25 Burst results for "Sidney Poitier"

"sidney poitier" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:37 min | 1 d ago

"sidney poitier" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"News with Nancy lions in Washington D.C. Hey Nancy Thanks Tim Secretary of State Antony Blinken is voicing U.S. support for Ukrainian independence following a meeting with Ukraine's foreign minister and ahead of talks with European allies in a meeting Friday with the Russian foreign minister Bloomberg served chat and has the latest from Washington Lincoln said Ukraine is getting U.S. economic aid to resist Russian destabilization and military aid to resist an attack Russia has ratcheted up its threats and amassed nearly a 100,000 forces on Ukraine's border which it could double relatively short order Should Russia carry through with any aggressive attempts and invade Ukraine will provide additional material Lincoln said he would refine a sanctions plan and other joint efforts with the Europeans to shore up the eastern Flank in Washington or Chapman Bloomberg radio President Biden will reflect on his first year in office with an afternoon news conference at 4 p.m. Wall Street time today We get a preview from Bloomberg government reporter Emily Wilkins Certainly he can point to victories such as the bipartisan infrastructure Bill that was passed as well as starting the vaccine rollout But Emily Wilkins reports the president has faced setbacks over his response to the oma crown variant a stalled social spending agenda and this week a voting rights bill that's likely to die in the Senate Broadway theaters will dim their lights tonight to honor the late actor Sidney Poitier He was a trailblazing actor director and cultural icon and the first black man to win a best actor Oscar The Broadway league which is coordinating the one minute tribute says poitier had an incredible impact on their art form Global news.

Ukraine Nancy lions Washington D.C. Nancy Thanks Tim Secretary of Washington Lincoln Emily Wilkins Bloomberg government Chapman Bloomberg radio U.S. Biden Lincoln Washington Sidney Poitier Oscar The Broadway league Senate poitier
"sidney poitier" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

02:59 min | 6 d ago

"sidney poitier" Discussed on Fresh Air

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It <Speech_Female> was in his time of faxing. <Speech_Female> He faxed me <Speech_Female> so call you tomorrow. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> And I was like, <Speech_Female> oh, should I call <Speech_Female> him tonight? <Speech_Female> And I didn't. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> And then I got the phone call <Speech_Male> the next morning. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> I had my two <Speech_Female> young children <Speech_Female> with me and I <Speech_Male> just <Speech_Female> dropped the <Speech_Female> phone and screamed <Speech_Female> everything you <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> probably shouldn't <Speech_Female> do in front of two young <Speech_Female> children, but it <Speech_Female> was a very <Speech_Female> immediate risk. I was just <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> awful. <Silence> <Advertisement> Awful. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Do you <SpeakerChange> think they were <Silence> <Advertisement> frightened by your screaming? <Silence> <Advertisement> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> I held them and <Speech_Female> walked them through her just <Speech_Female> as I've done <Speech_Female> when <Speech_Female> my father died and <Speech_Female> I had <Speech_Female> my two young goals. <Speech_Female> It <Speech_Female> just seems there's this <Speech_Female> anyway I hate talking <Speech_Female> about it 'cause it's too <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> much <Speech_Female> a part of <Speech_Female> who I just <Speech_Female> can't, it's <Speech_Female> too present in my life, <Speech_Female> those <Speech_Female> <Silence> calls. <Speech_Female> Understood. <Speech_Female> Yeah, <Speech_Female> so I <Speech_Female> talk about it and then <Speech_Female> I go, ah, <Speech_Female> don't <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> tread into this <Speech_Female> right now <Speech_Female> because it's just too <Speech_Female> emotional, especially with <Speech_Female> Jean Marc recently, <Speech_Female> and it's <Speech_Female> just like, <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> I don't want to <Speech_Female> even put words to <Speech_Female> it. <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> But I will say I <Speech_Female> really, <Speech_Female> I loved Stanley. <Speech_Female> And <Speech_Female> for him to leave the <Speech_Female> world so suddenly <Speech_Female> seems <Speech_Female> it was <Speech_Female> awful at the same <Speech_Female> time I loved <Speech_Female> my father for him to leave <Speech_Female> the world so suddenly <Speech_Female> Jean <Speech_Female> Marc to leave the world <Speech_Female> so suddenly <Speech_Female> but suddenly <Speech_Female> is <Speech_Female> probably for the person <Speech_Female> that leaves <Speech_Female> the <Speech_Female> yuko, <Speech_Female> oh, okay. <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> Well, at least <Speech_Female> there wasn't pain. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> There's pain <Speech_Female> for us, <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> but there wasn't <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> pain for you, <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> and I'm <SpeakerChange> very <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> glad that it wasn't pain <Silence> for Nicole Kidman it <Speech_Female> has just been wonderful to talk <Speech_Female> with you. <Silence> Thank you for spending time <Speech_Female> with us. <Silence> <SpeakerChange> Thank you for <Speech_Female> having me. <Speech_Female> Nicole Kidman <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> stars on the new <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> film being the <Music> <Advertisement> ricardos. Fresh air weekend <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> is produced by Theresa <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Madden, <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> fresh airs executive <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> producer is <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Danny Miller. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Our technical director <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and engineers are ju bentham. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Our <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> interviews and reviews <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> are produced and <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> edited by <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> any salad Phyllis <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Myers Roberto Sherlock, <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> sandburg, Lauren <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> krenzel, Heidi <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Simon, and <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> rebel Donato <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Seth Kelly <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and Kayla Lattimore. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Our <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement>

