35 Burst results for "Siegel"

Why Did It Take an Elite Billionaire to Liberate Free Speech?

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:12 min | Last month

Why Did It Take an Elite Billionaire to Liberate Free Speech?

"Play cut one 30. This is a Fox News alert, Elon Musk officially owns Twitter who bought it not to make money but to restore free speech to America if he actually does that this country will change forever. Immediately after the news came out, the CEO of Twitter Prague agarwal, who came to this country and immediately started destroying our most sacred freedom and the CFO and Siegel are both gone. The question really remains is why did it take the world's richest man to deploy $44 billion of his own money to go purchase a company to liberate it from its own tyrants from its own behavior of tyrants. And the answer is because Elon Musk is a different type of elite. I might disagree with him on a lot of different things, but buying Twitter and excommunicating pirog agarwal and the entire deep state bureaucracy. At the social media platform is a moral good for humanity. And the media is losing their mind. The media can not grasp this idea that someone with a lot of money might actually de fact and want to have freedom of speech online.

Elon Musk Prague Agarwal Twitter Fox News Siegel Pirog Agarwal America
"siegel" Discussed on Squawk Pod

Squawk Pod

01:45 min | 2 months ago

"siegel" Discussed on Squawk Pod

"I don't know when they history has written in the future about this period. I don't know what it's going to say. It might not be. It might be. Let's hope that he sees and the fed sees the light and the slowdown and we're not going to get four 75 unfed fine. Clearly, the market is primed for that and that's one reason it's depressed and we only seen the biggest rise in real rates. The biggest I mean, the degree of tightening is almost never happened like this. I mean, even the Volcker shock in terms of the long-term relative is almost not in comparison to what we have seen over the last three months. Yeah, in percentage terms and in how rapid it's been and in the dislocation, even though we're still at historically, somewhat low levels, but from where we came from, it's going to be, it could be they could rattle a few. We'll see what's under the surface of all this and something systemic could be there too. Professor Siegel, thank you. Appreciate it. You're an eagles fan, right? Are they good this year? You know? So don't we, we can argue about the first three games. I think jiggling hurts is coming to his own and it's going to be a great season. Yesterday. Yes. Did you see that? You didn't see golf, you didn't see what do you do? On Sunday. I take care of two and a half year old twins, Joe. Okay. All right, well, that's a little busy. Thanks, professor. Cheese will be next. Still to come on squawk pod leasing a car, rising rates may hit you with an extra unexpected

Volcker Professor Siegel fed eagles golf Joe
"siegel" Discussed on Squawk Pod

Squawk Pod

05:08 min | 2 months ago

"siegel" Discussed on Squawk Pod

"Today, on squawk pod. Can't fight the fed? Can the fed fight inflation? To say, wow, this is really too good. We need to kill this job. We are employed. We're making wage gains. We need a reason. This is bad. Longtime market watcher and financial historian Jeremy Siegel is fired up.

fed Jeremy Siegel
Vegas-based rental firm faces probes over pandemic evictions

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | 4 months ago

Vegas-based rental firm faces probes over pandemic evictions

"A company that owns thousands of rental units in several states is facing investigation over pandemic evictions The sagal group based in Las Vegas says it operates lawfully in that it tries to run the most dignified rental housing business they can For the company is facing investigations announced by the state of Nevada and Clark county after a congressional oversight panel found company executives used deception and harassment to force tenants out while collecting millions of dollars in federal aid aimed at keeping people in their homes during the pandemic The House select subcommittee on the coronavirus crisis looked at several large property companies and described Siegel's practices as uniquely egregious with executives advising employees to replace the air conditioner of a past lieutenant with one that didn't work asking state child welfare officials to investigate them or having security knock on the door twice a night Nevada state attorney Aaron Ford characterized the report as shocking and disturbing I'm Jennifer King

Sagal Group House Select Subcommittee Clark County Las Vegas Nevada Siegel Aaron Ford Jennifer King
Rep. Ronny Jackson: Joe Biden Should Take the Test!

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:25 min | 4 months ago

Rep. Ronny Jackson: Joe Biden Should Take the Test!

"When they challenged president Trump that he's too old and he's not up to it? Well, he took the test. Let's play the car. I said to the Doctor Who was doctor Ronnie Jackson. I said, is there some kind of a test? An acuity test. And he said there actually is, and he named it, whatever it might be. And it was 30 or 35 questions. The first questions are very easy. The last questions are much more difficult. Like a memory question. It's like you'll go person, woman, man the president walked us through it in that interview with Mark Siegel, he discussed it from the podium. And then afterwards, he was given a school. What was that score? That's awesome man himself. Presidential White House position rear admiral Ronnie Jackson. Now congressman Jackson from Texas is 13 district. Remind our millions of listeners, congressmen, admiral. How did our old boss do on that test? Sebastian, he did great. I can barely hear you though. There's another fate in my ear right now, but I think you're asking me how the president did on the test. Yes. He did extremely well. I mean, he passed with blind colors. And I'm pretty convinced that our current president would have no opportunity whatsoever to get anywhere close to that. So we've got a big issue right now, but president Trump set the standard. He established the precedent and I think that that's something that everyone should do now. And Joe Biden should submit to the test as well. All right, so

Ronnie Jackson President Trump Mark Siegel Congressman Jackson White House Sebastian Texas Joe Biden
Does Paxlovid Cause COVID Rebound?

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:13 min | 4 months ago

Does Paxlovid Cause COVID Rebound?

"And doctor Siegel said 79 years old with heart disease and A-fib, he could have mild symptoms, but it can turn severe pretty quickly. He said, giving him pax lovid. By the way, I keep saying pax Levi, I think the way they, I saw admiral Gerard this morning, he said, pax livid, her pax lovid. Doctor Siegel agrees with that treatment. He said the rebound, there's no point that it's the drug causing the rebound, Doctor Fauci had COVID rebound. After taking pax lovid, so did my friend Joey Hudson, Joey was prescribed pax lovid after he tested positive for COVID. Joey had some pretty, you're not terrible symptoms. Peg had some pretty tough symptoms. She was sick. She was real sick. A couple of weeks ago. They both recovering fine though. Peg is negative. Feeling great. Joey, again, got COVID rebound. And doctor Siegel says, when you get COVID rebound, you get a second round of pax lovid.

Siegel Pax Levi Admiral Gerard Pax Livid Doctor Fauci Covid Joey Hudson Joey Heart Disease
"siegel" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

Dose of Leadership

02:41 min | 5 months ago

"siegel" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

"Welcome and thank you for being a listener of the dose of leadership podcasts. Currently, we're expanding the conversations beyond just leadership in the health, wealth, purpose, spirituality, relationships, and much, much more, because today's leader has to be about all of these areas to lead into the future. Hi, I'm Matt lily, and I'm the new host of the previous dose of leadership podcast now called bright vibe. I've owned 20 businesses over the last 30 years, and I've studied business wealth health, strength, spirituality. You name it, I've studied it, and I've learned that you have to grow in all these areas to be the best well rounded leader that you can be, not just at office, but also at home. We have an oppressive lineup of speakers coming soon. So please stay tuned to the podcast. Thank you for being a listener and part of our dose of leadership community. And now we welcome and are excited to have you be a part of our bright by podcast community. So doctor Siegel, welcome to the show today. We're so excited to have you on. Thank you. I'm so honored to be here. Yeah, now this Today Show is going to be special. And it's going to be a little different than we normally do. And on purpose. So you're actually a veterinarian. Is that by trade? In practice, right? So you're sitting in your clinic. I move over so you can see. I love it. And it's all about the wonderful energies that art brings us. Perfect. I love it. I love it. And so we were talking pre show, and that's why I'm so excited for the show. We were talking pre show, because you're a veterinarian, you specialize obviously in animals and pets and extensively and not just you're not just your normal veterinarian. You've got a special practice there. But I love how in the pre show we were talking about how this all kind of ties together. And then I actually have, as you were talking, I was having some experiences in some memories of the pets that I've had. So basically, typically on the show, we don't talk about pets, but there's such an integral part of our lives. I have two dogs currently. I've had pets my whole life. Literally from early childhood all the way through dogs, cats, raccoons, deer, birds, I grew up out in the country. We had all kinds of wild animals we had as pets. So it's an exciting show today. But we are going to talk about this whole thing of pets, but not just as pets kind of out there, but pets kind of almost like in here, right? And how those kind of connect with us. So tell us kind of what your passionate about what your practice is about and then let's just dive into that. Wow, that opened up a lot didn't it. I'm rounding 40 years. So you started when you were two, you started when you were two. Yeah, thank you. Absolutely. And I actually did. My first patient, I.

