34 Burst results for "Siebel"

"siebel" Discussed on The gamingfixx1's Podcast

The gamingfixx1's Podcast

04:22 min | 3 weeks ago

"siebel" Discussed on The gamingfixx1's Podcast

"It's a little easier to understand rather than saying we're doing something out of our understanding and it's crazy and now it's let's humanized this as much as we can't like the respectful you're going we're going into this place where this thing may reside so do their home and say hey thanks for having us. We appreciate you having your. We're not here to bother you. We come out of respect that and we get a lot of positive results clients because we approach it that way but a report with reality. That doesn't always work. I've been in five major deals for tv shows over the years. And you know sorry to say this might be true for some people might not be but reality is not reality. it's all set up in scripted. They create characters. They do all that they tried to turn us into characters. And i- staedtler flick. I know the taps originally was a very solid team before they started their show and Ghost hunters that's what was your when they started ghost hunters and then they got them to on the producers got them to go with a A setup and after that nobody you know like yeah taps taps sold out because they were willing to do that whole string stupid thing. That was barely siebel. That's all it's dumb. it's like i mean you know. If like if they were going to do something they should have been like. Let's have a let's have a brick that you know. I don't know something like you know. Ready on the wall or something because it was so just barely there and it was. It was an interesting thing that happened. Where but the fact was faked. It's like oh yeah. They've been caught a few things that people are able to call out. I met a girl who actually was on. This was years ago. Like i want to say like the first season was very solid in real Routed real oh this legit and over time and saw. They got more exaggerated. More things started happening. I've been doing this a long time. And you're lucky when you get evidence like very luck even if you're going to most haunted places in the world this stuff is not like a dog. We can't say sit up jump took around now. i win. i went on one. Goes.

siebel
Rose McGowan Accused Gov. Newsom's Wife of Trying to Silence Her About Harvey Weinstein

5 Things

01:56 min | Last month

Rose McGowan Accused Gov. Newsom's Wife of Trying to Silence Her About Harvey Weinstein

"Recall election day in california. Voters are deciding whether democratic governor gavin newsom should be recalled and if so who should replace him conservative talk show host. Larry elder remains the favorite in the opponents field but recent polling shows that new some will probably remain in office. The election grew out of frustrations with newsome's pandemic orders that closed schools and businesses. For months and elders camp has recently been trying to distract from on field politics. He was joined by activist and former actress. Rose mcgowan on sunday. She was one of the earliest women to accuse. Producer harvey weinstein of sexual misconduct. And she now says that newsome's wife jennifer siebel. Newsom tried to convince her in twenty seventeen not to go public with allegations zoos about me projects and nationalize when she says invoice shoulder to make you happy so i sent my other contact and on behalf of attorney voice who's harvey weinstein's lawyer and call rose mcgowan and said what can we do to make you all way. What can we do to make this. Happy all to be talking between now and the end of my campaign. Newsom is denying that calling them part of a politically driven hit piece. So i guess. They are doing a last-minute minute classic piece a she's a big promoter of larry elder. Apparently rose is identifying with him over us and is been making some pretty outrageous and absolutely Foundation this accusations against my wife and that just shows you how low Things go in campaigns these days.

Newsome Larry Elder Rose Mcgowan Harvey Weinstein Gavin Newsom Jennifer Siebel Newsom California Rose
Rose McGowan Says Gavin Newsom's Wife Tried to Silence Her About Harvey Weinstein

Mark Levin

01:44 min | Last month

Rose McGowan Says Gavin Newsom's Wife Tried to Silence Her About Harvey Weinstein

"Now Here's what Rose McGowan actually said at this press conference Cut 23 Go gives me no pleasure. To be the bearer of truth, which is sometimes ugly. But do you want a society that has gangrene on his leg, but puts on a fancy suit and pretend it's not there while they hobble and pain? What do you want to just stop? Look at reality. Take your medicine clean up the wound. And run. Run free. Why not change? Why not go big? Why not put a stake in the heart of evil? Because that's what this really is. This is good, and this is evil. And if you're tired of people looking at this country like the Florida of the world, which it is looked upon that way, because you know it's earned in a lot of ways. Um I know this place has it in it to be better. I know it does. I have met so many good people in this country, not the elite. Absolutely not. But the person I meet, you know That's the housekeeper. The hotel was staying at Um, who shouldn't even have that title because she's a queen of a woman. And then we have the Jennifer Siebel Newsom's of the world. Mhm. Why Why do you keep choosing that? Why do you keep electing that? Don't listen to their buzzwords called leaders, which is what these people are. I would know. I grew up in one. Like I said, they massage your mind. They keep your fear. They keep you in doubt. Mhm. They do all those

Rose Mcgowan Jennifer Siebel Newsom Florida
Aisha Praught Leer on Qualifying for Team Jamaica for the Tokyo Games

Ali on the Run Show

02:56 min | 2 months ago

Aisha Praught Leer on Qualifying for Team Jamaica for the Tokyo Games

"The first thing that i actually want to get into and i think we've probably talked about this before. But can you explain to us the process of being on team jamaica. Because we know that you compete for jamaica. We also know that every country has a different way of picking their olympic teams in different sports but especially in track and field. So can you tell us how you earn your spot to get to run that. Fifteen hundred tokyo for team jamaica. Yes so jamaica has child system that is nearly identical to the us. Top three at the trials plus a qualifying mark or inacceptable World ranking on the descending order list gives you your spot to the olympics or whatever team might situation gets a bit unique. Because i am as of this moment. The only runner above fifteen hundred meters that has internationally competitive times and can hit national can hit international standards or be accepted on world ranking so often timelines. It's up to whether or not other people sign up for the trials It's it's an open system for jamaica. There are. i mean. There are standards to to enter the trials. But they're bit slower markedly slower than than the standards in the us And it's just an open registration system and it's always very hanway for me Whether or not occupied trials. I competed at the trials in twenty fifteen. I ran the fifteen hundred Even i went on to race. The siebel chase iran the shortest distance that i thought other people would sign up for which is the fifteen hundred. So did that in twenty fifteen there were three. Other competitors I won the race. And i ended up lapping. A woman in the race A masters runner and since two thousand fifteen. No-one has entered the fifteen hundred jamaica at and that means that. I have not competed at the trials since two thousand fifteen so i was just waiting on bated breath to see if anybody would register for the trials this year in the fifteen hundred so that i could go and compete at trials You know it's. It's a blessing in a curse to not have to compete at your trials. It allows me to take on other Competitive opportunities are not speaking for trials. But you also don't get to race with the opportunity to come national

Jamaica Hanway Olympic Tokyo Olympics United States Iran
"siebel" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

08:14 min | 4 months ago

"siebel" Discussed on Recode Decode

"If you apply with work at a start up and you look interesting a founder will actually reach out to an engaged with you Which i think is a completely unique experience so we got a nail the earliest age and then we have to figure out at every stage of our companies. How do we help them succeed. That sounds like a lot of work. How does y combinator make money on the back of all that. So we invest so we're investment shoprite so for why see The standard deal that every early stage company agreed to is. We invest hundred twenty five k. For seven percent of the company and then continuity is a growth fund they invest at whatever market founder interested in and we make money as a fund. What's interesting about why see though is just how much of the operation of the fund is funneling back into. How do we make our program better the early program having early program better how to make the series eight to program better how to make the program better. Basically a lot of what we're trying to do is figure out how to give our companies more and more advantages as opposed to just kind of how to line our pockets. Eventually i think he said sixteen thousand companies apply. That's a lot more than the beginning. You have multiple batches per year. How big are the current batches. The current batches range anywhere between hundred to four hundred companies. And you mentioned applications increasing. It's crazy in the last ten years. Applications increase twenty x. nyc has around a two percent admissions rate. So it's still pretty hard to get in but as more and more talented founders applied are strict goal has been. How do we make sure why he can. Scale to support as many deserving founders as companies as possible so as more apply we figure out how to make y. And better so. I asked every executive for their decision making process. I feel like with you as only one decision making process people want to know about. How do you decide who gets into a licey badge. I think what is so weird about why is that. Because we're funding batches of companies. We have a very different decision making process than a normal investor normal series and might only write two checks a year. The other thing that's different about why sees a lot of companies change. Iterative it after getting into y. See so you can't get too caught up in the idea. And then the third challenge we have is that were often amongst the first investors. So we have founders. Who are aiming for some moment ten years from now. We have the sing. We don't want to be too smart. We don't want to be too thesis driven right. We don't really know how the world's gonna be ten years from now founders invent that world and so the more opinionated we are about their idea or their market. The more were being too smart. So what are we look for yourself. We don't really care about the things we care about. I does the team have the ability to build the product. You know our original. Dna of wiessee was funding technical founders. And the reason why is because we felt like they had an advantage in building a product in the software world. That's still core so almost all of our teams have a technical co founder and can build a product themselves. they're not relying on contractors or consultants or anything else number two. Does the team have a pre existing relationship. It's extremely stressful to do a startup. And why is stressful as a program as well if the team has some pre existing personal or work relationship the founders have some confidence that that relational survive the stress. The founders met two weeks ago harder three can the founders clearly communicate what they're working on now. This is one that like. I never understood as a founder by was like judge mcgrath's if my graphs going up give me money and i think what i didn't realize was that the founders journey goes from being kind of doer to inspirer when the product works and so one of the things. You're trying to figure out as ken. These folks inspire the ten employees the hundred employees the thousand employees who will ultimately be the doers in the company. And it's really hard to inspire people if you don't communicate clearly the next one that we try to figure out is what is your connection to the problem like what is going on. Why do you care about this customer about this problem. And if we go a step deeper. Are you going to care about this problem for the next one year or the next five years the next ten years because the startup journey takes a long time. We're really trying to figure out. Are you in this kind of get rich. Quick category or is. There's something deeper tying youtube this problem that you're solving that's gonna keep you motivated over the longtime and i think the last thing that we think about a lot is. How much have you accomplished in the period of time. You've been working i think there's a set of founders. Basically believed that step one in their company is to raise money. And so you'll see some folks who oh we've been doing it for two years. We haven't built a product yet. We've just been pitching the whole time. As opposed to teams were. They're saying hey look we're technical we can build even if we have to do at nights and weekends has reboots dropping. We want to get the first of the product out there. We want to drive. Get the i ten customers. We want to look at. How long were in the startup. And what you've accomplished and we wanna be impressed in a little afraid because we believe that if you can accomplish a lot with a little than if given more resources you can do even more. So that's what you look at and to be honest. We default positive. Like if you're telling us this is a problem. We'll kind of assume it is if you hung us. This is a big market kind of assume it is like our job isn't to kind of second guessed your idea. It's really to figure out. Can you execute towards it. How do you square that with. How often combinator companies pivot inside the boot camp. Because i that's maybe the most common stories you get accepted to. Why see it was really hard. You got idea you're a weekend. Amanda idea collapse. You pivot and something else entirely exists. How do you square. You know it's funny. We are great. Thanks so put another way right. We aspire to hit all of those points that i mentioned. I wouldn't even give us an a a doing it. Maybe maybe minus and so what's cool about. Our model is that it accommodates with also cool about our model is. Sometimes those pivots are good right. I was co founder of justin. Tv we pivot to twitch it worked out sometimes in the process of start up. You learn something you learn that your course options were wrong. And that's okay. Let's be clear if you can execute them. When you acquire that new information you can incorporate and you could do something with it. if you can't execute you might not even learn doing the wrong thing and when you learn. You're doing the wrong thing. It's very hard to switch so we don't mind when people pay no. Let's be clear right. Most companies don't pivot. I think there's this perception like percent. Companies are pivoting all the time and i think pivot is being used in extremely aggressive ways. Nowadays kind of the cool term fox media has a whole podcast called pivot. It's the hip thing to do. They go they go. You know someone described y sees model as anti fragile. We don't try to be too right and there's a very very small downside of a wrong which allows us to give founders of benefit of the doubt and what's funny is that so many people were y c were alums and i think that we would argue. The why see definitely gave us the benefit of the doubt. I mean just in. Tv started as an online reality tv. Show where my co-founder justin was wearing a camera on his head and broadcasting his life. Twenty four seven right lake. I mean twitches kind of ended up right back where it started. I'm just saying it wasn't the most obvious idea fair. Just say they just launched the hot tub category because where we right back to the start. Wouldn't take a quick break but when we come back ask michael how to shift to remote work and how that has changed my combinator..