Jean Marc Nicole Kidman Stanley Danny Miller Theresa Roberto Sherlock Seth Kelly Kayla Lattimore
"sidney poitier" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

05:29 min | Last week

"sidney poitier" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Critic <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Kevin Whitehead <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> likes their chemistry. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> That's the co op trio <Speech_Music_Male> artifacts, <Speech_Music_Male> first convened by <Speech_Music_Male> cellist tamika Reed, <Speech_Music_Male> Tapping <Speech_Music_Male> two band leaders <Speech_Music_Male> who'd hired her <Speech_Music_Male> early on. <Speech_Music_Male> Drummer Mike Reid, <Speech_Music_Male> no relation, different <Speech_Music_Male> spelling, <Speech_Music_Male>

"sidney poitier" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

06:32 min | Last week

"sidney poitier" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Repeat and repeat and repeat. And it took some months the heavy a Caribbean speech and the rhythmic sing songy patterns began to fade and I began to develop at least the rhythm and pronunciation of how people spoke in the U.S.. So you've had end yourself on radio announcers. Yes, it's a matter of fact there was a gentleman in those days by the name of Norman brokenshire. And I listened to him, he had a very arresting voice, and I liked the way he spoke. And I listened to him an awful lot. I didn't always understood what he was saying. But I listened a great deal and I learned, I learned pronunciation of words that I that I was studying, I was trying to learn what the words meant. So you went back to the American Negro theater company and auditioned the second time. I certainly did. That was my aim. I went back 6 months later to audition, but I was really not really prepared because I didn't have a scene or a monologue from a play. I didn't know that one could buy such things and in certain bookstores. So I bought what I thought would be appropriate for an audition. I bought a true confessions magazine. And I memorized two or three paragraphs of this one of the stories that I didn't know any better. So I got up on the stage and I'm reading this thing. And I was hardly through the first paragraph when they stopped me. Oh my God, just thinking about it. So it's amazing, really, that you were able to actually get a part after all of this. Just tell me what was the thing that you did that you think convinced the right people at the theater company to give you a shot. They didn't give me a shot. They rejected me after they saw my audition. And I made some observations myself while I was there at mind you this now. To put you in proper focus. The first place I went to when I was given the first audition and the guy threw me out. It was the American Negro theater, and it was located on a 135th street near lenox avenue. They were in the process I had no knowledge of this, of course. They were in the process of moving to a much larger space on a 127th street, and that's where I went for this for the second audition. And they had a larger stage and they had a wonderful auditorium and they had many seats. I think the first place on a 135th street had probably 40 seats, 45 seats, maybe 50. This new place had at least, or they could hold at least a 152 hundred people. Anyway. I noticed that they did not have a janitor there. So when they rejected me the first time, after licking my wounds for a while, I went back a few days later and I proposed to them since they didn't have and it appeared as it appeared to me a janitor. I would do the janitor work, which I perceived as being not a great deal of work because I would just maybe mop the stage down from time to time and do the sweep up and get the garbage out, which I could do in a half hour or so or maybe an hour. And I proposed that I would do the cleaning up stuff if they would let me come and study. And the people to whom I was speaking, they were the administrators of the American ego theater at that time. And they were somehow impressed with my determination. And they said, if you want to study that bad, that badly, you okay, you can come in. And so they got they took me in and I was the janitor. We're listening to the interview I recorded with Sidney Poitier in 2000, with her more of the interview after a break, this is fresh air. Not everybody wants to run around The White House or Congress all day. That's where the NPR politics podcast comes in. At 5 p.m., NPR's best political reporters get together and break down the biggest political stories. No noise, just Friends, making sense of Washington. Listen to the NPR politics podcast every weekday. We remembering Sidney Poitier who died last Thursday at the age of 94. Let's get back to the interview I recorded with him in 2000 after the publication of his book the measure of a man, a spiritual autobiography. Let me advance the story a little further and take you to the early part of your movie career. Specifically to blackboard jungle, which was released in 1954. This was an important film for you. You had one of the leads in it. This is the most famous high school film, I think. Opens with rock around the clock, Glenn Ford plays the new teacher at a school, just filled with juvenile delinquents. And in your first scene, he catches you in some of the other guys smoking in the bathroom. You're washing your hands with your back turned toward the teacher for most of this scene. Let's hear this scene. What's your name wise, guy? Me? Miller. Gregory Miller. You want me to spell it out for you so you want to get it? I don't know, you don't have to do that. I'll remember my shot chief you do that. Or maybe you'd like to take a walk down to the principal's office right now with me. Is that what you want? You holding all the cards, chief. You want to take me to see mister wannabe? You do just that. Who's your home period teaching? You are chief. Why aren't you with the rest of the class? I already told you. Came in to wash up, chief. I didn't wash. Just cut out that chief routine you understand. Share chief. That's what I've been doing all the time. Okay, for us to drift naji. I want to catch you in here again. I suppose.

American Negro theater Norman brokenshire American ego theater Sidney Poitier Caribbean NPR U.S. White House Glenn Ford Gregory Miller Congress Washington Miller naji
"sidney poitier" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

