35 Burst results for "Siegel"

"siegel" Discussed on Mindful Mama - Parenting with Mindfulness

Mindful Mama - Parenting with Mindfulness

06:57 min | 3 weeks ago

"siegel" Discussed on Mindful Mama - Parenting with Mindfulness

"Raising good humans. A mindful guide to breaking the cycle of reactive parenting and raising kind confident kids. Hey welcome back to the mindful mama. Podcast oh my goodness twenty twenty one. What are your. This is amazing. Another amazing year was twenty eighteen. When that october released the original airing of this conversation with dr dan siegel but is so powerful is getting so many listens and so many references and so great that we just had to air it again this year. And we're going to talk with the amazing. Dr dan siegel. He's a mindfulness expert. He developed the field of interpersonal neurobiology. He's the founding co director of the ucla mindful awareness research center. He has written five amazing parenting books including brainstorm the whole brainchild and no drama discipline and parenting from the inside out which i love so good. He has been invited to speak to everyone from pope. John paul the second to his holiness. The dalai lama. So i was so thrilled to share this episode with you here talking about the yes brain and we're talking about some really important things. How mindfulness can help us feel physically healthier and happier. We're going to talk about how parental presence has been shown to be the key to optimizing chance. Your child has for life of wellbeing and resilient. So i want you to listen for some important big takeaways from this conversation. You're gonna hear five ways awareness slows down the aging process how to optimize kids wellbeing and resilience and how well being really all relies on integration in the brain and moves us away from chaos and towards that wellbeing which we so want need for ourselves and our kids especially after this raise a year. We have had now. These are all things that we do inside. The mindful parenting membership in the membership has grown. It's an incredibly supportive powerful community where we have thirty six hours of live coaching a here. We have skills practice to help you. Really master communication skills that you probably weren't taught from your parents so they know how to create effective boundaries without using punishments and threats. All the things we talk about here in this conversation are what we work on. Mastering in mindful parenting would a lot of understanding the less self compassion and we start to transform that inner voice. All that. good stuff. So if you want in if you wanna take this deeper. You've been listening podcasts. For awhile and you've decided you are ready. Then get on the wait list for the next time we open at mindful parenting course dot com. You can get on the weightless and we'll give you some awesome information right away and we'll let you know the next time. We opened the doors. Then we can hang out in person. You can ask me all your questions in person like alive. Podcast almost pretty cool right. So if you're interested go there. Mindful parenting course dot com. Okay now let's dive into this amazing replay. I know you're gonna love it. Dan siegel thanks so much for coming back on the mindful mama podcast. I'm so glad you're here. It's great to be with you. Great to see you again and again. Yes yes so. You are a book writing machine. Dan siegel the main thing. This is a monster of a book. This book your new book. Aware the science and practice of presence. And you have. How does that dove. You have dived even deeper into the science of meditation in this book in a really big way so kind of what. I'm getting from it. There's a lot of different things there. There's so much here. But what. I'm getting a lot in. This is that that sense of lack of separation right that the mind and body we tend to think of them as these separate things but the mind changes the body so much right like the way we work with. Our minds is actually changing our body a lot. That's tell me a little bit more about that. Is that what you're thinking. There's so much there so just tell me a little bit about the mind changing the body. So i'd love to know the feeling inside of you when you use the word monster. So monster book. What's the internal state that gives rise to that word monster. Did i say monster only gasparotto book. I think it was. Because i got the book like three days ago. And i'm like. I'm gonna talk to dan siegel today. My gosh. there's like all these pages. It's a big thorough book. It it does big big therapy. Because i've seen monsters of books that are really like aggressive and you know not very Inviting so. I hope this wasn't fighting for you to experience. Not the harry potter monster buck. You know like the monster book of monsters. Have you seen that in the movies. Like actually there you go. That's so Question of mine and body and stuff in the interconnection of everything you know. Part of the journey of the book aware is to let the reader. Do exactly what you're saying is to experience directly. How they're things that we sometimes think of as separate but that actually have a fluid connection to each other that we sometimes miss and it's kind of like You know how you can go. Let's say swimming in you swim. Let's say during the breaststroke and you're above era getting a gulp of air and then you go underwater and now you're in the water realm and as you see the fish around you or you see the plan or even notice your arms doing the stroking in front of you. Feel yourself in the water. Somehow water allows us to sense the deep interconnection between you and your environment you in the water and then you realize since i can feel the water. Wow that fish is in the same water so in a certain way the practice i introduced in the book aware called the wheel of awareness. Lets you experience that interconnection that you have in the analogy of swimming. When you're underwater with them you come up too breath in your eyes. Look around and you see. Let's say some trees on the shore of the lake. You see some dogs around you. Get the impression that everything is separate Right so in the air world the realm of reality when reality but in the air round you kind of get the feeling as far as as the feeling you were having before we get the feeling.

Dan siegel dr dan siegel Dr dan siegel ucla mindful awareness researc dalai lama John paul pope dan siegel swimming
Being Unruffled Is All About Knowing Where Your Child's Behavior Comes From

Janet Lansbury Podcast

03:04 min | Last month

Being Unruffled Is All About Knowing Where Your Child's Behavior Comes From

"I would not be doing a podcast stuff your feelings hide your emotions if you do. Listen here than you know. That i'm all about the opposite. I'm all about encouraging normalization of emotions all emotions having a curious attitude about them encouraging our child to express all there's no judgment on emotions and yes. We do need to do that for ourselves. As well as models but when i speak about being unruffled what unruffled really is is an understanding of our child and child development and behavior. What causes children to do these kinds of things that this parent shares about screaming in her mother's face throwing books saying she doesn't want to be hugged or kissed those the only actual examples that she gave. But i can picture a lot of things that children this age do. So why do children do this. What's going on with them when we understand that and can connect with it. We're still not going to be perfect. Yes we are going to get triggered or have an emotional reaction to certain things but not as much and the more we practice. What we're seeing here. Which is in all of these cases. Maybe not quite the affection one. But i'll get to that but in these cases of behavior that yes could make us angry or annoyed. The reason our child is doing that. Is impulse impulse. That comes from dysregulation emotional centers. They've gone into fight flight or freeze. They are in. What mondale hooked calls the red zone. They're not using their brains and their reason to do what's right. What they know in the frontal part of their brain is right. That part is getting hijacked by their emotions and tina pain. Bryson dan siegel talk about children flipping their lid. Well that sounds very extreme like something. We would definitely notice right if my child was just going off completely. Sometimes that does happen. We noticed that but through all these other subtler forms of it things like. Here's one that maybe we can relate to as adults. Maybe i've i'm on a diet and cutting sugar out but you my friend see me. There's a candy bar there. And i grab it. Tear the repre start taking bites. Am i super upset their m. i. Flipping my lid not really. But i've done something impulsive. That i don't want to do and so my friend telling me jennings shouldn't do that. Wouldn't be a helpful thing to say because i know i'm not supposed to do it and i did it anyway. An impulse may be do

Bryson Dan Siegel Mondale Tina Jennings
How Many Marketing Channels Is Too Many At A Time?

Marketing School

02:23 min | Last month

How Many Marketing Channels Is Too Many At A Time?

"We're gonna talk about how many marketing channels is too many at a time. So it's funny. Everyone's like oh. Yeah you need omni channel. And eric and i are big on omni channel. Some people you know ask us like. Aw is it too many ongoing after all these channels on it's like nascar and the answer is it really varies. If you're established business you have tons of people. You have a big team. You ideally want to go after all of them and if you're a small business in the short run you can't go after all the channels you need to go after all the ones that are producing the best results have the potential once. You're getting enough results in revenue than you can expand it add more channels than event. You can get to all about at the beginning. Union folks on the ones that are going to drive the biggest r. y. Yeah let's just use a case study here. So let's compare neal's his social audiences versus mine right so let's start with me. I right so thinking about where. I put my focus right now in this podcast. I spent a lot of time on the siegel brain blog over the years. And you know it's a couple hundred thousand visits a month right now which is great and then the other thing i would say to is for a period of time. I focused on youtube and growing pretty well right every video. Put out relatively speaking for my channel. Maybe a couple of thousand and go to a couple of hundred thousand views right for video and that's really good for the channel size because right now my subscribers about sixty thousand or so. It's like huge rights and so at the time a couple years ago. When i focused on youtube. I was getting those at least a couple of thousand per video now when i post on youtube. I'm lucky i get a couple hundred if even breaks thousand rights. It's because i haven't put as much time to focus on it nor have i built up a really big core audience right. This podcast has night's audience. What i would say. Is you get whatever you focus on at the end of the day right so i focused on single blog for a long four or five years before it broke one hundred thousand visits and now it started to compound and so if you go back and now you think about neil where. He's been doing this for a very long time. She started with the creek sprout blog. First and then he started buildings audiences ob and then from there he built his email list up and he started diversify over to youtube and then the other channels well why he has he kind of started made one really big and then everything they kind of spread out the attention right so there's different ways of doing it but what i've said for most people starting out is which is actually this is what neil that you focus on one first and then you branch out.

Omni Channel Youtube Nascar Eric Neal Neil
How to Use Job Search Sites To Your Advantage

Entrepreneur on FIRE

02:45 min | Last month

How to Use Job Search Sites To Your Advantage

"I got to ask this question a lot when i launched my book a few months ago. And what a pass this question onto you. Obviously you wrote a lot of chapters. And i'm sure you love each one of them for different reasons. But what's one chapter in the book that really stands out to you and for what reason it's really the first chapter because it's my number one piece of advice because it's the fundamental thing people do not understand about the modern job market which is at this point seventy five percent or more of the resumes that are submitted as applications for jobs are read by software before they are read by human and the only mission of your resume is to get past that software filter so that an actual human will look at it. That's it so now you're not writing resumes anymore for people you're writing them for robots and i explained to exactly what that means. What the changes are you need to make to your resume so that you popped to the top because it's now more important that the software be able to interpolate the information that you're providing to determine whether or not you're a candidate that should be handed to a human because that's the only way you're gonna get real consideration for a job. I mean fire nation. This one piece of advice could literally change the game for you on your next application because you'll be one of those few individuals that gets by the quote unquote robots and the ai to an actual human being so one thing that you do claim. Ian is that these so-called conventional wisdom of job search. It just no longer applies so above and beyond what you just shared. What have been the absolute biggest changes in job search. A lot of the conventional wisdom starts with the resume which we were just talking about. The advice. You got was things like Us a really unique style. So that when someone's sifting through a pile of resumes your resume pops Dress up your accomplishments use grandiose descriptions of the things you did. You didn't answer the telephone at the front desk. You were in charge of company communications. All of that is terrible advice because again there is some robot out there that is just trying to boil down exactly who you are and what you can do and the more you try to be special the more you use a non standard design a nonstandard font or or language that doesn't explicitly and directly. Describe what you did the more you confuse the robot. The robots are not very good at their job so the only way to help them to keep everything dead simple and if you're worried that when it gets passed that robot filter and in front of a human that they're gonna look at it and think that you're a simple person Let me allay those for those fears. The average resume has looked at for less than seven