Matt lily Siegel
"siegel" Discussed on The Thinking Atheist

The Thinking Atheist

02:53 min | 7 months ago

"siegel" Discussed on The Thinking Atheist

"Some kind of repetitive phrase where, you know, it's not necessarily even the content of the phrase, which is so critical. It's that we're saying these words instead of planning the next email. Yeah. You've been very generous with your time. I'm going to link to, of course, the wondrium course in your books, et cetera, in the description box because I know we're just taking, this is a first step into a much deeper dive. But I want to leave our audience with something proactive. I mean, what's a good starting point if you want to be more mindful if you want to try to get rid of the detritus and reduce the white noise and try to seize the moments? Where would you start us? Well, I would start with a little bit of formal mindfulness meditation. And by formal, I don't mean anything fancy. I just mean taking some time out of the day to do the kind of practice that I'm talking about. And it's usually easiest to do that with some guidance. One option, I mean, there's a lot of good options out there. One simple one is I have materials about this that you're welcome to use. It's you went to doctor Ron Siegel dot com. It's perhaps you could link to that as well. There's a resources section and it has meditation. Some are linked to the mind from a solution book, which goes through progressively how to develop and build a mindfulness practice as part of daily ordinary life. But anybody's welcome with or without the book to give those a try. And just listen and follow along. And see what happens. I mean, I think most people notice that if they start doing some mindfulness practices where they're not burdening themselves with a lot of expectations that their mind is going to go blank or if this is going to suddenly resolve all their problems, they start to notice, oh, this really does shift my experience. And if you take a little bit of a deeper dive, we start to notice that life becomes really very much richer and very much more fulfilling with just a little shift in attitude where we spend a little less time on the screen and a little bit more time. Noticing noticing the clouds, the trees, and the other human beings in our lives. Yeah, I mean, that sounds so good. I've found myself just on the hamster wheel. You know, just the overload and the overwhelming feelings, the lack of control, the crazy world we live in, and life is short. I want to seize the moments, right? I mean, we have to address the negative, but I sure do want to embrace the positive. And I'm looking for tools. I think many of us are looking for those tools to do that. Again, all the links in the description box. Doctor Ronald Siegel, you have been a real joy to talk to. I feel myself more centered as part of this meditative exercise that we have just had today. And I feel a sense of optimism. You know, that we do have some tools to be able to go out and make life a little bit better for ourselves and other people. So thank you so very much. Thank you for inviting me..

Ron Siegel Ronald Siegel
"siegel" Discussed on The Thinking Atheist

The Thinking Atheist

07:54 min | 7 months ago

"siegel" Discussed on The Thinking Atheist

"I'm always chaptering out because I guess I'm always in a state of flux or change. I guess we change whether we think we're changing or not. I know there's a culture of people who say that there's sort of a comfort mechanism in resistance to change. But how would you address that? I mean, are we changing whether we decide to or not, or what? Well, I think everything is changing always, you know, this is one of the, you know, one of the insights that comes from philosophic traditions, going back for millennia. Nothing is constant. The topic we were talking about just a few seconds ago already we're on to something new. Our listeners might have thought, hey, that's an interesting idea, or no, I don't agree with that. Those thoughts, those feelings, they're gone. They're already gone over the waterfall of experience, and we're now into this moment. And this topic, breakfast, ancient history. We start to the interesting thing is because we live in our thought stream so much of the time. We're talking to ourselves about ourselves all day long. And oh, I want that, or should I have the poached salmon over wilted spinach? That would be very healthy, but the lasagna looks great. We're constantly involved in these inner conversations. And when we're living in this thought stream in these narratives going through our heads, it seems as though we're talking about things that are very solid and very important. And who I am and what I want are kind of palpable things. But when we start to practice mindfulness more, we start to see, oh gosh, it is really very, very fluid. One moment, there's a sensation, the next moment, a thought, then a desire, then a fear, then the memory of the email this morning, then the aspiration for what to have for lunch. We start, you know, we start to see, you know, consciousness is actually very fluid and our whole sense of me is actually very fluid. There's a common public perception linking mindfulness to Buddhism. Do you get that question a lot? Doctor Siegel, are you must be a Buddhist, if you talk your proponent of mindfulness. You want to get into Buddhism and how we might. Is it incorporated into the mental health profession, these Buddhist concepts? Well, the interesting thing is virtually all of the world's cultures have hit upon some form of mindfulness practice. This is because we spend an awful lot of our psychological suffering comes from our thinking. For example, and Seth, if you wouldn't mind joining me in this and our listeners candle also, think of something that's upsetting to you. Not the worst thing ever. I don't want to be overwhelming, but just something which is at least somewhat upsetting to you. Right here, right now, if it weren't for the thought of the thing, would you be having a problem? And I would not. We realized, no, it's actually the thought of the thing that creates the emotional upset. Even if the thing that's happening is physical discomfort at the moment, it's the thought that it's going to get worse, where it's going to last forever, that causes me the distress. So this because this is such a universally accessible observation. Virtually all the world's cultures have looked for some kind of method to step out of the thought stream to try to get perspective on these thoughts that are constantly going through our heads all day because we realize that it's these constant thoughts that make us miserable. And if I can weave in a little bit of evolutionary history here, the reason they make us miserable is because our minds are not just some neutral computer. They're not simply analyzing the world and figuring out what to do. They have a very strong cognitive scientist called negativity bias. My friend Rick Hansen, who's written a lot about this, says the mind is like, Velcro for bad experiences and Teflon for good ones. Bad experiences happen to us. They stick. We remember them. Good ones. Slide right off the pan. And we can see why this happened if we look at evolutionary history. Imagine our ancestor out there in the African Savannah. Looking at some ambiguous bay shape behind some bushes. They could make one of two types of errors. They might say, oh my God, it's a lion when it's really just a beige rock. That would be a type one error or a false positive. We actually use these typologies labeled them this way in modern scientific research. Or they might look at the same shape and say, eh, it's probably a beige rock when it was really a lion. Now, they could make countless type one errors. These false positives and still live to tell. One type two error, that's the end of your DNA loan. Those organisms aren't going to survive. So we can imagine that there might have been happy hominids hanging around, holding hands, telling stories about dynamite sexual encounters and luscious pieces of fruit. But they weren't our ancestors. Why? Because statistically, they died before they got to reproduce. Our ancestors were the ones running around this event and saying, oh my God, a lion. Uh oh, not one of those poisonous snakes. Remember that spiny plant? What it did to uncle Albert? Those were our ancestors. So that's the kind of mind we have. So when we're living in our thought stream, we're very often remembering bad stuff and anticipating bad stuff and feeling anxious or depressed about this. So virtually all the world's cultures have evolved some kind of form of practice to get out of the thought stream. Some of them are what we call mindfulness practices and doing something simple like being with the breath and indeed Buddhist traditions have evolved those extensively. Others have developed prayer traditions of aerosols that are kind of repeating the same thing over and over and over in order to step out of the mindstream. Yoga traditions, step out of the mind stream. Singing and chanting, which is done in many cultures, step out of the mind and step out of the thought stream in this way. So actually mindfulness is part of a potentially have that virtually all cultures have developed. It turns out that Buddhist cultures have developed them in greater detail. So the techniques we use in western psychology are often borrowed from Buddhist traditions, but not because there's something inherently Buddhist about them. It's really talking about what are the causes of human suffering and one of the things we might do to resolve it. We did a show on Buddhism a while back. It was fascinating. And honestly, at the end of the year, research for the program, I thought, you know, beyond some of the superstitious stuff, there's a lot I really liked about, you know, be in the moment to try to get rid of the detritus, you know, carrying all the baggage from place to place, much of that has to do with the feeling of lack of control, the stuff in the world that might happen, the what ifs, that kind of thing, finding a way to sort of filter those out without being blind to all that's happening. But you know, doctor Siegel, here we are in the age of the Internet. They're fire hosing insanity of the entire world into our eyes and ears nonstop. That's got to compound the problem of mindfulness. Doesn't it? Especially when you've got outrage for clicks, you've got all these people who are essentially monetizing the fact that we are stressed and distressed. What do you do about the Internet these days? Well, it totally well, the Internet and media generally is problematic for a few reasons. One of them is that our brains evolved to be in these bands of 25 to 50, right? That was your total interpersonal world throughout your lifetime. And to live in a small area, you know, even the nomadic tribes never ventured more than about 50 miles from where they were born. Their whole life. So, and, you know, what were the stimuli? It's raining. It's not the sun came out. It got colder, got warmer. Those are the stimuli. And now we live with a constant bombardment of hearing about mostly pain and horrible things happening to people all over the world..

