal aircraft training. So that Harry pilots could be trained against the French aircraft used by Argentina Intelligence also cooperated with Britain to prevent Argentina from containing more exit missiles on the international market. Kim a two thousand two interview in reference to the support John Not then defense secretary at disquiet France. At Britain's quote greatest tally in two thousand twelve. He came to light that wall. This poll was taken place. A French technical team employed by docile and already in Argentina remained death throughout the world. Despite presidential decree the team had provided material support to the Argentines identify and fixing faults in exit missile launchers. John Not set the unknown. The French team was that beset. It's what was thought. Be Not of any the important and advised that French government denied any knowledge the time that the tech teams that in contrast French intelligence officer maintained a team was that it was in intelligence gathering capacity. Joel not that asked if he regretted his surly praised. The French said he's the French. were quote the excess and always have been an quote. The Sierra Leone government allowed task for ships to refuel preterm. BBC Ten transport aircraft landed on Joel in the Gambia Umbria flight between the UK and Ascension Islands. The United States was concerned. A protracted conflict with the Soviet Union Argentina's Argentina's side and initially tried to meet yet then to the conflict through shuttle diplomats however when Argentina refused the US peace over rituals US Secretary of State Alexander. Hey announced that. The United States would prohibit sale arms to Argentina and provide material support richest operations rations both houses the US Congress passed resolutions supporting us. Parchin sided with the United Kingdom. The into and you S. provided United Kingdom with Sidewinder missiles for use by the Harrier jets President Ronald Reagan approved Royal Navy's Request to borrow the sea curry capable amphibious assault ship. US Awad Jima. If the British lost aircraft carrier the United States Navy developed a plan to help the richest man that Shit with American military contractors likely retired sailors with knowledge of a Jima Systems

Argentina United Kingdom Falkland Islands British Government Prime Minister Margaret Thatch Argentine Navy South Georgia South Sandwich Islands BBC United States Navy South Atlantic South Georgia Island New Zealand Government Britain New Zealand Argentine Ministry Genta Rex Hunt London Ascension Islands