IAN
Georgetown Law Professor Barnett on What to Expect From the Presidential Commission

Mark Levin

01:13 min | 2 months ago

Georgetown Law Professor Barnett on What to Expect From the Presidential Commission

"Pros and cons. Um, of in favor of the different report foreign proposals that they're listening to, so they're going to do the pros and the cons and I, the witnesses that they have are hearing from by and large. I think the majority of them have been against core packing, including Left of centre professors from Harvard, like Noah Feldman and from Duke, like Neil Siegel. Um, now there's been some Ford it but mostly they've been against it where I think they're going to see more pros than cons, and I already get that sense from listening to their questioning is on court is on term limits. Because I would say more a majority of people. They're hearing from kind of favorite term Memphis, and I think that's even true. Some of the commissioners so they're going to get you're not going to get a recommendation. You're going to get a balance. You're going to get a report that shows pros and cons and there is like there are like seven or eight right of center originalist scholars on this commission Which is kind of how I got to testify out of how many Out of 30 or more. I mean, it's it's imbalanced. But look, there's more balance on this commission. And there is at the Georgetown law School. I can tell you Well, yeah, there's more balance at the, uh, on the in the polar Bureau and Communist China than there is any. Now let me ask you You're

Noah Feldman Neil Siegel Harvard Duke Ford Memphis Georgetown Law School Polar Bureau China
Organ-on-a-Chip: Recent Breakthroughs and Future Prospects

The Stem Cell Podcast

02:13 min | 2 months ago

Organ-on-a-Chip: Recent Breakthroughs and Future Prospects

"I'm kicking off the roundup today. With a story about organs on a chip. You know we just re Finished up our coverage of ice cr twenty twenty one so if you guys missed it i would recommend checking it out. We also have video episodes there so you can see us in all our glory but in that meeting there was a lot of talk about where we are and where we're going and a lot of that revolved around these kind of organs on a chip. Which i know ruin you're working on as ips cell derived Tissues organoids. Even but they're in a kind of complex chip type architecture allows a connection of different tissues and organs and see how they communicate with each other and it is the next wave I have a story here about the long. It's a kind of airway on a chip idea and you know it's basically idea. They didn't long In order to function you have clearance By airways cells eliminates the inhale pathogens and foreign matter. And that's done by these multi airway cells k. And it requires coordinated silly airy beating among cells. And if you have failure to properly orient the silly silly and coordinate that sillier a beating you get a lot of conditions like chronic bronchitis recurrent pneumonia This is implicated in various human diseases. Most notably a inherited disease Primary sillier disconnect. Which we're going to circle back to pc d- When it comes to like the ips in organoids world in trying to model This these multi steely aided airway cells. it's a challenge because getting the cells is not so much the problem as much as Using the conventional methods which is air liquide interface. It's hard to get the coordinated. Silia they don't they aren't coordinating their beating And it's thought that mechanical stress has a role in in coordinating sillier there but the existing system. Which is these in-vitro air liquid interface. They don't do a good job of addressing that are modeling The

Bronchitis Recurrent Pneumonia Silia
"siegel" Discussed on The Charles Moscowitz Podcast

The Charles Moscowitz Podcast

04:41 min | 2 months ago

"siegel" Discussed on The Charles Moscowitz Podcast

"Just the surprise of ben siegel was virginia. Hell eighth virginia was segel's girlfriend ha and it was in her house that he was killed and when he was killed she was in europe at the time so while we build. Why was he killed. Who killed him. Why i'll tell you exactly why. But what i'm doing is i'm telling you why then backing up a the reasons behind it is where the story is He was killed because he threatened. The life of way is best friend. He was Segal was the best man at their wedding and he was the godfather to their for sport. Why would you wanna threatened seguin. Well said way. Was the the accountant. The person responsible who sold this project to lansky and to the commission the five families and they were looking to set way for the numbers what was being spent. And where it was going and siegel was not giving it up. It was not telling them any kept stonewalling and they kept pressure. And as a result said we've helped started diminishing yet ulcers. He had a bad heart. He had all of this pressure and he wasn't Wasn't getting any help from his. Very good friend then siegel there were such good friends that when when Most wanted to marry be who is seventeen. Fresh out of high school in moses forty two when he wanted to marry be he went to his family. His business family first person game two was been. Ceo by second person he came to was landscape..

ben siegel virginia segel Segal seguin lansky siegel europe
"siegel" Discussed on The Charles Moscowitz Podcast

The Charles Moscowitz Podcast

02:46 min | 2 months ago

"siegel" Discussed on The Charles Moscowitz Podcast

"Sobel he is an investigative reporter Was written a A lot of research. On who killed bugsy siegel stewart. Thanks for joining me today or thank you for having me all right before. Go in the topic..

Sobel bugsy siegel stewart
Can Netflix help solve the Isabella Stewart Gardner art heist?

The Art Newspaper Weekly

02:36 min | 5 months ago

Can Netflix help solve the Isabella Stewart Gardner art heist?

"Now on the eighteenth of march nineteen ninety stole thirteen works of art including masterpieces by rembrandt and vermeer from the isabella stewart gardner museum in boston massachusetts. The extraordinary story of that night and thirty years of investigation and intrigue that followed the subject of a new four part series on netflix. Could this is a robbery. I spoke to jeff siegel producer of the series about the greatest art host in history. Jeff to begin with. Let's set the scene. What happened in march. Nineteen ninety at the golden museum in boston. So saint patrick's day night in boston march seventeenth into the eighteenth. Nineteen ninety two men dressed as police officers. Ring the doorbell for the security desk at the isabella stewart gardner museum and are buzzed in pretty quickly by the guard on duty and without much effort are able to lower the guard away from the security desk away from the only panic button leading to the outside world and are able to can him have him call down the other security guard who is on the rounds and you know in just a matter of minutes. Basically taking control over the whole museum fairly effortlessly it seems like The protocol was that that it shouldn't be that easy but it turned out to be that easy and the two men obviously turn out to. Police officers handcuffed the the two guards and tie them up down in the basement of the museum before going on and eighty one minute excursion through the museum and stealing thirteen pieces of art including a few masterworks. That are just unbelievably priceless. A rembrandt storm on the sea of galilee. Another rembrandt ladies and gentlemen in black. The vermeer one only thirty four thirty five in the world. The concert as well as the one of the more curious ones being the matinee stolen from the blue room downstairs the shea tour tony as well as a few other a few other items that are not necessarily of such great value monetarily or as well known which is part of. What's kind of confounding about what what was stolen there. They stole a five day. Gos- sketches but also a chinese who and the final from an opole jahic flag which are two items. That just don't a lot of people don't really seem to fit in with everything else that was stolen

Isabella Stewart Gardner Museu Jeff Siegel Boston Golden Museum Saint Patrick Netflix Massachusetts Jeff Sea Of Galilee Tony
Actor George Segal Has Died at Age 87 After Complications During Surgery

News, Traffic and Weather

00:23 sec | 6 months ago

Actor George Segal Has Died at Age 87 After Complications During Surgery

"Actor George Segal, who died Tuesday. I'm very responsible with my money. The Goldberg star honored by show creator Adam Goldberg, who called Siegel a legend, and then it was a true honor to be a small part of Siegel's amazing legacy. That legacy included an Oscar nomination in 1967, for Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? Over 125 other roles were told Siegel died of complications due to bypass surgery. He was 87 break

George Segal Siegel Adam Goldberg Goldberg Oscar Virginia
George Segal, 'The Goldbergs' and 'Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?' star, dead at 87

AP 24 Hour News

00:33 sec | 6 months ago

George Segal, 'The Goldbergs' and 'Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?' star, dead at 87

"George Segal was one of those actors whose career spanned decades and left memories for generations of movie and TV fans. He started his life as an entertainer as a banjo player before said, weighing into acting. He was nominated for an Oscar for the 1966 movie. Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? A newer generation of fans saw him stars the grandfather in the ABC sitcom The Goldbergs, his wife reports the Siegel has died so coming to complications from bypass surgery. George Segal was 87 years old. A

George Segal Oscar Virginia ABC Siegel
George Segal, 'The Goldbergs' and 'Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?' star, dead at 87

AP 24 Hour News

00:32 sec | 6 months ago

George Segal, 'The Goldbergs' and 'Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?' star, dead at 87

"Was one of those actors whose career spanned decades and left memories for generations of movie and TV fans. He started his life as an entertainer as a banjo player before said, weighing into acting. He was nominated for an Oscar for the 1966 movie. Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? A newer generation of fans saw him stars the grandfather in the ABC sitcom The Goldbergs, his wife reports the Siegel has died so coming to complications from bypass surgery job. Siegel was 87 years old, A Moscow

Oscar Virginia Siegel ABC Moscow
Supreme Court to Hear Appeal of Ruling That Overturned Boston Marathon Bomber's Death Sentence

Radio Boston

05:04 min | 6 months ago

Supreme Court to Hear Appeal of Ruling That Overturned Boston Marathon Bomber's Death Sentence

"Radio boston. I'm donna deering and we start today with another major development in the country's largest drug lab scandal suffolk. County district attorney. Rachel rollins says that her office could vacate up to tens of thousands more criminal convictions. That were based on drug evidence tested at the now closed hinton lab. Wbu our senior correspondent. Deborah becker is reporting on the story. Deb joins us now dead. Welcome back to radio boston. Thanks for having me so deb. D. rollins is proposing to vacate any drug convictions based on results. From the hinton lab from may two thousand three to august two thousand twelve why that nine year time window will. That was the time period when two chemists worked at the hinton lab at the same time. Any dukan and sony ferrick you may remember. Both women were convicted on charges of tampering. With the drug evidence they were supposed to be testing fair conviction though stemmed from her work at the state lab in amherst but both women worked at the hinton lab. At one time. Eric worked there before she went to amherst. Rollin says what's needed is a more thorough review of all the drugs certifications that came from the hinton lab wild. Both women were working there. She calls the drug lab scandal. Systemic misconduct and a catastrophic failure of management that she says needs a complete review so all the testing done at that lab during that time should be looked at and we should point out that after both chemists were convicted tens of thousands of criminal drug convict. Convictions were dismissed because of their misconduct. We're talking about more. Give us a sense of scale here. Deb how many people might this effect will will. There's no precise number but rollins office says is that the hinton lab certified almost eighty three thousand drug samples for evidence during that time and that was in suffolk county and the massachusetts supreme judicial court which has reviewed various challenges and calls for a way to deal with all of the cases in both labs has vacated thousands of convictions based on the testing and hidden lab alone about eight thousand from hinton so the remaining seventy four thousand drug certifications that rollins talking about from suffolk county. She says her office is going to review all of those and they could be part of what she says is a global resolution to deal with these cases once and for all and thousands more convictions could be erased. But there's no exact number because one drug certification could have several drug certifications could have been done for one case so. The exact number is unclear. Got it got it. But it's it's a lot to review. So how does it work are they. Are they essentially starting deb with the assumption that all the convictions must be vacated and then working backward from there as they review the cases. How are they gonna do this well. She says she's going to convene robin says. She's going to convene a summit next month with the defense bar to start this review look at every affected case all the drugs certifications and determine next steps and she says any relief in what she's calling her hinton lab initiative is only for controlled substances convictions. And if someone was charged with something else along with drug use or possession or whatever the drug charges may have been those charges withstand this would only be drug charges in a particular case and then after that they would look at expunging records. If need be it would be a very lengthy complicated process. So our defense attorneys reacting to this well The aclu the american civil liberties union of massachusetts which was the agency really primarily involved in fighting with the s sjc to try to get some sort of resolution for many of these cases that were based on evidence tested at the hinton lab and at the amherst lab. It says it is. It's pleased that rollins has done. This here is matt siegel whose legal counsel for the aclu of massachusetts certainly would our preference and the preference of the public defenders are law firm partners for all of these cases have been dismissed when we first started calling for that step in twenty twelve. There's a saying about the arch of justice and At this point were very glad that seems to be bending in the right direction. I think as referring there to the you know the arc of the moral universals long but it bends toward justice but regardless also the State criminal defender agency. The committee for public counsel services released a statement after They heard about rachel rollins initiative the hidden lab and it also said that. It's pleased that this is happening. And it hopes that other district attorneys will do the same. So will they deb. Do you think we'll other. Da's follow suit. And i guess. I'm wondering if somehow this forces their hands if they have to. Now i don't think anyone necessarily