youtube two years seven percent michael Amanda sixteen thousand companies ten years two weeks ago hundred thousand employees four hundred companies third challenge step one twenty five k. first hundred employees ten employees first investors two checks a year three
"siebel" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

06:35 min | 4 months ago

"siebel" Discussed on Recode Decode

"Okay michael sable managing director of y combinator. Here we go do michael sable. You're the managing director at y combinator. Which is one of the most famous startup incubator in the world. You're also the co founder of social injustice. Tv which is the company that became twitch. Welcome to decoder. Thanks for having me. I want to talk to you about twitch creator economy. I want to do a little bit later. But let's start with y. Combinator here's my understanding of what. Why does why combinator takes small investments in very small scrappy startup teams. You put them through a boot camp which has gained somewhat mythical and legendary status for how rigorous it is and then you have like a pitch session called demo day also somewhat mythical status in that demo day helps people get larger rounds of funding. That seems very simple. But like i said there's a lot of myth around it. And i know there's a lot of actual process inside of y combinator walk through that entire cycle and then kind of demystified a little bit unhappy too so i think we want to start with. What were the problems that y c was created to solve the first problem for any founder raising Funding traditionally is that they needed warm introductions. They need pre existing relationships. The second problem is the after. No all the best practices around creating a deck tech powerpoint deck. Exactly this is a very small very big problem right. Exactly it's actually. It's it's extremely scrutinized. And i think almost silly. It reminds me a tps report in office. Deputy the third problem is they're negotiating against an investor. I so the first relationship with the investors negotiation and one. That's not transparent. They don't know if the company before them or after them raised more or less got better or worse terms so the fourth problem is for the longest time. Technical people were not being only business. People only people. Nba's and the fifth problem was that after funding the relationship was only with the investor. The founder wasn't given a community of founders to learn from to get support from to grow with so why is essentially created to solve all five of those problems. And so if we go through one you don't have to know us. All you have to do is go to the website and applied to you. Don't have to do deck literally. All you have to do is an application. That's kind of like a college application or job applications when people have done three you'd have to negotiate with us. All of our terms are right on the website. Both the general terms and the legal docs said before you even ask us for money. You know the exact terms will invest at four. We put you in a cohort of other companies so that you're not only getting help from us but you're getting a community of people who can help you and that's why see that's what makes a great and so it turns out that those problems still exist. Even though i c sixteen years old and that's why sixteen thousand companies apply. See every six months. So it's interesting to me about that. Is why comedy was started to solve the problems. In some ways you have helped to solve a lot of them. Those problems will continue to exist. You'll continue trying to solve them. But after sixteen years. Why combinator is kind of the center of the universe for startup. accelerators like it has. Gravity is very influential the way that it works Influences how other people do things other lawyers are started in that disruptor lane anymore. I don't know that we're not in that. Disruptor phase most successful companies still don't do accelerators and so i would argue that Most founders today are still starting the process by negotiating with normal investors and confronting. Those same problems. I would say that there are more investors now and certainly more investors are tech friendly and founder friendly than they used to be sixteen years ago. But what's interesting. Is that half of wise investments. Now our international in those communities they look like the valley in two thousand and five or even worse in terms of founder friendliness. So i don't think the disrupting task isn't done yet now. Of course there's new things that we're doing to that we didn't do in two thousand and five but i would say that like men if the disrupting task was done if all founders didn't have to encounter those five problems mention the beginning i'd retire. I'd be like hey chainsaw community for the better. But i mean to speak to the new challenges. What's interesting about the people who run. Why seeing now is that so many of us were wisey alum so i did y see in two thousand and seven and then again in two thousand twelve and during that period of time why he was really just focused on the batch and one of the things that alum always talked about was what are the other services why c could provide you after the batch to after you graduate. You're gone through demo day. And you've got new investment after you've raised your seat around and we came up with this tag phrase like you know y c is with you from cradle to ipo. But we had to kind of ask yourself. What are we doing after the bath. And so what's been great is in the last six years or so we've really stacked more products post batch for our alumni and so we've a program called series to be which is a program for companies after the raise their series to help them figure out how do you kind of encounter the next stages. The next challenges of a company post series. We actually put them in a new batch of why see companies and a smaller batch so they had to have new pierce who at their stage. We've a growth program for companies. That are way. Post product market fit. They're really focusing on hiring and company. Scaling build executive team once again. Put them in new batch. And we have the continuity fund which the growth fund that can actually write twenty five fifty seventy five million dollar checks in the companies that are further along. We also have a little product that i love that desperately wished existed when i was going through which work startup so we basically built a common application that allows anyone to apply to all y. c. companies at the same time so anyone who wants to work at a startup they can apply in one website and then all of our companies can sort through the people who are applying reach out to them and the really cool part about that product is for the most part founders of the ones using it.

michael sable twitch two thousand sixteen thousand companies five problems fifth problem five sixteen years ago Both fourth problem three third problem twenty five fifty seventy five four today first second problem first problem sixteen years old one
"siebel" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

02:28 min | 4 months ago

"siebel" Discussed on Recode Decode

"Recently joined the board at read it after co founder alexis. Oh hand step down and asked the company to replace him with somebody who's black. That means michael is uniquely suited to talk about a lot of things. I'm really interested in exploring on decoder starting and growing business finding opportunities for new ideas the growing crater economy and making sure the next generation of business leaders doesn't look exactly the same as last one so this was gonna be great. So here's why i'm frustrated. We record these episodes ahead of time. And michael and i sat down last week and had a really direct really interesting conversations but all the things i mentioned then a couple of days later to start at founders who had been part of y combinator tweeted. They had been kicked out of the program for criticizing one founder. Paul bigger said he was kicked out for tweeting about founders skipping vaccine lines in march and another customer said she was kicked out for raising issues with the program. She thought misogynistic. She said quote. Why c has systematically disadvantaged female founders for years. These are big issues and given that michael. And i had specifically talked about making it easier for diverse founders to succeed. I invited him to come back and talk about them. He said no instead y combinator sent along the following statement which you will note does not address the substance of those issues and all. Here's the statement. We don't provide details into why people get removed from the white sea communities but both tweet threads are not accurate. There were not removed for the content of their posts but for breaking the terms of the community. One of our most important rules. We don't share anything from the forum with anyone outside. Why see this is a community built on trust in privacy. Now i don't really know what to make of that statement especially because one of the things michael talked about the most passionately in our conversation was demystifying like combinator by widely in openly sharing information and the criticisms of why see here are not that new so thought it would be appropriate for michael to come and explain all this. We followed up. We asked again. We tried to make the case. And this is the reply we got here. It's sentence michael isn't available for zoom. Call this week given interviews chart anyhow look. There's a lot in this conversation worth thinking about. And i did enjoy speaking with michael but i talked to a lot of leaders about making decisions on the show and a half to say. I don't understand this decision.

michael last week One this week march one both tweet a couple of days later Paul bigger one founder alexis
Will they take our Guns?

Talks with Chepe

02:19 min | 7 months ago

Will they take our Guns?

"Right so. I was thinking of the episode. We're gonna do the myth fact debunking the guy the gun. Lobby's favorite talking points because listen every time there's a mass shooting we always get the same you know same. Bs oh we're gonna we're gonna try to pass a law. Try to pass them temple reform from the left and then the right conseillers the trend. They're trying to they're trying to gones you know and i get it. It can look that way because these measures are you know trying to ban assault rifles from a ban certain type of ammo band bump stocks. Hold all these different things in. It can be a lot for somebody to understand or digest or to even think about when it comes majority was don't even have guns so it doesn't even come to our thoughts like oh let me by gun but it has been more and more common especially nowadays with the craziness. Going around people. Being tapped will being killed the pandemic. It's like the perfect storm in regards to what to do for guns and gun lobbying gun control so that being said let's dive right into it. The biggest myth is only a gun. Makes you safer. The fact is only in gun puts you at a higher and high in risk for gun violence. The nra often argues that the united states is a dangerous place in that owning and carrying a gun is the only way to protect oneself and one's family which i mean it logically when he say it makes sense. Somebody who really burst in topic would be like. Oh well that's logical. But numerous studies have found that gun ownership increases the risk of both gun related homicides and suicides. That's that's you know. Let's think about that for a second obviously can be somewhat true because there's people who are really unstable in regards to mental help. A lot of states. Luckily new york is one of the states in regards to the strictest gun control laws but a lot of days as a matter of showing up going. I d doing background check within a couple of days. You've got a lot of on mental siebel things going on and i'm going to touch bit guns in their homes particularly dangerous for victims of domestic violence. The presents were going in a home with the history of domestic violence increases the risks that a woman will be killed by five hundred percent guns intended for self are calmly and fatal accidents. Studies have shown that across states higher lows of gun ownership are linked to the higher rates of unintentional firearm. Deaths

Lobby NRA United States New York
Nasdaq closes down nearly 2% as tech sector weighs on stock market

Bloomberg Businessweek

01:16 min | 11 months ago

Nasdaq closes down nearly 2% as tech sector weighs on stock market

"A sell off in some of the world's biggest technology companies weighed heavily on the equity market, dragging down stocks amid dimming prospects for fresh stimulus. Today. The S and P 500 Index dropped 29 points down 8/10 of 1% the Dow Down 105 down 4/10 NASDAQ tumbled 243 down 1.9% the NASDAQ 100 Index halting its winning streak down 2.1% tenured on 5 30 seconds 10 Year Yield 100.93% Hold down $31 the ounce down 1.7% 18 38 West Texas Intermediate Crude up 1/10 of 1% 45 66 a barrel Hypo Watch a Seat three. A. I think that's the software maker founded by former Oracle executive Tom Siebel up 120% of its trading debut from the price and it's $651 Million. AIPO and shares of unprofitable food delivery platform door Dash surged 85% in their trading debut today. And the latest sign of investor exuberance. And what has already been a record here for I pose again recapping equities lower with the S and P 500 Index down 29 down 8/10 of 1%. I'm Charlie Pellet that his a Bloomberg

Tom Siebel Aipo West Texas Oracle Charlie Pellet Bloomberg
Customer Experience in the Digital Age

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

04:53 min | 1 year ago

Customer Experience in the Digital Age

"Talk a little bit about this. This idea of towards an ai. I operating model. Obviously a lot of people are familiar with it's on the minds and lips of so many different executives and certainly especially technology executives. But why this topic and why ranted around the operating model aspect of his as well. yes sure. so it's been clear for a while. Now that many organizations are at somewhat of an inflection point in the realm of digital transformation with here are our clients talking about this amongst their leadership teams and we hear captains of industry like tom. Siebel another recent guests on the podcast characterizing the last twenty years as an era of mass corporate extinction for those companies that failed acknowledged that the shifting digital landscape he says something like fifty two percent of companies in the fortune. Five hundred have fallen off the list since two thousand So at the center that's inflection. Point in the surrounding discussions are a lot of digital technologies The one that we've found to be most prominent is artificial intelligence undoubtedly a trend. We've been monitoring and witnessing for some time now however Leading up to our Digital symposium in july. We noticed the the conversation around a it was a evolving Specifically it was shifting from promising use cases in functions and business units to grander scale transformations so companies. Were rethinking as you said. The entire operating model in the name of ai redefining the seems the structure of the organization to break down data silos and standing up in a lot of cases entire Auctions dedicated to identify piloting and scaling. Those use cases that were most promising Symposium in july we survey about one hundred global cio hypothesis and found that. Two-thirds had already spun up dedicated teams or entire functions to focus on identification pilot than scaling of a i use cases and for those who more yet to do so sixty sixty percents that it was actually on the roadmap so this trend originally coined as shifting to a i i buy. Google was getting legs and we wanted to capture some characteristics of organizations that are effectively navigating the shift. You're very interesting. Talk a bit about the two executives that you you interviewed palo arbor from ten healthcare. Chris gates from all states a a leader in the in the health. Space a leader in the insurance space. Talk a bit of balance. Why them and why their stories were compelling sure. While starting in the aggregate healthcare and insurance or two of the most data heavy industries and generally where there's data there's opportunities to make products and experiences more intelligent and more automated in the case of gala the cio tenant healthcare there there's an ocean of clinical and claims data available from speaking with her in the past i know they're laser focused on synthesizing that data combining it with voice of the customer analytics to help improve the patient experience and enduring the panel. She shares some really interesting nuances on how to pursue without undermining the importance of the the human side of the patient physician interaction and then just recently under the pressures of covid nineteen. She has truly demonstrated her ability to lead in a crisis and spin up new data driven solutions in near real time to help manage these most unusual circumstances and then chris gates Chief technology officer at allstate is representing a company. That is no stranger to doing innovative things with data in the space of insurance The drive wise program for example that monitors driver dilemma tree data and offers rebates to those that exhibit behaviors on the road or the similar but different mile wise program that provides a pay as you go metered billing model for auto insurance both truly examples of creating new business models on the platform data in a i and outside allstate Chris just a truly dynamic leader that brings insights and experience colored by his leadership posts at other formidable companies such as a i g under armor and various business units general electric