07:03 min | Last week

"sidney poitier" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Going to moral? So. I guess his eyes flew open. And he looked up at the stage and it all came to him, you know, that I was a fake, so he came running up onto the stage and he snatched the script out of my hand and he grabbed me. I was a kid, you know? He spun me around. And he grabbed me by the scruff of the neck and my belt in the back, and he marched me to the door. On the way, he said, these were his words as I remember. He said, get out of here and stop wasting people's time. He said, why don't you go out and get yourself a job you can handle? And as he opened the door, and as he chucked me out, his last line to me was, get yourself a job as a dishwasher or something. Well, why'd you come back for more after that? Because I mean, as I'm walking down the street, heading to the bus stop to take a bus toward the area where the employment offices were where I would be going to get a dishwasher's job. I said to myself, how did he know that I was a dishwasher? That's how I made my living in New York City. And I remembered not having told him that I was a dishwasher. So I concluded that he presupposed that that would be my limit. I would fall comfortably in that frame or some such frame. My potential was characterized by his suggestion. And I thought that I can not let that happen. I would be less than I would like to be if he turned out to have been prophetic when he when he made that comment. So I decided, as I headed for the bus station, that I was going to become an actor. I was so offended by what he said. And I was going to go back and show him that he was wrong in his assessment of me. That's precisely how it happened. We're listening to the interview I recorded with Sidney Poitier in 2000, will continue our remembrance with more of the interview after a short break. I'm Terry gross and this is fresh air. What happens when you're pushed to the limit? And what does it take to go further? I'm Jay Williams, and those questions define my journey to the NBA and beyond. But overcoming limits is something we all have to do. So come with me, as I explore how. With some of the biggest names in sports business and culture. Listen to my new show, the limits from NPR. Let's get back to the interview I recorded in 2000 with Sidney Poitier. He died Thursday night at the age of 94. He was the first black actor to win an Oscar for best actor. His many films include a raisin in the sun, Paris blues, Louis of the field in the heat of the night. Guess who's coming to dinner and to sir with love. He directed buck in the preacher uptown Saturday night. Let's do it again and stir crazy. I spoke with him after the publication of his memoir, the measure of a man. He was born on The Bahamas on a small island, which had no electricity. He didn't see his first film until age 11 after his family moved to the larger island, Nassau. I asked poitiers if he liked movies. Well, I didn't understand them. The first one was a complete bathroom and I had never seen a movie never. You know, most of what I knew about life on cation was picked up from adult conversations, you know, the snippets from adult conversation and stuff. And I didn't know anything about movies. When I arrived in Nassau, I quickly made friends with the local guys my age, you know, the ten year olds, the 11 year olds, where we had found a place to live. They took me. They had asked me I have been to what they call and in those days, there's the movie house was called the cinema. Had you ever been to the cinema? I said, no, I haven't. They took me. And we went to this place, and then the lights went down. And suddenly up on the screen. Came. Writing, you know, stuff. Just writing about, and I was looking at this writing and suddenly it stopped and there were images and they were and I was fascinated because the images were of people. And not only of people, but they were cows. Lots and lots of cows because this was so western. And I was sitting there absolutely overwhelmed. Because I couldn't understand how all those people and all those cows could be in this one building. Let me get back to your audition. So, you know, you're told, don't come back, go be a dishwasher, and you decide you're going to prove that this guy is wrong. What did you do to try to improve your auditioning skills before going back to prove that this guy was wrong and that you could do it? Well, my first job was to. Because I had this Caribbean accent as you I'm sure you were acquainted with. Well, let me just stop you there and say, I can hear the accent much more in this interview than I hear it in movies. Oh, yeah. Well, I had it very intensely and so much so that he made remark about it. And I knew that from what he had said that I had to do something about that first and foremost. So I saved up enough money to buy a radio. And I thought that the best way to correct it was to listen to a radio here in America and try to learn the sounds, the pronunciations and stuff from people I heard on the radio. And I did that and I listened to the radio between dishwashing in terms of, in other words, when I'd get home wherever I was sleeping, I would plug in this little radio and I would listen until I fell asleep and whatever was said on the radio I would repeat it. Like a pirate. And I would just listen and repeat and.

Sidney Poitier Jay Williams Terry gross Nassau New York City NPR NBA The Bahamas Oscar buck Paris Caribbean America
"sidney poitier" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