Hinton Lab Donna Deering Rachel Rollins Deborah Becker Deb Joins D. Rollins Hinton Amherst Rollins Office Boston DEB Suffolk County Dukan Suffolk Rollin Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Rollins Sony Eric
James Bond: Goldfinger - Pre-Title Sequence Discussion

Cracking the Code of Spy Movies!

05:30 min | 6 months ago

James Bond: Goldfinger - Pre-Title Sequence Discussion

"The pre title sequence in goldfinger has set the bar for all future bond films in terms of how the pre title sequence is treated and is so prominent a part of each movie guy. Hamilton was brilliant in encapsulating. All the traits and characteristics of ban from his stealthy nece toughness blunt instrument of the government. Kind of spy. Womanizer coolness dapper nece and determination to succeed at whatever it is. He's doing all rolled up into the pre title sequence goldfinger. This is brilliant. He sounds amazing now. Golfing is considered by many to be the move that set the full relentless chance for be for many years to come. The first phone pray title was from russia with love however that will very much outlining the movie and letting us now that donald red grant wasn't assassin trying to kill james bond the goldfinger pre title sequence on the other hand as almost nothing to do with the rest of the movie. There are two small wins. The first is in the nightclub. I'm we'll talk about that later. And the second east when felix makes bond at the fund. Simple tally miami. Beach bond size on holiday might have now and would put me into the best. How telling miami beach after gratitude. Maybe that holiday was for the job title. It just isn't clear. Most people think the pre pull has nothing to do with the rest of the moment. We in agreement guys go. I think there is a little connection there. And i think we hear it in the nightclub in the pre title sequence. I think that's interesting. Because i saw an interview by richard maibaum and he actually says we thought we'd do this little mini thing in front. That had nothing to do with the movie. So it's kinda weird because they did try to seem to tie it together but as the writer said we did this just to Have some fun yeah. I think he's in miami for two reasons. One am wants him to trace the movements of goldfinger who happens to be there and to its immediately. After completing his mission we assume in central america which is not all that far from miami. So deploying double oh seven on the goldfinger mission might be believable since he was kind of in the area yes. It's true as from russia with love. The opening pre title sequence begins with a dark dimly lit scene. There's somebody walking we see these three. Large cylindrical objects. They kind of look like silos. Who hear the sound of footsteps on the stone. The camera pans back over a building. We start to hear the sound of water lapping the shore of the sounds. Yeah the sound effect. Here is brilliant. Yes it's really only second sound we hear. Is this water noise now. We know something's about to happen on the shore and we have to remember the cameras like our is. It's turning to what catches our notice or intrigues us. So the cameras leading us somewhere. Yeah yeah l. Of the details a small fishing boat perhaps is in the left foreground. Looks like a little fishing boat as the light bays or white structure in the background and perhaps a distant palm tree it looks like against the night sky the touches of warp with some lights that iran break the darkness a chocolate a couple of exterior structure lights just breaks the monotony of the darkness of the scene. So all of this is just beautiful in terms of a picture of what's happening as any greek pre title sequence should do it makes us wonder. Where are we who is there. What is about to happen. The music also is suspenseful other music greed in here because it's kind of suspenseful and then all of a sudden the score changes to these horns so it's kind of jarring. And we see the siegel swimming on top of the water. We have the great water sound effects in this. Short bursts of horns are learning that. Something's going to happen in a second. We know why we see that. The seagull is attached to bonds headgear of his dry suit as he cautiously looks around here moves the headgear and tosses it into the water. A nice splash again. Great sound effects and you see the splash in get is probably not a good idea. Because it's a pretty big splash buddies trying to be clandestine. So what do you guys. Think of this siegel thing it's bond. I mean it's cute. Thank you what do you think of that much of the skies. Someone would have be watching that. Second he said amusing disgracing Will be speaking later on a bit. More about baxter yet start of things. Start to the formula spouse. We say okay we say james bond approach approaches seething. The vote using fight anymore accident coins. This concept gets us twice more in the future. In james bond babies so these prey title has impact. Not only on many pre-title secrecy to comb. Won't on the mind body of gunman these in the gym. I thirty two saline octopussy. Where james bond roger roger. These time approaches the palace in a fight alligator or a crocodile thinking a crocodile. He uses it again. His voter a meets kid when he finds. Vj was killed. We have all seen the crocodile submarine at the now closed. Bond motioning experience. It was very cool. Indeed it'll be nice if they reopened that exist that

Goldfinger Donald Red Grant Miami Richard Maibaum James Bond Russia Hamilton Miami Beach Felix America Iran Swimming Siegel Baxter James Bond Roger Roger
"siegel" Discussed on Cineflek

Cineflek

02:06 min | 7 months ago

"siegel" Discussed on Cineflek

"Hello. Everybody and welcome to another episode of sin. Affleck i your host. Ethan coburn Clara is not with us for the week but she will be back next week for a special episode fifty with Carsten carson is coming back We're doing cats. I'm really really excited to Recording that in a couple of days that'll be really fun In the meantime we have To this week and then jurassic park in the second half of the week so it's a double double week On thursday we'll be joined jurassic park with my friend. Nev and ryan who you may remember from moonlight whiplash so That'll be that'll be really really fun. i hope you guys and checking that one out as well This week i have sophian siegel on who you may remember from the law. Land podcast the law in podcast was our highest played episode until until recorded one with karston but You guys seem to really really like that. And so they have great energy together. I figured it'd be fun to get them back together and talk about One of their favorite movies in kind of do a pixar double feature with with up so up also. If you haven't listened to that episode. I put that out. Last thursday i'm pairing this with a bordeaux so they just seem to drink a lot of wine in this movie It seemed appropriate to drink wine so and french. Wine seems very appropriate. So check I guess i guess. I don't really have a recipe but Check out my social media. I'm just gonna plug that anyway. At said affleck pod on instagram and at santa flick on twitter. Thank you to my patrons jaden. Stephen sydney zack isaac in griffin there. We go If you wanna be a part of my patriot Check that out at said afflict At sorry patriot. Dot com slash. Set.

Carsten carson Ethan coburn ryan Nev next week Last thursday thursday griffin jaden This week twitter Clara instagram this week sophian siegel karston Stephen sydney zack isaac second half Dot com santa flick
Apple reportedly developing next-gen ultra-thin displays for AR devices with TSMC

Daily Tech News Show

05:30 min | 7 months ago

Apple reportedly developing next-gen ultra-thin displays for AR devices with TSMC

"Nikei sources say that apple partnered with chipmaker. Tsmc to develop micro. Ola displays would displays built directly onto chip wafers for use in our future. Headsets that displays underdevelopment are less than one inch in size with mass production estimated several years away the beta for iowa's fourteen point five adds accident hazard and speed check reporting to apple maps. A new report button is available in the bottom tray of maps to report incidents and voiced support for siri is available as well and analysis by cambridge university university although they probably have anniversaries also estimates that bitcoin mining consumes roughly one hundred twenty one point three six terawatt hours of electricity per year which would make a top thirty energy consumer if it were used by country however for context the researchers noted that electricity consumed in the us by always on inactive could power the bitcoin network for year. I liked that comparison there. It's like yeah that sounds bad but then also that Following its launch in australia. Google new showcase launched in argentina and the united kingdom offering now includes free and paywall two articles for more than one hundred twenty uk and forty argentinian outlets bringing its total to four hundred fifty publications twitter announced monetize daily active users increased twenty seven percent on the year in. Its q four to one hundred ninety two million but missed analysts expectations of one hundred ninety three point. Five million with growth slowing for the third consecutive quarter. Twitter also said wednesday it suspended more than five hundred accounts and reduced certain hashtag visibility in india to comply with several orders from the indian government amidst farmers protests on agricultural reforms in the country. The twitter accounts are only being blocked in india and don't include news media entities. Journalists activists were politicians who have twitter accounts and twitter. Cfo ned siegel said on cnbc. Wednesday that people removed from its platform are not allowed to come back and that applies to president donald trump. Even if he ran for office again. All right let's talk a little bit more about what twitter is planning jack dorsey. He's been talking a lot about decentralisation over the past couple of months what did he say. This time scott feels like every time i'm on the show. There's something about his little idea but on this same call with investors on tuesday twitter ceo. Jack dorsey explained how it's internet project or internal project rather called blue sky and this something. He first announced wave back in december of two thousand nineteen Could create a decentralized social network to give people more choice over their twitter twitter experience Dorsey said twitter might create multiple rhythms for you to choose from offer them alongside those made by others a sort of marketplace on a lot of detail beyond that but dorsey feels Choice like this would not only help out business. But dr more people into participating in social media in the first place Decentralisation could also help twitter address concerns about moderation neutrality. all that kind of stuff Pretty fascinating idea I i still hope he does it with partners. And not just a a twitter store with algorithm skins. Well i mean it sounds like it's it's a combination of both the way twitter sees it happening. The company itself would say all right. You might want this experience. We have enough user feedback to know that some users are frustrated with the kind of stock twitter experience and using hashtags and maybe Filtering out certain keywords or searching for users or topics isn't enough for you you want twitter built a certain way and we can do that for you but then the company saying also third party developers might have some really great ideas and we welcome those algorithms as well as long as you know people wanted that. Could this be something that people would potentially pay for in the future. I would think yes. Yeah although i mean his focus on decentralisation implies that this would be something out in the wild right to the for longtime twitter's been talking about maybe we'll partner up with an existing decentralized solution which there are a few out there like mastodon. And i think that's a really really interesting way to approach this to say what if we decentralized twitter and differentiated twitter is just one of the better ways to talk with folks but like you said scott. He thinks that would help drive more people into participating if there was a federation so to speak that mastodon is that right now but twitter isn't part of mastodon so you don't have enough people using it so it doesn't get that momentum that it needs if twitter gets behind something like that whether it's mastodon or something else then suddenly it's got momentum and if you could say like well what i would like is a more environmental spin on this. I want a more libertarian. Spin you know wanted to promote things that are more about molecular biology promote scientists. I want i want to have a spiritual issues in christianity. Promoted more you you could have that and still everybody be participating in the same network and to his point about moderation neutrality. If you're the one picking the algorithm then you might have issues with how that particular algorithm works. But there'd be less burden on twitter or any other participant to be the person in charge of deciding what gets promoted and what doesn't because you'd have a lot of different approaches to it