AI Siebel Palo Arbor Chris Gates TOM Google Allstate Chris General Electric
Embraers CEO on the Breakup With Boeing and Going It Alone

Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

05:35 min | 1 year ago

Embraers CEO on the Breakup With Boeing and Going It Alone

"In April of twenty, one, thousand, nine, hundred Embraer selected veteran automotive industry CEO Francisco Gomez NATO as its new leader, and if ever there was a baptism by fire, he has gone through it in two, thousand and twenty. First, the COVID nineteen crisis hit crippling air travel and decimating demand for new airplanes then Boeing. Pulled out a four point two billion dollar deal to acquire an eighty percent stake. Embraer's commercial operations after emperor had shut down its operations for forty days and torn the company apart for car route. So where does ember air go from here and how can it recover here to? Answer those questions as Mr Gomez. NATO in his first conversation with the trade media since taking the helm at. Embraer. Also, joining us from Frankfurt to ask questions with me is yen's photo aviation weeks executive editor for commercial aviation welcome. Francisco. Let's start with the obvious question. Why did the deal with Boeing collapse and what are you doing to put Embraer's commercial operations back together? First of all, he says measure to be here with you. Thanks for for the Vision for this guests. Well I mean. We need that. Boynton has wrongfully naked. Reasons for the whose possession be. As, you said before point two billion. Dollar purchase bronze. Of Visualization. Progressing up is fast all initial TV areas in the service there is our. bigly. Read the great in we. Him also updated our band recall Roy. Sweep one twenty five mile e Cudi Commissioning Gatien in thinking The covy nine. So how do you plan to return the company to profitability and and wh what initiatives are most promising? Okay so he s an old this year. We really with a big issue the I wa. Dropping no revenues of the back of the V ninety. So event, not Anita the nature of the point lead this machine was more challenging because. With this, wrong in revenues combine costs. And higher the more. Because all day costs League Office. So this year what we are. We are we demanded A. Crisis Committee, and defining fighting for your. help us open the. Office will be the communication blow so. I will. Soon. As fight for artists, one is to protect. The health people because of all, these Colby get along people working at Home Office, the one who brought pants. All measures we Brought back to their health. Sat, on the second yard. This project allegations. Falls or on. Our. Our expertise always, you reduce our investments on only boom, our the siebel payables. The everything we coons who protect. Our cash. Who Wins? The vast in four four son loans to help us with a Number, three. was. recaptured. Seniors. Said before I mean we we had to recover. These is we had because of the off process. process. BROISSIA's. We. Promoted a rightsizing the organization because of the. Back, but also because of the effects of the Kobe. Needed his response, your guys edition, only a reduced cost, the new dynamic for the Popham who prepared again Asian. Our other strategic planning, one, twenty, five, the four priority is tool and. Die Of. This To Have A. More efficient immoral Gile Open. I. Is was. Is Now who view the basis for our future road then. We Very. Very. Robust. Recalling. One twenty five. That's a note we want that will already enjoy. Eating very A. CENTURY OUR FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE From. Linked to on. Any. Were democracy to. We expect. Enjoy rules any Mel Revenue Spike essentially, our financial. For.

Embraer Francisco Gomez Nato Broissia Boeing League Office Boynton Mr Gomez CEO Siebel A. Crisis Committee Home Office Kobe Frankfurt Anita Executive Editor Coons Popham
A Look At The Documentary  The Great American Lie

Morning Edition

07:04 min | 1 year ago

A Look At The Documentary The Great American Lie

"Edition on Edie. I'm Brian Watt from the pandemic to protest for police reform, systemic inequality has grown into a front and center issue in 2020. Recently released documentary film called The Great American Lie examines the roots of systemic inequality and some of the trauma that comes with it. It comes to us from filmmaker Jennifer Siebel Newsom, who many of us also know as the first partner of California, and it features Bay Area educator Ruby Dee Tai, who has been a public school principal in Oakland. And is now one in San Francisco. I got a chance to talk to both of them late last week as the film was just hitting digital platforms. First, I asked Jennifer Siebel Newsom. What her film is about The film really is about the fact that our country is in a crisis. The American dream is out of reach for a majority of Americans and social immobility in economic inequality is as bad as it was just before the Great Depression. And when you bring Koven 19 into that it's even worse. Ruby. Let me bring you into this conversation. In this film. We see the effects of trauma on an entire community, particularly on a growing population of immigrant Children, newly arrived What is the hardest part about having to fight for opportunities for these young people? Today? The film really highlights where we are in society where we live around how poverty is so really, violence is so real, especially are students who have come from other countries. Their experience. Getting here is it's traumatic in itself, right? And then they move into East Oakland, and they don't really recognize their own trauma. We have a school that's in the centre of East Oakland that is serving families that are in poverty and so with poverty comes experiences that we don't anticipate in everyday life, so the film highlights some of those experiences. Actually, Can we hear a clip from Ruby Dee tie from the film right now? Wei served a very high population of students who are in foster care. A lot of homeless families. My students come with no supplies. No backpack didn't eat. They come with that is in jail. My father was taken from our family and deported last night. Eliska. Lt's on a non of what they bring. And if they have a bad day, and they rolled their eyes then now you take it personally as an adult. I'm trying to imagine what all of that is like When you lay over it. The situation we are in with the pandemic. How challenging is that climate right now. It's extremely challenging, because now we're in not only an economic divide, but it's really brought to surface with the digital divide in our communities and with the fact that students are doing school at home, So when some student you know, may not have a death may not have their own bedroom may not have Internet access. So school districts, especially our San Francisco is rushing out trying To find resource is to get students Chromebooks to get hot spots and encompassed with all of that you have the stress of the parents who could have lost their job may not be getting unemployment because they have come to this country and they're not may not be documented. So they have lost all resource is and so that the stress of that as a parent on top of trying to make sure that your child is Joining that gym call, But maybe you have to go to work or you found another job. So you're not at home and now students, you know if you're 11 or 12 you rather you want to join a zoom or want to play a video game I need. You're still a child. So Our students are even in more needed. Jennifer Siebel Newsom you want in this film, not just to show how tough everything is, but also to provide a sense of hope. Where you finding hope For me. The hope lies in the fact that we see the humanity in each other. We closed the film with this concept that it is incumbent upon herself recognized that if there is somebody suffering or struggling or pour that perhaps that person doesn't have boots or boot straps with which to pull themselves up. And out of poverty. Perhaps that person wasn't born on first dates, but they were actually born outside of the ball park. Therefore, we have to emphasize and recognize that not only we failed that child or that individual, but we failed that entire communities, and I think there's a beautiful national conversation going on right now. It's certainly uncomfortable for a lot of people. It's a conversation about privilege. Ruby detail I I can't resist the chance to ask someone who has been an educator on both sides of the Bay East Oakland. And San Francisco unified about how this conversation sounds in those two different places in our region. You know, the interesting thing about education is it really puts a lot of responsibility on the leaders and I would say while in my time and open unified Think we had four different superintendent in an eight year period, so the conversation is always changing. Unfortunately, I think people and people, especially who get in the work of education, want to do better and want to do better for students who are economically disadvantaged and Students of color. I do believe that on both sides of the bay, especially in our country right now, I think the conversation is at the forefront The racism work that we have to do. As educators that is prevalent in San Francisco Unified that is something that is a district goal and mandate. Every single employee had to complete anti racist training the school year in the kickoff of distance learning, there's this idea that we talked about it a lot. But really, what does that mean? When it comes down to how We fund And how we create resource is for the highest need communities and or schools within a district I challenged. Our superintendent asked themselves and even the community members of district of parents of these districts. Would you send your child to that school? And if the answer is no. Then why does that school exists? Thanks to both of you for talking to us about this. Thanks for having us Thank you. That was very area School Principal Ruby Dee tie and filmmaker Jennifer Siebel Newsom talking about the documentary The Great American Lie Lie the the the films films films now now now available available available for for for streaming streaming streaming on on on Apple Apple Apple TV TV TV and and and Amazon Amazon Amazon Prime. Prime. Prime. You're You're You're

Jennifer Siebel Newsom San Francisco Oakland Principal Ruby Dee Tai Superintendent Amazon Brian Watt Ruby Dee Bay East Oakland California Koven Apple Partner WEI Immobility Chromebooks
Siyabulela Mandela - Personal Lessons from History

Untangle

03:48 min | 1 year ago

Siyabulela Mandela - Personal Lessons from History

"Siebel Villa. Thank, you very much. Ariana family me and thank you. For joining us, it is my sincere pleasure and honor. I would love to begin with you telling us a little bit about your own story and the inspiration for your current work. Thank. You very much. Really. I grew up in effeminate that was highly politicized and our shaved. By the history of the Feminine so-fi as its involvement in the struggle against apartheid resume colonialism in south, Africa, and in Africa in general and in the fight for the. Liberation of the black masses AFA people against the shuttle's off. Appreciate up on. Racism and all forms of injustice that degeneration of Mandela waged against our shaped by that kind of history and our shaped by those material condition, and it is the involvement of my family and my involvement of my great grandfather, Nelson Mandela that has inspired me to anti into the food dolf intensive relations particularly focusing on issues that were made peace confluence, Aleutian and human rights in South Africa. Andy. Africa's when the world more generally, and at the moment, my final stages of my doctorate studies which averages stepped on that Nelson Mandela University in Africa and partly, half of my research was done in the United States at George Mason invested to scorn of conflict, resolution and analysis. Dot Potential Training has opened opportunities for me. I'm currently based in Juba South Sudan where I work as a team, lead the country director for the Subsidy Program for an organization whole geneticist for human rights. So that is the way that I'm currently doing in south, Sudan. Patent puzzle supporting the Peace End. Development Agenda since the end of the civil war in this part of the was. So that's the kind of work that I'm doing, and that's what I'm engaged in at the moment. I'm sure people are curious about a little bit of your direct experience with your great grandfather. What is a memory that you might have and a piece of wisdom that you've learned from him that you'd like to pass along? A very few memories of. Microsoft. Grandfather Nelson, and among those memories was always division that instilled to all of us and something that we all learned from him and even the past generation the past it to him that. Occurred to importance to treat people quantity godless of their social status in society when you begin with rich people. Equally. You begin to understand and begin to know who people are for people would be willing to talk to. And people will be willing to listen to. That Nessin did. If you look at the entire store, you would have conversation with his prison. And he was highly regarded and respected by his prison for he treated that particular individual symptoms spent that they will lead to the president of Salafi, Cadet and. Someone that comes from. Hubble, begins. And when you begin to imagine from the kind of a background is individual new, get to recognize that we are only important it regardless of social status in society,

Grandfather Nelson Nelson Mandela Africa Juba South Sudan South Africa Nelson Mandela University George Mason Siebel Villa Nessin Ariana Microsoft Andy United States President Trump Director
Siyabulela Mandela - Personal Lessons from History

