35 Burst results for "Siemens"

Fernandez, 18, Beats Kerber at US Open to Follow Osaka Upset

AP News Radio

00:34 sec | 3 weeks ago

Fernandez, 18, Beats Kerber at US Open to Follow Osaka Upset

"Rising star Felix OJ only a Siemens ended the U. S. open run of American hope Frances tiafoe but not before a three hour and twenty three minute battle to secure a spot in the quarterfinals the twelfth seeded Canadian posted a come back full centric tree and next faces eighteen year old Spanish surprise package tell us al Qaeda's who continued his record breaking run through the draw men's second seed dental Medvedev continued is quiet but effective moved through the draw and the women's second seed out of settling and the fifth seed Elena Svitolina both phones as women's favorites after reaching the final eight I'm grand like us

Felix Oj Frances Tiafoe Siemens Al Qaeda Medvedev Elena Svitolina
"siemens" Discussed on The CyberWire

The CyberWire

05:02 min | 4 months ago

"siemens" Discussed on The CyberWire

"Of this vulnerability could allow an attacker to write arbitrary data and code to protected memory areas or read sensitive data to launch further attacks. Quote if you operate siemens. Plc's by all means upgrade to the latest versions company has provided a. It's time to take a moment to tell you about our sponsor recorded future if you haven't already done so take a look at recorded futures cyber daily we look at it. The cyber wire staff subscribes and consults it daily web is rich with indicators and.

Nicole Perlroth On The Cyberweapons Arms Race

The Lawfare Podcast

03:49 min | 6 months ago

Nicole Perlroth On The Cyberweapons Arms Race

"Nicole peril roth on the cyber weapons arms race nicole statement at the end of your book which is a pretty serious indictment of the us government. That i think sums up the thesis of the book you say quote the very institutions charged with keeping us safe have opted time and time again to lead us more vulnerable unquote it. You explain with that means and just tell us what the books about shore. So what that means is that. In order to preserve our espionage operations are battlefield preparations in the digital realm. It necessitates these days. This tradeoff that basically entails leaving americans more vulnerable when you find a hole in the system and you decide that you can use that whole to spy on our enemies or drop a cyber weapon on their grid. One day there was no problem with that three or four decades ago when we were all using different systems but these days we all use the same systems. We all use iphones and androids and microsoft windows whether you know it or not and siemens industrial software and schneider. Electric industrial software. Were all using it for our critical infrastructure. So if you find a whole no systems and you decide that you're not going to get it fixed so that you might able to exploit at one day for espionage or surveillance or a gun. Cyberattack you are leaving americans more vulnerable these days and when i wrote that sentence i wasn't even just talking about the nsa or command or or some of our other spy agencies. I was really talking about the entire system. You know microsoft. They've come a long way but it is holes in their products in their technology. That just able this. Latest chinese attack on our systems solar winds that did not catch the fact that the russians were essentially using it software update as a trojan horse to get into our federal. It networks you know. No one is incentivized to seriously look at security. They are incentivized to get their product to market to cut costs to keep shipping and government. They're incentivized to spy on as many people as possible in the name of protecting americans but the problem is we have this moral hazard in this trade off now where it effectively left a lot of americans less safe so that that is the nut of the buck i really wanted to explore. The is incentive structures. I wanted to look at this because from my vantage point. I've been covering nonstop cyber-attacks the new york times and you know ten years ago. When i started. I could cover one attack every week or every other week but steady getting a little bit worse now. They're all happening simultaneously from so many corners of the globe and they are so costly. Not just for american businesses and government. They're costly for hospitals. There was just a a ransomware attack on a hospital that costs the hospital. Ten million dollars and an american cities and towns so remind vantage point things. Were getting a lot worse. And we had no interest in legislating that critical infrastructure operators up their security. We had no interest in exacting penalties for companies. That didn't take their security seriously. So i really just wanted to look at the incentive structures if going to rely on our free market economy to sort of dictate the terms of our security. I wanted to understand what those incentives were and if there was any opportunities to correct

Nicole Peril Roth Cyber Weapons Arms Us Government Nicole Microsoft Schneider NSA The New York Times
interview With Scott Whyte, Chief Digital Officer at AeroSafe Global

Outcomes Rocket

04:26 min | 10 months ago

interview With Scott Whyte, Chief Digital Officer at AeroSafe Global

"Welcome back to the outcomes. Rocket saw marquez. Here today i have the privilege of hosting scott white. He is the chief digital officer at air safe. Global scott is a veteran life sciences and health. It leader with over twenty five years of experience serving the nation's largest life-science provider payer and health solutions organizations at zero safe global he's responsible for driving digital innovation partner and customer relationships and more scots also actively advising early stage health technology companies and investors on health tech prior to joining arrow safe scott was the chief strategy officer at clear data the leading life sciences and healthcare cloud automation insecurity company where he helped drive thirty x growth. In prior roles scott served as the it vice president common spirit health vice president and cio of phoenix children's hospital and seventeen years helping build. The healthcare practices at siemens healthcare and cap. Gemini is serving hospitals health insurance and life. Science companies scotus spoken nationally on topics including accountable. Care cloud information exchanges digital engagement. Engine olmecs. his background is impressive and And also multifaceted and so. I think everybody's gonna enjoy our conversation with scott today. Scott thank you so much for joining us so it is great to be with you today. Really excited to Talk with you. Yeah likewise scott and so before we dive into air safe global in the work that that you guys are doing there. I wanna learn more about you. Scott and have the listeners learn about you and what inspires your work in healthcare good. So hey it'd be good to go back in the early days. I was so excited about. Technology was a programmer early in high school. These days were just coming out and studied information systems and was excited to to apply technology to make businesses better and i was not actually interested in healthcare but my consulting organization assigned to a project at kaiser in northern california helped design implement and go live with the system in a brand new hospital northern california. I completed cop bug so working with physicians and nurses lab pharmacy radiology people and the beauty and complexity of the human body medicine. I'm along with having problems to solve. I mean there's really some broken workflows need for improved information. Sharing just just pulled me on and that's been a twenty five to now pushing thirty year journey of wrestling with problems in healthcare and expires me. Because there's there are still Illness and disease and tried to burn out so many problems that we need to work on to apply technology to To make things better. Not that is partially. Yeah that's so interesting scott and you've been through a lot and so now you're you're doing some very interesting work at at aero safe so talk to us about what you guys are up to there and what exactly you're doing to add value to the healthcare ecosystem well it is so relevant to day Arrow safe global focuses on cold chain shipping for pharmaceuticals. That's very important me that even amongst healthcare professionals very few knew about it until right now. It's in the national news. Because of kobe challenge and the challenge of shipping vaccine some some which needs to be at negative seventy degrees celsius and so cold. Chain strengthen center even in mainstream media. So i'm thankful to be a part of that too. Been as we speak the involved in the delivery of vaccines all of the world and my role digital side is to connect our digital cold chain solutions with other parts of the healthcare ecosystem. And so even just this morning was talking with a global medical device company about ways to bridge some of the big gaps and problems that we have between the vaccine and devices other elements of the system. That really all need to come together ultimately in order to vaccinate people and Pushback this this awful pandemic

Scott Cio Of Phoenix Children's Hosp Siemens Healthcare Scott White Marquez Gemini Kaiser Northern California Wrestling California
How To Align Your Customer Experience

eCommerce Fastlane - Shopify - Shopify Plus - E-Commerce - Ecommerce Business

05:45 min | 11 months ago

How To Align Your Customer Experience

"Now my guest and says, episode is Tim Ashe who is an acknowledged authority on evolutionary psychology and digital marketing. He's a sought after international keynote speaker and the best selling author of two books I one landing page optimization, and more. Recently unleash your primal brain actually just listened to recently on audible. Fantastic. We're going to dig into that one for sure Tim has been mentioned by Forbes as a top ten online marketing expert and by Entrepreneur magazine as an online market influence to watch. For nineteen years he was a CO founder and the CEO of site tuners, tuners dot, com and their digital marketing and optimization agency. Tim has helped create over one point, two, billion dollars in value for some amazing companies that I know. We all know Google expedia harmony facebook and American Express and cannon and Nestle there's massive list year semantic new to it and humanity Siemens anyways in countless direct to consumer brands. So exciting to have Tim today busy schedule. But please join me conversation with Tim Today. So. Tim Welcome ECOMMERCE battling. A Ha-. Very. Happy Veer Steve. So you've had quite an eventful career I might add keynote speaking around the world are writing bestselling books year you run international conferences, I guess pre cove in our doing some virtual events. So tell me a little bit about best can your entrepreneurial journey so far? Sure. Well, I've worked in a variety of high tech companies when I started university at UC San Diego my undergraduate majors were in computer engineering and cognitive science, and then I stayed there for graduate school and what would neural networks or what would now be called deep learning or machine learning or A. And this was early days We didn't have the big data sets that we do now with the Internet. So I switched Internet marketing and started my first marketing agency back in the early DOT com days and Never, let go of the Tiger's tail and twenty five years. Later I decided you know running an agency wasn't my highest and best use on the planet. So I decided to focus on what I really enjoy, which is the thought leadership in the form of as you mentioned, keynote speaking and writing my latest book and spreading knowledge out to people as opposed to working on client accounts. Right? and. So I did mention a little tiny bit of top of the show but you know you've worked with a lot of some really great ecommerce brands some of the largest brands I might add like what are some mistakes that you see kind of consistently some of these e commerce brands are making today will if we restrict people have different definitions of ECOMMERCE, I, just WanNa start there for some ecommerce anywhere. Any website that has as A. Checkout anything where you sell items directly and for others, it's more restrictive and I'd say it's a e commerce catalog and that's I think a more standard definition. If you also use a lots of different items, you have a homepage category pages, search results, pages, and product, and so on. It's not a website where there are two or three things for sale in those early incidental. Would I don't know is that a fair definition or how would you agree with that? Totally would agree with that yes. So In the case of large catalogs, I'd say the common mistakes that we I've seen in my careers one gratuitous use of motion and wasted real estate on the homepage in the form of giant sliders everybody seems to have those Sh. Yeah. That's a big known my book I talk about I have a whole e-commerce best practices section in my landing page optimization book and I devoted a page to why sliders. An evil that should be immediately removed from your site. While you know what part of it I think to is that it doesn't position the brand well, enough I think with having like motion and I think when people have a lot of different slogans, tag lines or kind of looks and things going out other different sections on the site they think they're trying to blast all of their bullets out on this highly sought after a piece of real estate versus maybe having a proper positioning statement or something. One thing that's very important. That's key to why someone should click. Through or why someone shown up on this particular website having one message and one brand image and go further than that I, would say that I'll numerate the reasons why you shouldn't have a slider on your homepage. The one that you mentioned is by far the most important our brains from an evolutionary perspective are designed to notice things moving in are visual field. It kind of has survival value. If you know what I mean here is coming to eat me I need to know what direction and how big is right So. they're they're an interrupt, their the nuclear option in the face of motion graphics won't get looked at and even in the face of graphics, text won't get read. So anything that's graphics or text on your site can't possibly compete with that atomic bomb of a slider on your homepage. And and another reason that really bad is because it's trying to pretend you have more real estate than you really do. So everybody wants a piece of the homepage and lurk. We can add another frame tour slider. Well Great. Thanks. So now have to sit through a longer commercial nobody likes to do that on broadcast TV. There's certainly don't have the attention span to sit through five three seconds sliders to make sure they saw every frame of the crap you're trying to throw them on your home page You don't really an editorial problem. You can't decide what's important. So you're trying to cram it all in there and make everybody happy except your site visitors that are trying to give you money,