Doctor Siegel Rick Hansen African Savannah Seth Albert Siegel
"siegel" Discussed on The Thinking Atheist

The Thinking Atheist

07:01 min | 7 months ago

"siegel" Discussed on The Thinking Atheist

"Let's get underway with the topic at hand. There's video of our conversation that YouTube link is in the description box of the show. In this crazy stressful world. I'm always interested in how we sort of recenter ourselves. I mean, especially in the era of the Internet and low and behold, I have someone who speaks and educates and writes about this very subject. I've got doctor Ronald Siegel, he is the assistant clinical Professor of psychology at Harvard Medical School. He also teaches psychiatry at the university of Massachusetts medical school. He's author of several books about mindfulness. The mindfulness solution everyday practices or everyday problems and mindfulness and psycho therapy. Look, it's an expert. And he joins us here. Doctor Siegel, thanks for coming, man. Thanks for having me. So I'll just start without getting into the metaphysical. I mean, do you separate the mind and the body? I know philosophers get into the mind body dualist thing. Are they the same thing, the mind and the brain? You know, sometimes described as one is a software and when is the hardware. As a possible way to understand this. But it certainly seems that our experience of consciousness, which is what we call the mind. And what's happening in the brain are closely related. I mean, it doesn't take much. If we're hit over the head, suddenly, our experience of consciousness changes dramatically if we have a beer, our experience of consciousness changes dramatically. So clearly what's going on in the brain changes the experience of mind. And for that matter, all I have to do is say something upsetting to you and your brain is going to start firing in a pattern, which is radically different than before I said that. So clearly what happens in the mind influences the brain. So I think these are two levels of looking at a unitary phenomena. You know, we can look at it in the experience of consciousness or what we can see in a functional MRI scanner, but we're looking at the same organism here. Okay, well, I guess we should start with definitions then, right? I mean, if we're going to say the word mindfulness and wrap a whole conversation around it, what's mindfulness, how would you define it? So mindfulness is actually an attitude toward experience. It's how are we going to work with whatever arises in the mind body organism at a given moment? And it's an attitude of awareness of what's happening in this moment with a kind of loving acceptance. Much of the time what we find if we start to watch the mind is that we're clinging desperately to certain things. Oh, I want the pleasure experiences. I want the things that feel good. And we're fearing or we're running away from or pushing out of awareness, anything that hurts or is painful. And what we're doing actually in cultivating mindfulness is learning both to be present and to be accepting of the full range of experience. That which feels good. And that which feels not so good. And the irony in that is when we learn how to do it, we actually wind up far more content, far happier and far more satisfied with our lives. So you're not talking about like a head in the sand kind of a happy, clappy. Let's just embrace the good and ignore the bad kind of a thing. You're saying that we allow it all to come in to play, but we keep it in context or in perspective. I don't know what put words in your mouth, but it might close on that one. I know, I think that's fair. And the whole sense of we that's doing it starts to transform, and we start to experience consciousness in a way that's closer to what it is, which is this constantly changing fluid experience. You know, whenever we're in a particular moment, let's say upset about something now. I feel like the world's an upsetting place. If I'm happy right now, I think the world's a great place. And it's actually quite fluid and changing all the time. Like if I were to ask you, what was your worry three worries ago? You might have trouble coming up with that, right? And yet at the moment, it was center stage in super important. So one of the things we learned from mindfulness practice is just actually how fluid consciousness is. And as we see that, then we're having less trouble when we're in a particular state when we're in an unpleasant state. We get it. Wait a minute. That's going to change for a bit when we're in the pleasant state. We get it. Wait a minute. It's kind of change as well. And it makes us much less desperately trying to arrange our experience in a certain way. It allows us to live in the world far more flexibly. And with far more presence. You know, I had this in my prep for later in the conversation, but in your wondrium series from the great courses, you said something that I stuck on for a second in a good way. And you were talking about how I am not necessarily the person I was one minute ago. I am in a perpetual state of evolution or change or what? Yeah, I think that's fair. If you were to interview my wife, she would tell you that angry Ron is very different from loving Ron, who is very different from anxious Ron, who is very different from Hungary Ronald, although Hungary Ron sometimes looks a lot like angry. But we're in these different states of mind. And different states of body constantly. And when we're in the state of the moment, it's kind of a different person. It's as though these different parts of us are taking over and defining who we are and certainly coloring our outlook. Look, when I'm depressed, the world looks like a terrible place and I feel like a failure and I have little hope for the future. When I'm happy or charged, the world seems like a vibrant and fascinating place. And the next moment is a new opportunity for learning or discovery or joy. So yeah, it's very fluid and the only thing that holds together are sense of self, if you will, are the stories we tell about ourselves, right? Like, oh, I'm Ron. I'm a psychologist. I've written books. I've done podcasts. I'm a father. I'm a husband. I'm reasonably articulate. I'm a terrible artist, et cetera. It's these narratives we tell ourselves about ourselves are what create a kind of illusion of continuity. But if we really see what's happening moment by moment, we realize it's very fluid in here. Yeah, I'm always talking about myself in terms of chapters, aren't I? The young Seth, when I was a teenage Seth, when I was an idealist conservative Fox News Seth, when I left that culture and now I'm a heathen liberal Seth..

Ronald Siegel Doctor Siegel university of Massachusetts me Harvard Medical School YouTube Ron Hungary Ron Hungary Ronald Seth Fox News
"siegel" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

03:07 min | 9 months ago

"siegel" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"Nobody would possibly read the book, right? We do live in a bizarre time where there's this idea that ordinary or average is failure. And you know, unless we happen to be in a certain part of what is at Minnesota like, what would be gone, where all of the women are strong, all of the men are good-looking and all of the children are above average, we're doomed because we're going to be below average half the time. And if we've got to be special, oh my God, what a painful and difficult burden that is. And as you say, social media has so amp this up. How many times do you see an Instagram post or Facebook post where the person is basically saying, woke up this morning? Had the runs again, afraid I'm going to get a bad performance review at work, and I think my girlfriend's gonna leave me, right? No, it's like, here I am at this fantastic place with a fantastic party with curated beautiful people and you're not here. That's what we see all day long. You know, if we were nation states, it would be as though we're reading our own crime and poverty statistics and looking at other people's travel brochures. But this is the world of social media. And I found adolescents hard enough without social media. Just imagining what it would have been like to be alone in 8th grade or 9th grade and watching images of all my friends who were at the party that I wasn't at or even kids who weren't my Friends, but just the people at the party. Oh, the horrible pain of that. So it's gotten much worse. Roy bow master who's studied self esteem as an academic psychologist for years. He said, after decades of research, I'd say, forget about self esteem, put some money into self discipline and effort and engagement. That's a pretty good place to leave it before I let you go. Can you please plug your book and any other books you've written in any other content you put out into the world that you think people might want to access? Well, if you're interested in exploring this further, the book is the extraordinary gift of being ordinary, finding happiness right where you are. There are instructions in the book on cultivating a mind from this practice. But if you want to go more deeply into that, there's another book I wrote some time ago called the mind from the solution everyday practices for everyday problems. It's really a practicing psychologist look at how to apply mindfulness practices throughout your life. So those are probably the two that are most relevant to our discussion today. Ron, thank you very much for coming on. Great job. Thank you so much for having me. Thanks again to Ron Siegel. Thanks as well to everybody who worked so hard to make the show a reality Samuel John's Gabrielle zuckerman, DJ cashmere, Justine Davy Kim bike and Maria were telling Jen play out, also our friends over at ultraviolet audio, who do our audio engineering. We'll see you all on Friday for a bonus. We have an incredible offer just for you, starting march 23rd, get a two month free trial of one plus by subscribing in Apple podcasts..