08:17 min | Last week

"sidney poitier" Discussed on Fresh Air

"The iconic actor died Thursday night at the age of 94. In his New York Times obituary, poitiers was described as America's first black matine a idol, who helped open the door for black actors in the film industry. In 1963, he became the first black actor to win an Oscar for best actor. Sidney Poitier has said that he always believed that his work should convey his personal values. When he started making movies in 1949, it was difficult for black actors to get significant film roles. It was even difficult to get small parts that were in stereotyped. But in the 50s and 60s, Poirier starred in a string of films that addressed the racial tensions of the time. Films like a raisin in the sun, Paris blues, lilies of the field, a patch of blue, in the heat of the night, guess who's coming to dinner and to sir with love. In the 70s poitier directed such films as buck and the preacher uptown Saturday night, let's do it again and stir crazy. When I spoke with him he'd just published a memoir called the measure of a man a spiritual autobiography. Poirier grew up in The Bahamas on cat island and Nassau. His family was poor. He was born in 1924, and arrived prematurely weighing only three pounds. His father prepared for his baby's imminent death by buying a little casket, his mother went to a fortune teller. The soothsayer said to my mother, who was deeply concerned about my survival because I was in fact born to my mother with the assistance of a midwife, I was considerably less than three pound. Anyway, her great trepidations for my survival was such that she was the only person standing in that regard as a matter of fact, most of the others thought that I should be, let go, because the chances for myself ever were few anyway, she stood alone and she dressed herself and she went out in search of help. Anyway, this went through whatever the procedures were for such people and she told my mother she came out of what appeared to have been a trans am told. Not to worry about me that I would live and I would. I would walk with kings. She said to my mom and that I would travel the world and my mother's name will be known and heard and all the corners of the earth. That's what she said. Would you describe cat island the island in The Bahamas where you grew up? Cat island is one of many, many islands in The Bahamas. It's The Bahamas is now an independent country, but in the time of my youth and for many, many years before it was a colonial possession of the British Empire. And it's an island 46 miles long and about a three miles wide, the population was very small during my early years. It was barely over a thousand if that many today it is still quite small. It is about 800. I mean, about 1800 people. It's difficult to describe in that words would be hard to find convey the beauty of it. You know, we have the most extraordinary beaches in the world. The water is of a color and of a luminance that is absolutely striking. Now, I grew up with it and I had to travel the world to find that there were no other places comparable, at least to my recollection. And describe your house for us. The house. The house was a. Tiny four room structure with thatched roof made from palm leaves. My dad with the assistance of local people built the house. It was it had no electricity obviously because there was no electricity on the island at all. There was no running water. So consequently, we had no bathrooms, and we had no kitchens attached to the house. The kitchen was some several feet several yards away from the house and. We brought water, for instance, from 200 yards away for bathing purposes of a cooking purposes. And all other bathroom functions were accommodated in the in the outdoors and the life was such that you walked everywhere you went and if you had any heavy loads to carry you would use a mule or a horse or a donkey and stuff like that. When you were ten, your family moved to NASA, I think, because there was what a crop failure on the island. Well, they were tomato farmers. That's what they are in their living, and they sold to the middle guys in Florida. And they did that for many, many years. And when I was about 9 and a half or so, the U.S. government in Florida on behalf of the Florida tomato growers placed an embargo on tomatoes coming out of The Bahamas for reasons I suppose beneficial to the local farmers in Florida, but that devastated the whole farming of tomatoes in The Bahamas throughout the islands in The Bahamas, and especially on cat island, which affected my father, and he having no other. Means of making a living had to move the family to NASA, which was, and still is a terrorist community and a serious economy, and he had to find work as best he could somewhere in that new culture. What kind of work did he find? Well, not much. He found a job, ultimately working for someone in a bicycle store. And he wanted to continue farming, but the soil available was not resilient enough to be useful. You left for Florida where your brother was living with his family when you were age 15, you plan to stay with him. You didn't stay for long. What was like to face southern segregation? While it was, it was an experience I can tell you. There was some semblance of it in NASA when we moved from cation to NASA. There was none of it, not absolutely none of it. On cation island, I never developed any sense of what color would eventually come to mean in the other parts of the world. The first place outside of caravan would have been NASA and NASA. There it was a fairly modern juris community and the majority of people were black. There was a governmental infrastructure that consisted of a community of whites mostly English people. They control the government, they control the economy and I found sufficient comfort within the bounds of the black community and.