Twitter Cambridge University Universit Jack Dorsey Cfo Ned Siegel Chipmaker President Donald Trump Tsmc Apple United Kingdom India Indian Government Iowa Argentina Cnbc Dorsey Scott Australia
Twitter suspends over 500 accounts in India after government warning

Daily Tech News Show

00:48 sec | 7 months ago

Twitter suspends over 500 accounts in India after government warning

"Twitter announced monetize daily active users increased twenty seven percent on the year in. Its q four to one hundred ninety two million but missed analysts expectations of one hundred ninety three point. Five million with growth slowing for the third consecutive quarter. Twitter also said wednesday it suspended more than five hundred accounts and reduced certain hashtag -bility in india to comply with several orders from the indian government amidst farmers protests on agricultural reforms in the country. The twitter accounts are only being blocked in india and don't include news media entities. Journalists activists were politicians who have twitter accounts and twitter. Cfo ned siegel said on cnbc. Wednesday that people removed from its platform are not allowed to come back and that applies to president donald trump. Even if he ran for office again.

Twitter Bility India Indian Government Cfo Ned Siegel Cnbc President Donald Trump
"siegel" Discussed on Cineflek

Cineflek

02:36 min | 8 months ago

"siegel" Discussed on Cineflek

"Come everyone's going to look back at it and you look. This is this is good stuff. Well yeah and that's why it's interesting to me like you know it could just be that it takes a while but you think about like movies like you know. I'm just a bother you siegel like like how how how spider man her iron man like introduced a wave of superhero movies. You know like Lake i'm surprised that like just a single mega success like this just hasn't really spawn. Even one knock off. I think while. I think it's also easier to copy iron man or spiderman as much as it is hard to replicate get into point. It's easy to go off of superhero movies from your way off. And he said a formula but didn't didn't make a formula. It presented a musical. Well i just wanna say that like early musicals are very formulaic. Like the mgm musicals. That referencing done. I don't think lalla land was bringing. I don't think we had a chance to bring that back while i was clearly. Its own lines had some home edge like old musicals. Which i think we're we're really nice that they like us here and they're very long. You saw them. Yeah but siegel you just said that the fact that it's a musical but what. I thought it wasn't what you explained. I think that siegel siegel get into. We really need to hear his relation. Okay here's my thing. It is a musical. it obviously is a musical. There's the character dance but it transcends musicals have been because it isn't just like if you. I think it's easier just to use japanese musicals because it's more almost exactly akin to to land is especially younger of rushmore. Now sorry especially survivors is. That is that every line is sung and everything they do. It's not that it's a musical beth. It's a musical as telling a story. This is telling a story and it's kind of like for example. Let me let me try to say this as second the opening scene. The fact that they're singing dancing is try and traffic if not because of the musical. It saying they're singing and dancing and traffic. Because they're in la la land and they're all in this in this state of being in la la land in this dreamy jazzy state that they're successful or take the lovely night scene where they're dancing to the music jazz dot but it's still undertone of this related lyrics being this relationship won't work and it's kind of ironic but the lyrics obviously kind of ironic but at the same time. They are dancing to lyrics. I'd say this relationship.

siegel siegel second siegel spider one japanese spiderman lalla land single mega success Lake rushmore
New York City’s mayoral election needs an upgrade

Morning Edition

00:40 sec | 9 months ago

New York City’s mayoral election needs an upgrade

"Democrats running for the office of New York City mayor. But some political analysts say the candidates haven't offered enough specifics about what direction they want to take the city in W NY sees Brian Lehrer show Daily News columnist Harry Siegel said few of the Democratic candidates have released detailed policies and plans including around crime, and the NYPD. The police need to be doing more Do they need to be doing Wes? We have the right number of police is this is this way too many Can we afford this? Given the massive budget shortfall. The city has that those are the sort of questions I want to hear these candidates engaging with now. The Democratic mayoral primary is on June 22nd

Harry Siegel Brian Lehrer New York City NY Nypd WES
Interview With Dr. Ron Epstein

Untangle

05:27 min | 10 months ago

Interview With Dr. Ron Epstein

"Dr ron epstein. It is so great to have you on tangled. Thanks so much for being here real to be with you. I just want to read some of the quotes that are in the beginning of your book because they really struck me. John cabot zand says this book will be phenomenally useful to all of us who are desperately in need of true health. Care and caring. Dan siegel says the book is a beautiful synthesis of inner wisdom and hard earned impure cle findings and you start the book by saying that you believe the practice of medicine depends on deep understanding between clinicians and patients and that human understanding starts with the understanding of oneself. And i would just like to start with this question. where did you begin with understanding of oneself. It's probably in my james to some degree. Because i remember even as a young child being interested not only in the world outside but also the world inside pat. I was interested in what thought was and i was interested in breeding. I was has not as a child so badly. Learn how to briefing not cost kind of interested in how the body were town on a mind. Were tell ideas got into your mind. Things like that from a pretty young age. I guess it's the upside of being somewhat introverted at that dual view of the world just that interior human observers you. When did you first recognize that in yourself. will you ten years old. Did you have some influences. It sounds like you a seeker that you were asking a lot of questions. Her number certainly started before high school. I was really interested in reading. And i read things that were beyond the point where my world experience but allow me to truly understand and i was reading cavu when i was in junior high school. Obviously you can't really get what he's talking about. I mean i knew the words. But i kind of had the sense that he was really trying to understand the world and sewers. I am discovered hermann hesse fairly early on also that actually resonated with the because all of his novel is basically the same plot to people who start out life one becomes a contemporary live and spends there's lives on monastic search for wisdom and the other goes out in the world becomes longer and tries to understand universe through experiencing the world in a deeper way and i saw both of those in myself and quite a young age thought was drawn to that. I think it was sometime. In highschool that i learned about maslow's hierarchy of human vs botanist like survival and at the top was self actualization wanted the express train to sell That's where i wanna be. I can't say that there's wild ridden. It does the same thing from the. I discovered his poetry. We had to read some of his poetry like a junior high school or something that i really discovered it as a personal manifesto probably but i was like fourteen or fifteen history of connection to the world to everything that the world offer and an internet connection wasn't just observe that but i have merged myself in this i jumped into the water and the deep end and swim through it. So that was the place i started. And as how i ultimately got interested in meditation and autos actually at age nineteen thought i would become a monk. A serious attempt back. Yeah you spent a few months. At the zen saying cisco center person there. And why did i. I can't imagine what some of the older students were thinking about this young kid. Who is there that i just needed to do. That was the next step for me. It sounds like you could have gone down this path of being a spiritual monastic or a philosopher. How did you take what you were learning from. Meditation and from studying at the zen center and then decide to be a doctor. The subtitle of your book is medicine. Mindfulness and humanity. And i think that's so perfectly represents the essence of who you are as a human being but when did this and how did this all come together for you. As a child. I was interested in things medical and originally when we first got an encyclopedia paper encyclopedia. Nothing and i look up. I interested asthma. As as matic started reading about other illnesses aspects of human experience and that coupled with a fair degree of family. i wouldn't call it pressure. I guess some expectation or hope or aspiration that the family would somehow produce a doctor

Dr Ron Epstein John Cabot Zand Dan Siegel Hermann Hesse Maslow Cisco Zen Center Matic Asthma
Biden's Climate Change Plans Could Face Serious Challenges In A Divided Congress

Environment: NPR

03:56 min | 11 months ago

Biden's Climate Change Plans Could Face Serious Challenges In A Divided Congress

"Climate change is one of the top four crises president elect biden. Says he'll tackle. I but his ambitious plans could meet serious challenges if he faces a divided. Congress make an rod is part of npr's climate team and joins us now. Hi nathan nary biden's climate plans. Were the most aggressive ever put forth by a major party candidate. How much do they depend on. Congressional support Quite a bit to accomplish everything that he's pledging to do. Because yeah i mean as you said. He set some very ambitious goals though we should say they are goals that targets. That are very much in line. With what the scientific community has been saying for years that we need to do which is cut greenhouse gas emissions fast to avoid worst case climate scenarios. And that's what biden's plan would do. He wants to cut all carbon emissions from the electric sector by two thousand thirty five. He wants to make america. Carbon neutral p- not adding any greenhouse gas emissions to the planet by twenty fifty. And to do that would require massive changes and not just our electrical sector but industry transportation massive investments in new technology. And obviously. that's a lot easier to do financially politically lawsuit wise. If it's done with congressional support with congressional support you said so what happens if democrats control the house and republicans control the senate as looks likely. How much of this can you still get done. That's a good question. I think there are you know. Obviously there are parts of the republican party current present included who do not see climate. Change is as much of an issue but that is not universally true and You know remember. There's also this big and growing movement of businesses utilities cities states that are taking their own aggressive actions to reduce emissions themselves. So i've heard some environmental groups and also some more conservative folks. In recent days you know suggest that biden reach out and try to engage. Republicans on this issue scott siegel for example as a partner at the lobbying in law firm bracewell which represents some fossil fuel companies and. He says there is an appetite on both sides for technological advancement so better batteries. Hydrogen fuel carbon storage and. He thinks that's an opportunity. A lot of where we've seen. Bipartisan legislation in congress has married and innovation agenda to expansion frankly of regulatory authority so there might be the makings of a deal there and i think that A biden administration be well placed to try and pull that deal off and by that means you know. Biden has a history of working across the aisle and being in congress so that should help. So what if mitch mcconnell says not going to happen. What could biden accomplish with executive actions. He can still do quite a bit you know. He could roll back rollbacks. At the trump administration undertook on you know everything from methane emissions to clean water rules. He could use existing laws like the clean air act to direct agencies to regulate greenhouse gas emissions. That's what the obama administration did before you know maybe one of the easiest goals that he set for himself to accomplish just to make the us a big part of the global conversation about climate. Change again He can do that by rejoining the paris climate agreement which he says he's going to do and just by being a part of international talks. What are you going to be looking for between now january twentieth when he's inaugurated know i think it's gonna be really telling to see who he nominates to some of these key agencies that deal with environment and climate issues. He's being urged by more progressive parts of his party to not give leadership roles to people who have ties to fossil fuel companies That is something that no modern administration has done before. It's something that biden has not committed to But if he does go route or he nominates folks were viewed as more progressive to lead the epa or interior department That could be a signal of how ambitious you might try to be on climate action you know but also if republicans maintain a senate majority and they fight those nominations to nail. That could be telling of how much resistance. He's going to run into on his broader climate agenda as well. That's npr's nathan. Thanks nate thank