TIM Tim Ashe Tim Today Entrepreneur Magazine San Diego Veer Steve Forbes Siemens Google Co Founder Nestle Facebook CEO American Express
Siemens Healthineers to Buy Varian Medical for $16.4 Billion

Fox News Sunday

00:23 sec | 1 year ago

Siemens Healthineers to Buy Varian Medical for $16.4 Billion

"Health and years agreed to to buy buy Varian Varian Medical Medical systems systems for for about about $16.4 $16.4 billion billion in in cash cash and and the the biggest biggest medical medical acquisition acquisition of of the the year. year. Seaman's. Seaman's. The The German German Medical Medical technology technology company company offered offered 1 1 77 77 50 50 a share for very in which is 24% more than variants closing price of 1 40 to 72 on Friday. The deal would give health and years a sizable market share in the rapidly growing field of cancer treatment. Some

Varian Varian Medical Medical The German German Medical Medi Seaman
Siemens Healthineers to acquire Varian Medical Systems Inc for $16.4 billion

Bloomberg Radio New York Show

00:23 sec | 1 year ago

Siemens Healthineers to acquire Varian Medical Systems Inc for $16.4 billion

"Years agreed to buy Varian Medical Systems for about $16.4 billion in cash. It's the biggest medical acquisition of the year. Seaman's. The German Medical technology company offered 1 77 50 a share for Varian, which is 24% more than variance closing price of 1 40 to 72 on Friday. The deal would give health and years a sizable market share in the rapidly growing field of cancer treatment. Friday

Varian Medical Systems Varian German Medical Seaman
Siemens allows 'mobile working' permanently for many workers

Mornings on the Mall with Brian Wilson

00:17 sec | 1 year ago

Siemens allows 'mobile working' permanently for many workers

"Conglomerate. Siemens says it plans to allow more than 100,000 of its employees to work away from the office for two or three days a week on a permanent basis. Company says the Corona virus crisis has shown that working independently offers many advantages and his possible on a much wider scale than originally thought

Siemens
"siemens" Discussed on Pod 4 Good

Pod 4 Good

01:31 min | 1 year ago

"siemens" Discussed on Pod 4 Good

Siemens says profits down, this quarter could be the bottom

Bloomberg Daybreak: Europe

02:45 min | 1 year ago

Siemens says profits down, this quarter could be the bottom

"Now to earnings and Siemens a script is fully a full custom softer Europe's largest engineering company saw profits single divisions second quarter adjusted a bit from its industrial businesses fell eighteen percent of the seo checker is a spoke to Bloomberg's and it would serve you and said he expects to see the bottom of the downturn this quarter take a listen I'm not happy to see that the market is responding well to what they have been saying the oldest leave Siemens has been very early in restructuring the company could have a civilian portfolio be it healthcare beating Dustin automation and also the actions we have been taken on the energy side the right on plan with our spin off of the Siemens energy business so we will have by that time we would have a very very beautiful because company portfolio so I think that's what you're looking at and of course the times are turbulent into complicated and very hard to deal with because there's so much uncertainty from other partners scenarios but the fact of the matter is there will be a time after court or not and that's also the time to look at to get prepared for the upswing and how we can benefit from that in in a proper way and I always say to my peoples the night the starkest before dawn so think about the future too without neglecting what needs to be done now at the very values CV or double crisis yes some comforting words I'm sure it says the balance sheets and how you prepare the balance sheet for this crisis as and then Joe you've recently secured another three billion euros in credit lines do you have concerns around the Quincy no we don't really though and I mean the you know cash is not endless obviously so we are mindful about cash position to but you have a very experienced very strong CFO who holds things together email as you know we have had about eighty M. Italy February in twenty twenty to be paid out the dividend of C. ninety euro per share which was up ten cents from the prior year the Soviet we are done with apple and buys September by end of September we will putting that the Siemens energy assets to the market as a spin off that means this is a dividend in kind of material science so that means that there will be a shareholder value associated with that tool for fiscal twenty twenty on the equity side this is true we did secure a three billion loan but that loan actually he's supposed to transfer to the Siemens energy assets so that well financed and built you know the good position for a successful start into

Siemens Europe Bloomberg Dustin Automation JOE Quincy CFO Apple
The Third Wave of Robotic Learning with Ken Goldberg

This Week in Machine Learning & AI

09:37 min | 1 year ago

The Third Wave of Robotic Learning with Ken Goldberg

"All right everyone. I am on the line with Ken. Goldberg can is a professor of engineering at UC Berkeley. Ken Welcome to the TWAT podcast. Thank you pleasure to be here. It is great to finally get you on this show. We've been talking about this for a bit. You know I meant to ask you before we started last time you were. You mentioned you. Were working on a book. Maybe we'll get remembering that right. Well I think I'M I. I've been thinking about that for a while but I'm also thinking about an more right now an article. Okay okay. Well we'll We'll get to the article. I think I I came across you and some of your work in the context of decks net. I saw that at a Siemens Innovation Fair last year. I think we exchanged tweets and stuff like that. But you know I would really love for you to introduce yourself to the audience and share a little bit about your background and how you came into working in robotics and okay great. I well first since you mentioned twitter I should mention my twitter handle which is at Ken. Underscore Goldberg. And I've been trained very well. My daughter to post there at least one today so I've got the actually. I found it very interesting channel so so I am posting technical things as well as updates about things that are that are finding out which is the learning about which I find very useful. So my background is that I was. I went to University of Pennsylvania and then went to Carnegie Mellon for I was at USC for four years and then to Berkeley where I've been for now twenty five years for here. I RUN A lab. The we we call it the auto lab for Automation Science and Engineering and we have approximately thirty students doing research in there. And we're doing work. There's there's there's post graduate students and a good number of undergrads and we're also associated with other labs like the Berkeley Research Lab and the rise lab and citrus and other programs at Berkeley our particular labs interested in in in doing research on on robotics basically on algorithm ick approaches to robotics and specifically in last year's been focusing on learning methods for for imitation learning deep learning and reinforcement learning for control of robots in applications from grasping as you mentioned which is a primary want working on for for thirty five years to surgery surgical assistance Hugh assisting human surgeons for for robotics and home robots to especially for seniors and in who are who are who prefer to live at home and the last year is very new and we can talk about later is is agriculture and we have a new approach to poly culture farming that were exploring using deep learning so one thing that I thought was really interesting in looking at your bio is in spite of the fact that you are a highly accomplished robot assists you start your your body starts with Ken. Goldberg is an artist so art clearly must be very important to. You actually saw some sketches behind. You am curious. I'm curious about Ken as an artist. And you know how if all ties into your work. It's not the usual fare of this podcast but then I saw somewhere else. You are filmmaker as well Is that your art? Tell US okay. Well actually I wanted to be an artist when I was a kid and I I basically my mother said listen. You can be an artist after you become an engineer. So She she. She was very wise and I think it was. It was it was a good choice for me because actually love both art. Something that I take very seriously. I think it's often underrated by many people especially Engineers who think of it as as lightweight. It's actually just opposite trying to produce something that's meaningful in the art. World is extremely difficult and demanding. So I've spent a lot of time studying I have made a series of installations and projects. That almost always involve technology in some way. But they're also commenting on the role of technology in society. So probably best known pieces of project is a project called Tele Garden that my students and I set up in the very early very early years of the Internet. So it's nineteen ninety five that we we connected a industrial robot arm to the web interface at the time which was mosaic Browser and we built an interface. That would allow you from your screen from anywhere from your laptop There were no cellphones at the time. But you could. You could log in this thing I think. Yeah it was very fun project. We thought well. It's kind of curious. who would use it if anyone and we got thousands of people coming in and and moving the robot but the part of what was made. An artwork was the context because it was sitting inside a garden. A real physical gardens. We could plant in water seeds remotely and then we got tens of thousands and we estimate that over the time that product was was that robot was available online which is approximately nine years. It was visited over. Hundred thousand people participated in the in the project. That's awesome that's awesome again kind of the technology and are coming together rate. So that was the thing Sam because one of the ideas were said I. I don't think I would have pursued that if I just stuck with my research plans at the time but because this came out and offered a way to reach a at the time when I saw as potentially very broad audience I started putting effort into this then there was a fantastic team of students who worked on it. And then we are thrilled with the the idea that you could take a robot and you could put it into the hands essentially of potentially millions of people and then there were. There was a proof of concept the interface questions there it turned out that there were lots of interesting theoretical questions that came out of that so after that project we did a series of subsequent projects and then had an NSF grant to develop versions of this. We have a patent related to the south. Yeah it really grew into a whole new direction of research that that really started with our awesome awesome into tell us a little bit about your research interests nowadays more broadly. So we're still doing art and I can come back to that. There's a new contract. But the the the lab right now is been been very very focused on robot learning and especially as as I know your. Your listeners are very aware there's been huge revolution in the past decade. And so we've been. We're interested in this before the the advanced in deep learning started but now it really has become a huge focus for us so in particular. We have this been working robot grasping for many years and then went deep. Learning came out. We saw an opportunity to apply it. I can tell you that story if you if you like how we do it. Maybe start from the perspective of the grounding on the challenges associated with grasping like we see these pictures of whether they're rohbock robot hands or more industrial types of robots or prostheses. And you know a can grasp like we've seen we've all seen pictures of that but maybe it's harder than it looks or you know maybe the opportunities that have not figured out. Oh good okay so I can. I can answer that partly. I've realized only last few years that part of the reason I believe I went into this field was at myself as a kid was was incredibly clumsy. I still I still am. Anyone would throw me a ball I would drop it and so You know the last kid getting picked for any sports Games or anything like that and it was just Ed. I think that may unconsciously made me interested in in trying to figure this thing out like how. How do you grasp things and many years? Later when I was in Undergraduate I joined a laboratory of the University of Pennsylvania and they were studying various aspects of tactile sensing and I built a very simple hand with another student and we started really exploring this question. Of How do you grasp things? And it is fundamentally difficult for robots like to say that robots remain incredibly clumsy today. They're much better than they were but industrial arms. If you give them novel objects there will drop them with a fairly high frequency and this is a problem because we really want is want You WANNA be able to pick up anything that's put in front of you and the application the big application that's growing enormous right now is e commerce so you wanna be able to take objects every orders different so you wanna take things from bins and pack them. Lift them out of the band. Grasp and put them into boxes or bags for shipment and that turns out to be a bottleneck right now for robotics