The Bahamas Poirier Sidney Poitier poitiers cat island Cat island Oscar Nassau New York Times Florida NASA buck Paris America U.S. government
"sidney poitier" Discussed on Pop Culture Happy Hour

Pop Culture Happy Hour

06:33 min | Last week

"sidney poitier" Discussed on Pop Culture Happy Hour

"With love. I love that song. When lube starts to sing that song, we're supposed to give them the present on God. I start crying. It's ridiculous. It gets to be this movie. And I really like movies about teachers. I think my love of the teacher genre or the love of teachers genre works because I saw this movie. And it's almost a flip side of Sydney was one of the hooligans in the blackboard jungle. Now he's teaching the hooligans here. Yeah. And so the flip side of that is really interesting. I'm a sucker for this movie. I'm sorry. It's okay. I wouldn't put it up there with my favorites of his. I think in part because as you mentioned, it is part of that genre of film that we would see later on stand and deliver and dangerous minds, part of the younger generation and that's what we grew up with and then seeing it and I was like, oh, this is this one of the places this is coming from. But I do have to say it is moving in a way that those other movies are not. And I think it does owe a lot of that to the Sydney potty character. And the real chemistry he has with those students. And that song. If you wanted sky I would write. You said you wanted to sing, but I said. It's a great song. Well, we have talked a lot about his on screen performances, but before we close that, I think it's important to acknowledge that he was also a pretty prolific director for several years starting in the 70s. And you wanted to talk about his directorial debut, which was back in the preacher. It was interesting that he chose to make a western assist debut. And it's a very fascinating question. I watched it recently. And it's much darker than I remember. I mean, it's got comedic aspects get heritable at it and he's naked for people that love variable of aunties when they're on nude in this and it has a conversation between Native Americans and the black soldiers who have people who are coming out west. And there's some dissent. And I can't think of a movie before that that even brought this up. It was a little bit of a history lesson for me growing up when I saw this movie that this even existed. They give you that kind of the way they treat the Native American characters in this western, as much different than they treat them in most other westerns. Yeah. The harder they fall kind of owes a debt to this movie, though, the Netflix harder day for western. And that has black people as what they were, cowboys. I mean, a lot of the rodeo stuff was invented by black cowboys. And Sidney brings this in. It's almost like I'm going to change my image. Because when he started directing movies, when he got blacker, when he came back to us, let me put it that way. Sydney was returned to black folks, but he started directing because it allowed him to be black to be romantic to be sexy, to be violent, to be all the things he could not be under the Hollywood system. And this movie is really interesting and that was his debut. It's not a perfect picture, but it set me a fascinating one in terms of how it treats history of the west. You know, you could see that he was finally able to be the sort of actor that he was supposed to be. He should have been playing different kinds of characters outlaws, people who weren't just like these fine upstanding citizens. And then to have the combination of him in Harry Belafonte and Ruby Dee, as his wife, it's just like you're watching this black Hollywood royalty on screen, getting to delve into, yes, the issues are still very much about race. But it's from their perspective. And it is being told in a way. There's a moment where city parties character slaps a madam, this white madam, an owner of a brothel. And it happens very quickly and it's very much in the vein of that sort of misogynistic hysterical woman going crazy and then the guy slaps her. So it's not like the best depiction of a man towards a woman. But at the same time, it's kind of revolutionary that he was even able to do that. I think of that in that connection to the slap in the heat of the night is like, okay, he's loosening up. He's able to be a bit more rebellious than he ever got a chance to be. Brings it out. I mean, some of the clothes they have on in that movie are insane. Yeah. And even for by 70 standards they're insane. And so he really loosens up the city was never really funny. Didn't sell does the same thing Sydney does or to kind of that kind of thing he does in his voice where you kind of he's trying to make a joke or he's making a joke. Without necessarily explicitly doing so. But he's funny. He gets to be funny. He gets to have massively ridiculous laughs. Slap stick things happen to him. And it's almost like Hollywood was pigeonholing him as his respectable black person. And he couldn't do anything. So it made him so static. That's why a lot of people I love NP was and so on. Didn't like him. And thought that he was basically a Tom because Hollywood was forcing him to those roles. And this is kind of his liberation. They always say that you want to make the movie you want to make. If you want to be in you direct it. That's what he did. Well, I think it's safe to say that his legacy has been reconsidered and for the better because we understand with hindsight, what he was up against. And just so glad we're able to see him loosen up and be able to express himself in ways that he wasn't before. And obviously there are a lot of movies that we didn't mention. He had a very long career. So if we didn't mention your favorites, it doesn't mean we didn't like them or that we haven't seen them. It's just, we couldn't talk about all of them because he was a legend. So thank you, odie for chatting with me about Sydney poitier. It was a pleasure as always to have you on. Thank you. This is fun. And we want to know your favorite Sydney pate films and performances. So find us at Facebook dot com slash PCH and on Twitter at PCH. And that brings us to the end of our show. We'll see you all tomorrow. What happens when you're pushed to the limit? And what does it take to go further? I'm Jay Williams, and those questions define my journey to the NBA and beyond. But overcoming limits is something we all have to do. So come with me. As I explore how. With some of the biggest names in sports business and culture. Listen to my new show, the limits from NPR..