Untangle

04:32 min | 1 year ago

Siyabulela Mandela - Personal Lessons from History

"This week I have a special guest, sea. Ebola Mandela. WHO's the great grandson of Nelson. Mandela. Lilla is a PhD in peace and conflict. Studies, in continues his grandfather's legacy of advocating for human rights and shares his perspective on the stomach nature of racism with us. He recently wrote a chapter in the book for the sake. Of Peace. African perspectives, on. Racism? Justice. And peace in America. Sibylla will also share with us his perspective on what we can each do to decolonize our own minds and the lessons that he learned from his grandfather's character. He speaks to us today from south, Sudan where he works. Welcome Siebel Villa. Thank, you very much. Ariana family me and thank you. For joining us, it is my sincere pleasure and honor. I would love to begin with you telling us a little bit about your own story and the inspiration for your current work. Thank. You very much. Really. I grew up in effeminate that was highly politicized and our shaved. By the history of the Feminine so-fi as its involvement in the struggle against apartheid resume colonialism in south, Africa, and in Africa in general and in the fight for the. Liberation of the black masses AFA people against the shuttle's off. Appreciate up on. Racism and all forms of injustice that degeneration of Mandela waged against our shaped by that kind of history and our shaped by those material condition, and it is the involvement of my family and my involvement of my great grandfather, Nelson Mandela that has inspired me to anti into the food dolf intensive relations particularly focusing on issues that were made peace confluence, Aleutian and human rights in South Africa. Andy. Africa's when the world more generally, and at the moment, my final stages of my doctorate studies which averages stepped on that Nelson Mandela University in Africa and partly, half of my research was done in the United States at George Mason invested to scorn of conflict, resolution and analysis. Dot Potential Training has opened opportunities for me. I'm currently based in Juba South Sudan where I work as a team, lead the country director for the Subsidy Program for an organization whole geneticist for human rights. So that is the way that I'm currently doing in south, Sudan. Patent puzzle supporting the Peace End. Development Agenda since the end of the civil war in this part of the was. So that's the kind of work that I'm doing, and that's what I'm engaged in at the moment. I'm sure people are curious about a little bit of your direct experience with your great grandfather. What is a memory that you might have and a piece of wisdom that you've learned from him that you'd like to pass along? A very few memories of. Microsoft. Grandfather Nelson, and among those memories was always division that instilled to all of us and something that we all learned from him and even the past generation the past it to him that. Occurred to importance to treat people quantity godless of their social status in society when you begin with rich people. Equally. You begin to understand and begin to know who people are for people would be willing to talk to. And people will be willing to listen to. That Nessin did. If you look at the entire store, you would have conversation with his prison. And he was highly regarded and respected by his prison for he treated that particular individual symptoms spent that they will lead to the president of Salafi, Cadet and. Someone that comes from. Hubble, begins. And when you begin to imagine from the kind of a background is individual new, get to recognize that we are only important it regardless of social status in society,

Grandfather Nelson Juba South Sudan Nelson Mandela Mandela South Africa Africa Nelson Mandela University Nessin Lilla Sibylla George Mason Siebel Villa Ariana America Microsoft Andy United States President Trump
"siebel" Discussed on The Side Quest Inn Podcast

The Side Quest Inn Podcast

05:15 min | 1 year ago

"siebel" Discussed on The Side Quest Inn Podcast

"Now floating next to him. Being, born again and then. Bill Punches. Tries to punch it. He succeeds that's he does not succeed. He misses that punch That's all. That's all I can do. They'll move Michel you're up. Okay the one guy who was trying to save died. So I'm just GONNA throw more ropes out there. Oh, this Actually to throw rope to the captain and. and. You'll see the dead motherfucker next to you lights lobban. Rogue care about you doesn't. Care Oh. A rope falls right. In the boat is next to me as well. Yes. I will use the momentum from the boat in to do a sudden leap to get over. Onto the turtle we didn't go over this this episode because I forgot but suddenly your new ability Yeah. Let's me jump twice as far as may speed and I. Let me pull it up again. I I know what it does. I just need to be able to read it. Yeah. So I use my long jump DC and I can increase my maximum distance to double my speed while jumping. and. You can attack right at Elliot Point Jump Yes. Yes. So the boat comes sailing past you and you like. Grab the rope that Michelle just threw down. Up. The. And then jump over. Roy around. How high up is that Siebel -ture? The one above you thirty five feet Rowbotham strict. Twenty two. I that's that's enough. Twenty feet. Yeah and I can go twice my speed only need to go twenty three. Yeah. So you land on the turtle and I make a strike. Action. Twenty five don't think that is amiss. Flanking 'cause he's alive. Yes you do. So Twenty, seven, twenty seven is a hit. Yeah. Thirteen damage. And then I have one more action, right? You do I'm just GONNA do a regular attack..

Bill Punches Roy Siebel Michel Michelle
"siebel" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

Daily Tech News Show

02:51 min | 1 year ago

"siebel" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

"Z. Y.. N. N. has been removed from the Google play store. After accusations of plagiarism wired reports that a lot of high profile tiktok users were saying their content or sometimes their entire account and profile were being copied without permission, zinn launched on Android and Ios at the end of May and hit the top ten of both APP. Stores really quickly. Zinn pays users to watch videos, and then refer users and get some payment that way to then says it is working with Google to fix the problem. REDDIT CO founder Alexis Ohana. Step down from the board last week, and at the time said he wanted to be replaced by a black candidate read. It has now named Y combinator see CEO Michael Siebel to its Board to replace O'Hanlon Siebel was combinator is first black partner, and also co-founded Justin TV became to eventually. qube added support.

CEO Michael Siebel zinn Google Alexis Ohana qube Justin TV CO founder REDDIT partner N. N.
Reddit names Michael Seibel to board after Ohanian's call for black candidate

Daily Tech News Show

00:15 sec | 1 year ago

Reddit names Michael Seibel to board after Ohanian's call for black candidate

"Co Founder Alexis Oh Hainian step down from the red at board last week, asking to be replaced by a black candidate read, it has now named Y combinator CEO Michael Siebel to its board to replace Hand Siebel was Y combinator is first black partner and Co founded Justin TV.

Alexis Oh Hainian Ceo Michael Siebel Hand Siebel Partner Justin Tv Co Founder
"siebel" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

08:12 min | 1 year ago

"siebel" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"The week on our daily radio show there were so many of them these are just some of our favorites and just a reminder everybody was happening in real time as the news continue to evolve around us and we got to catch up with Tom Siebel Carol I really enjoyed talking to him so thoughtful he's the CEO now of C. three dot A. I. he's the author of a book that we had talked about when it came out digital transformation survive and thrive in an era of mass extinction also of course you know by the name the founder of Siebel systems one of the best known and most influential companies in the history of Silicon Valley but he's got a new company and this whole concept of the data lake it's fascinating in northern California I would say that leaves them there's really been very little impact from call of that in the county that I'm in San Mateo county there are this would be everything planned north of Palo alto in Silicon Valley we have three quarters of a million people the population there seventeen hundred hospital beds and on any given day there might be fifty people hospitalised with close it if you look at Santa Clara county which is the county immediately south of us where there's roughly two million people that would be everything from Palo alto to San Jose is about two million people four thousand hospital beds at any given day will be a hundred and fifty people caught hospitalized for quoted in the San Matteo county I believe there are no people on ventilators most people in the town that I live in Woodside there have been ten people diagnosed with COPD so it kind of messed up well I mean there's an argument meant to be made I think Tom and I'm guessing some of your local lawmakers would make it which is you guys did the right thing I mean the sort of shut it down pretty early and in the entire bay area right we did set it down early and the high and you know I I think the purpose for shutting it down was to keep from overwhelming the hospital systems right and we never got close to that I made out of seventeen hundred hospital beds and any given day fifty might be occupied with in this county fifty might be occupied with COPD patients so it you know maybe it worked I'm you know there's lots of different opinions on this but it's kind of never happened here yeah interesting interesting well let's hope it stays that way yeah exactly lesson learned you know in terms of a playbook for for how to do it for you guys in the studio or you're doing this from home we're doing it from home we're going from a disordered for you is that what everybody got their professional operation seamless professionalism congratulations well thank thank you yeah we well we've gotten good at it we're at the end of our ninth week doing this from home so yeah I mean good as our team who got us all set up but it is it's sort of it it's an amazing tribute to technology Tom know far more about than we do so let's talk about how technology is maybe helping us get our arms around this we were talking with you earlier in the year about cyber attacks we've got a different sort of attack on our hands now and I do wonder how technology in this whole concept of a data lake help us understand how that's being used here you know you'll recall that one of the things we spoke of when I was with you last in New York was the area of precision medicine okay and precision medicine unquestionably will be one of the largest commercial and industrial applications of artificial intelligence so we can use this for disease prediction adverse drug reaction genome specific medical protocols a I insisted diagnosis so this is the largest and most rapidly growing segment of the US economy and in many economies and a I is going to impact medicine in a huge way now enter code it says this is a really unique opportunity to apply a I'd to contribute to this dialogue and if we look at all the emails everybody has just been guessing mandate only has to change from your one TV channel two and other any list and Neil Ferguson at king's college or the person in Stafford and one person says the you know the mobility rate is going to be between two percent five percent of another expert with the same level of expertise says the probability rate is going to be going to be like you know one one thousandth of one percent what is a policy maker to do well what we did is we formed a coalition that we call the C. three A. I. digital transformation institute and we founded this with Microsoft we funded this to a tune of about four hundred million dollars and we aggregated the human capital at MIT Carnegie Mellon Princeton and the university of Chicago the university of Illinois and and UC Berkeley to engage in large scale research on applying AI to mitigate coded pandemic and so this is a I and machine learning models to mitigate disease bioinformatics modeling and simulation of propagation so that's a that's a major initiative is under way it's really exciting and that is one of the efforts that we've been engaged tell me really laid out what data lake is all about what your goals this is you know coping nineteen data collection what are you hoping that it does or what do you expect it to do and and and what's that time time line on it in order to perform data science in order to get accurate predictions whether the course of disease or the efficacy of souls of medications the latest need data so what we have done in the past month is we have taken the twenty two largest data sources that is available in the world about closing it from Johns Hopkins scored nineteen of the New York times in the Milken institute and what have you here's C. T. scans your mortality data core morbidity course of disease and we have aggregated those data into a unified federated the image that we made available this is called the C. three A. I. because of it nineteen data lake and we've made this resource available to the world at no cost to be able to do research and we've we've had so this is by far the lawyer the world's largest coke please the corporation of Kobe data available to researchers this is being powered by a friend today WS who provided the in the cloud platform to do it and I think this will be an enormously important resource for people to research you research understand the course of the disease and control the this epidemic and other epidemics like Tom Siebel CEO of C. three dot a I I can tell you Carol this is one of those conversations that stuck with me part of it is tone part of it is substance and you know this was a guy that we clearly sort of caught in a moment where he's been thinking big thoughts well we've had so much nationalism going on populism going on he is saying this is going to be a global effort and you know it's all about large Social Research none of this in terms of attacking the virus can be done in a vacuum and he reminded us and he's only repeating us he's actually making an effort to share all the data so everybody can be working on a solution to cope in nineteen and that of course was just a part of the conversation that we had with Tom Siebel for the full interview be sure to check out our business week extra podcast you're listening to Bloomberg business week coming up entrepreneur hotelier and real estate developer Ian Schrager he's a legend this is number Bloomberg we know a lot of financial experts the former president of the European central bank global financial workers is a classic textbook a lot of political experts if you were advising the president I'd states what's the thing that he's not doing that you should do lucky for you we know a lot of science experts you talked about those reagents which are necessary for the testing it's also the behavioral.