Ken Welcome Goldberg Berkeley Automation Science And Enginee Berkeley Research Lab Uc Berkeley University Of Pennsylvania Professor Of Engineering Siemens Innovation Fair Carnegie Mellon Tele Garden Engineer NSF SAM USC Hugh
William Shatner awarded horse semen in his divorce settlement

Jason and Alexis

00:57 sec | 1 year ago

William Shatner awarded horse semen in his divorce settlement

"William Shatner and his ex wife Elisabeth they have divorced now they've settled their divorce they do horse breeding and in the divorce settlement I'm sure TMZ looked all this up he is keeping the horse breeding equipment including quote all for Siemens well hold on to that I'm sure it's like thoroughbred horses that Arnold yeah really expensive valuable it is super valuable for Siemens yeah because every have you ever met him no I met him yes is he is weird as he seems yeah he's got a call in just a month ago okay he's got this new show on the history channel on Saturday nights and I've heard him being interviewed and he's a weird dude yeah I need to he turns it on and it's loud and but yeah he's got a lot of the other things

William Shatner Elisabeth Siemens Arnold
Jackie's Coming Out Story

Coming Out Stories

10:59 min | 1 year ago

Jackie's Coming Out Story

"Out for. The swearing comes Jackie. Haiku poet Comedian Anthony. To Mak- she grew up in skelmersdale in northwest England. I'm just white hair about her. First sheltered crushes. I think she's the first person that's ever taught me about being attracted to an object couple of into this. Well I always take the bisexual box literally but the small size ends than that isn't the I like. The word Queer is on fire with an lots waves produced Survive Queen just meaning like fucking things off like an assault of of quite like you know doing it wrong for any sort of purposeful goods. Why saw linked to and GAL rank had to go wrong. Even crepe wrong lights disabled wrong so that people can say me so got one leg and so I- folk that applied instead of being like the. Oh God of Gotland Lego. Pull me or you know whatever light the thing that people expect to be as I do like stump poetry. An you'd like you know you've got to get a celebrity is obviously so it's like things to fuck shit open. A really goes. Why THEM OPENLY SURF expectation? So that's your favorite subject to them. Basically yeah yes. That's what it's called like. Calm Yourself Queer. Because that's what I'm about ways so alike but then when you say queer people like what does she really mean. What's the real sexuality as if it's an umbrella term that means nothing? I don't think that I love it so then you like you're right. Yeah you just want to know. What jets wholesome into his own? Yeah so I mean some yeah. Yeah so all of them all of them and then as problem as advice actual isn't words now. It's the the problem of sexual I mean. A lot of people now are saying Pan Sexual as opposed to vice may be in the past. Marta said bisexual this big shift. Isn't that the problem with bisexual? So people again and a couple of ood might people's on from scam in Wigan listen cone means like he got he got gangrene loving bisexual because of buy into so people like that means that you only like men and women. I'm by taming. You hate transpeople. Or You are an unseen. Non Binary so. That's absolute bollocks. You know historically bisexual people of been translated some advice on use of limited space. It's not like Oh you're bisexual you've got twice. The amount of exceptions gay people hate you straight people here generally people just keep the fucking down which at some yes so historically. It's like being bisexual rights. I don't care about being accepted by any of the group of people Which is true as well of being non binary and Trans and you know occupying all. I'm spices song. Yes was bullshit just because just because the prefix by means ten means that people can really like so fixate on the Ron and going Oh do you know what this represents people and people more complicated than that? By definition you probably would identify as being panned. But you'll just quite happy using by sexual stuff is just like the underdog. I just wanted to defend the word bisexual. Rarely saw stay with it and also I just saw a fought for inside and outside to me. That's because it's you're yourself as well an fought for it for so long about. Just give it all you know so. We'll just fight the case for because there's a lot of sex was out there but the core find not enough people put their head over the parapet and go. Yes me. I'm bisexual. Well exactly. Yeah and especially when you've got a platform if you perform in some sense because you don't know that she giovanna you're gonNA pay the rent Matassa if you like. Oh Yeah Bisexual and the streets you folks on what Stacey Wipe People's so it was sort of come to the conclusion that you were by social what was like my first crush was multiple. Was on tremendously Sasi. Yeah like h three with multiple. I was very very politically correct when it was on the way. Multiple glomma model lovable and Rambo. Rambos Rob Rumba Joe Jr so take like Kinsey. You know it was the people you love some crushing Mongo. I'm moms what you call this. Big Massive St that Intel from the way of Santana big massive tape Zack. Were get so plus plus two. What about the guests that was in there with the group? I was as a Christian Catholic blaster as well. Okay well. This is moving into a whole news. Fair inanimate objects as well well you'll stay. There was just so didn't have any I mean. I think I haven't changed that much since I've lived like quite hard life but in another way quite charmed life because of never rarely socialized. I've never had an office job. I add my parents who great I was never really told off. Fancying ghetto blaster. So we're never stops at quick fair enough check. And you're the first person that's come out. Mister trump's object today like you. I didn't know that you sexually with age child. You wouldn't really so. When was the first time you sort of articulated that and said maybe to your family or someone that union Joran advance and Brooke signs and at been getting the balls up phrases. Well I should suppose that was some some of whom Ananta parents and it didn't say to them moms odds I'm bisexual because it sounds to sexual you know like even just saying the words something sexual Siemens feels embarrassing society as well. He's just embarrassed. The rivalry so aside at the the girl saying I'm not my friends. That's my girlfriends. Go thirteen year. But she wasn't she didn't really like me. That's why USC skips over at nine nine thousand virus so you were having a relationship with not just it was you liked to. I live in a world of delusion. It's like even citizens vets-go angle most the most the reality of this because one year reis from performing you re rice life the narratives in your own life because you use it using the angle. What really happened so at thirteen? There was a girl at school. Presumably that you liked. Did you tell her that you know I was studying like everyone I think is? Is that my sexuality? Always been like a won't the elicit thing on the saying I'm not meant today once a Catholic school. So maybe that's so you're not meant to go out with women but then once so as like very established in the lesbian community. It's like Oh you're allowed to go out with women now. So that's not fun anymore for how Lesbians Hate is shackled men. Let's go to that and then once it was like Oh Giannis just bisexual or okay. So now I'm allowed to Shag out everyone on so where to go. Now so did you. Really get flack from les pins than for food. Let me yeah. Yeah Yeah I was angry. Sort of twenty something. You get more people on the late. I didn't see you face. Those quad knock ECOWAS land. I wasn't this wonderful chairman. Of course you got loads of like bi phobia. I go threatened and stuff life performance pride and do stuff about bisexuality and go like threatens and the Beer Garden say threatens me and you know when you think Oh my God. I'm going to get my kicks usually annoyance and like some people get an annoys for being in Chris Vices or existence in general and then you got like straight people alike. Think just think that it means the Kinky and you WanNa go fronts while I watch so. Why is it so difficult for people to comprehend? I've never really understood. It's just proud. People love binary is learning. People are obsessed with like extremes. The idea that the world's and people are just very gray area and everything's fluid scares the shit our people because humans needs the categorize things like pick a solid any side. Exactly you feel miserable. Yeah it's just don't give a Shit. Choose one very very similar to the football analogy. Yeah it's interesting. I know why phobia exists. I've certainly dated a lot bisexual. Men over the years and a half off lesbian friends. Turn around and go Emma. Why are you bothering? Yeah and the assumption is. They'll never commit to you. Because in the end of the day they will go up and find him on these sump. Shen and then I guess in straight world. The assumption is for men that you're going to go off and leave them for women so you can just want you have kinky sacks. Yeah yeah difficult so you haven't told me yet. The conversation over brookside. What happened to be here for us? So let's go back in time and they were just like okay. It wasn't a difficult kid but I was fucking whimsical. You know thought could fly. It was a more lowest much so they were just like okay okay. I think they saw us. It was a phase but because it was a faizy kid not because they were pricks. And you said you couldn't say reverse bisexual. So how did he phrase it? What did he say? I sat this girl. I such as my girlfriend but then you start talking about what she really Alfred portion on you have to keep coming out so it was. It was years I was being bisexual. I would say it was bisexual swell the people and then Owens University and I was so excited about joining and it was just the algae bay then feel old. I was so excited about being around people and then I got there and it was like Oh okay. You know survival instincts that sends us and you like folk. I should say. Espn so then. There was a lesbian to try. And Fa these people are whenever fest with anyway so it was more of a class thing than a sexual thing but anyway he didn't think that except you. You said that you were born. Not Definitely

Assault Skelmersdale Jackie Anthony MAK Siemens Northwest England Ecowas Marta Wigan Mister Trump Espn Stacey RON Rob Rumba Joe Jr Owens University Chairman Beer Garden Chris Vices USC
'Dark Towers' Chases Scandal-Ridden Institution Deutsche Bank