Roy bow Minnesota Facebook Ron Siegel Samuel John Gabrielle zuckerman DJ cashmere Justine Davy Kim bike Ron Jen Maria Apple
"siegel" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

05:16 min | 9 months ago

"siegel" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"Favor and cultivate. So there are many, many instincts that we have toward cooperation towards sharing, toward justice, and I think that we can recognize that these instincts will flourish if we feed them some if we actually try to act in a just way. If we actually try to share and be generous. And here not so I can think I'm a good person being generous, although it's going to be part of it, but with that not being our main thrust, but because we get it, that living this way feels better, that it actually doesn't feel good to be constantly worrying about me and it feels good to be connecting with other people in this way. You know, I'm talking about this like it's some discovery, but it's all the stuff that the world's religious traditions have been telling us for years would be where we should put our energies. It turns out that they're mostly right. All the cliches are true. As we vector toward the close here, I want to get you to talk a little bit about you have a nice phrase. The joys of insignificance. Same war, please. Yeah, you know, it's not an accident that many of the world's religious and wisdom traditions have invited us to contemplate the fact that we're going to die. A lot of useful learning comes from that. There are so many people who have some kind of life threatening experience where it reorients their values. They have this experience and suddenly they realize, oh gosh, all this energy that I was putting into building me up. That's not what really matters to me. That's not what's most important. And it comes in part from realizing that I'm not going to be here forever. And in fact, this whole enterprise, I'll put it in the first person, this whole enterprise of edifying Ron, maybe working against what is both most gratifying and most important. And if we can embrace the fact that this podcast someday, I don't know what'll happen but digital medial change. And there probably won't even be a way to listen to it. If we can embrace the fact that books I've written are going to decompose and go back to the earth in some way, that the same is going to happen to this body. There's a certain freedom that comes from that is a certain realizing that, oh gosh, all of this preoccupation with me and how am I doing is fundamentally quite silly a little question I have that I find helpful around this which is, you know, do you know who the king of England was in 1343? And most people say no. And I say, I don't either, but in 1343, he was a really big deal. And everybody in England really knew who he was. Now not so much, right? And this is so true. I haven't heard an argument against this. What if we actually lived each day as though it were so. And thought, so what do I want to do with this day? You could branch off into nihilism when this happens. Oh, nothing matters. You know, et cetera. But that's not actually mostly what happens. Mostly what happens is we start to lean more against the right wall. We start to think, you know, I'm not going to try be so successful. I'm going to try to do something useful. You know, I've had moments writing a book. Well, you know, writing a book, there's all sorts of attachment to what are people going to think about the book. And all of that, not to mention Amazon ratings. And sometimes, and this is a fruit of having written the book and thinking about this. Sometimes on a walk or something and I think, you know, I don't know how many people are going to read the book. And I don't know how many people are going to like the book, but if this book is useful to even just a few people who can lighten up with this thing and can actually live their life a little bit more insignificantly and feel more okay about being ordinary and connect a little bit more deeply with friends or family or for that matter the clerk in the store wouldn't that be lovely. I'm not saying I always drill there. I'm not saying I'm enlightened, but when I have that experience, oh, what a relief. How sweet, how nice, how intuitively right? In terms of the wall, that feels. And it really comes from embracing ordinariness. It really comes from embracing insignificance. And the fact that we're all the temporary little blip. And in fact, you know, the whole solar system is going to be gone after a while. It's quite countercultural though, because at least I remember for being a kid who lectured about how special I was. And I think that's reinforced in the age of social media, another thing you say is you're not that special and other good news. This notion of not being special and not being more significant than anybody else is for some, I would imagine hard to swallow. I start the book with a quote from a friend who says, you can't have a title that's about being ordinary. Nobody wants to be ordinary. Nobody would possibly read the book, right? We do live in a bizarre time where there's this idea that ordinary or average is failure. And you know, unless we happen to be in a certain part of what is at Minnesota like, what would be gone, where all of the women are strong, all of the men are good-looking.

England Ron Amazon Minnesota
"siegel" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

02:28 min | 9 months ago

"siegel" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"This is the 10% happier podcast. I'm Dan Harris. Hey everybody, as we were preparing this episode. I was thinking about a story that a meditation teacher friend of mine once told me. I'm not going to name him because I didn't actually ask permission to tell the story. But the gist of it was that my friend was on a retreat doing walking meditation, walking super slowly and trying to be mindful, and he noticed how after each step he was assessing his own performance. Did I do a good job with that one? Was I awake for the whole step, et cetera? As I recall the story, my friend broke down and wept when he suddenly realized that he had spent basically his whole life engaged in compulsive self evaluation. If that sounds familiar, welcome to the human condition. I think many, if not all of us have a nonstop ambient thought track or you might call it a self directed diss track running through our skulls of how am I doing? How do I look? Why did I say that thing? Am I running behind? What do other people think of me? And blah, blah. How did we get this way? And what do we do about it? My guest today has thought a lot about this and has a ton of practical answers, including the notion that we should lean into our insignificance. Many of us growing up being told how special we were, but my guests argues that the words you're not special, constitute extremely good news. Ron Siegel is an assistant Professor of psychology, part time at Harvard Medical School. He's a board member at the institute for meditation and psychotherapy. He also has a private clinical practice in which he works with low income children and families and treats adults with chronic pain and other stress related disorders. And he is the author of a new book called the extraordinary gift of being ordinary. In this conversation we talk about his contention that we did not evolve to be happy. We talk about why we self evaluate so much. We talk about the downsides and upsides of this self assessment, strategies for dealing with our often irrational, self grading criteria, including mindfulness, self compassion, and gratitude, and we'll talk about what Ron means when he uses the phrase leaning our ladder against the right wall, heads up if you've got kids around this conversation includes brief references to mature topics, including sex and addiction. We'll get started with Ron Siegel right after this. Not all care is created equal. Alaska airlines care standards go above and beyond your regular airlines. And they want people to know that the next time they book a flight with them, they'll be booking it with the most caring airline in the sky..

Dan Harris Ron Siegel institute for meditation and p Harvard Medical School chronic pain Ron Alaska
Sowell's 'Vision of the Anointed' Explains How Liberals View Others

The Dan Bongino Show

01:31 min | 10 months ago

Sowell's 'Vision of the Anointed' Explains How Liberals View Others

"They just don't get it I mean he sees himself Trudeau as most liberals do as he's benevolent kind of benighted knights of the round table like figures that are saving humanity from the smelly Walmart horde of deplorables that we all are you know That's what they do Gosh saving you from the body odor infested Walmart crown all missing teeth and all voted for Trump That's how they see themselves I know it you know we joke and it's ridiculous and it's stupidity But I'm not kidding That's how the left seizures a great book about it The vision of the anointed by Thomas soul one of my favorite books ever an older book but you'd read it in a night or two and it really describes how the liberals really think they're these anointed ones That there's these patricians who should just oversee us just dopey rubes who don't you know dumb hay seeds all of us And if we would just shut our mouths and keep quiet the Jen Psaki's and Jake Sullivan's of the world could lord over us and would lead to a more lead to a more prosperous tomorrow And because they see themselves in this as the quote Fred Siegel with this patrician spirit like the fatherly avuncular figure among us She's these dopey Trump supporters They would just shut their mouths We would take care of them and lead them into the promised land right What that does is this hubris this unearned pride they have This non meritocratic aristocracy where they anoint themselves they put themselves in the Mount Olympus of intellects and aptitude right

Walmart Trudeau Jen Psaki Jake Sullivan Fred Siegel Thomas Mount Olympus
Dr. Marc Siegel: Joe Biden's Use of Mandates Will Get Us Nowhere

Mark Levin

01:55 min | 1 year ago

Dr. Marc Siegel: Joe Biden's Use of Mandates Will Get Us Nowhere

"Doctor Mark Segal Fox News channel He said vaccine mandates for kids are just not going to work When he was on judging show and this was a couple months ago and he was right then and he's right now Tonight we closed with hypocrisy unmasked As this week we watched as Joe Biden and his wife emerged from the Washington D.C. restaurant without a mask Fox News medical contributor doctor Mark Siegel joins me now to weigh in on it all Good evening doctor Siegel Good to have you back All right let's talk about the hypocrisy of the CDC recommending that kids continue to wear masks even as their vaccinated What is going on Well look they're actually focusing on the wrong thing because they should focus on the idea that the vaccine works And that if kids take the vaccine they're much less likely to spread it And they need to get more testing at home judge so that you actually know if you have COVID or not And let's make sure that teachers get vaccinated The people that are spreading it right now the most at schools are really really young children who aren't get vaccinated And by the way crowding kids together doesn't help mask or no mask So they've got to be practical here It's not like you go to the back of the room and you're with a dunce cap We know in schools that that's not the way to teach is it It's teaching learning exchanging instead there's always the idea of the ruler Remember the ruler and the principle That's what the Biden administration is using The ruler on kids Okay And that's going to get nowhere Those mandates don't work Okay so the mandates don't work So why would we masking kids They want to vaccinate kids and then mask them This is a negative influence on their psychological health on their emotional health and their social well-being What is this all about It sends the wrong message It's the message is it's always going to be a scolding you us fully in you us telling you