Biden Nathan Nary Biden Congress Scott Siegel Trump Administration Bracewell Republican Party Obama Administration Senate Mitch Mcconnell America House Paris Interior Department EPA NPR Nathan Nate
"siegel" Discussed on First Class Fatherhood

First Class Fatherhood

01:34 min | 11 months ago

"siegel" Discussed on First Class Fatherhood

"Thanks for stopping by if this is your first time listening to the PODCAST, please go over there and Baghdad subscribe. He did not want to miss the action. It's coming your way right here on First Class by the right DAD's diving into the latest information on the corona virus today and what you need to know as parents to keep your kids safe out there for this I have an incredibly joining me today Dr Mark Siegel who has A new book out covert the politics of fear and the power of science. Dr Mark. Siegel is the medical director on Sirius Xm satellite radio. He joined Fox News as a medical contributor back in two thousand eight. He is a columnist for the hill a member of the board of contributors at USA Today. He contributes to the Wall Street Journal National Review And New York Daily News Dr Mark Siegel is a clinical Professor Department of Medicine at Nyu Grossman. School of Medicine in addition to his new book, He has authored several books on influenza contagious and. Even a medical thriller entitled Bellevue Amount of to have him here to pick his brain a little bit about the pandemic, which has drastically changed all of our lives Dr Mark Siegel will be here with me and just a few minutes please stick around for the interview. Today's interview was recorded on video and is available for you guys to watch my youtube channels. If you'd like to watch the conversation between Dr Mark Siegel and myself please get over and hit me with a subscribe on Youtube link is into description of today's podcast episode Okay and one. Of the little silver linings during this pandemic is that has made a lot of people become available for interviews. So I've been able to grab some really phenomenal guests during the pandemic for the podcast including comedian Joel McHale, Weatherman, Al roker backstreet boy nick, Carter my pillow, Mike Lindell NFL quarterback drew bledsoe, and so.

Dr Mark Siegel Dr Mark youtube Baghdad USA Today Sirius Xm drew bledsoe Joel McHale School of Medicine Professor Department of Medici DAD Nyu Grossman medical director Wall Street Journal National R New York Daily News Al roker Fox News Mike Lindell NFL Carter
Breaking Down Joe Biden's Plan To Make The U.S. Carbon Neutral

Environment: NPR

03:44 min | 11 months ago

Breaking Down Joe Biden's Plan To Make The U.S. Carbon Neutral

"At Thursday's debate, there was this telling exchange about climate change. Would you close the? Transition from oil minister yes. I was trying to. It is a big statement president trump again boosted the fossil fuel industries contributing to global warming. Joe. Biden is campaigning on a plan for net zero greenhouse gas emissions by twenty fifty and peers. Jeff Brady has more on his two trillion dollar proposal Joe Biden's climate plan is ambitious for an economy as big and complex as the United States but even those connected to fossil fuel industry. Say it. May Be Doable Scott Siegel with the energy focused law firm Bracewell says plan is pragmatic and includes both regulations and incentives for the growing list of companies focused on using cleaner energy in the future one thing that makes Biden's approach somewhat comfortable is that you can sketch out that linear commitment to additional resources to achieve these objectives which I think most people in business believe are going to be. The future anyway, the country has one example of meeting an ambitious climate goal. The Obama Administration's clean power plan aimed to cut emissions from power plants about a third by twenty thirty even though court challenges stopped the plan from going into effect, the country is ahead of schedule David. Doniger. IS WITH NRDC Action Fund the political arm of the Natural Resources Defense Council, the power sector is already undergoing. Changes have reduced their emissions by more than thirty percent ten years ahead of the target that the Obama Administration thought was aggressive in two thousand fifteen. A big part of that was the collapse of the coal industry coal fired power plants continue to go out of business replaced with cheaper natural gas and renewable energy. Still, the Biden, climate plan faces significant hurdles it relies on technologies that haven't been. Developed or may not be commercially viable. That's why the plan includes four hundred billion dollars over a decade for research with the economic hit from the coronavirus pandemic Biden's campaign updated the plan this summer it includes billions of dollars to hire people for things like plugging abandoned mines and building electric vehicle charging stations. Steph Feldman with the Biden campaign says, the plan also focuses on environmental justice forty percent. Of the benefits of those investments, go to communities of color and low income communities that have been disproportionately harmed by pollution and the exit climate change. This is especially important to the most vocal climate change activists while Biden has distanced himself from the green new deal. It is popular especially with the left wing of his party Jenny Marino Zimmer with three fifty actions as this is the strongest plan. Yet from a Democratic presidential nominee, the Biden campaign has committed to doing some really great things like ending leasing of also feels on public lands. We'd like to see them go further and create a true phase out for the entire fossil fuel mystery over the course of the next decade. Biden's plan has a longer time line for a transition and includes a role for fossil fuels with offsets and. Carbon Capture Amy Myers Jaffe manages the climate policy lab at Tufts University and says, all this is a credible plan for addressing climate change. The Biden campaign has listed the right things but the difference between listing things and getting those things is a big difference. If Biden is elected, he'll likely need democratic congress willing to pass laws and allocate money to make his plan a reality. Jeff Brady NPR

Joe Biden Obama Administration Fossil Fuel Industries Jeff Brady Jeff Brady Npr Amy Myers Jaffe Natural Resources Defense Coun Nrdc Action Fund Jenny Marino Zimmer United States President Trump Scott Siegel Congress Steph Feldman Bracewell
"siegel" Discussed on Krypton Report: The Supergirl Podcast

Krypton Report: The Supergirl Podcast

08:08 min | 11 months ago

"siegel" Discussed on Krypton Report: The Supergirl Podcast

"So less than ten years apart. Jerry lost both his parents and it was Jerry's father's death that really bothered Jerry. Jerry always liked writing. He wrote it a lot for the Glendale paper in his High School in Glendale. In Cleveland. It's amazing how much he loves science fiction and he loved writing I mean. He would create stories. About people he knew in school and he create pseudo names for himself to write stories to himself. To create. Interest. Jerry. Loved writing he he's. On multiple occasions tried to start his own science fiction magazine, he would write. Beautiful well-crafted letters, which is such a lost art form. To famous. Writers and science fiction writers of the time. One being ray Bradbury. And Just trying to get his name out there. Trying to bring attention to his work. It's amazing and we'll we'll keep going. I don't do it enough justice. I am not Jerry Siegel. AFICIONADO, but at the same time, I, just appreciate the workman has given us and. I just think it's something to talk about more. Jerry. Joe Love, science fiction and. In one, thousand, nine, hundred, thirty, five, still living in Cleveland. They. Began Selling Comic Book Stories to National Allied Publications at the time. That was the publisher that one day would be DC comics. Siegel and Shuster have been developing the Superman story for years and it's famously known that the original Superman Story. was called reign of the Superman and it was about superman who was a villain and then they liked the title. And they reworked it and they re work the story. And over the years It has very in original very Moses Esq connotation. In symbolism and over the years somehow we've been. Christ connotation I think mainly because. Of the Superman the film. But. That is the inspiration when you think about where Jerry grew up. It makes a lot of sense for him to want to create this character. And then. Through much like this is a very summary of oh come on. Tell you. It's a summary. Please read the Book Search Out Information Watch. The little documentary talked about. Because they were selling to national. National Allied Publications. A lot they went back and forth with them and after. Basically trying and trying with superman getting rejected. They basically sold Superman for one hundred and thirty dollars. In today's money that'd be about two, thousand, three, hundred and some. Superman. and. They got jobs though. Okay. So they got jobs out of it, but there's no security in the sense that. They could be fired or let go so they got to work. For DC COMICS INFURIATE SUPERMAN and I've been rereading the golden age stuff I- but. The golden age of Comic Superman for three bucks at Ollie's always if you have one in your areas great comic books. So DC now owned the character, reap the royalties, reaped all the benefits and just pay Jerry and Joe for their work. So. In thousand, nine, forty, two together. Jerry Joe Orange Sixty, three, thousand dollars. which looks like ingested for inflation. That'd be about one hundred, thousand dollars. That's I mean that's pretty good. Right in comics I mean I don't know what a lot of complex writers make everything. Especially, the time you know out of the Depression Post. Pre World War Two. -SEGO did end up nineteen forty-three happened to he was drafted and did go into. The war and he ended up. Working. In many different jobs of public relations and reporter. He supposed in Honolulu he wrote for the military newspaper Stars and Stripes. He did a lot of comedy columns. He was discharged January twenty first nineteen, forty six at the ring of technician fourth grade. So Jerry is a veteran. During, her service in Hawaii. Seagull learned from shoes that DC comics had published a story featuring a child version called super boy. But this is a big controversy. To controversy because Jerry create. Super. Boy. and. Super Bowl? Even though it was a younger version of Superman was looked at. As. A second. Character. That will plan later with. Why The character being split while there was a super boy TV series. I. Was Basically Superman because they were trying to get away with using the name of how Jerry later after being fired from DC comics after him Joe? Try to get the rights back for Superman. They were fired, but then eventually, because Jerry's wife. He was able to return to DC comics. They had him writing and he got super boy. And He was. He held the rights for Super Bowl now. J. Was married twice his first wife. I have here my notes. I think. Bella -SEGO. MARRIED THIRTY MARRIED IN THIRTY NINE DENVER divorced and forty eight, a second wife Joanne single married nineteen, forty eight and divorced on divorced. Married till his death six. Now Joanne has a very interesting story as. Her fell in love. But it was Joe, who initially sought her and not as very kind of heartbreaking story and we'll get into that when we do our Joe Special. It was. Very interesting because. Joanne is actually. The inspiration character model for Lois Lane. And I think a lot of ways. In a lot of stories I think Clark Kent. Kinda represented Jerry. In Superman was what he wished he could be. Represents. A lot of all of us. Like of after a lot of legal battles. Jerry was able to. To write. He wrote stories that went on credit. See contributed a lot a lot of things for man through. The super boy stories go later on and be adapted into. Modern canonization. In one, thousand, nine, hundred, ninety, five, A. Upon hearing that Warner Brothers Producing Superman movie. -SEGO alerted the press of his conditions and gave much information to try to stir up interest. Through much deliberation and the help of Neal Adams and that's a great story to read to read about. Siegel. Jerry. is most known for creating the follow. Characters, Doctor. Occult..