The Book Review

08:10 min | 1 year ago

'Dark Towers' Chases Scandal-Ridden Institution Deutsche Bank

"David ensor joins us now. His new book is called Dark Towers. Deutsche Bank Donald Trump an epic tale of destruction it debuts this week at number two on the New York Times bestseller list and I also have to disclose that. David is my cousin in law and he eats all the pie Thanksgiving about his nonetheless. Welcome here on the PODCAST. Lobo I didn't know what you're going to get that person quickly. Yeah important. Why people to know Dave? Thanks for being here. That's revenue so we're not GonNa talk about that crime. We're GONNA talk about some other ones. This is a book about deutchebanks. Started off with reporting that you did beginning around two thousand fourteen. I was in London working at the time of the Wall Street Journal and I'd already been kind of obsessing about Deutsche Bank. Ps This is you know. One of the biggest banks in the world one of the most troubled institutions and involved is either at or near the center of just about every financial scandal under the Sun and then in January twenty fourteen one of the most senior executives at the bank and kind of the right hand man to the CEO at the time was found hanging in his apartment in lended. Who is he his name is? Bill Broke Smith and he was a guy who had worked at the bank on and off for almost twenty years and he had he was an expert in risk management in an expert in derivatives and he but more important he was the guy who turned to as kind of the ethical compass of the bank he was. He was known informally as the conscience of the place. He was someone who could say no. He was pretty conservative and he was not quite as hungry for short-term profits as most of his colleagues were and it's something that happened at the bank immediately precede his suicide and did he leave a suicide note like do. We know that this was tied to his work. Well I mean it's really hard and I think probably dangerous to try to make in light statement about why someone does something like this but he did leave a bunch of suicide notes including one to with his longtime colleague onto Jane who at the time was the CO CEO of the Bank. And so one thing that became clear over the years a report and I did and working to talk to his many friends and family members and former colleagues as I could was that. There's no doubt that at the time of his death. Deutsche Bank was very much on his mind in someone he knew his on his mind in a not in a good way he was very upset about some of the things that had transpired while he was there are before we get into some of the things that that he personally saw during the I guess the Early Twenty First Century you say that as of two thousand fourteen it was well established that Deutsche Bank was kind of troubled scandal-ridden institution I mean. How far does that date back? Well the bank is one hundred fifty years old this year. Happy Birthday Deutsche Bank and for the first several decades of its existence. This is just a pretty provincial. German and European lender helping big industrial companies like Siemens spread their wings internationally. But when the Nazis came to power in Germany in the thirties Deutsche Bank became a central part of their attempt to take over the world and this is not attempt to take the Nazi attempted takeover. Was that different from what other German banking institutions did. At the time Deutsche Bank was by far the biggest German bank. A lot of German companies to survive did what it took to arrive in that area which was helping the Nazis. But there's been an attempt by the bank and some historians I think in recent decades to kind of sanitize that basic fact by saying well. Everyone was doing it and that was just the way the world works and we can look back at this period now and say that Deutsche Bank was party to genocide. Wow most people who don't work in finance and don't report on finance look at these banks. They all kind of seem interchangeable and interchangeably bad. That every one of them or many of them have had one terrible scandal or another or many in recent years is a bank especially at I mean. Is there something about its culture? There are a lot of things that make it a specially bad. I mean first of all wallets true that just about every bank under the Sun has been attached to one or more financial scandals over the years. Don't you think really has been involved in a disproportionate number and it's faced disproportionate penalties. As a result of that you can look at that in terms of the number of criminal charges. The bank has faced around the world or the amount in fines that it's racked up the to me. The better measure of its destructive capacity is the havoc wreaked around the world. And you can really look in. Probably almost every continent of the world in see some major in pretty pretty bad scandal to the bank was involved with the cause real harm whether it's destroying companies or really messing up economies or being involved in major bribery or corruption scandals laundering money violating sanctions. Deutsche Bank is blamed by the families of some American soldiers for their deaths in Iraq because the bank was illegally funding Iranian terrorists. So you can say that about some things but you can't say about every bank that every single scandal comes right back to their doorstep in that unfortunately is the case. Allow the time with deutchebanks one of the things that differentiates Deutsche Bank for many other banks is that there is no villain at the top. They have no. Ceo Unlike many other banks is that part of the problem that there isn't one person who has held accountable. Well it actually used to be that way these days for the past fifteen years or so they have had a CEO. In fact you can trace the banks last series of problems going back to the mid two thousand to the decision to place increasing power in this unitary see It's gotten worse when they've had someone. Yeah although it got worse under Joe Ackerman who is the longtime CEO from two thousand to two thousand twelve. And he was the one who converted the organizational structure of the bank from being this kind of collaborative committee led approach to being one where there's an American style. Ceo At the top of the bank and Ackerman very shortly upon arriving as CEO of the bank made a very fateful decision which was that he decided that within a very short period of time a couple of years deutchebanks prophets needed to go up about five hundred percent and looking backwards. It doesn't seem that surprise and the consequences that followed that at the time. This marked a really transformational change within the bank. And it went from being an institution that looked around and kind of saw itself as serving multiple constituencies whether shareholders or customers employees or the communities. In which an operator and it went from doing that to having a single minded focus and obsession on maximising short-term profits basically consequences. Be Damned and when you talk about the recent crimes of DEUTCHEBANKS and we're not even getting to Donald Trump who is in your subtitle him later. Did most of those things manipulating markets helping terrorists regimes defrauding regulators. Did most of this take place during that two thousand and two to two thousand twelve period when he was the CEO will the got started. Then and that was Ackerman's decision to prioritize short-term profits above all else was the catalyst for all sorts of bad behavior within the bank and it wasn't just the people were rushing to make money at any cost and although they were doing that it was also that the bank at that moment because it was so obsessed with meeting quarterly profit targets. It stopped investing in things that cost money. For example they stop investing in technology. And so the banks internal computer systems became just this. Archaic jumbled mess and that sounds kind of technical and maybe not that important but the reality is immense that Deutsche Bank. If you if you were asked to say Deutsche Bank what how much money have you lent to say Russia? There's no easy way to answer that you can just type it into a computer. None of these computer systems are talking to each other. And that's a pretty scary thing for bank. And they also completely failed to invest in compliance an anti money laundering staff. And because those are things that cost money they're not going to produce revenue and in fact they they do the opposite prison revenue. They take away revenue as their job. If they're doing it properly is to say no to potentially problematic and potentially very lucrative transactions this focus on quarterly profits and profit above all else. Is that very different from what other banks were doing. During this period Deutsche Bank went from

Deutsche Bank CEO Birthday Deutsche Bank Donald Trump Joe Ackerman Nazis David Ensor Co Ceo Dark Towers Lobo New York Times Dave Siemens London Bill Broke Smith Wall Street Journal Bribery
"siemens" Discussed on Conversations with Dez

Conversations with Dez

10:32 min | 1 year ago

"siemens" Discussed on Conversations with Dez

"Had some help from from from computers and technology and everything to help them make an informed decision or the right decision or or or better decision? And that's where I think again. This digitalization is really going to help them there. And then I think you know the point is that it's really it's really heterogeneous. I think there's there's going to be data and information coming from all sorts of areas here and you've got to have kind of this ubiquitous this platform this ecosystem to be able to consume all these different different a data repositories these different sources of data. So they can feed that feedback clinician with the right information and this is where again we need to have. Great Technology partners that are connecting facilitate that. They're flexible enough to be able to pull that information from the different areas. And then you have these great clinical algorithms that CNN actually leverage all that data and then and then make the right decision for for for the patient. Indeed Industry you here. We have a thing called the flying Doctor Service because the sixth largest piece of dirt on the planet. Twenty five million people where we're quite well spread out and so often. People live on farms remote areas or country towns. Where there just isn't a doctor and we have to fly the pick them up and bring him back to the city's imagine this is now going to kind of shrink the world and create the small village mentality that whole world is connected and digital anyway can bring these skills one of the things. I was fascinated about with and I thought about the relationship. You've you've formed now where you're working so closely with Intel is. Is it fair to say that? Now you've got the to kind of open the door in the same well. Siemens and Siemens health and he has had a whole range of challenges that you've put interests it help us solve these. Imagine now you kind of ask them well. What else haven't we thought token sort of Wilkins they will. Have you considered this? So have you seen this technology just built this? Imagine now you can flip the coin in that you've gone to challenges and they've helped you solve them and you've got democracy early probably done it at a fraction of the cost if you had to build yourself self but now. I imagine you'll kind of asking them. What other things can you do to help us differentiate? Yeah absolutely I mean. It really is here as as we talked about earlier. Health healthcare is playing a little bit of catch-up relates to technology here. So we're we're now kind of embracing and trying to figure out how we can leverage all these technological advances topic click ai and whatnot but again from from Intel's perspective and in other in other disciplines you know. Technology has been used quite prevalent through throughout other industries here. So we're we're we're turning to our partners in Intel and saying you know. Hey where where? Some other places that we can apply. Apply your great technology towards in the healthcare space. And you talked about earlier. Does you know about about reaching remote patients and cannot remote areas of the country. Or How do you get? How do you get clinical specialty? Special specialist to those areas. I mean with with the help it Intel. We're now we're now actually putting together solutions where we can. We can remotely operate some of our imaging equipment or some of our. You know therapy procedure equipment off from a remote location so being able to kind of say you know. That patient doesn't have to be flown into the big city to have that procedure of that exam done. Let's let's let them go to this the community hospital and then we'll have our specialist doctor who's who. Who is you know? Who's the expert there being able to remotely controlled control the The scanner or remotely troll the therapy device there and again this is. He's our visa great concepts that that I think Siemens when necessarily thought on their own. And you know what the Hell intone insult? Kind of saying look in in other industries you know kind of remote access. Computing Industries is norm. You know you can actually apply that into the healthcare space and we've got the technology that enables that you know it's it's fun. Great conversations happier that actually turned into something You know again beneficial for the patient. Indeed I mean I'm studying thinking about what we've been doing. Vpn technology forever email web browsing? Why could we use that With with Intel's VPN secure encrypted technology just to get data across from from remote site to special still multiples. But also what doing chip level around things like mobile devices an in Car Technology. Now make it health related. I wonder if we could maybe wrap up with one last thing. I liked to US my guests to do and that is that when we think about all the things you've done here and congratulations on an amazing success stories. They found with seem as healthy as I think. It's an exciting concept to my mind is kind of like a stop legacy in many ways and that we still fintech within banks. We saw all these other spaces Piven applies digital thinking to legacy environments. I think it's an a phenomenal success. Story the the pot and got into bed with Intel and and looked at leveraging strings particularly leveraging. What until does the so broadened deepen every space. If I was to ask you one last question. I'd love to hand Your Crystal Ball. A virtual crystal say could you guys into this and just for a moment ponder where we are now twenty twenty if we wouldn't look at an x three to five years. I mean it's a very big fundamental shifts around mobility and enterprise mobility something in traditional enterprise. Space I can see this coming into health. I can see all the things. You're working around with remote imaging an onsite imaging processing. I can imagine that as you said before. If you've got something where a machine learning model is being applied to particular thing with ten fifteen someone might say. Well I WANNA run a thousand years with analysis on this. We'll just stand up a thousand cores in the cloud bound by Intel. And see what happens. It's going to cost six dollars. I would say yes do that. But advise the DP decision whether it's with your vice president of business development at digital health healthy or not in the next three to five years. What are some of the big trends you think are gonNA come out around? What's possible how we're gonNA see things pivot because one of the things I'd love to do is give people come a couple of takeaway thoughts that they can then look at actioning You know do they have a great strategy in place said they got the right skill sets has HR department thought about this. Imagine given the year literally the bleeding edge. You a better position than almost anyone I've met for a while on the planet was sort of think about what's coming horizon. And what should people be thinking about? Yeah I mean I you know for for me personally I you know I see I see a big push especially in the healthcare space around personalized medicine. We touched on it a little bit here with with some of the solutions that we're working on it. Siemens but but I think again this concept of a personalized medicine. So it's not only finding kind of the right diagnosis and Whatnot. But it's also getting trying to create that personalized therapy plan. That's really optimized for for the individual here so stabbed like platforms that again really ingesting. Large amounts of data to be able to kind of figure out almost create. Kind of almost. Like a bit of of of you're me right there this digital twin concept that we talked about earlier. But but the whole reason why there's this concept the digital twenty and everything is because we're we're trying to push towards the concept of personalized medicine. So wouldn't it be great if I have a twin of Dez that I could actually then try out different different therapies to see which one is the most effective to declare the ailment that you have but in order to do that from a practical standpoint. It's going to require a lot amount and data and that data has to be really in kind of a discreet or curated form and what I mean by. That is kind of being A. It's gotta be in a form where we could extract that information and do something with it and I think that's a challenge rate that we have today from a practical sense with with all these new emerging technologies especially in healthcare as they're relying a lot on on on data but data may not actually be in that discreet or curated. Form that these algorithms and everything need you know. They might be just kind of buried. Might be just kind of like a scion of of of a patient history. You know that or a photo or something of that sort and and what we really want to do is trying to pull out all those different data elements and make them kind of discreet in interior basically finding meaning behind all that all that all that data so one of the one of the things that that practically needs to be done today is kind of making sure that data becomes an accessible in easily able to index and search and be able to pull out all the right pieces of information and arguably especially healthcare. A lot of that data is is not in that form today. You know a lot of providers say oh. Yeah we've accumulated history of ten twenty years worth of data. Whatever but you know if those those pieces of data again are just scans of a paper there. You're going to be difficult to to pull out what that clinical meaning is so so I think what what can be done right now is really kind of you know making the data accessible and preparing the information so that we can feed some of these new technologies in the future. This is this is something that's going to be a big challenge but something that If if done correctly then you can leverage all these great these great new and emerging technologies. That are happening today. Indeed and I had a startup of my own years ago where we were doing digital transmissions for healthcare environments. Bigly age care and I'd horror scenario around what you're just talking about with the protection data. Where an H? Person had to get their records and IT TURNS OUT. It wasn't in a cardboard box in a in a compactness storage space in the building. It was in a forty foot shipping container behind the healthcare center and had rained and everything in there. Turner Pep couldn't get the person's record so they had to go through all the scans and all tests again even though they didn't charge him a second time. Just the pain the drama. But I had this mental picture when you're talking about digital twins eventually having seem insulting year Intel palled Tamagotchi of myself. Which which I look forward to. I can't wait to download. Install the temperature of diz and track myself in keeping myself to make sure I'm healthy. Peter's has been absolutely fantastic spin and now with you thank you so much.