Sydney Hollywood Ruby Dee Harry Belafonte Netflix Sidney cowboys Tom odie Jay Williams Facebook Twitter NBA NPR
"sidney poitier" Discussed on Pop Culture Happy Hour

Pop Culture Happy Hour

05:42 min | Last week

"sidney poitier" Discussed on Pop Culture Happy Hour

"I think it's the closest we get after no way out to a little bit more rage, at least it's a lot of simmering rage that I think is translated in Sinead pois character. Sidney pottier plays Virgil tibbs. He's a police detective from Philadelphia, who finds himself roped into helping solve a murder in Deep South in Mississippi. And it's directed by Norman Jewison and it costars Rod Steiger as the local cop Poirier works alongside. And Rod Steiger in pretty much all the other white characters in this movie are just flat out races. And it's a lot of Sydney again having to simmer keep his rage or his annoyance at everyone around him who and it's stated very clearly in many scenes like he is by far. He's an expert. He knows what he's doing. You can see it happening, but of course he still has to deal with all this racism from all these various people. And what I like about this performance is that there are so many moments where it's communicated through his body language and through his face. Obviously there's the famous slap scene where he is interrogating one of the suspects of this murder an older white man and the white man slaps him and without flinching. He slaps him back. Then, of course, there's the even greater moment afterwards where there is a black servant who is in the room and after Virgil and the Rod Steiger character have left the servant just kind of looks at this white employer and shakes his head. So much of it is based on his body language. And so I want to play a little clip that really demonstrates just the sort of tension that is bubbling within sine parties character. And so in this scene, the Rod Steiger character has just gotten off the phone with Sidney's boss, to confirm that he is actually who he says he is. And Sydney's just like counting the money and you can hear him sort of pause and then count it again. And you can just see how annoyed he is by this entire interaction. Well, now you were the number one homicide expert. That's right. Boy, I bet you get to look at a lot of dead bodies, don't you? Well, well, what? Well, no, I just thought maybe would mind taking a look at this one. No, thanks. Why not? Because I've got a train to catch. The way in which he is always pulling it back in, I think. You could argue that it's again this classic Sydney character where he's got to keep his composure and rise above it when they go low, we go high. But I also think it makes for a really fascinating performance that I think he wasn't nominated for the Academy Award for this. No. Stagger one. Which is wild to me, and he should have. Because I think this is an even better role than the one he won for. But what are your thoughts on in the heat of the night? Are you a fan of this movie? Oh, I love this movie. What's different about this Sydney character? And it kind of goes back to no way out is that he's an expert and he knows he's an expert, and he's perfectly willing to rub it in from all those white folk that don't think that he's worth anything because he's black. And Sidney plays this much harder here. And this movie, and he just relishes in fact, this is one of the times when the white characters know they are outmatched, and they have no choice, but to accept that they are. It Sydney's going to have a little fun with that. Some of his violin would you say that dialog to the others? All these little things he's doing in the movie. If you watch it from a perspective of that, he's kind of being a butt because he's an expert, but he's appropriately being one because they are trying to misjudge him at every level. And he's going to show them up. And he's going to enjoy showing them up. Also, it's one of those movies that just looks hot. Yeah. You can just feel the heat. It's got in the heat of the night. And it just admits that just kind of swampy, deep, Mississippi, heat. And everybody's got a suit on. And you can tell that they're hot. Oh, God. No one looks happy. Well, I want to move on to another movie that came out that same year. In fact, cine had three movies that year that were huge. The other one, besides this one, was guess who's coming to dinner, which was also nominated for best picture that year. And obviously they're like kind of two sides of very different coins in terms of how they deal with race on their face. But the other movie you wanted to bring is to start with love. If I were honest, I would say that this is my favorite Sydney poitier performance. And there's a couple of reasons why. One, it's a sweet little movie. It's we look at the teacher's genre now, and we see a lot more cliches, but this is 1967. Also, it's a black teacher and I come from a family of teachers. And in my schooling, I didn't have that many black teachers until I got almost all high school, middle of high school pretty much. And I went to a public school and a black neighborhood. Oh wow, listen to college for me. Seeing him on the screen and just simply being a teacher and just commit interacting with these kids and they make some call with sir. I think it's maybe the first time I saw a black person being respected on the screen because this is on TV a lot when I was a kid, seeing him on the screen and commanding this respect. It just made me feel like, I don't know, I just felt warm and I felt like so warm towards Sydney's character in this movie. And he kind of wins over these kids. It's almost kind of a similar story. The black guy is winning over the white kids, but it's a little bit different in.