Jerry superman Jerry Joe Orange Jerry Siegel National Allied Publications Cleveland science fiction magazine Joe Love Glendale DC ray Bradbury Neal Adams Warner Brothers Joanne High School Honolulu Clark Kent Ollie publisher
"siegel" Discussed on Krypton Report: The Supergirl Podcast

Krypton Report: The Supergirl Podcast

07:36 min | 11 months ago

"siegel" Discussed on Krypton Report: The Supergirl Podcast

"And super. We discussed games. Cartoons to. Find the FACEBOOK instagram. Youtube and twitter. Welcome to the Krypton report. This is a special episode I'm actually doing by myself. It's an episode that I didn't want to miss the opportunity fourth. It's already behind and explain why here momentarily. But. This is an episode that's a special birthday or just a tribute to Jerry Siegel. October twenty seventh lives Jerry's birthday and. What had happened was the family we had planned to go last week to the Siegel House because it's a nice monument to Jerry and JOE IN CLEVELAND. But some things happened in our personal lives that delayed that we were going to go on Thursday. But could not go. It's just been kind of. A battle. To get up there and be mega to go here soon but I wanted to go and get this out. It's kind of. Important. Jerry Siegel being the writer. And co-founder Superman and. This year I was able to complete reading the book, Super Boys IT IS A. Wonderful Book. By brattle ricker. It is a Kind of A. Biographical Tale of E. Things the boys went through and I would love to have him on the show one day and. break everything down and just talk about A. More than more indepth because it a great looked. At just the two men. Created Superman. So I just talk a little bit about Jerry today. One thing is. I like to write I. Don't know if I consider myself a writer, but I like to write. It's always been a passion and a fun thing. Tonight did you personally so I relate more with Jerry. I'm not a drawer. I can't draw I hate it because I was have ideas and never have anybody to work with to expand those ideas. So a lot of the things that I feel connected to I, feel from Jerry's writing. Also, one of the big things was just listening. To. PEOPLE TALK ABOUT JERRY And Pushes feeling. He's he's from Ohio. I live in Ohio and I feel a connection. With just the way my mind works and. Things kind of dream up and. Dream about and I don't think people recognize how important Jerry is to comic books in general. Without Jerry. ANDRO. You wouldn't get to marvel you get Stanley. And I don't think Jerry. Jones, enough appreciation brought they've come contributed. Are also referenced. So this year. I finished I read super voice. Great Great Book bought it on Amazon check it out. I also there's a special that was on AMC. By. Watches AMC and I've bought this and I re watched it and it's it is a great. Thirty minute quick documentary. If. You don't have a lot of time and. You're just like, I wanNA I. WanNa. Learn about. You know the struggles that Jerry Jones had. This is great. Quick. Way of doing. So and it's called Robert Kirkman secret history of comment. Came out in two, thousand, seventeen episode three. It's called the trial of Superman. And I just check it out I mean. It is. You won't be disappointed. That's all I'm GONNA say like. Is Amazing. Everything is just check it out and I'm. You? Know Just go get it. It's a buck ninety, nine on itunes if you get the standard definition, you know. I also follow on. facebook. The Jerry in Joseph's society. Historical Society basically out of Cleveland and I'm kind of rambling is kind of weird just doing myself. I've gotten so used to talking with James and Jimmy, Bryan and Phil and he graced us with his presence, any of the other level of guests that I've had over the years. It's weird being back to just me talking. And you this. Can I talk? To myself just now, I'm talking to myself into a microphone for other people to here. So it's not as weird. But. Let's let's. Learn. About. Jerry. Jerry or his birth name Jerome Segal was born October Seventeenth nineteen fourteen. And Sadly, passed away January twenty eighth nineteen, Ninety six. He used many different pseudo names in his rank loon Carter and Jerry S. He was an American Comic Book Writer, his most famous creation being superman. Siegel and Shuster show Shuster were inducted into the book. Industry Will Eisner Comic Book Hall, of Fame, in. One, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, two, and Jack Kirby Hall of fame in. Nineteen. ninety-three. Jerry was born in Cleveland Ohio. Yeah. That's why I've always thought that Smallville should have been. Ohio but that's me. In died at the age of eighty one in Los Angeles California. Jerry won many awards for his writing and contributions to comics. He when the bill finger. Award for excellence incumbent McCready postmortem in two, thousand and five. Jerry was of a Jewish family. His parents were both Jewish immigrants who lived in New York in one, thousand, nine, hundred. Having fled the anti-semitism in their native that the win. Yeah his father was born. Mikhail. Seagal of each. And as I've stated many times on the podcast I, apologize if I mispronounced names but once I hear name I'm good. So. Same thing. Real life. and his mother was born SORTA. Beata color else. I apologize once more. But they changed their name to Michael and Sarah Siegel after moving to America. Jerry was the last six children. His father was a tailor known to clothing store on June second one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, two. Jerry's father was assaulted in his store by shoplifter and suffered a fatal heart attack in Jerry's mother. died of heart attack in nineteen forty one..

Jerry Jerry Siegel Jerry Jones CLEVELAND Jerry S. Ohio writer Siegel House Youtube Krypton Superman brattle ricker Robert Kirkman twitter AMC Historical Society co-founder Seagal ANDRO
Climate Change Is A Top Campaign Issue  At Least For Democrats

Environment: NPR

06:54 min | 11 months ago

Climate Change Is A Top Campaign Issue At Least For Democrats

"This year climate change is a top campaign issue at least for Democrats. Yesterday, we looked at president trump's record. On the issue today, we'll explore toe Biden's plan, which is the most ambitious climate proposal. Any presidential candidate has ever laid out. We've got NPR's Nathan rods and NPR's Jeff Brady both of our climate team with us. Hi, guys good morning. So. Let's just the obviously our Joe Biden and Donald Trump do not exactly agree on climate? Change. Absolutely yeah I think that's a fair way to put it. President trump repeatedly rejects climate science and generally he depicts regulations to address climate. Change is bad for the economy and bad for jobs Joe Biden calls climate change existential threat to our health, our economy, our national security, the whole thing but he's also trying to frame it right now as an opportunity you know when? Donald. Trump thinks about climate change he thinks hoax. When I think about I think jobs. Good paying union opposite put. To work. Building a stronger more. Climate resilient nation I mean nate. That sounds great. But has he laid out a plan for how he would actually make that happen. Yes, and it is a lot Hewitt invest money for one climate. Change is part of his economic recovery plan for the pandemic. But he's also says he'll do executive actions right? Other Gate. He says he's GONNA re enter the Paris climate agreement and put the US back in the global climate conversation He's talking about conserving land for biodiversity stopping offshore drilling in the Arctic. Methane from existing oil and gas tell me when you want me to stop. But he's also putting money towards climate adaptation measures to make communities more resilient to sea level rise flooding hurricanes fires. You know the type of things we've experienced over the last few months and he's also promising massive investments in green energy and infrastructure. This is where the. Jobs part of what he's promising comes in. So that means more solar more wind high speed rail, electric car chargers all with the goal of zeroing out carbon pollution from our electrical sector by twenty, thirty five and making the country carbon neutral. So it's contributing anymore to climate change by twenty fifty. And I mean I know a lot of campaigns I mean the rhetoric is aspirational, right but even so I mean by twenty fifty shifting the entire US economy to be carbon neutral to sounds like a massive undertaking is he going to be able to accomplish that Jeff? You know most of the experts I've talked with thinking is possible. The plan includes a lot of executive actions. The Biden says, he would take right away some of the nature mentioned. It also this plan requires new laws passed by Congress to create policies for meeting that overall goal. Now, that's going to require a democratic majority in the Senate most likely I talked with Scott Siegel. He's a partner with the law firm Bracewell, which represents a lot of energy clients including fossil fuel companies, and you can imagine that they have a lot at stake care. He thinks guidance climate plan is realistic. He says, it includes both regulations and incentives for people. In Industries to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and I think when a plan has both and doesn't rely only on the carrot or the stick, it's a sign of maturity in approaching these issues. Siegel likes that it leaves room for some fossil fuels with carbon offsets and capture, and he points out that the electric power sector is already on its way to meeting that interim 2035 call some of those companies in utilities are setting net zero carbon goals all on their own. Yeah, and that's an important point. I talked to Karl Frisch who worked at the US Department of Energy under three administrations including trump's she's now at the Rocky Mountain Institute you know and I asked her if she thinks it could all be done by Biden alone if he gets elected. No. So to get where we need to go on climate in the United States to reduce emissions and build a sustainable economy, it takes action by the executive branch action by Congress. And action by state leaders, city leaders, business leaders on the ground, and she says, you know a lot of these actions are already happening at the local level. So a Biden administration would be smart to try to build on that existing momentum. So something we hear president trump attack Joe Biden on a lot is fracking fracking for natural gas. The president alleging that Joe Biden wants to ban it. Let's just clear this up Jeff Does Joe Biden WanNa. Ban fracking. No, he doesn't want to ban fracking. He has repeatedly said that he would not ban all fracking just new fracking on federal land and when trump says that it's aimed at voters and energy producing swing states like Pennsylvania, which actually has very little federal land but that's still a point of contention for for Biden, with mini climate activists who say the country should stop all fracking and keep all fossil fuels in the ground to slow climate change. So. What about the politics of climate change you know I mean we know what the facts are that it is happening that humans have contributed to it as well. But what about the politics of climate change because we know for Republicans it's an incredibly divisive issue where do Democrats stand on Biden's proposals? Well, polling indicates a majority of registered voters in the US view climate change as a real threat to the country, and when you look at Republicans climate change is actually a lot less divisive you get. But in terms of Democrats a recent poll by Pew found that more than two-thirds of Joe Biden supporters sit climate change is very important to them. So Biden's. Plan is not as ambitious as what some Progressive Democrats want to see it is not the green new deal despite what the president repeatedly says, but it is more ambitious than what Joe Biden had initially proposed. So for example, his plan now includes an environmental justice component which would aim to address the fact that people of color are disproportionately affected by pollution climate change and have been for a long time. His plan says he'd do that by investing in disadvantaged communities pulling polluters accountable I talked to Michelle Roberts with the Environmental Justice Health Alliance about this, and she has a long history with Biden because she's actually from Delaware, his home state and she says historically. Always overly supportive when it came to dealing with polluters like dupont over communities like hers he was a Filibuster for the political economy that was running the great state of Delaware. Does that make sense BA- Roberts says she's met with Biden since and she thinks his views have a she supports him but it's going to be important. She says if he's elected to hold them accountable all the things that he's promising to do now. NPR's nate wrought and NPR's Jeff. Brady, thank you for your reporting. Thank you. Thank

Joe Biden Donald Trump Jeff Brady President Trump United States Executive NPR Congress Scott Siegel Michelle Roberts Us Department Of Energy Nate Dupont Delaware Senate Nathan Hewitt
"siegel" Discussed on Kingpins