Intel Siemens CNN flying Doctor Service US Wilkins Computing Industries Turner Pep Piven vice president of business dev Peter Dez
What's Next for Bombardier?

Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

05:22 min | 1 year ago

What's Next for Bombardier?

"It's been a big month not just for Birdie but for business aviation in general. By months I mean. Basically since January sixteenth until February seventeenth. There was all kinds of speculation. About what bombard he was GONNA do. Because January sixteenth. They came out with a warning to Wall Street and they said first of all our twenty one thousand nine financial results are going to be so great. But that's not the biggest news. The biggest news is we're going to do something to our business portfolio. We just don't know yet and that got everybody going. As to what the possibilities or in the possibilities were bombarded currently exists with two divisions a business aviation division and in bigger train related division of trade related they make everything from actual trains to signaling products that go along with the railway system and so turned out. They were shopping. Both of them out to see which one could get the better deal and on February thirteenth. We heard the actual financial results for the year. And they of course. We're not as great as once hoped but more importantly what the. Marta announced that it was selling the rest of it. Eight to twenty stake to Airbus the eight to twenty is the series that Bernier originally developed and they were going to sell this now. They're remaining speak. They'd already sold part of it. They're going to sell the remaining of it for about five hundred fifty million dollars in cash and what that means is Airbus gets to walk away with the whole former C. series. Now the eight to twenty is entirely in its control and then four days later on February seventeen bombard. Ea announced it had reached a deal to sell its train. Division notice bombarded transportation to also come of France also is one of the two big train makers based in Europe Siemens being the other one and long story short. They're going to sell this for. They're going to sell the training division for up to four and a half billion dollars which does sound like a lot of money but then again you're talking about businesses that have more than fourteen billion dollars backlog or annual work and so it's it was a pretty much a fair deal all around and for Bardy what it does is it brings a desperately needed money. That bombarda was running out of Because it has a major debt payment next year and had to make the more importantly it had this huge debt pile of more than nine billion dollars that it faced with no real great business plan to help to pay it off now to getting out of the train business. And it's getting out of eight to twenty. It's going to be business aviation only and it's GonNa have half the that it used to have. So what does that mean for bombarding going forward? Let's say some big space so this money going trump's ideas trouble having trouble wild -veloping because he went way over. Budget and and Airbus Boeing basically were playing competitive games so they couldn't get a huge hole so they brought in a new CEO about Bellemare and they launched a five year plan and they've been sort of on that plan selling everything everything. They've acquired over the last three decades. They've been selling off to judge as part of this plan. How quick can you name them? All CR J sold off candidates. They've sold off the Canada's down view PLA. They've sold off. Sra Damn Cameras Downfield. They've sold of Canada. They sold off the would bomb. They sold off the out. J. Them Nestled on twenty with pupils. One hundred hundred let themselves with the business championships. Actually with you. Get back to nine hundred eighty six. I started when the quad candidate. And they're still making the challenge but anyway southern this strategy this five year turnaround plan and the idea was by the end of twenty twenty. They would have they'd be you know they'd be back into having SPEC CASH. They could use to pay down the debt right. So we're all tracking along this way. And of course the rail business going to ride together just contractual delivery troubles so they have all of a sudden at twenty twenty figgers way. Wonky and it was so fun to read the Michael Story because the apple is so McCall was saying he segment strategy. This is not strategy. Ain't just has been almost fire sale. Just keep so to say that. I've been thinking about this philosophy days sadly I've been thinking this philosophy and it's like watching a horror movie right. We have saved these. Don't go into that darkened room with taps which don't turn your back on the camera. Don't gain that car in the history of bodies don't stretch the J. develop a new airborne. Don't leave your regional airline customer base behind to develop an airliner. Don't try to yourself that you're not competing with the HIP Hustler. Unless you all of this thinking I really still don't WanNa get in that car bombarded. They are now very focused on business. Va Shin. But I'm this is not the end of the store.

Airbus Bombarda Canada Airbus Boeing Bardy Va Shin France Marta EA Bernier Donald Trump Europe Siemens CEO Bellemare Apple Mccall
"siemens" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

TalkRadio 630 KHOW

02:18 min | 1 year ago

"siemens" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

"Siemens coaching just because I can be such a dangerous game when you had all that emotion and that locks at Stanford which was a heartbreaker and any face a team that is so desperate that could be a real big trap game for any team on any level that's a classic trap game and they did they took care of business and what I like about the show a lot of persistence which sometimes you kind of see the roll up and down a little bit of that in that game really they kind of get their foot in the gas bill there it it never was I never feel threat right they they didn't feel like that when was ever that much let's take a listen and from Sunday are you PS next day air delivery the game out of here get a piece of top left hand inside of delivery of the game he is working with you learn more everybody game we picked out in the second quarter after her after the contest was big for a point guard who charter he was probably expecting at the beginning of the season but she did her job and then the team really gonna call the presents for them in the game is really a little physicians for the bus order I just encourage you to see his little had that a jury has really good reasonable spot to be in with the blaster job today you're kind of searching for was a lot right in those other guard position she received her being utilized a couple different ways now which is nice there are a lot I don't know she's learned in all these plays the position of no those two they had with their typical guard lined up right really I he has the thing yeah the.

Siemens
Climate Activists call on Siemens to review Australia coal project

AP 24 Hour News

00:35 sec | 1 year ago

Climate Activists call on Siemens to review Australia coal project

"Climate activists a staging rallies outside the offices of the German engineering firm Siemens over its involvement in a coal mine project in Australia the group from the days for future which is held weekly protests demanding action against climate change for more than a year won't Siemens to quit via Donnie mine project because emissions from coal fired power plants contribute to global warming Siemens chief executive is offered to meet with representatives of the group and said the company takes the activists concerns seriously he also said on Twitter last month that he would diligently look into

Australia Chief Executive Twitter Siemens
"siemens" Discussed on AP News

AP News

01:44 min | 1 year ago

"siemens" Discussed on AP News

"During the two days of negotiations in the Ethiopian capital Addis Ababa were around reaching agreements on technical issues related to the damn Ethiopia's building along the Nile which flows into see down in Egypt Egypt wants the damn to be filled more slowly in order to reduce the restriction on the flow of the Nile three weeks EBS which depends on the roof of the irrigation of its agriculture the Ethiopian minister disclosed that his country will none the less stop filling the dam in July of this year at the start of the country's rainy season the water and energy ministers from the three countries are now expected to meet in Washington DC on Monday to report on the progress they've made so far the US in the World Bank or observers to the talks climate activists a staging rallies outside the offices of the German engineering firm Siemens over its involvement in a coal mine project in Australia the group from the days for future which is held weekly protests demanding action against climate change for more than a year won't Siemens to quit via Donnie mine project because emissions from coal fired power plants contribute to global warming Siemens chief executive is offered to meet with representatives of the group and said the company takes the activists concerns seriously he also said on Twitter last month that he would diligently look into the matter the mass of brush fires in Australia have made a heavy impact on Kangaroo Island animal sanctuary in South Australia the AP's that Donna here reports and emergency triage area has been set up in the park so we don't have any sense of the allies well the Los Angeles a rescue or injured koalas kangaroos wallabies and wombats are being brought in park owner Sam Mitchell says fighting for these animals lives is overwhelming wealth.

chief executive Kangaroo Island Siemens Washington Sam Mitchell Los Angeles Donna South Australia Twitter Addis Ababa Australia World Bank US Egypt Nile Ethiopia
Greta Thunberg calls on Siemens to review Australia coal project

AP 24 Hour News

00:35 sec | 1 year ago

Greta Thunberg calls on Siemens to review Australia coal project

"Climate activists a staging rallies outside the offices of the German engineering firm Siemens over its involvement in a coal mine project in Australia the group from the days for future which is held weekly protests demanding action against climate change for more than a year won't Siemens to quit via Donnie mine project because emissions from coal fired power plants contribute to global warming Siemens chief executive is offered to meet with representatives of the group and said the company takes the activists concerns seriously he also said on Twitter last month that he would diligently look into

Australia Chief Executive Twitter Siemens
"siemens" Discussed on Green Connections Radio -  Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

Green Connections Radio - Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

14:05 min | 2 years ago

"siemens" Discussed on Green Connections Radio - Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