Tom Siebel
"siebel" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

07:32 min | 1 year ago

"siebel" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Daily radio show there were so many of them these are just some of our favorites and just a reminder everybody was happening in real time as the news continue to evolve around us and we got to catch up with Tom Siebel Carol I really enjoyed talking to him so thoughtful he's the CEO now of C. three dot A. I. he's the author of a book that we had talked about when it came out digital transformation survive and thrive in an era of mass extinction also of course you know by the name the founder of Siebel systems one of the best known and most influential companies in the history of Silicon Valley but he's got a new company and this whole concept of the data lake it's fascinating in northern California I would say that leaves them there's really been very little impact because that in the county that I'm in San Mateo county there are this would be everything planned north of Palo alto in Silicon Valley we have three quarters of a million people the population there seventeen hundred hospital beds and on any given day there might be fifty people hospitalised with close it it look at Santa Clara county which is the county immediately south of us where there's roughly two million people that would be everything from Palo alto to San Jose is about two million people four thousand hospital beds at any given day they'll be a hundred and fifty people caught hospitalized because of it in the San Matteo county I believe there are no people on ventilators most people in the town that I live in Woodside there have been ten people diagnosed with COPD so it kind of messed up well I mean there's an argument meant to be made I think Tom and I'm guessing some of your local lawmakers would make it which is you guys did the right thing I mean the sort of shut it down pretty early and in the entire bay area right we did set it down early and the planes de um you know I I think the purpose for shutting it down was to keep from overwhelming the hospital systems right and we never got closer I made out of seventeen hundred hospital beds and even day fifty might be occupied with in this county fifty might be occupied with COPD patients so it you know maybe it worked I'm you know there's lots of different opinions on this but it kind of never happened here yeah interesting interesting well let's hope it stays that way yeah exactly lesson learned you know in terms of a playbook for for how to do it for you guys in the studio or you're doing this from home we're doing it from home we're out of a certain degree you accept what everybody got their professional operation it's seamless professionalism congratulations well thank thank you yeah we well we've gotten good at it we're at the end of our ninth week doing this from home so yeah I mean good as our team we've got this all set up but it is it's sort of it it's an amazing tribute to technology Tom would know far more about than we do so let's talk about how technology is maybe helping us get our arms around this we were talking with you earlier in the year about cyber attacks we've got a different sort of attack on our hands now and I do wonder how technology in this whole concept of a data lake help us understand how that's being used here eagle you'll recall that one of the things we spoke of when I was with you last in New York was the area of precision medicine okay and precision medicine unquestionably will be one of the largest commercial and industrial applications of artificial intelligence so we can use this for disease prediction adverse drug reaction genome specific medical protocols a I insisted diagnosis so this is the largest and most rapidly growing segment of the US economy and in many economies and A. R. I. E. is going to impact medicine in a huge way now enter code so this is a really unique opportunity to apply AI to contribute to this dialogue and if we look at all the you know everybody has just been guessing mandate okay change from year one key detail to another enlisted Neil Ferguson at king's college or the person in Stafford and one person says the eight yeah the morbidity rate is going to be between two percent to five percent of another expert with the same level of expertise says the morbidity rate is going to be going to be like you know one one thousandth of one percent what is a policy maker to do well what we did is we formed a coalition that we call the C. three A. I. digital transformation institute and we founded this with Microsoft we funded this to a tune of about four hundred million dollars and we aggregated the human capital at MIT Carnegie Mellon Princeton and the university of Chicago the university of Illinois and and UC Berkeley to engage in large scale research on applying AI to mitigate coded pandemic and so this is a I and machine learning models to mitigate disease bioinformatics right modeling and simulation of propagation so that's a that's a major initiative is under way it's really exciting and that is one of the efforts that we've been engaged tell me really laid out what data lake is all about what your goals this is you know coping nineteen data collection what are you hoping that it does or what do you expect it to do and and and what's a good time timeline on it in order to perform data science in order to get accurate predictions whether the course of disease or the efficacy of social medications the latest need data so what we have done in the past month is we have taken the twenty two largest data sources that are available in the world about quoted from Johns Hopkins scored nineteen of the New York times in the Milken institute and what have you users see peace scans his immortality DataCore morbidity course of disease and we have aggregated those data into a unified federated image that we've made available this is called the C. three A. I. because of it nineteen data lake and we've made this resource available to the world at no cost to be able to do research and we've we've had so this is by far the lawyer the world's largest coke please the corporation of Kobe data available to researchers this is being powered by a friend today WSU provided the the cloud platform to do it and I think this will be an enormously important resource for people to research you research understand the course of the disease and control the this epidemic and other epidemics like that some people C. E. O. of C. three dot a I I can tell you Carol this is one of those conversations that stuck with me part of it is tone part of it is substance and you know this was a guy that we clearly sort of caught in a moment where he's been thinking big thoughts well we've had so much nationalism going on populism going on he is saying this is going to be a global effort and you know it's all about large Social Research none of this in terms of attacking the virus can be done in a vacuum and he reminded us and he's only repeating us he's actually making an effort to share all the data so everybody can be working on a solution to cope in nineteen and that of course was just a part of the conversation that.

Tom Siebel
"siebel" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

07:42 min | 1 year ago

"siebel" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"So many of them these are just some of our favorites and just a reminder everybody was happening in real time as the news continues to revolve around us and we got to catch up with Tom Siebel Carol I really enjoyed talking to him so thoughtful he's the CEO now of C. three dot A. I. he's the author of a book that we had talked about when it came out digital transformation survive and thrive in an era of mass extinction also of course you know by the name the founder of Siebel systems one of the best known and most influential companies in the history of Silicon Valley but he's got a new company and this whole concept of the data lake it's fascinating in northern California I would say that leaves them there's really been very little impact from close it in the county that I'm in San Mateo county there are this would be everything Clinton North Palo alto in Silicon Valley we have three quarters of a million people the population there seventeen hundred hospital beds and on any given day there might be fifty people hospitalised with close it it look at Santa Clara county which is the county immediately south of us where there's roughly two million people that would be everything from Palo alto to San Jose is about two million people four thousand hospital beds at any given day they'll be a hundred and fifty people caught hospitalized for quoted in the San Matteo county I believe there are no people on ventilators most people in the town that I live in Woodside there have been ten people diagnosed with COPD so it kind of messed up well I mean there's an argument meant to be made I think Tom and I'm guessing some of your local lawmakers would make it which is you guys did the right thing I mean the sort of shut it down pretty early and in the entire bay area right we did set it down early and the high and you know I I think the purpose for shutting it down was to keep from overwhelming the VA hospital systems right and we never got close to that I made out of seventeen hundred hospital beds at any given day fifty might be occupied with in this county fifty might be occupied with COPD patients so it you know maybe it worked I'm you know there's lots of different opinions on this but it kind of never happened here yeah interesting interesting well let's hope it stays that way yeah exactly lesson learned you know in terms of a playbook for four or how to do it for you guys in the studio or you're doing this from home we're doing it from home we're trying to discern them for you is that what everybody got their professional operation seamless professionalism congratulations well thank thank you yeah we well we've gotten good at it we're at the end of our ninth week doing this from home so yeah I mean good as our team we've got this all set up but it is sort of it it's an amazing tribute to technology Tom know far more about than we do so let's talk about how technology is maybe helping us get our arms around this we were talking with you earlier in the year about cyber attacks we've got a different sort of attack on our hands now and I do wonder how technology in this whole concept of a data lake help us understand how that's being used here you'll you'll recall that one of the things we spoke of when I was with you last in New York was the area of precision medicine okay and precision medicine unquestionably will be one of the largest commercial and industrial applications of artificial intelligence so we can use this for disease prediction adverse drug reaction genome specific medical protocols a I insisted diagnosis so this is the largest and most rapidly growing segment of the US economy and in many economies and A. R. I. E. is going to impact medicine in a huge way now enter code so this is a really unique opportunity to apply AI to contribute to this dialogue and if we look at all the you know everybody has just been guessing mandate only has changed from the one key detail to another enlisted Neil Ferguson at king's college or the person in Stafford and one person says the you know the morbidity rate is going to be between two percent five percent of another expert with the same level of expertise says the morbidity rate is going to be going to be like you know one one thousandth of one percent what is a policy maker to do well what we did is we formed a coalition that we call the C. three A. I. digital transformation institute and we founded this with Microsoft we funded this to a tune of about four hundred million dollars and we aggregated the human capital at MIT Carnegie Mellon Princeton and the university of Chicago the university of Illinois and and UC Berkeley to engage in large scale research on applying AI did mitigate coded data and services A. I. and machine learning models to mitigate disease bioinformatics right modeling and simulation of propagation so that's a that's a major initiative is under way it's really exciting and that is one of the efforts that we've been engaged tell me really laid out what data lake is all about what your goals this is you know coping nineteen data collection what are you hoping that it does or what do you expect it to do and and and what's that time time line on it in order to perform data science in order to get accurate predictions whether it be course of disease or the efficacy of social medications the site is need data so what we have done in the past month is we have taken the twenty two largest data sources that are available in the world about quoted from Johns Hopkins and cord nineteen of the New York times in the Milken institute and what have you here's C. T. scans your mortality data core morbidity course of disease and we have aggregated this data into a unified federated image that we made available this is called the CPA I cove it nineteen data lake and we've made this resource available to the world at no cost to be able to do research and we've we've had so this is by far the lawyer the world's largest copays the corporation of covert data available to researchers this is being powered by our friends at a WSU provided the in the cloud platform to do it and I think this will be an enormously important resource for people to research you research understand the course of the disease and control the this epidemic and other epidemics like Tom Siebel CEO of C. three dot a I I can tell you Carol this is one of those conversations that stuck with me part of it is tone part of it is substance and you know this was a guy that we clearly sort of caught in a moment where he's been thinking big thoughts well we've had so much nationalism going on populism going on he is saying this is going to be a global effort and you know it's all about large Social Research none of this in terms of attacking the virus can be done in a vacuum and he reminded us and he's only repeating us he's actually making an effort to share all the data so everybody can be working on a solution to cope in nineteen and that of course was just a part of the conversation that we had with Tom Siebel for the full interview be sure to check out our business week extra podcast you're listening to Bloomberg business week coming up entrepreneur hotelier and real estate developer.

Tom Siebel
"siebel" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

02:14 min | 1 year ago

"siebel" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"That you know we were picking his brain on counterintelligence he was new and we are you know in the the incoming administration coming and that's how they were trying to frame yeah yeah I mean I know this is this is again this is the this is just so rotten we'll get to more this coming up plus we talk about the the the blind placebo study for ram and disappear right and you know whether it works or not exactly why they are now going to use it apparently the recovery time is thirty one percent faster okay which they believe one of the reasons they believe they said you know they're not sure about the death rate either either one but the recovery rate is thirty one percent faster which means hospital beds are available quickly yeah right that's huge yeah if every cover if you recover that quickly that means now there's a lot we don't know about the study I don't know if it was severe cases you know they talk about the death rate was a little less eight percent for the people that took one disappear eleven percent of those that did not but I don't know if you know what how do you equalize the severity of each case of corona virus that's what you don't know what that particular case right what was the severity of that still has to be figured out that this because this was a government study and a blind you know plus Siebel study that they you know they give some people the and you don't know what you're getting they give some people the placebo some they give the the room disappear that thirty one percent of faster recovery which is huge yeah I choose to make that makes a huge difference when it comes to hospital beds because that was really the concern the concern from the the the from the beginning was we can't overrun by hospital systems right up there yet and so we'll get that coming up here just a little bit pleasure calls and comments so much to talk about eight six six ninety right I with more radio with a record be a part of the conversation call the shell Rotella T. hotline eight six six nine zero seven three three three nine shell Rotella the engine oil that works as hard as you do for all the men and women who keeps the.

Siebel
"siebel" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

03:02 min | 1 year ago

"siebel" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"To have hot spots in the country for the next four Siebel future until some kind of vaccine is invented and I have no idea when that's going to be I mean you guys I can Google right now covert nineteen vaccine and I can find thirty different stories however would say oh my gosh it's right around the corner these three Israeli scientists these French scientist these scientists here the side there right around the corner in the fifteen articles to say oh we're so far away right now they don't even know what mechanism they need to use to make a vaccine because vaccines work because they they trigger a certain something about a virus or bug and you have to figure out how this is such a complicated medical thing for me to try to Wade into on the radio all viruses work slightly differently they attack the human body in a slightly different way so when you're trying to create a vaccine you want to find what you can disable in that virus that will prevent it from attacking whatever to tax and human body right now if you prevent that you have to make sure that the virus cannot immediately mutate around what you've just done so it has to be something significant and unique within not viral structure and you have to figure out how to attack that significant and unique within that viral structure thing and then figure out how to make that work it's not just Hey let's get some data bodies work from small box that's not what we're talking about here this is a much more complicated thing so we really I I I I say that not to be again and negative Nelly but I see it because we should be as individuals considering what our tolerance level is you know do we get to a point where if you're over eighty we ask you to stay at home for months and months and months at a time because if you look at the numbers across the country this I'm mark my words Dave what right it down somewhere when we look back on this this will be known as the nursing home killer because this disease is annihilating our elderly population and it is getting into nursing homes and it is spreading like wildfire in nursing homes and guys I have a friend and I talked about her she until forty five days ago worked at a nursing home in Long Island and they have not been counting the nursing home deaths in Long Island because they haven't tested all of these old people but in the nursing home she used to work at you know they had had a death in months and they're like it five a day right now I mean think about that for a second this disease is devastating our elderly population so what what do we look at to say how do we protect that population but allow our school age children the death rate is so negligible around among school age children we have to let kids go back to school how do we balance that sister you know we're gonna be thinking about that Susan what can what's good news won't work it'll.