Mark Segal Washington D.C. Mark Siegel Fox News Channel Joe Biden Siegel Fox News CDC Biden Administration
Fox News Contributor Dr. Marc Siegel: 'There's Almost No Spread of COVID on Planes'

The Larry Elder Show

01:09 min | 1 year ago

Fox News Contributor Dr. Marc Siegel: 'There's Almost No Spread of COVID on Planes'

"Mark sego is the expert medical expert for Fox News. And on airlines ending mask mandates aboard flights hit what he said. First of all, this is happening Larry I bet because Southwest Airlines is down 16 points over the past month and American down 3% over the past day and they need to rally the stocks in the companies and they're probably down because of all the restrictions. Now, what is the science show? The science shows a Department of Defense study from last year showed that if a mannequin is wearing a mask, just the exactly the right way, it decreases spread on a plane. But the CEOs are making a great point, which is to help a filters take out 95% of viruses. That's right, 95%, and the entire air in the cabin recirculates every 6 minutes. The plane isn't where COVID is spreading. It's in the airport that it's spreading. And in terms of the masks themselves, have you been on a plane lately? They're wearing them off their chin. They're not wearing the proper mask at all. They're wearing a cloth mask, which has been proven not to work at all. I mean, if everyone was mummified and then N95, then they'd stop breathing probably, but that would actually work. So there's no reason that they're wrong about this. I don't see it.

Mark Sego Southwest Airlines Fox News Larry Department Of Defense
Jeff Garlin Is Gone From 'The Goldbergs'

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

00:54 sec | 1 year ago

Jeff Garlin Is Gone From 'The Goldbergs'

"Let's turn our attention to Jeff garlin, ABC's long running comedy the goldbergs, they lost them. They lost well, first they lost George Siegel because he died earlier this year. Now they got Jeff garlin leaving the show because of multiple misconduct allegations and human resource investigations. The problem with Jeff was he got the notes from HR and he laughed them off. So a mutual agreement was reached the other day that Jeff garlin would not return to the show right now. I think for the next episode, they're taping they're using his stand in. Which means you're going to see the back of this person's body for a few seconds here and there. They can't afford to write a new script to say that Jeff garlin died as some shit. They're going to just put the standing in and we're supposed to think that that's him with his back turned to the camera. I don't watch the show. So that's a few guys to do.

Jeff Garlin George Siegel ABC Jeff
Mark Levin: It's Not Team Vaccinated vs. Team Non-Vaccinated

Mark Levin

01:00 min | 1 year ago

Mark Levin: It's Not Team Vaccinated vs. Team Non-Vaccinated

"So it's not team vaccinated in team unvaccinated It's not the kind of myopic thinking of ignoramuses who just wear the same uniform as the Democrat party I have no doubt these vaccines have saved the lives of many people particularly the elderly And it is certainly possible once you're vaccinated the effects of actually getting the virus are lessened A lot of people believe that too But that was my decision I want to live my life I spoke to my doctors This is what they told me to do That's what I did I don't listen to the TV doctors I don't care what they say Other than Mark Siegel that guy's a genius And there's a few others Sapphire and a few other you understand But I mean for my own personal health they don't know anything about me Heart disease asthma all the rest So there you have it

Democrat Party Mark Siegel Heart Disease Asthma
South African doctors see signs omicron is milder than delta

AP News Radio

01:03 min | 1 year ago

South African doctors see signs omicron is milder than delta

"Early early indicators indicators suggest suggest patients patients infected infected with with the the Omicron Omicron variant variant of of the the corona corona virus virus are are not not getting getting as as sick sick as as those those infected infected with with delta delta I'm I'm Ben Ben Thomas Thomas with with a a closer closer look look what what have have we we got got here here most most of of what's what's being being learned learned about about the the Omicron Omicron variant variant of of the the virus virus is is coming coming from from South South Africa Africa where where was was first first identified identified professor professor Alex Alex Siegel Siegel at at the the Africa Africa health health research research institute institute this this virus virus is is using using the the same same receptor receptor as as the the other other variants variants and and the the ancestor ancestor of of ours ours so so it it hasn't hasn't while while it's it's changed changed a a lot lot on on his his genome genome it it has has not not essentially essentially change change how how it it behaves behaves south south African African Medical Medical Research Research Council Council chief chief going going to to grace grace is is they've they've been been monitoring monitoring breakthrough breakthrough infections infections among among vaccinated vaccinated health health workers workers most most of of them them are are mild mild and and very very few few have have gone gone into into hospital hospital okay okay thanks thanks doctor doctor freedom freedom doll doll is is treating treating patients patients at at a a field field hospital hospital in in Pretoria Pretoria the the difference difference this this time time around around is is that that the the majority majority of of these these patients patients I'm I'm not not here here because because of of a a severe severe COPD COPD pneumonia pneumonia scientists scientists caution caution it it will will take take weeks weeks to to know know whether whether the the early early observations observations hold hold up up I'm I'm Ben Ben Thomas Thomas

Ben Ben Thomas Thomas South South Africa Alex Alex Siegel Siegel Africa Africa Health Health Re South South African African Me Africa Pretoria Copd Pneumonia Pneumonia Copd
Rep. Matt Gaetz's Lesson to Freshman Congressmen

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

00:54 sec | 1 year ago

Rep. Matt Gaetz's Lesson to Freshman Congressmen

"You. What is the lesson learned that you want to send to all those freshmen congressmen and women or all those people in the media spotlight? This is a mark of being effective, is it not? Yes. I tell folks like Lauren boebert, Martin jury Taylor Greene, Madison Cawthorn. Folks who I think are really untethered from the corrupt influences of this place that there's two kind of fighters in this town, those who've had a scandal and those who will have a scandal because they gin up nonsense. I mean, I saw that with Cawthorn. You see that with boebert, where they really try to focus you on everything other than the task at hand. And one thing that president Trump taught us, you can't let the process be the punishment. You have to remain focused and driven for the mission for the people. And never, ever apologize for anything, fight, fight,

Lauren Boebert Martin Jury Taylor Greene Madison Cawthorn Cawthorn President Trump
Dr. Marc Siegel: Okay With Children Getting Vaccinated, but Not Infants

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

00:30 sec | 1 year ago

Dr. Marc Siegel: Okay With Children Getting Vaccinated, but Not Infants

"Months. Your reaction to the idea that children infants should be vaccinated if there otherwise healthy, what is your take? Well, believe it or not, I don't know about infants. That's we're not there yet, but I'm okay with children getting the shot because they're using a much lower dose. I think it decreases spread, which to some extent, which is what I want because the spread is the problem here. And so far, it's been very good with that. I'm not against that at all. What I'm against is forcing mandates on children. That's something I'm against all across the

Dr. Marc Siegel Responds to Dr. Fauci's 'I Am Science' Comments

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

00:59 min | 1 year ago

Dr. Marc Siegel Responds to Dr. Fauci's 'I Am Science' Comments

"We have doctor Anthony Fauci in his position for 37 years, takes her home $438,000 of taxpayer money, who at the weekend said attacks on him are attacks on science because I am science. He actually said that. Isn't that dangerous when any one individual believes they are science, doctor Siegel? Well, sure, especially because that is dangerous because people are wrong. And he's been wrong. He's a very bright guy. He's got a tremendous history of HIV forward, but no, he's not science. And one of the ways that science comes about and this is really important is that things that seem to be experimental. And we like to say science is throwing things at the wall. It's not about dogma. It's about it's about learning and experimenting. That's one of the word experiment comes from. Everyone would agree that the word experiment fits with science will experiment means you didn't know and then you'll learn. That's humble. Science is

Anthony Fauci Siegel HIV
The Iron Triangle: Whenever You See These 3 Things, Run for the Hills

The Dan Bongino Show

01:22 min | 1 year ago

The Iron Triangle: Whenever You See These 3 Things, Run for the Hills

"To those whenever you see these three things three things run for the hills it's a trap It is a trap It's a hallmark of a trap Every single time Whatever you see the iron triangle at tip Fred Siegel in his book revolt against the masses Run for the hills The mountains the ocean anything just get away from where you are It's a trap And here are the three things and this is why the Facebook whistleblower thing was so obviously a scam When you see activist groups this is the iron triangle Congressional committees and the media all pushing the same narrative it's a trap It's a scam Thank you admiral It is a trap This is how the left advances BS nonsense gaslighting narratives and a bunch of anti liberty anti freedom crap And somehow swamp brats always fall for this crap Think about it right The iron triangle I'll get to the Facebook thing and say and how the iron triangle was all over this He had the media 60 minutes Congressional committee you saw that And then you had activist groups fake fact checkers and everything trying to get conservatives banned from Twitter Hit it all the home of Twitter and Facebook And at all the hallmarks of