"I would like you to meet bonnie datta senior senior director regulatory affairs and market development for the americas in southeast asia at siemens. I met bonnie recently at an e._d._t._a. Form that's the electric electric drive transportation association talking about electric vehicle adoption the privilege sitting next to balmy actually a form bonnie focuses on the impact that state and federal legislation and regulations have on e. mobility. She also focuses on modernizing. The grid which we know is desperately needed and for increased security to maximize constantly evolving alternative energy technologies into shift the economy cleaner sources of power. She focuses focuses on selected international markets as well including southeast asia as her title reflects am delighted to say the bonnie joins us live today in washington in d._c. Hosting us in siemens conference room in washington d._c. Welcome connections radio bonnie and thank you for joining us. Thank you so much for having me. It's it's such a pleasure to be here with you. Dan welcome to siemens as you can see we have great viewed capital and the weather's pretty okay today too so let me start start with this. I'm gonna jump right in here. You focused on removing the barriers to electric vehicle adoption which assumes frankly that there is a big market for them. South since most of the population are not electric vehicle drivers. Give us your best pitch for an electric vehicle to buy one would like to save money <music>. Would you like to save the environment would do like to keep the planet intact for your next generation drive electric trick there you go. That's quick summary and you could do that at an advertisement couldn't you. Adoption is three legged stool. We need the vehicles. We need the infrastructure infrastructure and we need aggressive outreach to educate and train the market about these vehicles and how to drive them and how to charge them how to maintain them's actually some of the work that i did a chrysler chrysler. What do you think is holding back. Mass adoption the most well in a recent study about eighty seven percent of prospectivity two e._v. drivers lack of charging infrastructure which is chicken and egg situation so do we build a charging infrastructre thinking they visa comma. Should we wait the to come and then building infrastructure actually in my opinion. This probably probably reflects. Many of my peers who worked in this industry is that it is going to happen. It's a trend that's going to <unk> happened primarily pushed by kind of mandates. That's coming down from countries in europe. We've seen china coming with mandate so it's not so much that it is if it'll happen. It's a question of winner will happen. That's interesting. There's also a lot of incentives in the u._s. Electric vehicle tax credits etcetera and there are incentives to build the charging infrastructures as well and as as we know electrify america for example has to by virtue of their settlement with the government over the clean diesel thing what storage overlaps in there as well between between vehicles and infrastructure and to make this ecosystem work we need the utilities to do their part which is a bit of a heavy left right and then we need them to stay abreast rest of technologies and to be adaptable to the new energy sources what is holding utilities back from doing the best playing their role in in this in this ecosystem in one word regulators so limit kind of take you back to what we think is the broader issue so in europe or asia there are clear goals and mandates to reduce accused geagea mission and transport sector is now the biggest amador oxygen rain houseguests greenhouse gases. Yes yes so you should. I have a goal and i think many u._s. States have a goal to reduce rina's gas emission russian and in connection <hes> electrifying transport however just having a goal is gonna get you you need to we'll have a strategic road map on how to reach those goals and once you have that you need to have a policy framework that will say okay this. This is how it will work in the market if you well so what's the role of the ability weather stakeholders how's the financing zing models who can play and what role you need a framework that guides the regulatory context of you will so utilities have have no clear direction apart from being told that they are a monopoly and therefore they can only play a very restricted role and and everything they do has to be approved by their public utility commission absolutely on the regulated side of the business that can be based so our position is that the market where we find ourselves in the in the u._s. is being very restricted because the regulators have not defined defined clear policy framework and therefore it's been very at hawk utilities are making an application indovina czar countering that regulators are staying on the very narrow business model as opposed to diversifying the business model and not thinking about how do we protect attacked the investment. We're making public. Funds hubby protect the customer. That's making some of those investments. How do we educate the customer are so that they can avail of what we call smart chargers so that they can avail of avionic tariffs so i'll give an example exxon son minnesota surprising coming from minnesota people think doc about california but the coolest examples coming from minnesota they pronounce it may nassau committing sorry. I spent a lot of minnesota <unk> so what accent minnesota's doing is a subscription model so oh four seventeen dollars a month. They will provide a turnkey solution at a residential level fit you with the charger and <unk> salon you charge at off peak time it's seventy dollars only electric vehicles loaner vehicle and then they've just got approval as it so happens and by coincidence is going to be another seventeen dollars that the owner has to pay to charge their vay recall on a monthly basis again offbeat so as e._v. driver. You know that every month is gonna cost me thirty four l. dollars doronin e._v. and if i live in an expensive gas state like california. It's like one. I'm fifty dollars three hundred dollars for an is vehicle depending on how much i dr that math is very clear and who does want to save money and you're not even having to pay for the charger you are not you're just leasing and it's a great model to show how utility can play such watch a positive role in the adoption and animating the market truly which is what we want more and more regulators in every stayed aid to consider. It's not just about no we will restrict the to the to providing you know just one aspect of the value and everything else has to be rebate base. Is this whole rebate base which is such a waste of rape pay money and public money. It is unbelievable evil that it has carried on this long and we really focused seamen's really focused in educating legislators and regulators about the fact that you need to open up the market because otherwise you're not going to have fair competition among older players to drive down the cost of the end of it. That's all we're concerned about. We have to lower the cost of ownership for the customer. When i say customer the donor and we have to reduce your cost of ownership for the use of the driver just as the accent minnesota. It's a very very clear map so there's a ton to unpack in that one of the things i want to unpack about it. Is you talked about educating hitting the consumer the buyer and that's critical. You're putting it in the lap of the utilities. It sounds like but it's really everybody's job. It's the the automakers job. Electrify america for example has to educate that's part of their settlement with the government as well and the other charging station manufacturers do the same. It's really everybody's job to do that right. So where is the messaging getting lost lost in your pitch in the beginning. It was very simple. You made three points which are unassailable but people need convincing that the cost is lower. I mean i did lobby chrysler gillette on total cost of ownership comparing them for example what is missing in the sales pitcher in the communication nation to the end user. What do you think the public is not hearing or not. What's not getting across. There is not a consistent message. I will correct this to say that i don't believe is just the utilities role frankly if you ask me and this is my vision said this to many many stakeholders there's in the in the regulatory field or in the legislature is that every constituent of any jurisdiction should be able oh to go into the internet for hopefully they haven't access and type in zip code and say who their utility and they should have all the information asian hamad dealers of their which cars available. How can they get a panel set up in the house all the relevant information that the need to purchase compared chargers provide information on chargers so it's not just you know lead the utility do it. I'll give an example in california this spending spending hundreds and hundreds of millions of dollars in educating customer on electric always the few c- <hes> is is doing so. There's an organization on velos which is kind of entity. That's been set up by a few private and public entities. I think velez is doing some interesting work but the fact is i. I read a stat. The other day would said sixty per sixty seven percent of californians name a single easy so it's it's not about spending the money. It's about effective metrics. What are you trying to change. What is your method of communication and at the end of it. Are you measuring. Whether what you're doing is effective well. It's also about effective messaging as well as metrics right the other point that you made aide a minute ago is it seems like people are not if i'm reading between the lines sounds aren't there isn't any coordination. There isn't enough coordination. So so how do we do that. I mean everybody has their obviously their own self interest in their own agenda which is understandable but it almost sounds sounds like the regulators don't know enough about the technology to be able to rule on it and they need to be the educated themselves and that is part of was holding back this coordination amari. Am i hearing that right or my understanding that right not just from you but in general to some extent yes. Let's face it. You know the e._v. Industry so at such a fast pace evolution that like like many in the industry are finding it hard to keep up while on its brand new really exactly all right and let's face it to the regulators have been buffeted by the whole kind of energy revolution if you will and he'll come z._v. So it's like the whole kind of nineteenth century context has evolved the twenty first century context and you're absolutely right. The regulators have a really hard job to keep up with technology evolution. That's one all the state entities independent with stay do all the multiple entities that are engaged just because energy and now comes e._v. So that involves a transport sport agencies as well and then it involves the city's because you are getting into urban areas and semi urban areas and and that's the city control and county control so e._v. To me is probably the most complex system just because it's not very clear at at this falls only for this stakeholder it cuts across multiple stakeholders and i couldn't agree with you more in terms of the need for court and i'll just add one more point point. I think in terms of consumer education the alarm the vehicle. O._e._m.'s have a huge role to play. Let's face it. You crave porsche or ukraine some nice s._u._v. just because you've seen it since i'm billboard or some television ad or the media feed you need to do the same thing for electric vehicle and obviously that requires a change in business model for them because e._v._t.'s vs don't require that much maintenance and then

minnesota siemens america bonnie datta california europe southeast asia asia chrysler washington exxon Dan market development rape senior director china d._c O._e._m.
"siemens" Discussed on Green Connections Radio -  Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

Green Connections Radio - Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"siemens" Discussed on Green Connections Radio - Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

"You concerned about where and how often to charge it as of july twenty nineteen nineteen there are about one point three million electric vehicles on the road in the united states and about three million worldwide sales of eady's these spiked or thirty three percent in both june and july of two thousand nineteen over two thousand eighteen so adoption is on the move you've but this is a fraction of the vehicle sold overall and a lot of the resistance. It's what's called range anxiety fear that you will run out of charge and not be able to charge the car when you need to an end up stranded. So where do we charge electric vehicles. How much will it cost. Who decides these are some of the issues we are going to talk about today with one of the top experts in electric vehicle infrastructure as many of you who are regular listeners of green connections radio now i am an unabashed fan of electric vehicles because i led the communications cola the sales and marketing of chrysler's electric electric car division so this is one of my favorite topics. These vehicles in the technologies behind them are very cool in so are the people in this industry three including our guest today so here we go welcome to green connections radio where we bring you insights and tips from remarkably innovative women about corporate responsibility energy in sustainability related issues. I'm john michaelson. We talk about

eady united states chrysler thirty three percent
Electric Vehicle Obstacles

Green Connections Radio - Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

01:36 min | 2 years ago

Electric Vehicle Obstacles

"As of july twenty nineteen nineteen there are about one point three million electric vehicles on the road in the united states and about three million worldwide sales of eady's these spiked or thirty three percent in both june and july of two thousand nineteen over two thousand eighteen so adoption is on the move you've but this is a fraction of the vehicle sold overall and a lot of the resistance. It's what's called range anxiety fear that you will run out of charge and not be able to charge the car when you need to an end up stranded. So where do we charge electric vehicles. How much will it cost. Who decides these are some of the issues we are going to talk about today with one of the top experts in electric vehicle infrastructure as many of you who are regular listeners of green connections radio now i am an unabashed fan of electric vehicles because i led the communications cola the sales and marketing of chrysler's electric electric car division so this is one of my favorite topics. These vehicles in the technologies behind them are very cool in so are the people in this industry three including our guest today so here we go welcome to green connections radio where we bring you insights and tips from remarkably innovative women about corporate responsibility energy in sustainability related issues. I'm john michaelson. We talk

John Michaelson Eady United States Chrysler Thirty Three Percent
Donald Trump, Elizabeth Warren And Joe Biden discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

02:25 min | 2 years ago

Donald Trump, Elizabeth Warren And Joe Biden discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"From the u._s. I warren says i'm viewing person can be trump yeah. This is really interesting because <hes> donald trump of obviously he's. He's grabbing the headlines. He's the u._s. President but also he's making a lot of noise not necessarily for the right reasons but we shouldn't forget that whilst he's been grabbing the headlines the the democrats have been trying to choose news the candidates who all go all the candidate who is going to run against him in twenty twenty and it was a very crowded field and it was hard to pick count who was likely to stand head and shoulders above the rest now there was a bit of a division because you have people like joe biden who of course was the vice president to <hes> barack iraq obama who is mr trump's predecessor and he was seen as a pretty safe pair of hands etc. You have people not camera. Harris peak book league and elizabeth warren anaylyst both warren came to the fore so to speak because she was dumped pocahontas by donald trump exactly because she said that that she had native american ancestry and he then he he gave her this this soubriquet and <hes> she then he then he then said oh well you know prove it and i'll give give it. I'll give a million dollars to to a charity and she did actually have d._n._a. Tests which proof that she does have native american descent in her and of course surprise surprise donald trump didn't didn't actually cough up the money but the pointing not no he didn't in fats the reason why we know this is because it is worn appeared at form for native american indians on the native american vote is actually quite important because there are something like over three million votes three point seven million voters and <hes> there's a gentleman who is quoted in the article mr ajay siemens of the rosebud sioux tribe and he said that d._n._s. dna has wasn't to prove she was an indian. It was to meet donald trump. Pay that million dollars he put out there and then instead of honoring in his words he just got more derogatory but the point about it is the elizabeth warren is appears to be catching up on joe biden. She seen is very folksy. She seems to have an answer for everything thing. He's seen as a little bit accident prone. She's seventy. He's seventy seven and the worry is is that perhaps if if he does actually beat off the field that is really going to be pulverised by donald trump but certainly it is warren she is. She's she's doing well. She's pretty much neck and neck with joe biden in some of these polls and <hes> she sees having having a very good chance of beating donald trump in two thousand