Siebel
Voice Development and the Creative Process with Ilarna Nche

Bixby Developers Chat

10:42 min | 1 year ago

Voice Development and the Creative Process with Ilarna Nche

"Today I have the honour talking to Alana Chad who's a voice developer. Whose boiled many many different experiences for Alexa. Google and bixby. And what really impressed me about Lorna is her creativity and all the things that she's done with voice. Some really really excited to talk to her alarm. Why don't you introduce yourself? Hi everyone my name is Alana. I am twenty four years old. I am working on voice. Assistance will be free is now and I recently graduated from the University of Kent For Year pursued. Waste Industry Kind of Siebel where it was all about added Paid off and I've recently been announced Alexa champion and will serve Recently announced as bixby develop theories. Well said a very pleased with how guarding. I'm glad I took the the junk ready grades. And congratulations on being the bixby developer. The air at project voice and Being Alexa champion. That's quite an accomplishment of I have to ask you. What did you get your degree in technology degree or completely different? Yes so I was down that route of going into university in thinking what do I actually want to do and I never I? I was at the point where we have to decide what route you wanted to go down. I'd never really done any of computer science or anything up until hours around sixteen years old because they didn't ready introduce that into into schools much so it wasn't until I was sixteen. Monday introduced Him It's like a high school the high school side at. That's what I saw and I was like. Wow I wanna try it and I kind of not with the whole computer science as and I knew then I wanted to do something in that field but did I want to do it as a job. So that's why I chose. Degree weather is very broad so it. It kind of varies from Web Design to games designed to photography reading modeling like any module any cool secret drink. It was very very broad. Silos able to be like take if I liked it will hide the just will not go down that route because I actually did want to do reading log lane. I thought was really cool. What I saw the course at Casino Harry possible violence the Pixar than when I came to ours like actually this is quite hard and also quite you have to patients because you'll be making a ten second clip in the whole time. I literally I. I have the patience with that. So I did like the whole mobile application development and everything else that came with the coolest so I tied down the the programming side. That's how I kind of figured out went to be in fields. Great you know I encourage people to go explore different things and try things out right because who knows I think should reinvent yourself every end years and figure out what really excites you and go pursue it and even if that means a big change so good for you to try a bunch of things and and you landed on something you enjoy for right now and Yeah go pursue it so learn by my count you created twelve different Vicky capsules and they arrange everything. There's some educational capsules was capsules. Fitness. There's an. As Amara capsule yes in Quiz Games. Can you describe a couple of those big speak capsule in experiences? Yes with with big beat being so new and that the market is well. I I wanted to basically kind of see which type of capsule John kind of like making the Live at the mall one. It was simply something. I bake these experiences to me some cause before I related to other people by decided. Let's take an approach. Like make them for myself. I would you so I'm a big fan of they. Samah I love going to sleep to the mall and I noticed that there are no asleep. Sound experiences out that the A very big market. When look on Youtube for example a lot of people do love a law on it so different to ambient noises because of the whole experience is supposed to deliver this brain light tingle to grain and relax your brain so I wanted to make one and the best thing about putting it on bixby. Robin like Youtube is that we've topped the screen on and you're trying to get to bed the light shining in the room at least if you put it on a voice platform than kind of eliminate the whole having to have screen on and you can just listen away and go to sleep at sun baths with the small one with education. I've kind of always with me being in education for so long you kind of It's kind of a nice way to just keep shop and keep lining whether is learning a language learning maximum stuff stuff that you kind of need to keep learning with at and also fitness. I never really did many experiences and I wanted to see especially when it comes to the end of Christmas. Everyone's not fitness mentality. And you always WANNA keep so i. I've never tried one of my capsules. I made my yoga. I never done yoga before. But I forbid good. experienced Yoga positions as well as make something. I could use to win. You know I love it when people say they built something for themselves she we're talking about. Am tomorrow the Yoga Capsule Education Capsules Unit? You sound found personal benefit to these any wanted to share it and always find that when you build from the heart something you just do your much more motivated and it really really shows in the quality of what you build so great great job you touch them. This a little bit alarmed. But how did you first get involved with building for voice? What what motivated you to to build for this new medium. The main difference the main encouragement life for me to get into voice was honestly. I did that Michael sweaters on full of different modules. And I I knew that where I struggled was with visual graphic design and I love my lapse. I really did want from that. Was My design Like designing the the APP so visuals so when we Amazon dot came out. I notice that you could speak to it. And it will these skills and I didn't realize it was a third party developer. Who'd made these this experience so i. I love learning skills. I'm always up for landing anything so when I when I saw you could make one yourself. I jumped at the opportunity and I started building. It was really simple experience. It was gang could odds on why you would not match the same number of Alexia so that was by really enjoyed Also collected have to think about the design side of things so fast already love love voice. Yeah that's great so it sounds like followed your strengths so I was gonna ask you. What your first voice experience was. But you said it was the odds-on is that still out on the skill store. I had I had no idea still lacking yeah. I think we all have our first things that we built. They think the first thing ever built is a jokes scale. I don't know if you're not have to go check. But when and how did I get started developing bixby itself? Yeah so I was invited to be developer partner program and yet I was told you want to start developing on BEC- speak I had heard expe- before the the the sound on Samson Introduced to the essay the Galaxy S. nine and I was like of course anew scaled the I'd just I just love learning anytime some of that. Something I'm like. Yes for and then the Simpson team. What me on. Everything the ide- e the Bixby Studio hand it kind of was very very intimidating fast. Because I was like a new platform is different syntax using bid. I'd never hundred full but I think it made it easier once I once I kind of just in that whole Amazon Mine Alexa. Mind watching the fall but once I remember that was we did not. You did a tutorial that Webinar with the horoscopes. A yeah actually. I think it might have been atom uncharted the Horoscope to Joyal few. It was about horoscopes. But yeah coding without him. Yeah yeah it was yeah Lebanon end it was like Every helped so I always say like a lot to learn. Visually visual linings. Always our big eight for me. I I kind of documentation is good with support. The I thought visual AIDS so when there's a lot of videos stuff out there examples not the example is really helpful. It really helped kind of move my Experience with big speak

Bixby Developer Alexa Alana Chad Yoga Capsule Education Capsule Amazon Youtube University Of Kent Google Siebel Lorna Aids Pixar Lebanon Amara John
"siebel" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

05:28 min | 1 year ago

"siebel" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"Center over here the two central banks hapa backs Siebel Millay simplicity and records and record that's what we said we are heartbroken yeah it's it's high in vacuum they cost more the last longer they do a better job it's not big Bucks junk it's really high end stuff you get your money's worth you get your money's worth and I think that's what it's all about let's head to Chicago that's where merry is a merry good morning hi thanks for waiting what's up I want to know can I use the vacuum on drugs and without the trouble of being sucked into the vacuum well I guess that depends upon how heavy the Throggs are some Ron white there are very light yes yeah I the red car vacuum cleaner probably better because it has an actual these are the newer ones and they have a like a like a speed control for the brush you can put it on a lower speed so it doesn't go as fast or turn it off and that would work fast and what kind of sense R. Ricardo it's spelled R. I. A. C. C. A. R. and I'm I'm sure you got a dealer somewhere in the Chicago area and that is the complete name of that just last yes brand preference the brand your record dot com can you assume about forty cents evil at all I don't know what the civil may work but you gotta go over those area rugs fast so forward only not backwards you don't come back with it like normal you go forward only and then you come off the rug and then do it again kind of start a Saturday I wasn't gonna let up yeah casings good choices so Tom phasing in his house in his super house house he designed yes yes has a central bank system from west bend vacuum center that you love I do and it's ten twelve years old now it works like a champ the only thing I have to do is emptied the bucket once in awhile that collects all the dirt and I have to admit off here I was admitting I can only collect data gets really full of stuff it's amazing though it discharges the air into the basement and there's not a any dust thrown in vacuum after ten or twelve years and also at all so the vacuum portion the filtering portion is very efficient and it still maintains that suction with bucket full you don't even know it's fall so then you get this holds one thing right how many of those disks somebody just one would they hang up what would you do with those usually what I usually wanted depends on the levels of your house okay so it's a thirty four holes soul in it so downstairs you could have it depends your square foot soul let's say it's two thousand square foot home by P. three and let's me before but if you have an upper level you might want to get another one so a lot of times customers will come in to get a second powerhead kit we call it and then they don't drag it up and down yeah and then when I have it's it's a power vacuum right in the old days where it's just a fact of it it's a power house road has a beater brush on a client you plugged into the outlet and then they could little button on the vacuum portion turns the vacuum I don't often turn to power right yeah right so it's real simple and what and what brand name power it is that time that's a sequel you betcha I got reminded F. for how many times did you have it repaired it works so well I don't even know what right really good how many times have you had a repair I think not whatever see that's the thing don't buy once cry once yeah seriously yeah yeah so the stuff you've got the CBOE the mailing the simplicity of the wrecker these are higher in vacuum cleaners last long work well yes tear down easy plus repair a technology they're not clunky they're not and and you know what they're also not a hundred and fifty Bucks a minute just say it up front no not but you won't be spending another hundred and fifty dollars off for years on the thing falls apart now we have customers that do that they'll have something for a couple years and hundred fifty Bucks and then they'll go on do it would be shocking they'll go and do it again why are you going to do it again they'll come and see us and then you're done yeah because by the time you do it two or three times and then you come in by us you just bought solve yourself right right right and you know that plastic does not recycle none of it sold ninety one percent of plastic does not recycle does not get recycled fact so goes into landfill so yeah is that a guilt trip yeah I kind of don't throw the vacuum cleaners on every couple years it doesn't make sense yeah yeah winds up some plants occurs for diretor washer and dryer real quick do a text question you have cordless vacs yes Sir okay mmhm stick backs and regular vacuum got it okay and then for stairs the CBOE the super simple that you have in here you just use the whole Israel pull out yep the hinge upon there's an extension allows you can put on it and then there's also a turbo brush your regular attachments are all there so you can get a bare floor tool for it but like I said before works great to go from carpet to bare floor if we have anything if Danny vest as far as the the vacuums aren't the filtering systems are so much better yes hi hi invectives so you have threatened to around nine in the journal all schools all show customers the bag inside where the Vegas in two or three years as clean as a whistle that's how much it's holding back from leaking out series vacuum cleaners his victims people Weston vacuum center Jim Lee Taylor thanks going to guys yeah that's right we might two six.