Fred Siegel Facebook Congressional Committee Twitter
"siegel" Discussed on Mindful Mama - Parenting with Mindfulness

Mindful Mama - Parenting with Mindfulness

06:57 min | 1 year ago

"siegel" Discussed on Mindful Mama - Parenting with Mindfulness

"Raising good humans. A mindful guide to breaking the cycle of reactive parenting and raising kind confident kids. Hey welcome back to the mindful mama. Podcast oh my goodness twenty twenty one. What are your. This is amazing. Another amazing year was twenty eighteen. When that october released the original airing of this conversation with dr dan siegel but is so powerful is getting so many listens and so many references and so great that we just had to air it again this year. And we're going to talk with the amazing. Dr dan siegel. He's a mindfulness expert. He developed the field of interpersonal neurobiology. He's the founding co director of the ucla mindful awareness research center. He has written five amazing parenting books including brainstorm the whole brainchild and no drama discipline and parenting from the inside out which i love so good. He has been invited to speak to everyone from pope. John paul the second to his holiness. The dalai lama. So i was so thrilled to share this episode with you here talking about the yes brain and we're talking about some really important things. How mindfulness can help us feel physically healthier and happier. We're going to talk about how parental presence has been shown to be the key to optimizing chance. Your child has for life of wellbeing and resilient. So i want you to listen for some important big takeaways from this conversation. You're gonna hear five ways awareness slows down the aging process how to optimize kids wellbeing and resilience and how well being really all relies on integration in the brain and moves us away from chaos and towards that wellbeing which we so want need for ourselves and our kids especially after this raise a year. We have had now. These are all things that we do inside. The mindful parenting membership in the membership has grown. It's an incredibly supportive powerful community where we have thirty six hours of live coaching a here. We have skills practice to help you. Really master communication skills that you probably weren't taught from your parents so they know how to create effective boundaries without using punishments and threats. All the things we talk about here in this conversation are what we work on. Mastering in mindful parenting would a lot of understanding the less self compassion and we start to transform that inner voice. All that. good stuff. So if you want in if you wanna take this deeper. You've been listening podcasts. For awhile and you've decided you are ready. Then get on the wait list for the next time we open at mindful parenting course dot com. You can get on the weightless and we'll give you some awesome information right away and we'll let you know the next time. We opened the doors. Then we can hang out in person. You can ask me all your questions in person like alive. Podcast almost pretty cool right. So if you're interested go there. Mindful parenting course dot com. Okay now let's dive into this amazing replay. I know you're gonna love it. Dan siegel thanks so much for coming back on the mindful mama podcast. I'm so glad you're here. It's great to be with you. Great to see you again and again. Yes yes so. You are a book writing machine. Dan siegel the main thing. This is a monster of a book. This book your new book. Aware the science and practice of presence. And you have. How does that dove. You have dived even deeper into the science of meditation in this book in a really big way so kind of what. I'm getting from it. There's a lot of different things there. There's so much here. But what. I'm getting a lot in. This is that that sense of lack of separation right that the mind and body we tend to think of them as these separate things but the mind changes the body so much right like the way we work with. Our minds is actually changing our body a lot. That's tell me a little bit more about that. Is that what you're thinking. There's so much there so just tell me a little bit about the mind changing the body. So i'd love to know the feeling inside of you when you use the word monster. So monster book. What's the internal state that gives rise to that word monster. Did i say monster only gasparotto book. I think it was. Because i got the book like three days ago. And i'm like. I'm gonna talk to dan siegel today. My gosh. there's like all these pages. It's a big thorough book. It it does big big therapy. Because i've seen monsters of books that are really like aggressive and you know not very Inviting so. I hope this wasn't fighting for you to experience. Not the harry potter monster buck. You know like the monster book of monsters. Have you seen that in the movies. Like actually there you go. That's so Question of mine and body and stuff in the interconnection of everything you know. Part of the journey of the book aware is to let the reader. Do exactly what you're saying is to experience directly. How they're things that we sometimes think of as separate but that actually have a fluid connection to each other that we sometimes miss and it's kind of like You know how you can go. Let's say swimming in you swim. Let's say during the breaststroke and you're above era getting a gulp of air and then you go underwater and now you're in the water realm and as you see the fish around you or you see the plan or even notice your arms doing the stroking in front of you. Feel yourself in the water. Somehow water allows us to sense the deep interconnection between you and your environment you in the water and then you realize since i can feel the water. Wow that fish is in the same water so in a certain way the practice i introduced in the book aware called the wheel of awareness. Lets you experience that interconnection that you have in the analogy of swimming. When you're underwater with them you come up too breath in your eyes. Look around and you see. Let's say some trees on the shore of the lake. You see some dogs around you. Get the impression that everything is separate Right so in the air world the realm of reality when reality but in the air round you kind of get the feeling as far as as the feeling you were having before we get the feeling.

Dan siegel dr dan siegel Dr dan siegel ucla mindful awareness researc dalai lama John paul pope dan siegel swimming
Being Unruffled Is All About Knowing Where Your Child's Behavior Comes From

Janet Lansbury Podcast

03:04 min | 1 year ago

Being Unruffled Is All About Knowing Where Your Child's Behavior Comes From

"I would not be doing a podcast stuff your feelings hide your emotions if you do. Listen here than you know. That i'm all about the opposite. I'm all about encouraging normalization of emotions all emotions having a curious attitude about them encouraging our child to express all there's no judgment on emotions and yes. We do need to do that for ourselves. As well as models but when i speak about being unruffled what unruffled really is is an understanding of our child and child development and behavior. What causes children to do these kinds of things that this parent shares about screaming in her mother's face throwing books saying she doesn't want to be hugged or kissed those the only actual examples that she gave. But i can picture a lot of things that children this age do. So why do children do this. What's going on with them when we understand that and can connect with it. We're still not going to be perfect. Yes we are going to get triggered or have an emotional reaction to certain things but not as much and the more we practice. What we're seeing here. Which is in all of these cases. Maybe not quite the affection one. But i'll get to that but in these cases of behavior that yes could make us angry or annoyed. The reason our child is doing that. Is impulse impulse. That comes from dysregulation emotional centers. They've gone into fight flight or freeze. They are in. What mondale hooked calls the red zone. They're not using their brains and their reason to do what's right. What they know in the frontal part of their brain is right. That part is getting hijacked by their emotions and tina pain. Bryson dan siegel talk about children flipping their lid. Well that sounds very extreme like something. We would definitely notice right if my child was just going off completely. Sometimes that does happen. We noticed that but through all these other subtler forms of it things like. Here's one that maybe we can relate to as adults. Maybe i've i'm on a diet and cutting sugar out but you my friend see me. There's a candy bar there. And i grab it. Tear the repre start taking bites. Am i super upset their m. i. Flipping my lid not really. But i've done something impulsive. That i don't want to do and so my friend telling me jennings shouldn't do that. Wouldn't be a helpful thing to say because i know i'm not supposed to do it and i did it anyway. An impulse may be do

Bryson Dan Siegel Mondale Tina Jennings
How Many Marketing Channels Is Too Many At A Time?

Marketing School

02:23 min | 1 year ago

How Many Marketing Channels Is Too Many At A Time?

"We're gonna talk about how many marketing channels is too many at a time. So it's funny. Everyone's like oh. Yeah you need omni channel. And eric and i are big on omni channel. Some people you know ask us like. Aw is it too many ongoing after all these channels on it's like nascar and the answer is it really varies. If you're established business you have tons of people. You have a big team. You ideally want to go after all of them and if you're a small business in the short run you can't go after all the channels you need to go after all the ones that are producing the best results have the potential once. You're getting enough results in revenue than you can expand it add more channels than event. You can get to all about at the beginning. Union folks on the ones that are going to drive the biggest r. y. Yeah let's just use a case study here. So let's compare neal's his social audiences versus mine right so let's start with me. I right so thinking about where. I put my focus right now in this podcast. I spent a lot of time on the siegel brain blog over the years. And you know it's a couple hundred thousand visits a month right now which is great and then the other thing i would say to is for a period of time. I focused on youtube and growing pretty well right every video. Put out relatively speaking for my channel. Maybe a couple of thousand and go to a couple of hundred thousand views right for video and that's really good for the channel size because right now my subscribers about sixty thousand or so. It's like huge rights and so at the time a couple years ago. When i focused on youtube. I was getting those at least a couple of thousand per video now when i post on youtube. I'm lucky i get a couple hundred if even breaks thousand rights. It's because i haven't put as much time to focus on it nor have i built up a really big core audience right. This podcast has night's audience. What i would say. Is you get whatever you focus on at the end of the day right so i focused on single blog for a long four or five years before it broke one hundred thousand visits and now it started to compound and so if you go back and now you think about neil where. He's been doing this for a very long time. She started with the creek sprout blog. First and then he started buildings audiences ob and then from there he built his email list up and he started diversify over to youtube and then the other channels well why he has he kind of started made one really big and then everything they kind of spread out the attention right so there's different ways of doing it but what i've said for most people starting out is which is actually this is what neil that you focus on one first and then you branch out.