Kingpins

11:32 min | 1 year ago

"siegel" Discussed on Kingpins

"I am Hull Heart. I'm Kate Leonard and this is kingpins. Apar- cast original every Friday. We journey inside the ranks of Organized Crime Rings From Street gangs to mafiosos to understand how a kingpin or Queen Pin Rises to the top of the underworld why they fall as we follow the lives of infamous crime bosses will explore how money and power changed them and how it changed the community around them. You can find episodes of kingpins and all other podcast originals for free on spotify or wherever you listen to podcasts to stream kingpins for free on spotify. Just open the APP TAB browse anti kingpins in the search bar at park cast. We are grateful volt for you our listeners. You allow us to do it. We love let us know how we're doing reach out on facebook and Instagram at podcast and twitter at podcast cast network. And if you enjoy today's episode the best way to help us is to leave a five star review. Wherever you're listening? It really does help us. Today we begin again our dive into stone cold gangster. Benjamin Bugsy Siegel then was best known for founding the Flamingo Hotel and casino when the Flamingo opened it brought Las Vegas onto the national stage as a glitzy pop culture taste maker and high end Bochum risk this playground. This week will explore bins far less. Glamorous start on the grimy streets of New York in the nineteen twenties. He built his fortune inside the growing organized crime network in New York. Fostering a reputation as a sought after gun for hire and bootlegger next week. We'll follow oban out into the Nevada desert as he opens the Flamingo a move. That would change sin city forever in the summer of nineteen forty. Six Ben Siegel was a forty year old handsome knockout in a silk suit. His Blue Eyes popped underneath the brim of a matching hat. He was dead set on finishing construction on his dream. Hotel and casino the Flamingo. Oh but in the middle of the nineteen forties the US was experiencing a major shortage of building materials because of a boom in housing construction as world. War Two veterans flooded back into the country. Many of them with foreign brides. It became apparent that there weren't enough places for them to live the high demand for construction. Shen materials prioritized residential over commercial that meant raw materials like concrete wood copper and steel. Were incredibly the hard to come by for a project like the Flamingo. So been bought a plane. He instructed Robert Rupert A World War Two fighter pilot in his his employees to fly the plane all over the country looking for construction materials. He wanted them before anyone else could get their hands on them. Rupert protested tested. He knew no matter how fast he arrived at a supplier he wouldn't be able to get his hands on materials they simply weren't available but ben wasn't done yet been dumped a suitcase onto his desk. He unsnapped at and reveal stacks of cash inside one hundred thousand. I was in dollars which rupert should use to bribe suppliers rupert hesitated with this really work. He knew he couldn't say no. Not After Ben had bought him his first plane rupert looked back to his smiling boss and nodded the pile of cash worked like a charm charm while the rest of the country struggled to find enough materials to build badly needed housing. Ben Segel's contractors had all the copper INS deal they needed for the Flamingo. Ben Siegel New Hunter Flex to get things done and he knew how to do it in style. But with the materials in hand hand he still had another obstacle to hurdle been wanted his oasis to go up fast however that required getting around construction and licensing regulations relations so he turned to his closest government. Ally the portly senior Nevada. Senator Pat McCarron. Ben Bragged that he got got very good cooperation. From Karen. During the flamingos construction in exchange for some bribes when a government agency withheld authorisation. Shen for the Flamingos Construction August. Nineteen forty-six Ben said McCarron was going to pound the table with his fists to make it clear. The state of Nevada wanted the hotel constructed but bins best asset wasn't the money he slapped on the table for McCarron or the violent reputation shen that followed him from New York bins. Best asset was men like Rupert People. He could legitimately trust. Ben Couldn't by trust trust can only be built over time and over many shared illegal ventures his most trusted allies on the Flamingo. Project had ben in business with him. Since the beginning of his criminal career Mo said way. And Meyer Lansky Ben. I teamed up with most said way when they were running a protection. Racket on the streets of Manhattan by nineteen forty six said way was a balding fifty two euro Jewish gangster. Who ran the old cortes? It's a Vegas Casino. Owned by Ben Siegel said way was bins man on the ground in the desert it was said way who I got his foot in the door of the Flamingo. When it was just an empty lot he bailed out the properties first owner after his gambling debts grew unmanageable? And when the time was right he brought ben onto the project said way was also on the board of Directors of the Nevada Project Corporation. The company been founded to funnel cash cash into the Flamingo Project as a member of the board said way track the company spending and stood to take part of the prophet when the Flamingo opened another stockholder on the Nevada. Project and primary investor in the Flamingo was Meyer Lansky. Ben and Lansky were more than just just business associates. They were brothers. Their relationship went all the way back to the mean streets of New York City a time when every immigrant coming from Europe pass through Ellis Island and when the first generation of gangsters control the underworld Benjamin Siegel was born on February brewery twenty eighth nineteen o six and grew up. In New York's lower east side. He was the second of five children born to his Jewish immigrant. Parents Max and Jennie Segal. The SEGEL's came to New York in nineteen. Oh three they hailed from Galicia a province in the austro-hungarian empire at at the time about five thousand people in the area perished from starvation or malnutrition. Every year the Segel's knew that staying in Austria Hungary meant risking screen death. The conditions in New York were a little better but not by much. Max was a machine operator later in a pants factory. He worked eighteen hours a day and brought home an average of five hundred and thirty dollars a year like many immigrants. Living in New York. Money was always an issue. Everyone worked in order to survive even of surviving men living in a tiny mold. Ridden apartment without a private but toilet. By the Time Ben was eleven he had dropped out of school and worked a steady job with the United States trucking company but as he was driving up and down the streets he realized there was a quicker method of making money. When ben was growing up street gangs were practically mandatory for boys days since eighteen? Fifty gangs flourished along with the influx of immigrants from different ethnic groups on the lower east side. There were Italian gangs Irish Irish gangs and Jewish gangs been of course enlisted in a Jewish gang. A former gang member. From Ben's time reminisced about the streets. It's of New York. The gang was romance. Adventure had the zest of banditry the thrill of camp life and the lure of hero worship the gang gave young Ben Sense of pride power and purpose. The warfare between the groups taught him. That success depended on being harder. Crueler and smarter than everyone else Ben took to it. Naturally he and his fellow members served as protectors of their district against the Irish Irish and the Italians. He quickly built a reputation as a fearless street brawler but the primary draw for been was the fast money around nineteen twenty when Ben was just in his early teens he and two other boys entered alone office not far from their neighborhood. Having already case the place they knew the loan officers kept bags of change easily accessible on their desks as they serviced customers been in his conspirators snatched. Watch the coin bags and darted back out the doors onto the street scattering in every direction Ben recalled fondly. I had to run like health for about ten blocks carrying two bags full of small change before the Guy Chasing us ran out of breath and quit. It might have been better if they caught me because after that I was game for anything Ben was hooked. Though he continued to work a variety of jobs. It was crime that became his driving. Force crime brought him money. Respect travel women and his best friends including his lifelong friend. Meyer Lansky in their first. Meeting has become the stuff of legend and there are several different versions of the stories circulating in Gangland Lore what follows is the version landscape has told around nineteen twenty a group of local hoodlums. Drunks were in the streets playing a game of craps. It's been in Lansky were among the participants the stakes were high and that meant everyone in. Attendance was on a hair trigger at one one point. Someone accused another of unfair play. That accusation was all it took for weapons to be drawn knives iron in bars and even guns in a few seconds. The craps game escalated into an all out brawl. The police arrived within minutes Lansky was making his exit when he noticed. been fighting with another boy over a revolver Lansky knew that only an idiot Sheila Mazal which shoot with the cops insight instead of running Lansky stopped and pulled ben out of the fray. He told him you're you're crazy. Drop the gun and run as the cops inched closer and closer. They knew they were running out of time. Ben was torn. Did he stay and fight for the gun or give up and save his own skin.

Meyer Lansky Ben Ben Siegel Ben Segel Nevada New York City Meyer Lansky Rupert People Manhattan Benjamin Bugsy Siegel Flamingo Hotel Ben Sense Senator Pat McCarron Flamingo Project spotify US facebook Apar Kate Leonard Hull Heart Robert Rupert
"siegel" Discussed on Kingpins

Kingpins

02:12 min | 1 year ago

"siegel" Discussed on Kingpins

"Due to the graphic nature of this kingpins crimes listener discretion is advised this episode includes discussions of murder and sex that some people may find offensive. We advise extreme caution for children. Under thirteen January nineteen forty seven the opulent Flamingo. Hotel and casino had been open less than a month but was already the talk of Las Vegas. The casino created a new who standard of luxury. For Sin City the carpeting was plush. The walls were upholstered in green leather. Even the dealers were Tuxedos. The proud owner and manager forty year old. Benjamin Siegel bounced around the casino floor. Charming the guests with his Hollywood good looks and sharp sharp suit and on this January night he decided to step in for one of the blackjack dealers. The players were cheered as been laid out out the next hand but the mood soured quickly. When one of the players referred to Ben as Bugsy Siegel Bugsy Bugsy Ben hated that nickname it was a disrespectful reminder of his street gang origins a past? He didn't want publicized publicized. His lip curled into a snarl as he returned the greeting saying. I'm pleased to meet you too. Goodbye the obtuse news player couldn't take a hint he retorted. I ain't going nowhere till I make up my mind to leave then smiled then. He nodded led to the nearby security guards and silently stepped away. The Brawny Guards lifted the offending player from his seat carried him off the casino floor floor and threw him onto Las Vegas Boulevard. That player was no longer welcome at the Flamingo and his punishment had the effect Ben was looking for word. Spread quickly. Never call him. Bugsy.

Bugsy Siegel Bugsy Bugsy Ben Benjamin Siegel Las Vegas Brawny Guards Las Vegas Boulevard murder Hollywood
"siegel" Discussed on You Must Remember This

You Must Remember This

02:26 min | 2 years ago

"siegel" Discussed on You Must Remember This

"Benjamin Bugsy Siegel famously hated to be called Bugsy, although stories vary as to whether he earned that nickname as a Jewish kid on the playgrounds of New York or as an up and coming gangster on the streets of New York. It was in the latter. Milieu that Seagal I met George raft. Who by the early nineteen thirties would become one of the biggest gangster film stars in Hollywood. But during the nineteen twenties. Raft was a struggling dancer who sometimes slept in the subway. Prohibition. Was scrambling ideas of right and wrong of legality and respectability. I felt there was no difference between a gangster ended detective raft. Recalled later to him. They had the same methods of working and were just trying to outsmart each other more than that the gangsters had great. Suits, and nice cars and more often than not the police would step aside and let them have their way raft. Idolized the crooks later when raft portrayed gangsters and movies. He would tell the hairstylist to comb his hair just like Bugsy Siegel war his hair at first. This was an inside joke between the two old friends. But then Siegel showed up in Hollywood. Then had been arrested when he was twenty years old on a charge of rape, the accuser recanted. Her story apparently under some pressure from Segel's associates, and the charges were dropped Siegel was already climbing the ranks of the New York Jewish mafia. He married a girl he grew up with esta crack, our and had two kids the family was stored in scarsdale while Siegel stayed in the city seemed to his business which revolved around the sale of bootleg booze. But then prohibition ended and the mob had to look for new ways to keep making money. The syndicates Siegel was part of headed by Meyer Lansky decided to expand into new geographic areas Siegel.