Donald Trump Elizabeth Warren Joe Biden Vice President Barack Iraq Obama President Trump Harris Million Dollars
Harris discussed on The Savage Nation

The Savage Nation

03:31 min | 2 years ago

Harris discussed on The Savage Nation

"Do caller Harris it cannot be the goal to to to express one's ego and to engaging gamesmanship without much serious regard to the consequence I think that's what we've seen as president well you know it's it's it's trump is the agent here he's the problem yet the Washington post of headlines like this transferable Siemens put national security at risk experts warn us the experts now it is on the Washington post opinion they found some experts one of the beautiful things about the media you can always find an expert who is going to back whatever position you wish to push I there and I don't see an article in The Washington Post around six chaos in order to preserve nuclear option experts warn Michael quoted some experts I know some experts but now those are the experts they want to talk to your time has a piece from Susan rice former national security adviser to Barack Obama suggesting as president trump's fault she says of president trump's process of ordering and cancelling military strength was a mass but he now has an opening to restart talks on Iran's nuclear program on there's the punch line the punch line members of the Obama administration doing exactly what Iran would like them to do trying to push president trump back into a batter on nuclear deal that allows around a pathway to a bomb and also allows Ron to pursue its regional ambitions with American and European cash they're doing exactly what Iran wants them to do the only way to fight that is for the president to take a forthright eight a forthright strong and Stalin's a solid stance and what exactly he's willing to do what our policy is and that's our policy take it or leave it that's the way it is any of Cory Booker this is always amusing to make is Cory Booker and Democrats claiming that president trump can't act on around without coming to Congress let me just point out the Iran nuclear deal was never approved by the majority of the Senate necessary to prove trees it is not in fact the treaty they point out the Barack Obama routinely violated his oath of office by exceeding his constitutional boundaries now got Cory Booker saying well you know president trump can't act on around without coming to Congress realistically speaking we have to call the last time we declared official war in the United States it was back in World War two we have an official war since so Cory Booker is a little late to this band wagon I I'm sympathetic by the way to the idea the president should go to Congress for foreign policy I mean that that is where the constitution is supposed to work I'm pointing as the Democrats seem to have had a slight change of heart about the powers of the executive branch as soon as the man in the in the oval office was named trump not Obama I think there's a bipartisan group of senators that spoke up pretty clearly last week that this president cannot take military action against Iran without coming to Congress the two thousand one authorization for the use of military force does not cover a military strike against Iran the constitution speaks very clearly on this that he needs to come to Congress before he engages in military action that again could have less tumbling towards chaos and war in that region okay now do Libya now let me or wants full scale war too cheap basically not much except getting rid of a bad guy Qaddafi replacing it with a bunch of terrorists which is basically what happened the aftermath of all of that the legislature end up trying to legislate from a boat off the coast of Libya I don't remember all of the congressional debate about Libya good times in a second we'll get to immigration where also we're seeing some mixed signals and then we'll get to Democrats were incredibly radical here's the truth regardless of what president trump does at this point as president if the Democrats moved too far left which they are in the process of doing and they're not winning the election and they are busily moving in

Harris
"siemens" Discussed on Masters in Business

Masters in Business

04:27 min | 3 years ago

"siemens" Discussed on Masters in Business

"Friend ordered their employees to do with tech, Sonny, Sonny ball, wanting her boyfriend, her number two executive, oh, they ordered people in the lab to to hack machines, made by the German company Siemens, and to adapt them to small finger stick samples. And one of the steps that was needed to to do this hacking was to dilute the tiny finger, stick samples to create more volume in the Cup because these regular machines from from good old Siemens could only test normal sized sample of blood. And so you need a lot more sample for the machine to work. And so they diluted the finger stick blood to create more volume and which itself caused all sorts of problems. Let's talk a little bit about the process that it took to get people to speak to you and the threats of litigation and everything against the journal. How challenging was it to bring this story. To light and ultimately to get it in print at the Wall Street Journal. By far the toughest story that I've ever done in twenty years twenty plus years of reporting, the challenge was to full. It was getting sources to trust me and talk to me, which was was very hard because Lisbeth homes, they knew that those with homes in her company were very litigious and they knew that the the companies outside counsel was was David boies America's premiere litigate, right. And when you say Letitia service, not just, you know, everybody knows people, the changes these people were seemed to be extremely aggressive and used all sorts of questionable approaches. Elizabeth homes had sued former employees early on in two thousand as far back as two thousand seven for supposedly stealing trade secrets. And then she had sued her childhood neighbor, Richard fuse who. Apatment it a part of her vision that and that infuriated her. So she came up with a story that he and his son had had basically colluded to steal proprietary theranos patent information from a law firm with son was working where the sun was working, but there was never any progress whatsoever that that that ever happened. And personally, based on all my reporting, I believe that it never did happen that those were false accusations. When you mentioned trade secrets, what trade secrets the they had nothing, no technology. Were there any trade secrets? And by the way, I'm relying primarily on your book when I say I don't see any trade secrets here in my role. No, there were there weren't really any traits. Trade secrets was a definition of that is it was basically a way to to say, you know, a, we can't tell you what we have because if we tell you about it, our big competitors questioned lamp Corp. Copy us and and be, you know, you all of your reporting, you have to either destroy it or return it to us, you know, because it's sensitive could do us great harm. These were the arguments that that theranos David boies used to try to get us to kill my reporting and to not publish the story. Well, they were right. It was sensitive and it could do them great harm. However, there were, no, it doesn't seem like there was anything other than the bed behavior and fraud in the company that you revealed. Right? And so it gave rise to a surreal, five hour showdown at one point in June of two thousand fifteen at the journals offices in a conference room pitting me and my editor Mike offie and our lawyer. Jake Conte on one side of table and David boies and two associates, and his former voice Schiller partner, Heather king would become the general counsel theranos. And we went around in circles for hours because you know, I had sent them a list of questions ahead of time, and I was trying to get answers to these questions and they would say, well, we can't answer that question because it's trade secret covers trade secrets. And of course, my questions went to the essence of weather theranos really had technology and really was using proprietary technology to do. It's blood tests based on my sources, my confidential sources..

David boies Jake Conte Siemens Richard fuse David boies America Sonny ball Wall Street Journal Letitia Lisbeth executive Elizabeth lamp Corp fraud Heather king partner Mike offie editor twenty years five hour
"siemens" Discussed on POLITICO's Pulse Check

POLITICO's Pulse Check

04:23 min | 3 years ago

"siemens" Discussed on POLITICO's Pulse Check

"The healthcare system needing to believe that something that is impossible is chiba able but as your book details painstakingly various attempt after various attempt to figure out how this technology would deliver on her promises failed and failed even as she is selling investors and and getting this in front of patients who were getting inaccurate test results right and so to give you an idea of where it really becomes fraudulent and ingredients you could say that that started really early two thousand ten she and her boyfriend sunny ball wanting approach walgreens and safeway and tell them that they've created this machine that she has invented this machine that can do all the lab tests just based on on a tiny pinprick of blood and in fact they haven't even started working on the last version of the technology which is the mini lab in the second iteration of technology was a machine called the edison and could only do one class of blood test immunoassays and that's all they had at that point so that the the work on the mini lab which is supposed to finally fulfil her vision starts like eight months after she asserts to walgreens and safeway that she already has the product and then it gets worse when in fall two thousand thirteen she actually goes live with these finger stick tests in walgreens stores in northern california and arizona and the the mini lab is still a prototype that doesn't work at all the edison only does one class of blood tests and it doesn't do them well it has all all sorts of accuracy problems and they roll out with the edison for a few of the finger stick tests and then they use secretly us commercial machines one in particular that they purchase from siemens the german conglomerate and get that they're trying to put out of business competitor but they're secretly using their competitors technology right and their motto defying the siemens machines to try to adapt it to these tiny finger stick samples and the main modification is diluting the blood to create more volume so that the siemens machine will will accept because the siemens machine is designed to process normal normal size blood samples so they need to increase the volume to make it work and of course the siemens machine is most commercial analyzer already has a lution step in its protocol and so what they were doing affectively doubled diluting and that created all sorts of problems with the the accuracy and so that that's really where this devolves into into a massive scam and your book does a very good job of making this complicated blood testing work more clear especially to someone who might not be as familiar with how it works but that delusion making things inaccurate that that was a weight at understand that i think even if you're not in this field makes some sense before the walgreens roll out there were a number of moments that that i are someone who cracks healthcare companies thought is this where they went too far for the first time where they crossed blind perhaps the study that they did with pfizer in tennessee i'm curious from your perspective knowing this twelve year history where was the first moment that elizabeth holmes made a moral decision than retrospect might have been too far to walk back from what you could argue that it was as early as two thousand six one she convinced pfizer to do a pilot project with the theranos blood testing machine which at that point was the first integration of the of the system cartridge and reader system with micra fluid who's actually the most ambition ambitious thing that they attempted and it didn't work at all and yet she pursued this pilot and the pilot actually happened and it involved a terminal cancer patients in tennessee who were taking drugs to try to slow down the growth of their tumors and so they were in a clinical trial with the pfizer drug and eliza with had convinced pfizer test out her product on these dying cancer patients one thing to bear in mind is that the the results the faulty results from that they are knows device were not used to inform the treatment of these patients it was just a comparison of the normal that their blood was tested with regular methods by pfizer and then they also compared the results that got from theranos but you could argue that that putting those dying cancer patients in tennessee through these completely unnecessary a blood draw several times a.

chiba eight months twelve year
"siemens" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"siemens" Discussed on TechStuff