Siebel Millay
How Apple Is Getting You To Think Less And Spend More

The 3:59

09:26 min | 1 year ago

How Apple Is Getting You To Think Less And Spend More

"The knock on apple is that it's no longer innovative and it's phones have gotten boring a year ago. The company stock was slumping and in sales in China. Were down. Well guess what since then the stock doubled and people are buying more of those boring quote unquote. IPHONES Scott. What what do you make of all this? Let me in the IPHONE. Eleven got less expensive. Compared to the ten are and I think that just became you know low more practical but I mean I think it's not just the phone is we know it's like the air pods and the watches and also like the. The lower cost apple watches things like the the series three It's all that collected stuff. So let's let's start with the iphone though. You reviewed the latest iphone and it was. It was a little cheaper. It's like fifty dollars cheaper. It's still seven hundred dollars so it's not like an impulse bye or anything like that but from your impressions. Did you think it was more polished as you think it was a little bit better. Is there something about the phone that you think really incited a lot of people. Oh to buy it. This time around I think battery life. I think that that That made an impact for people The idea the battery life would be better and get over that Hump and when reviews were showing that I think that mean camera matters but you know I always think that the changes are pretty incremental but it seems like you know this generation around things like that white angle things is like the night vision mattered but I am pretty surprising to me. I'm really surprised I was watching that. Presentation in September first revealed fielded and it seemed like a snooze to me seeing and granted. This is just one quarter. This is just one quarter and a lot can happen over the course of a year but record revenue in profits. That's exactly what we used to say about apple just basically like clockwork every single quarter. I just kept doing better and better. and was it the iphone six when they came out the blew the doors off like they absolutely crushed it so it does kind of feel like they're getting their Mojo back foreshadowing. We're on that to come right Yeah it is surprising to me too and I don't really have anything really concrete to say about that because it feels like they're continuing the same path that they're always been doing which is like these as low instead of it. Yeah incremental interesting sometimes You know more obvious sometimes more in the weeds updates each year. And we're not doing. We're not dealing affordable. We're not not doing a foldable. Doing Gene we've been on his show multiple times saying. Hey this is getting a little stale this is getting already dusty. Apparently people are pretty comfortable with what their expectation is. If anything apple is really good at giving you a product that works that you know how it is and maybe not changing it up that much. Make accents I'm frankly I am a little surprised but hey the numbers are the numbers. It's been a very practical product but it's also funny because in the last year I was thirteen in had a lot of bugs going on so twelve to thirteen. I feel like we've had the incremental updates things that have been a little wonky about it so I i. It's it's interesting because when that all shakes out you're like everything else it's okay but I do think there's going to be said for the sick the consistency in the product line. Because I look at like the five G. Steph. Okay but particularly the foldable stuff regardless of whether you WANNA buy one it's also the prices so oh hi. Sally totals so price sensitive. That like you gotta get those prices down more so particularly for apple more expensive. I don't WanNa more expensive less expensive. And there's like the talk about whether the iphone nine or the se to in the spring to go against like a pixel for a or these other more affordable phones like. That's the direction action that needs to happen for apple so like don't look I wouldn't look like up the ramp but WANNA look to like I. I totally down. Obviously from a consumer perspective. I totally agree. We have a lot to cover so. Let's keep moving The MAC and the IPAD revenue is down in both of those lines so all is not well an apple world. That's worth mentioning that. So what what are your thoughts about that you kind of feel like You know the ipad really still facing challenging times. What what do you think that they can do about that? It was a weird year for that stubble. First of all there was no IPAD new IPAD pro last year and the new IPAD. The IPAD came out. Were these iterative. Like ipad mini and then the you know now in newer version of the base IPAD and they still haven't resolved the difference between the IPADS and the rest of the MAC line which like Microsoft's done awhile ago exploring surface purpose and things like that. So we've been waiting for that apple's just taking its time with that you know some people think that's fine other people really think that's not okay. I get really annoyed at all the ways that the ipad Hi pad is not my full everyday machine. They're not to say that it can't do a lot of other things on a daily basis. But then you have to use it in connection with another divisive lying around. Yeah so you're paying a lot of money for that for an IPAD. Okay but then you know you get an ipad pro territory where you want that to do everything so I I still think that needs to be resolved and then for the X. It's like you know the keyboards the like. They had something or effect with the air a a long time ago and now they're just like all these different versions I feel like and then people have issues about one or the other and I've never liked the touch bar so I I just feel like get all needs to be kinda redesigned familiar similarly I foot touching their get rid of the touch bar so let's in the IPAD. Yeah so this this is the sweet spot especially specifically for this quarter was wearable and services when we talk about services that includes the APP Store Apple All Music Apple Pay I cloud for wearables. It looked like the bell of the ball was very specifically airports. WanNa call out. A Bernstein analysts because apple doesn't doesn't provide this information at Bernstein analyst predicted air pods generated about six billion dollars in revenue for Apple in two thousand nineteen nearly double the twenty eighteen level. I mean like are there you look at wearables a lot. Are there any other wearables that come even close to the air pods. Why do you think they're so popular? Where where where did this come from? I remember wearing them and having an awkward. Look on my face into sixteen. How far how far things have changed? I mean well. First of all they're headphones so like it's a very impractical market so there's always an interest in that stuff but it really spiked in and drove it forward But I think it starts from there because it's a lot of times you think. Well what am I gonNA do with blank. I going to use it and like you'll use headphones especially if you can slide them in your pocket easily so I think that are already like made them. I'm really functional and really interesting and they work I never pods too. I was super function resistance at airports for a long time because I had all these other headphones lying around that I got every single single time I bought a new apple phone and You know I eventually just decided to spend the what is one hundred thirty dollars for the original air pods and I use them them all the time. Now they are the really fits very basic function. This is the apple promises. Is that if you buy the product you're going to be spending more money on it but it works and you don't have to bother with all sorts of nonsense. Yeah it did a really good job of like Bluetooth stuff is annoying but it. It doesn't perfect all of it but it really smooths. WHO's over a lot of that stuff to make it the least annoying version of that right? So that's what you need to like. Pick it over plugging something plus the disappearance appearance of F.. Phone Jack Rowley. Like trying to figure out whether you want the lightning or the dangle and then you just going to get the air pilots and it connects to that and it's sort of like it's not far off from a from a really expensive battery case accessory type of thing it's upwards of that it's a hunt one sixty rain. I was surprised at how many air pods people have been you know buying the pros and have you noticed people upgrading to the pros because that would actually be seeing a lot of money in apple people in the city wearing them you know. I've seen the pros but New York City is its own stories. You know But it was like an air. pod City It really is. Yeah what does it mean to see like New Jersey commuter wearing them it's a different As a subset. But I also think like there's something about the price of that that like lines up with the price of what the IPOD used to be like It's like accessory. I always think accessory prices like what will you buy as an add on in the watch has been getting in that zone to to like apple. Watch game the one nine nine. That's like the Amazon Echo Prize. It's like the marriage not exactly but I hear what you're saying. It was like one ninety nine. It gets closer to being a useful add on useful accessory where it's not super cheap by Apple. It is less expense for like two hundred or less as the part where I go. That's a lot of money but like I could maybe spontaneously think about going for something but more for just for me but getting to more within that gets into like its own device. Its own like commitment so I maybe it's something of that like they found some some zone because the Apple Watch at like four hundred dollars ars is its own consideration like. That's a lot of money. Okay so like you creep down to like one nine eventually go to less compete with like fitbit's and others I feel like the series. Three is what people are really interested in lodge like in the in the suite. Siebel one on the other one like that's the price you'd one eight four

Apple China Siebel New York City New Jersey Jack Rowley G. Steph Gene Sally Microsoft Analyst Bernstein
"siebel" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:15 min | 1 year ago

"siebel" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Ness see three A. I. S. same artificial intelligence we'll talk to the company's CEO Tom Siebel about all of that next this is Bloomberg Toyota is.

Ness Tom Siebel Toyota CEO Bloomberg
"siebel" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

18:16 min | 2 years ago

"siebel" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

"They'll cease to be competitive any believes the US will be in trouble if we do not win the twenty first century technology however remains motivated after a long successful career I great debate here thank you absolutely well Tom I thought we would begin Animus company Siebel systems acquired by Oracle way back when it's in described the business for the last ten years a decade and about a half a billion dollars building and develop provision and operate enterprise and industrial scale the United States Air Force on the kind of massive scale ones each also older generation in terms of their founding and I wonder mentioned what they have done in what others like them need to do in order to more fully age and scale need to go through in order to ensure that they are ready there's a I would call a step function and information technology would elastic cloud computing big data. The Internet of things is a there's a massive rush with these technologies to change the way that they manufacture products twenty first century very interesting and Y- Kodak's Toys R. US as Westinghouse's blockbuster circuit cities of the world which is to say fortune five hundred is when you become more rather than less rapid can you talk a bit about in your study that's forming I don't think anybody is fully transformed who is who Tesla or Amazon or Airbnb that are all about says our retail like whatever it may be now this technology trend price application software companies that did not adopt these technologies against and other technology other step bunks and sint step functions and technology celebration as you mentioned of Edo in the area of this mass extinction about things with what we call new DNA read about it Forbes all the La Hospitality or Baltimore and industry so or the or the beltway in Washington DC. Some I'll have an advantage in this appearance the J. P. Morgan chases the Boeing's the conceivably asset amounts of data and data is the fuel of a are you know that is allergies that are coming out of Silicon Valley and other places to use a ought shell Baker Hughes iron that dramatically accelerating companies that don't adopt these technologies they will cease to be competitive the balance between developing an ecosystem partners yourself in go on the one hand versus building internal capabilities internal arduous to build that bench strength relative to some of these how do you think about that balance between aw there we have seen in the last forty years say of Information Technology Oracle Corporation where we released relational database technology to mark in a bite from Oracle or Oracle's competitors the decision was well I we're going to build these palatial database systems themselves and to my knowledge nobody it when we introduced enterprise application software to market ERP systems building this myself or should I buy it from a professional software company and in the Mike Microsoft Ibm Hewlett Packard Compaq tried to build these systems right technology's very frequently CIO will elect a bill to technology you know Patchy open-source Ado and spark and what have early and I would say when you get into a I- i- Ot applications these are an order disc so some companies consider building themselves like GE did and no no application software developers very interesting I wanna that is evolving and many would say still very early stages in terms of its I wonder if you could take a moment and reflect on where you see in it's like Julius Caesar you know thought you know considered the project like Google deep mind where we're the the attempt and this gets to you know the militias killer malevolent killer robots second class of as as it relates to social media systems nick brain and I think this is I think this malevolent I think it is doing what we see going on in social media the third category Ari which is where we this is building prediction engines for example identify fraud to devices in digital oilfields or the smart grid using a Ai to lower the cost of production okay to a are mel impact and so as it relates to this area I think this is Chilean five years and most of that growth is all about so I think that job of really significant social and economic impact the report is talked about how I heater the country that Wednesday I identities like the dod in the Air Force you mentioned earlier but but I'm curious how you a lead in the extent to which it's appropriate language win in the Letterman Putin said whoever wins the one dominates the world I think that's and today they're making they are you know if we can read we read you know infiltrating a great interest power grid infrastructure every day in they can remotely just turn the grit off and so this is a well documented officer personnel management in the United States government and the stolen the personnel the star war what is it so then we have the Chinese and we mean read the thirteenth a year trying to advance a to win this battle to dominate in many ways this is a test of to you know fundamentally hop down command and control economy where the and are DC thanks very well educated.

Friend or foe? Unpacking Trump's UK visit

The Heat

05:07 min | 2 years ago

Friend or foe? Unpacking Trump's UK visit

"Joining me now to talk about the ship. And Donald Trump's visit to the United Kingdom is Simon marks he is chief correspondent featured store, new seven great to have you with us lovely to be here. Now we've often heard about the special relationship and to be fed there is much in this relationship that strong, these two countries have a common language. Of course, historic links. They have a strategic relationship, which goes back a long way. But looking at it today. Do you still see as a special relationship? I think there is no question that it is a special relationship. It is not necessarily any longer. The only special relationship, and there is no question that it has been somewhat bruised and battered since Donald Trump became president of the United States. This is a president who has never hesitated to pull the rug out from beneath to recent may at every possible opportunity. During the course of the last couple of years now, the relationship, obviously is only ever as strong as the prime minister of Britain, and the president of the United States, personal relationship. I one of the earliest stories I covered as a journalist was the visit to London by Ronald Reagan in nineteen Eighty-eight speech that he made the guilt all and Margaret Thatcher was there. And, you know, the two of them were absolutely philosophically ideological soulmates. They got. Along like a house on fire. The special relationship in, when, in many ways, was never more special than it was at that point, take a look at another relationship. Tony blair. And George W Bush. They didn't come from a shared political background, Tony Blair labour party. Prime minister George W Bush conservative Republican and yet they forged a relationship so special that ultimately it consigned Tony Blair in the minds of many Brits to the as sheep of history because of his decision to join in the invasion of Iraq. So this is a relationship that has weathered a number of different outlooks and dynamics, but at the end of the day, those shed language the shared language, the sense of shared history, commemorating, the seventy fifth anniversary of d day, President Trump described while he was in London as perhaps the greatest liberation in history. I mean that underpins relationship. That I think, at least for the feast Siebel future will always be a very important bilateral relationship. But as you say, President Trump has pulled the rug from under to resume several times, he hasn't just don't resumes down to other allies. Well is the United States in Britain still trusted as now while sixty seven percent of the British public say that they don't have a favorable view of President, Donald Trump, and that partly fueled the protests that could be seen on the streets of London during the course of the last few days, but look, I, I mean, Ronald Reagan and Margaret Thatcher's relationship was such Margaret Thatcher was often accused of turning Britain into America's floating aircraft carrier in Europe. Tony Blair was accused of being George W Bush's poodle by his opponents. So the relationship is, always a lopsided relationship the size of the American economy dwarfs the size of the British economy. The size of America's military. He might dwarfs, what is now Britain's somewhat tawny armed forces, and yet the relationship endures, and it is, actually a Matic if you're British Prime minister, or an American president the, you still talk in hallowed and revered terms about that special relationship. One of the reasons you do that is from an American perspective. Nothing Americans light more than wallowing in a bit of pump and pageantry that only Britain can can really do the way it, does it. And if your British Prime minister, you know, that Americans equally love going on holiday to the United States, and they love listening to American music and watching American TV shows so there's the cultural aspects to this that also underpin it as you point out lots of ceremony on the Monday of Trump's visit to the United Kingdom and on Tuesday, they did get done some business. The president met with resumes. Cabinet had a meeting with her as well. And I'm wondering how much substance can? We attach to this visit because to raise a may is on her way out. Yeah. I mean she's a here today. Gone tomorrow, prime minister, I mean, yes, there was pumping pageantry on day one. There's only one issue that's at the heart of all of this really and its trade if Britain leaves the European Union, and Donald Trump gave voice to his view once again that he believes the United Kingdom should leave the European Union. The UK will have to strike a trade deal bilaterally with the United States and US trade negotiators. No Britain will be desperate for a trade deal, and that potentially they will have Britain over a barrel in those negotiations. And at the end of the day from an American perspective all the other stuff is background music to trying to advance that trade conversation because the American see a massive opportunity that