Omni Channel Youtube Nascar Eric Neal Neil
How to Use Job Search Sites To Your Advantage

Entrepreneur on FIRE

02:45 min | 1 year ago

How to Use Job Search Sites To Your Advantage

"I got to ask this question a lot when i launched my book a few months ago. And what a pass this question onto you. Obviously you wrote a lot of chapters. And i'm sure you love each one of them for different reasons. But what's one chapter in the book that really stands out to you and for what reason it's really the first chapter because it's my number one piece of advice because it's the fundamental thing people do not understand about the modern job market which is at this point seventy five percent or more of the resumes that are submitted as applications for jobs are read by software before they are read by human and the only mission of your resume is to get past that software filter so that an actual human will look at it. That's it so now you're not writing resumes anymore for people you're writing them for robots and i explained to exactly what that means. What the changes are you need to make to your resume so that you popped to the top because it's now more important that the software be able to interpolate the information that you're providing to determine whether or not you're a candidate that should be handed to a human because that's the only way you're gonna get real consideration for a job. I mean fire nation. This one piece of advice could literally change the game for you on your next application because you'll be one of those few individuals that gets by the quote unquote robots and the ai to an actual human being so one thing that you do claim. Ian is that these so-called conventional wisdom of job search. It just no longer applies so above and beyond what you just shared. What have been the absolute biggest changes in job search. A lot of the conventional wisdom starts with the resume which we were just talking about. The advice. You got was things like Us a really unique style. So that when someone's sifting through a pile of resumes your resume pops Dress up your accomplishments use grandiose descriptions of the things you did. You didn't answer the telephone at the front desk. You were in charge of company communications. All of that is terrible advice because again there is some robot out there that is just trying to boil down exactly who you are and what you can do and the more you try to be special the more you use a non standard design a nonstandard font or or language that doesn't explicitly and directly. Describe what you did the more you confuse the robot. The robots are not very good at their job so the only way to help them to keep everything dead simple and if you're worried that when it gets passed that robot filter and in front of a human that they're gonna look at it and think that you're a simple person Let me allay those for those fears. The average resume has looked at for less than seven

IAN
Georgetown Law Professor Barnett on What to Expect From the Presidential Commission

Mark Levin

01:13 min | 1 year ago

Georgetown Law Professor Barnett on What to Expect From the Presidential Commission

"Pros and cons. Um, of in favor of the different report foreign proposals that they're listening to, so they're going to do the pros and the cons and I, the witnesses that they have are hearing from by and large. I think the majority of them have been against core packing, including Left of centre professors from Harvard, like Noah Feldman and from Duke, like Neil Siegel. Um, now there's been some Ford it but mostly they've been against it where I think they're going to see more pros than cons, and I already get that sense from listening to their questioning is on court is on term limits. Because I would say more a majority of people. They're hearing from kind of favorite term Memphis, and I think that's even true. Some of the commissioners so they're going to get you're not going to get a recommendation. You're going to get a balance. You're going to get a report that shows pros and cons and there is like there are like seven or eight right of center originalist scholars on this commission Which is kind of how I got to testify out of how many Out of 30 or more. I mean, it's it's imbalanced. But look, there's more balance on this commission. And there is at the Georgetown law School. I can tell you Well, yeah, there's more balance at the, uh, on the in the polar Bureau and Communist China than there is any. Now let me ask you You're

Noah Feldman Neil Siegel Harvard Duke Ford Memphis Georgetown Law School Polar Bureau China
"siegel" Discussed on The Charles Moscowitz Podcast

The Charles Moscowitz Podcast

04:41 min | 1 year ago

"siegel" Discussed on The Charles Moscowitz Podcast

"Nineteen forty six the same time the flamingo was opening and lasky was there and And all of the other heads of the mob and lansky and luckily who's head of the american mafia or very close from the time they were kids ano- when luchino tried to have his gang steal Landscapes lunch money as a kid and lasky brought back. He got beat up but he fought back in so Louisiana saw something special tim so they became friends for life after that and they were the ones who combined called the combination the jews and the italians they were the ones are putting together 'cause sicilians and italians never wanted to mix with anybody way so yeah back. They talked about that in the godfather movies. They show how while one of the sons was like half irish and he was seen as like. You know like a lieutenant. He could never really be on the inside because he wasn't a full blooded sicilian fingers Yeah but but yeah. I mean and the families are very tight you know. It's like the old saying. Keep your keep your friends close and your enemies closer by strike surrogate whereas the jewish mobsters. I don't know they. They kind of were second fiddle to the italian sauces in the united states and they often played roles of like Kind of quarriers and and You know they would carry messages and they would perform services. I mean my alaska legalism accountant. No you're you're going on a wrong track okay. were separate. they were separate they. Didn't they didn't curry curry for anyone but themselves. And they did call. Meyer lansky the mob accountant. And they call the mob auditor. He went behind landscape to make sure everything was correct. Seaside way was very quiet introspective person he was not a killer at heart and he never personally killed anyone although he did hire murder inc to kill. Somebody wants and seagull but his participation in that as a wedding gift to subway who singles of course. Yeah it was a killer. Absolutely and he. He enjoyed it. He would go out of his way to be part of the group and of killers and it didn't matter if it was by himself or with a group to handle the deal was barred people. Absolutely there's nothing glamorous about him we're not talking about. I think it was Recently the late f. Lee bailey who I interview before. He passed away a couple of years ago and he represented barboza was one of the most vicious killers and arable horrible man and he was asked at went barbosa diet. He's a reporter. Asked him how he felt about it and he goes you know our society is no worse for wear without him around and he's a anyways but What happened to segue in at the end. Well unusual that Segue died of natural causes. He was killed by anybody. But the reason siegel was killed was because he threatened the life of our subway. Yeah well i mean. I would think that seagal would have been savvy enough to know that that would have been doubt sentence but maybe he had become so full of himself that it didn't with got his beyond that we'll it's more than that. He knew there was a death sentence when he refused to Payback any the flamingo that he had borrowed even to make the first payment when they started becoming successful in the hotel. He's up pay him up pam. You know i get around to it..

lasky luchino lansky curry curry Meyer lansky Louisiana tim barboza alaska Lee bailey united states siegel seagal pam
"siegel" Discussed on The Charles Moscowitz Podcast

The Charles Moscowitz Podcast

04:41 min | 1 year ago

"siegel" Discussed on The Charles Moscowitz Podcast

"Just the surprise of ben siegel was virginia. Hell eighth virginia was segel's girlfriend ha and it was in her house that he was killed and when he was killed she was in europe at the time so while we build. Why was he killed. Who killed him. Why i'll tell you exactly why. But what i'm doing is i'm telling you why then backing up a the reasons behind it is where the story is He was killed because he threatened. The life of way is best friend. He was Segal was the best man at their wedding and he was the godfather to their for sport. Why would you wanna threatened seguin. Well said way. Was the the accountant. The person responsible who sold this project to lansky and to the commission the five families and they were looking to set way for the numbers what was being spent. And where it was going and siegel was not giving it up. It was not telling them any kept stonewalling and they kept pressure. And as a result said we've helped started diminishing yet ulcers. He had a bad heart. He had all of this pressure and he wasn't Wasn't getting any help from his. Very good friend then siegel there were such good friends that when when Most wanted to marry be who is seventeen. Fresh out of high school in moses forty two when he wanted to marry be he went to his family. His business family first person game two was been. Ceo by second person he came to was landscape..

ben siegel virginia segel Segal seguin lansky siegel europe
"siegel" Discussed on The Charles Moscowitz Podcast