"In of windows the machine was using and whether or not that machine also happened to have those two siemens programs installed on it eventually the researchers figured out that stuxnet would shut itself down if it could not find evidence of those siemens programs on the host machine the virus would continue to try and infect other machines from it's infected host if it were on a network system but otherwise it would not unleash its payload if the siemens programs weren't present which was also confusing because here you had some malware that was so specific that it only leapt into action if those two programs were on the host computer otherwise it wouldn't do anything at all so it clearly wasn't meant to recap across all machines it was still problematic that was infecting lots of different computers because obviously you never wanna have malware infects your computer but if you didn't have those siemens programs on your computer it didn't do anything else apart from tip to infect other computers network to yours it didn't mess with your files it didn't encrypt anything without your permission it didn't delete anything everything was fine so a lot of the code and implementation suggested that stuxnet was probably the product of years of work from at least one or two or maybe three teams of talented programmers there were some gaps in the code and implementation however that led some security experts to call it perpetual perplexingly sloppy or careless one of those was nate lawson who's a cryptographer who criticized the code and said that it smacked of amateurism in many ways and here's a direct quote he said i really hope it wasn't written by the usa because i'd like to think our elite cyber weapon developers at least know what bulgarian teenagers did back in the early nineties.

nate lawson usa siemens two siemens
"siemens" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

Marketplace All-in-One

01:40 min | 4 years ago

"siemens" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

"This marketplace podcast is brought to you by cements mind sphere from siemens is the open cloudbased operating system for the internet of things ilott's you connect you are machines and infrastructure to the digital world so you can turn big data into real business value connected a at siemens dot com it's marketplace tech for thursday august 24th i'm lizzy o'leary in for ben johnson if you think paying attention to the tech news this summer you've heard a lot about sexual harassment ellen pow has new book out describing her case and its aftermath and there's been a string of allegations against investors from female up founders many of whom are now speaking out the response public apologies pledges to take steps to fix things and now a piece of legislation that might make a difference california state senator hannahbeth jackson is introducing a bill to tighten up the rules around sexual harassment between investors and the entrepreneurs they fund for more on this we turn to in a freed chief technology corresponding for axios iena can you give me a little bit of detail about this legislation lic powerwork voted do it would amend an existing civil right frothy on route civil rights act one of the key pieces in california to include investors and entrepreneurs as a category protected against sexual harassment so in addition to your employer were already seeing legal protections for things like lawyer and client or doctor and patient because those relationships are seen as potentially vulnerable and this would add protection for entrepreneurs so that they aren't sexually harassed by investors do you think this will make much of a difference.

siemens operating system ben johnson ellen pow hannahbeth jackson harassment civil rights california siemens dot lizzy o'leary senator
"siemens" Discussed on APM: Marketplace Tech

APM: Marketplace Tech

01:40 min | 4 years ago

"siemens" Discussed on APM: Marketplace Tech

"This marketplace podcast is brought to you by cements mind sphere from siemens is the open cloudbased operating system for the internet of things ilott's you connect you are machines and infrastructure to the digital world so you can turn big data into real business value connected a at siemens dot com it's marketplace tech for thursday august 24th i'm lizzy o'leary in for ben johnson if you think paying attention to the tech news this summer you've heard a lot about sexual harassment ellen pow has new book out describing her case and its aftermath and there's been a string of allegations against investors from female up founders many of whom are now speaking out the response public apologies pledges to take steps to fix things and now a piece of legislation that might make a difference california state senator hannahbeth jackson is introducing a bill to tighten up the rules around sexual harassment between investors and the entrepreneurs they fund for more on this we turn to in a freed chief technology corresponding for axios iena can you give me a little bit of detail about this legislation lic powerwork voted do it would amend an existing civil right frothy on route civil rights act one of the key pieces in california to include investors and entrepreneurs as a category protected against sexual harassment so in addition to your employer were already seeing legal protections for things like lawyer and client or doctor and patient because those relationships are seen as potentially vulnerable and this would add protection for entrepreneurs so that they aren't sexually harassed by investors do you think this will make much of a difference.

siemens operating system ben johnson ellen pow hannahbeth jackson harassment civil rights california siemens dot lizzy o'leary senator
"siemens" Discussed on APM: Marketplace Tech

APM: Marketplace Tech

01:58 min | 4 years ago

"siemens" Discussed on APM: Marketplace Tech

"This marketplace podcast is brought to you by cements mind sphere from siemens is the open cloudbased operating system for the internet of things ilott's you connect you are machines and infrastructure to the digital world so you can turn big data into real business value connect today at siemens dot com and by kenny group is your organisations it security at risk by baking solid security architecture in compliance concepts in from the ground up kinney group offers a security by design solution proven from the company's work in strict security environments three best practices enabled the solution softwaredefined infrastructure analytics driven insights and automation reducing the time and costs associated with securing complex environments kinney group specialising insecure it infrastructure realtime visibility and compliance for global two thousand and public sector organisations learn more at kenny group dot com slash security hits marketplacetech through friday the eleven i'm ben johnson the tech industry grappled with some big moral issues this week first you have the fiasco around the former gugel engineer who penned a manifesto riddled with sexism yozo had an email published in the new york times where netflixing yield read hastings wrote to pay pal founder and trump tech adviser peter thiel in said his support of the president was catastrophically bad judgment oh and then there's the story of airbnb buzzfeed reports of airbnb is d activating accounts of users planning to attend a white supremacist rally in charlottesville virginia professor dana fisher studies individual and corporate activism at the university of maryland we're going to talk to her about this dana thanks for chatting thanks for having me ben first question i guess is can airbnb do this law lawyer by on my understanding is that companies can deactivate accounts for all series of reasons and my understanding is a airbnb has a specific i believe it's swing called like a community profile.

peter thiel university of maryland dana fisher professor virginia charlottesville founder siemens dot airbnb president siemens hastings new york times engineer ben johnson design solution kinney group kenny group operating system
"siemens" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

Marketplace All-in-One

01:42 min | 4 years ago

"siemens" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

"This marketplace podcast is brought to you by cements mind sphere from siemens is the open cloudbased operating system for the internet of things ilott's you connect you are machines and infrastructure to the digital world so you can turn big data into real business value connect today at siemens dot com and by amazon in the information age data is the new oil that's why amazon web services built amazon kinney's us a powerful new way to collect process and analyse streaming data you can get timely insights and react quickly websites mobile apps and iot sensors and the like can generate a huge amount of streaming data sometimes terabytes an hour if process continually that can help you learn what your customers products and applications are doing right now and take action in real time amazon can uses from a w s lets you do that easily for less with can he says you only pay for the resources you use no minimums no upfront commitments learn more at caen isa's dot aws is marketplace tech for wednesday august nights i'm ben johnson you'd have to be on a desert island with no form of internet whatsoever to have missed the efficiency memo or misogynist manifesto penned by a google engineer that went viral internally and externally in recent days the company fire james to more this week saying he violated multiple company policies after d'amour complains that the company was focusing too much on diversity and that women work cut out to be engineers we call them nicole sanchez dogged by this she worked for three years as a vp of social impact at the code focused organization get hub is now the ceo and founder at via consulting nicole thanks for talking with us thanks for having me.

engineer d'amour google caen siemens dot founder ceo vp nicole sanchez siemens ben johnson dot aws amazon real time amazon kinney web services operating system three years
"siemens" Discussed on APM: Marketplace Tech

APM: Marketplace Tech

01:42 min | 4 years ago

"siemens" Discussed on APM: Marketplace Tech

"This marketplace podcast is brought to you by cements mind sphere from siemens is the open cloudbased operating system for the internet of things ilott's you connect you are machines and infrastructure to the digital world so you can turn big data into real business value connect today at siemens dot com and by amazon in the information age data is the new oil that's why amazon web services built amazon kinney's us a powerful new way to collect process and analyse streaming data you can get timely insights and react quickly websites mobile apps and iot sensors and the like can generate a huge amount of streaming data sometimes terabytes an hour if process continually that can help you learn what your customers products and applications are doing right now and take action in real time amazon can uses from a w s lets you do that easily for less with can he says you only pay for the resources you use no minimums no upfront commitments learn more at caen isa's dot aws is marketplace tech for wednesday august nights i'm ben johnson you'd have to be on a desert island with no form of internet whatsoever to have missed the efficiency memo or misogynist manifesto penned by a google engineer that went viral internally and externally in recent days the company fire james to more this week saying he violated multiple company policies after d'amour complains that the company was focusing too much on diversity and that women work cut out to be engineers we call them nicole sanchez dogged by this she worked for three years as a vp of social impact at the code focused organization get hub is now the ceo and founder at via consulting nicole thanks for talking with us thanks for having me.

engineer d'amour google caen siemens dot founder ceo vp nicole sanchez siemens ben johnson dot aws amazon real time amazon kinney web services operating system three years
"siemens" Discussed on APM: Marketplace Tech

APM: Marketplace Tech

01:31 min | 4 years ago

"siemens" Discussed on APM: Marketplace Tech

"This marketplace podcast is brought to you by cements mind sphere from siemens is the open cloudbased operating system for the internet of things ilott's you connect you are machines and infrastructure to the digital world so you can turn big data into real business value connect today at siemens dot com and by procure fine procure if i helps businesses around the world manage their procure to pay process stop spending your time hunting down purchase orders and expense reports backing slips keep all your documents in a single easy to search location and set up your financial controls for success you'll be able to cut down your audit times prevent invoice fraud and find ways to reduce wasteful spending practically manager company team and project budgets with procure if i don't believe us start your free fiveday trial today at procure five dot com slash tech and see how procure if i can help your business manage company spending cuts marketplacetech for two i'm ben johnson this week when i sold google slashed prices for its flagship pixel phone in anticipation of a new pixel phone a started talking myself into buying the old one called me oldfashioned new devices are also expected from samsung in apple in the coming weeks with the current versions of these phones are still like the most powerful mobile computing miracles we've ever held in our hands that won't stop millions of people from can over top dollar to be early adopters of the brand new phones in so let's dig into what we think we know in what we dealt with lindsay turn time editor in chief of cnet.

siemens operating system fraud ben johnson apple lindsay cnet siemens dot google samsung mobile computing editor in chief fiveday
"siemens" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

Marketplace All-in-One

01:31 min | 4 years ago

"siemens" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

"This marketplace podcast is brought to you by cements mind sphere from siemens is the open cloudbased operating system for the internet of things ilott's you connect you are machines and infrastructure to the digital world so you can turn big data into real business value connect today at siemens dot com and by procure fine procure if i helps businesses around the world manage their procure to pay process stop spending your time hunting down purchase orders and expense reports backing slips keep all your documents in a single easy to search location and set up your financial controls for success you'll be able to cut down your audit times prevent invoice fraud and find ways to reduce wasteful spending practically manager company team and project budgets with procure if i don't believe us start your free fiveday trial today at procure five dot com slash tech and see how procure if i can help your business manage company spending cuts marketplacetech for two i'm ben johnson this week when i sold google slashed prices for its flagship pixel phone in anticipation of a new pixel phone a started talking myself into buying the old one called me oldfashioned new devices are also expected from samsung in apple in the coming weeks with the current versions of these phones are still like the most powerful mobile computing miracles we've ever held in our hands that won't stop millions of people from can over top dollar to be early adopters of the brand new phones in so let's dig into what we think we know in what we dealt with lindsay turn time editor in chief of cnet.

siemens operating system fraud ben johnson apple lindsay cnet siemens dot google samsung mobile computing editor in chief fiveday