Prime Minister Chief Correspondent President Trump Britain United States Tony Blair George W Bush United Kingdom Margaret Thatcher London Ronald Reagan Siebel America European Union Simon Europe Cabinet Iraq Sixty Seven Percent
Brexit: UK asks EU for further extension until 30 June

Hugh Hewitt

00:36 sec | 2 years ago

Brexit: UK asks EU for further extension until 30 June

"Faced with the unenviable choice of a no deal. Brexit next Friday, all begging the for further extension to may has opted for further today to persuade the EU. It's delay for pup us. Mrs may right. She will continue efforts to find agreements among Britain's politicians she has conceded. However, the UK might have to take part in elections to the European parliament. So the immediate drama of a no deal Brexit next week seems to have gone away the political uncertainty in the UK look set to continue for the full Siebel future. If of course, the e u agrees to

MRS European Parliament UK EU Brexit Britain
"siebel" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

Talk Nerdy

03:43 min | 2 years ago

"siebel" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

"I was talking about the class earlier today. You know in teacher asked you ever get sad when something doesn't go, right? And I said, yeah, I get sad. I get frustrated. Sometimes I even doubt myself, you know, and how do you work through that? And so I think one of the important things is acknowledging some of the feelings that that young people have around stem in their capability and empowering them to sort of be aware of those feelings and then navigate through them to get to the other side. Gosh, you're so after my own. That we talk about a lot when we talk about the differences between young girls and young boys in there. Path. Let's say if they are stem interested, and they want to maintain that or alternately end up working in science technology, engineering, your math fields, and we see obviously this leaky pipeline. We talk about it all the time on the show, and it starts very very early. But there are these punctuated periods of development where it's becomes quite obvious. And I think one of the things that we talk about a lot when we talk about stereotype threat, and some of these other. You know, kind of let's say scholastic or how much toward that these other specific traits or specific experiences that have a lot of evidence behind them. Right. A lot of scientific evidence behind them is that young girls are socialized to be okay with their feelings and young boys aren't like we've I always highly recommend a couple of films by what's her name? Jennifer nusa. Make sure I'm saying what's her middle. Name Siebel, Jennifer Siebel Newsom, actually, that's probably her her maiden name. But she did these two really great documentaries misrepresentation. I documentary there. So it's so good. It's so good. Yeah. Misrepresentation is everything and it's all about women in positions of power. But then skew living is about how we raise our young boys to like, basically, not be comfortable talking their motions. And I think you hit the nail on the head when you talked about it's okay to fail. Not only is it. Okay. It's the only way this I can progress and those feelings of inadequacy and those feelings of discomfort are part of the process, and they're what make you better. Because I think what happens a lot of times, especially in the elementary school age kids is that they take a math class or they take a science class. Actually, they're not taking classes that are called bath and signs Tiffany's. Yeah. The girls are like this is hard in the boys like notes, not totally easy. And then. But wait if you think it's easy. I think it's hard. Maybe you're better at it. I'm bad didn't continue and really know everybody sitting there struggling, it's hard. But the boys are socialized not to say that. And that's a big problem for girls because it it's a mirror. It's like a fun house mirror. That's being held up to the so I think it's actually that you go out there and like make that. Okay. Because I'm not sure how often they're getting that from society from their parents from their teachers from anybody because American society is a we don't fail. We don't apologize. We don't look at society that healthy right is. She. I think one of the one of the points that you hit on is. It's not healthy for either side. And so you're not getting the full benefit and the full potential, and I think when we talk about women and stem, and we talk about gender equality has to be a conversation across the gender spectrum. I don't think it should be just on women and girls to believe in themselves and try harder..

Jennifer Siebel Newsom Tiffany Jennifer nusa
"siebel" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

Talk Nerdy

02:39 min | 2 years ago

"siebel" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

"Students that we're bringing into the pipelines to save you can be in those roles to here's how he can help you get there. Absolutely. You know, I've mentioned this before on the show guys. I might a little bit like a broken record. But I always highly recommend Jen Siebel newsome's documentary misrepresentation because I think it's one of the few documentaries out there that specifically singles out this conversation about it's not just about what we call in academia the leaky pipeline. But it's about the issue of. Yes, the first step is getting people in at the ground floor. But ultimately where we're seeing the worst. Division is at the highest levels of management at corporate board rooms at like, you said tenured, professor ships dean levels that there's a huge disconnect between starting the process and staying in the process and being in many ways decision maker across the board. Whether we're talking about academia industry or any other any other platform, so maybe maybe you can speak a little bit to that conversation about what we've deemed sort of the leaky happy to talk about that. Because I think I've experienced it even watching many of my peers and colleagues as I was going through school graduate school in the profession. I've watched them of women who dropped out, and it's really a shame because really talented young women gave up early on particular academia, saying I can't do this. I can't MSA career and also be responsible this family that I'm trying to raise at a time when it was still pretty much up to the women to be managing much of that family low. And by the way, they were young men to do a career families who experienced the same thing. So it doesn't wasn't just a such a women's issue as more of a family work balance kind of issue as well. But the I watched a lot of women drop out, certainly academia so women who had gone on got PHD's that they wanted to try being a faculty position within a couple years have dropped out. Fast. Fact, most of the women that I was in graduate school at the did that and it's really shame and really never got back into the workforce. Which think about the talent you're losing their what I often see now sometimes as I'm going to board meetings and incorporations. I mean, highs leadership is I still see that much more older generation of male who's in those cease. We levels who very uncomfortable having conversations with a women leader. So it's very interesting to watch that for some reason, they don't they don't think they can talk about the same topics with you that they do with the other men in the room. And I also feel like they have a hard time looking in the I think what the talk about night that. I talk about the same thing as guys wheth-. You wanna talk about business economics?.

Jen Siebel newsome MSA professor
"siebel" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"siebel" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Budget surplus. Do you see any struggles there, and he said, you know, I think he does have that business mind. And I do think that there is that tempered. Sort of approach to things that you know, some people are worried that with these lofty goals that he might just kind of blow this budget surplus that round has built up. So yeah. A lot of a lot of hope and optimism political leaders on all levels. Very optimistic about the future. Sally, can I quickly get a bit of your reaction to the role of first partner as she's going to be called, Jennifer Siebel, Newsom her presentation prior to the oath of office in both English and Spanish, and she is an actress so her ability to perform is, of course, outstanding. But she has talked before publicly about setting some of her work as a documentary filmmaker and an advocate a bit to the side as she works with her husband in this new role statewide and navigates therefore children, and because you work so deeply in politics. Not only with men and women across the state. What's your take on what her presence in place in the state might be? Yeah, I think again another expression of very progressive approach. Saying I partner, you know, that's kind of a new term that we're hearing here, but you know, Gavin Newsom for a long time has been linked to these very progressive policies. You know, a lot of talk again about the, you know, him as mayor. You know, marrying anyone that would come to the come to this city hall to get married and really take that stand on LGBTQ issues last night. It was a very young progressive vibe at his inaugural concert that he threw and again, his his wife definitely was actually when they came out on stage, the one that really was the voice there and really kind of commanding presence. And I think it's just an overall production of like, a younger energetic. Progressive move that they want us.

Gavin Newsom Jennifer Siebel partner Sally
USOC goes nuclear on USA Gymnastics

San Francisco Chronicle Sports - Spoken Edition

03:13 min | 3 years ago

USOC goes nuclear on USA Gymnastics

"You're listening to the spoken edition of the San Francisco Chronicle. USOC goes nuclear on USA gymnastics, author unknown for sports, the US Olympic Committee is moving to revoke USA gymnastics status as the governing body for the sport at the Olympic level meeting out the nuclear option to an organization that has botched its own reorganisation in the wake of a sex abuse scandal involving former team doctor Larry Nassar in an open letter to the gymnastics community, Monday, US Olympic Committee, CEO Sarah Hersh land said you deserve better. And that the challenges facing USA gymnastics are more than it is capable of overcoming as currently constructed. The US Olympic Committee also has faced criticism for not responding quickly and appropriately to sexual abuse cases. And though the move was cheered by the gymnast whose revelations helped propel Nassar's years of abuse to the four. Thank you re tweeted, Rachel, din Hollander, others viewed it as a ploy to shift blame today's announced. By USOC seeks only to deflect from their total failure over decades to protect the gymnasts in their care said a statement from attorneys Michelle Simpson two-goal and moa Z's who represent Olympia tasha Schweickart and her sister Jordan in their lawsuit against USA gymnastics, and the US Olympic Committee this year, the US Olympic Committee said it was seeking to remove itself as a defendant from a number of lawsuits, including those filed by gold medalist Michaela, Maroney, Jordan Weaver, and Allie rice -ment claiming Nassar did not work for the federation nor were his crimes for Siebel by the committee the lawsuits claim the US Olympic Committee as the umbrella organization that oversees USA gymnastics should have done more when it learned of the abuse. Elsewhere Stanford women are top soccer. Seed defending national champion Stanford is the top overall seed in the women's NCWA tournament and will host Seattle in its postseason opener. Friday the cardinal entered the tournament on a school record forty one. Game unbeaten streak six longest in CWA history. Santa Clara is a number three seed in its portion of the bracket and begins play Saturday when it hosts Milwaukee in the same bracket, San Jose State plays its first game Friday at number two seed UCLA running the New York City marathon has set a record for the most finishers of any marathon worldwide fifty two thousand eight hundred twelve organizers said Monday, the total top the Mark of fifty one thousand three hundred ninety four from the two thousand sixteen New York City marathon, the race through the city's five boroughs Sunday was watched by more than one million spectators crisp fall day, Lisa deceased of Ethiopia and Mary kidney of Kenya where the men's and women's winners. Obituary Gianluca baron a World Cup downhill skier from Switzerland has died in a paragliding accident. He was twenty four the Swiss ski federation said Barron one of its best prospects at how fine. Speed races died Sunday morning.

Us Olympic Committee Larry Nassar Olympic USA San Francisco Chronicle Swiss Ski Federation Din Hollander Sarah Hersh CEO New York City Soccer Seattle Switzerland CWA San Jose State Jordan Weaver Michelle Simpson Barron Tasha Schweickart
Student allegedly rips MAGA hat off classmate's head, slaps teacher

Brett Winterble

00:41 sec | 3 years ago

Student allegedly rips MAGA hat off classmate's head, slaps teacher

"A high school student. In northern California's facing battery charges after she grabbed a make America great again Hat off another, students had AM seven. Sixties, Eric Rubalcaba has the story deputy seventeen year olds JoAnne Butler also slapped a teacher as she escorted her from the room JoAnne has also been suspended from school for a week don't agree with you know grabbing someone's hat and verbally talking to him. That. Way But as far as the issue being brought up that maybe this is something that Snead's to be not just needs to be brought up the Toronto high. Union high school district's clothing policy, allows students, to wear political symbols

Senator John Mccain Kgb Mccain Senator Arizona Vladimir Putin Eric Rubalcaba John Kyle Union High School District Chris Martinez CBS Joanne Butler Siebel Phoenix Joanne Washington Snead Heather California Aaron America