The Charles Moscowitz Podcast

04:08 min | 1 year ago

"siegel" Discussed on The Charles Moscowitz Podcast

"The segue was lance. Key's kind of guy he's concerned. Point man who would go out and manage the mob enterprises which were gambling and loansharking and drugs. Well drugs later on criminal activities. Not only that. He was more than that. You would manage it. He give his blessings on projects so if he came to him with a project he would go over the project make sure all the all the terms and conditions were correct and from there if he gave his blessing on it. The lasky will do it. And the same thing with siegel siegel would come to said way. And if he had any any projects and if he gave his blessings arm he would do it and said we got a piece of every action that he blessed and siegel little historic background. I think it's safe to say that. The mo the american mob infrastructure italian jewish otherwise they really bought a lot of the money from prohibition and for x. illegally exporting Boos from canada and the like over lake erie which rich like a mob small that and you ended up having big families become extremely rich from that including the kennedy family. Oh yes the irish mob is. Well certainly here in boston. You had that And it really was a corrupting influence. they were able to Move into a business that was people wanted and and make hay out of it. And then after prohibition ended they got into it looks like they got into Booking bookkeeping you know bookmaking. I should say and And gambling and Eventually that lets casinos. True was was a boon not because it was more lucrative because everything they went into is lucrative but the the achilles heel for all of these mobsters was not paying their income tax income taxes only one percent of their income but how can they explain having billions of dollars playing one percent when they had no business. There was no business. That's al capone got in trouble an income tax. Exactly exactly i mean they're basically You know money laundering and hiding money and offshoring money which is what they do now and a lot of it they run afoul of the tax man. That's what might apparently happened. Two hundred biden and other modern criminals but putting a so go into that will end up getting dander and youtube right so back to bugsy siegel the Why would be. He owed like a lot of money. He went behind in his. Daddy was being very arrogant and felt like above everyone. Yes why did they kill him. Well let me let me back up a little bit. He didn't own money. He owed an enormous amount of money. They were fronting him. One point one million dollars. Which was the estimate that billy wilkerson gave to build complete his hotel as wilkerson described it and siegel changed the plans and watered down to a a shadow of what wilkerson vision was and cost one up to six million dollars now. How can that happen now. I'll tell you how it happened. Okay skim city skimmed everything and the biggest skimmer of all of all..

siegel siegel lance siegel lake erie kennedy al capone boston canada bugsy siegel biden billy wilkerson wilkerson youtube
"siegel" Discussed on The Charles Moscowitz Podcast

The Charles Moscowitz Podcast

02:46 min | 1 year ago

"siegel" Discussed on The Charles Moscowitz Podcast

"Sobel he is an investigative reporter Was written a A lot of research. On who killed bugsy siegel stewart. Thanks for joining me today or thank you for having me all right before. Go in the topic..

Sobel bugsy siegel stewart
"siegel" Discussed on Conscious Millionaire Show ~ Business Coaching and Mentoring 6 Days a Week

Conscious Millionaire Show ~ Business Coaching and Mentoring 6 Days a Week

04:49 min | 1 year ago

"siegel" Discussed on Conscious Millionaire Show ~ Business Coaching and Mentoring 6 Days a Week

"And they said we don't have a hospital rule of you have those day until tomorrow. Then they found the rule. They sat me up. Says what room was it. Eight one nine then. They put a wristband on me to identify me. What are the numbers. Eight nine nine. Six six three three. Everything's adding up. Denying and i knew my wife was watching me and i'll be fine now. People listening to this could say siegel is really not no. I'm not not all these things have happened. And my wife communicated with me she died and one of the best ways and we were married on the eleventh. i have found a fistful of dimes and penny In bird feeders on the mattress in our bed. When i was changing the bed. I mean i could go on describing. There's no way to explain it. It's mystical but she communicates with me. I haven't got her yet to help me win the lottery that i may work on. You know 'cause. I play birthday numbers and We have six birthdays with twins. Some people but Well let me say. I ask her two winters ago. I said her gloves had come in a bar. I need to bear gloves low. I find when i go shopping. I come out to. My car is a pair of gloves by the driver's door and a couple of weeks ago. My cell phone disappeared and kids went through the house searching bora. We called it. You could hear it ringing but outside in the car nowhere. We can hear the sound and sunday evening. If the two days searching son geoffrey was driving home. Then i hear a knock on the door and it's him again he said i heard mom's voice. She told me to look on the chairs that are out on the edge of the woods near the house. And there i found your phone now. How the hell of god bear. I don't know whether my wife found it and blurted there. But i know it didn't fall out of my pocket. And he came in handed me by cell phone and you know there are a lot of things. We gandhi blame wealth. The the mystical is made manifest. I wanna tell you again..

siegel geoffrey
"siegel" Discussed on Conscious Millionaire Show ~ Business Coaching and Mentoring 6 Days a Week

Conscious Millionaire Show ~ Business Coaching and Mentoring 6 Days a Week

04:32 min | 1 year ago

"siegel" Discussed on Conscious Millionaire Show ~ Business Coaching and Mentoring 6 Days a Week

"Dr bernard s siegel bernard. Thank you so much for being our guest today. My pleasure you know. There's so many directions we can go and folks this think of this show is. This is about your growth as an entrepreneur. And i gotta tell you you know. I work in the area of performance. Your growth entrepreneurs going to have the most to do with how your business grows more important than the strategies. The marketing the sales all of. That's important but you're what's most important because you know what you chose. The entrepreneurial journey as really a spiritual conscious personal growth journey for yourself. You know something right. Stop you for minute because how amazing it is all the things that have happened to me in college. The only see i got was in creative writing nineteen books published. Now i gotta see in creative writing my sense of humor. I wrote the colgate. University said raise my grade to a. b. and i'll have the high honors and they rolled back a series letter telling me not allow the old the grades of the graduate. I sent them the let it to make them laugh. Not to become academicians but what changed. My life literally was how poorly with trained to be surgeons. Young said it this way. The doctor the dot. The diagnosis helps back of a dozen. Help the patient for there to keeping is the story and so we're trained to treat diseases not people and i love people. That's why i wanted to be a doctor to help people and when one patient said to me i feel better one of the authors with you but i can't take home with me so i need to know how to live between office visits. That changed my life. I mean i changed my life. Because i thought wow bike can help people live. I don't have to feel like a failure. And i mean that literally no i i understand i. I said to myself a to help address. Pain portrait's old family. Through relax me in the evening at home and they got tired of posing and i've painted myself all covered up cap mask and gown.

Dr bernard s siegel bernard Young
"siegel" Discussed on Cineflek

Cineflek

02:36 min | 2 years ago

"siegel" Discussed on Cineflek

"Come everyone's going to look back at it and you look. This is this is good stuff. Well yeah and that's why it's interesting to me like you know it could just be that it takes a while but you think about like movies like you know. I'm just a bother you siegel like like how how how spider man her iron man like introduced a wave of superhero movies. You know like Lake i'm surprised that like just a single mega success like this just hasn't really spawn. Even one knock off. I think while. I think it's also easier to copy iron man or spiderman as much as it is hard to replicate get into point. It's easy to go off of superhero movies from your way off. And he said a formula but didn't didn't make a formula. It presented a musical. Well i just wanna say that like early musicals are very formulaic. Like the mgm musicals. That referencing done. I don't think lalla land was bringing. I don't think we had a chance to bring that back while i was clearly. Its own lines had some home edge like old musicals. Which i think we're we're really nice that they like us here and they're very long. You saw them. Yeah but siegel you just said that the fact that it's a musical but what. I thought it wasn't what you explained. I think that siegel siegel get into. We really need to hear his relation. Okay here's my thing. It is a musical. it obviously is a musical. There's the character dance but it transcends musicals have been because it isn't just like if you. I think it's easier just to use japanese musicals because it's more almost exactly akin to to land is especially younger of rushmore. Now sorry especially survivors is. That is that every line is sung and everything they do. It's not that it's a musical beth. It's a musical as telling a story. This is telling a story and it's kind of like for example. Let me let me try to say this as second the opening scene. The fact that they're singing dancing is try and traffic if not because of the musical. It saying they're singing and dancing and traffic. Because they're in la la land and they're all in this in this state of being in la la land in this dreamy jazzy state that they're successful or take the lovely night scene where they're dancing to the music jazz dot but it's still undertone of this related lyrics being this relationship won't work and it's kind of ironic but the lyrics obviously kind of ironic but at the same time. They are dancing to lyrics. I'd say this relationship.

siegel siegel second siegel spider one japanese spiderman lalla land single mega success Lake rushmore