Benjamin Bugsy Siegel George raft Siegel New York Hollywood scarsdale Meyer Lansky Seagal Segel rape twenty years
"siegel" Discussed on The Smoking Tire

The Smoking Tire

04:20 min | 3 years ago

"siegel" Discussed on The Smoking Tire

"Alright, on this episode of the show, interviewing a man named Robert Siegel. He's the director of a new movie called cruise. Cruz is a really cool flick. I checked it out. It is set against the cruising and street racing culture of Long Island and queens in the nineteen eighty s and I watched it with a keen car guy and both aesthetically and technically and the dialogue. The car stuff is right on point. Actually, it's really, really accurate car stuff. And if you grew up in the northeast in the eighties or the nineties, this is going to be a very familiar podcast and a very familiar movie. The director of the movie crews, Robert Siegel in studio. Oh, on the smoking tar podcast. So the film hits close to home. It seems like we're now in this is the show. Now we're now doing the show a little. We can start keying. Interesting. Sleaze. All right. We can curse whatever the fog. It's all good. There's CC. It's brilliant, Robert Siegel, ladies and gentlemen. Do you prefer rob Robert? When he let me just test the mic. Fuck shit. Fuck. Fuck shit cock. Sucker motherfucker works. It's good. It's good. Robert. What do you like. Prob. All right. Robert is being done to Bob ro. No, you're not. I have an ankle Bob. That's Robert. I also have an uncle Richard who goes by dick, which I don't understand the voluntary is a very old slicking to seventies. He's not that old. He's he wears shit like a badge though he wants, he really wants to be any wants to be. Oh yeah, he, I think he really likes it rob Siegel. Hello, sir. Nice to meet you. Nice to meet you. I I watched your film last night crews, new movie. I liked it night even though it's like a romantic kind of movie. It is totally set against a backdrop even though there things besides cars in it. Some. Yeah. Yeah. Although Qadam do you get the cars in you got the cars cars in that. So you've been around a little bit. You wrote the wrestler? Yeah, which was awesome. Thank you. And you wrote the founder, which I fucking love. I love the founder. Thank you. Yeah, Kroc was a piece of shit. Yeah. How do we tell me? Can we I wanna talk about here is your new movie, but I also wanna talk about the founder a little bit. I probably don't know enough about cars to fill in our, so let's do twenty. That's fine. I bet you do. I bet you do. We'll see based on the film, I bet you. So you're from New York from New York? Yeah. Grew up on Long Island where a Long Island Merrick sows? No, yes. A little bit. My my fiance is from Long Beach. So I know I know the north shore of the south shore a whole fucking I'm from Westchester. So I've been around on beaches, trendy now, people are Long. Beach is cool at people are moving their wants a hurricane trashed, it. It was like, wow, I can get an ocean front home prices dropped and they brought boardwalk. My fiance's parents house is literally front row in long and it got Taraq Andy. Yeah, they did houses. They don't even rebuild somebody didn't, but you know what they're doing now is they're lifting him. Who want to stay in rebuild are raising their houses like ten, twelve feet off the ground. It's really bizarre. It looks like, what am I gonna get to their house? This fucking staircases instant. Yeah, and they have these weird carports and then just a bunch of air and a tallest, it's so bizarre, but they're doing it just moving land. Yeah. How ground level house now, you know what something about that see air man. Yeah. Yeah. No, I know I live in Venice and there's going to be a storm and it's going to take my shit right out. You know h I'm close enough that that I won't be escaping. I'm one of those little walk streets. Oh, you probably it's probably right. Where am I'm on eighteenth place? Oh yeah. You're not far from my house. Dang Airbnb. There you go. Airbnb venison, what's up? Oh yeah. There's a lot of them. A lot of mounted surfboards on wall. Every house I go walk into everyone's. Got, that's what you do with your whole bores. You turn them into art. You got to create the Venice vi-. You never see surfboards on walls in New York City, the south shore, you might a Long Beach. They surf actually do surf a..

Robert Siegel Long Island dick founder rob Robert Long Beach Kroc Venice Airbnb New York City Bob ro Cruz Taraq Andy Long Island Merrick rob Siegel hurricane Qadam New York Westchester
"siegel" Discussed on Mafia

Mafia

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"siegel" Discussed on Mafia

"Welcome back to mafia and this audio boom original podcast series we explore america's criminal underworld to reveal the lives and careers of its greatest gangsters our sponsors for this episode are ziprecruiter and dollar shave club this series has been extensively researched and produced in consultation with experts authors and those who were actually there previously on mufida ben siegel wasn't a make pretend tough guy he was a out an out killer hollywood actually thought they saw in bugsy siegel a star they thought that bugsy siegel was you know he he was mafia he was everything that the hollywood try to envision when they did their movies bugsy siegel was a hitman a mafia guy they loved it they loved him and i all site in this news comes out that he possibly murdered somebody and it opened their eyes like oh my god like you're actually the gangster we thought you were just pretending to be so at this point you know his life was ruined in hollywood i was just desert town pretty empty weeds overflowing it was not the glamorous world that he's leaving behind but he had a vision for it and he was out to make it the next destination that he could be the king of benjamin bugsy siegel was a jewish street kid who rose through the rain so lucky luciano mob to become one of the most feared and vicious gangsters on the west coast but bundy's ego and love of the highlife would get the better of him and ultimately lead to his downfall there was a.

bugsy siegel hollywood bundy america
"siegel" Discussed on Mafia

Mafia

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"siegel" Discussed on Mafia

"One who to be totally relied on having wiped out his opposition luchino took command it was a criminal revolution establishing the modern mafia in america uniting feuding gangs into a criminal impair powerful enough to thrive and outwit the authorities for decades to come for his role in making all this possible for luchino ben siegel was assured of privileged position ben siegel was tremendous asset to somebody like luchino and lucina was a tremendous asset to somebody like segal he traveled the country coordinating takeovers of local mobs and rackets the gangster life suited him to a tee for ben siegel it was all about the display it was all about the style it was all about what people thought and for the approval hungry siegel what better way to impress than with a string of high class women bugsy siegel had these baby blue is in fact he was known as baby blue eyes and he was playboy mobster he had this rough edge around him but he's also irresistible you know he he owned the room when he walked in and that's what women loved about him with siegel never really had any of the great business ideas it was usually lansky alone who dreamt up the money making schemes all that is apart from one to nineteen twenty eight he had lansky what come under the ages of on rothstein the famous jewish organized crime came and monitor maya will shine in the great gaps got to be.

bugsy siegel rothstein america ben siegel segal lansky
"siegel" Discussed on Mafia

Mafia

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"siegel" Discussed on Mafia

"They then paid one dollar per week per push god to this fourteen year old street punk name ben siegel but it established him as a isci criminal let's put it that way he was not the only sacrame loose on the other kids involved in those guys activties but he was a guy very earliest average that this is somebody who's a bad seed it's that simple now the bugs came from the fact that friends of sequel began to say you know he's crazy as bedbug which got short to bugsy bugsy was meant as an affectionate little name you know like you say mugsy in bugsy bendon didn't see it that way for the rest of his life you called him bugsy to his face at your peril he would kill you together siegel and lansky were now making good money the books mall was burqa lading along prohibition health because now suddenly this gang of petty thieves which is what they were fundamentally sunday could start making real money my running beer runs by hijacking trucks they are themselves out often as shotgun on major liquor shipments and then lansky in the first of his great innovative criminal light is came up with the beauty he said you know these people who get into the boot like business that kind of problem the eight trucks and cars to move this stuff trucks in gaza expensive so they started a riddick our business if you were into the business you could go to meyer and sequel and rent the truck for certain amount of money a day this does the predecessor of avis hertz and raise the now the virtue of that from the from segel's and lastly standpoint is that the overhead was quite low why because they stole all these vehicles they steal them in rent them out beautiful more after a word from our sponsor.

ben siegel bugsy bendon gaza meyer avis hertz segel bugsy bugsy lansky fourteen year one dollar
"siegel" Discussed on Mafia

Mafia

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"siegel" Discussed on Mafia

"Welcome back to mafia and in this audio boom original podcast series we explore america's criminal underworld to reveal the lives and careers of its greatest gangsters our sponsor for this episode of mafia is hymns ben siegel wasn't a make pretend tough guy he was out and out killer he was driven by power money status and sex bugsy siegel is an american mob legend he's the guy who dreamt up las vegas he put the glitz and glamour into sin city this is muffin benjamin bugsy siegel grew up in brooklyn and by a young age had already developed a reputation for violence and a flair for making a buck through theft and extortion he was desperate to prove himself but in the nineteen twenties opportunities for jewish hoodlums were severely limited ernest volkmann author of gang bangers you had roy stick divisions between the various ethnic gangs jews didn't even go into talion woods atanas didn't even go onto jewish naval it's much less cooperate on crime but in nineteen twenty nine the world opened up for young siegel when an up and coming talion american mastermind charles lucky luchino realized that segregation of the different ethnic criminal groups was bad for business here was luchino saying we're going to cooperate i don't care these jewish he doesn't care from it down guess what she just donald bill here okay does that look jewish your talion to you is pretty neutral right that was his point if you if you organize and you put her on a business basis who the hell cares what you are doesn't doesn't make any difference that whole distinction doesn't make any sense anymore a true capitalist doesn't care about race or religion eric doesn't whole author of the devil himself and luchino recognized that if you keep the rackets just to italian 's you cut out a lot of great earners.

benjamin bugsy siegel brooklyn theft luchino america ben siegel las vegas extortion ernest volkmann roy donald bill
"siegel" Discussed on MeatEater Podcast

MeatEater Podcast

01:47 min | 4 years ago

"siegel" Discussed on MeatEater Podcast

"Same kids it'll go down to the ocean collect all kinds of emails and little fish improvement of bucket to suffocate overnight yes you like name inla's let slower going to die he's like but a siegel or i'm sorry a see cucumber wept over the death of the sea cucumber so i don't run around spend a ton of time like thinking that there's something wrong with what seems to be like really natural things about my kids and i do put a tunnel weight on what were my experiences the more the experience the people that i love and associate with the most and the people that i associate with the most and that i loved the most grew up around catching fish caught in the mob mclean them shoot squirrels cotton up and clean them and they turned into like despite all of it turned into like be most stellar individuals that i've found on the face of the plan some does not going to now like by in the study that we need the question that all new we took some folks into the fray church wilderness couple of weeks ago one of which was a pesca terrier that had never killed her own fish so took care of that and another gala who had never caught or killed a fish looking explain as a she was just eating fish eating bread is the only protein yana in this is because i i put out a big spread for the first nine the only animal protein yeah only animal protein and i took it to mean like oh you just don't like processed.

inla siegel