Rod Steiger Sydney Sinead pois Sidney pottier Virgil tibbs Norman Jewison Poirier Sidney Deep South Mississippi Virgil Philadelphia Academy Award
"sidney poitier" Discussed on The Oprah Winfrey Show: The Podcast

The Oprah Winfrey Show: The Podcast

05:07 min | Last week

"sidney poitier" Discussed on The Oprah Winfrey Show: The Podcast

"My evening meal breaks, I sat in a quiet area of the restaurant reading, newspapers, trying to sound out each syllable of each unfamiliar word. An old Jewish waiter noticed my effort took pity and offered to help. He became my tutor as well as my guardian angel of the moment. Every night, we sat in the same booth in that quiet area of the restaurant, and he helped me learn to read. Did you ever see him again? Years later, I was compelled to try to find him. I couldn't. And I do even to this day regret. That I did not have a chance to thank him and explain to him the good services he had rendered to me that was essential to my success as a film actor. And I think you ultimately paid it forward by showing black people what was possible. You know, the importance of speaking well, and. That question. Bothers me a lot. It's a question of education. We are too rich a country. To have in a city education, what it is. It is each family. I believe. Who has the responsibility to educate their children? No matter what their own education is. Right. It does seem because I work with the new city kids and what was so brilliant about when I introduced the book to them. They said, wow, I didn't see any 48 could barely read in the beginning, and that registered. They could connect with us. Because they can be because Sidney Poitier and so many others now stand for what is possible. Exactly. Yeah. I'd like to make a toast. I'd like to make a toast to the forces. I'd like to thank the forces, whatever you choose to call the forces that allowed me to ten years old. The forces that put me in front of my magnavox black and white television set to see Sidney Poitier received the Academy Award and planted that seed. That moment that I saw you, I've told this story many times before, but it is true. The moment that I saw him accept the award for lilies of the field, it's said to me that this is possible because what your life has meant to all of us says that your love, your sense of honor, your sense of integrity. It is possible for all of us, and so here's to you, and here's to your beautiful book measure of a man. It's your hair. Here's to you who I've loved my entire life, and even before I was born. Oh, my goodness. Hello. Can I ask you this? What did it mean for you to turn 80? What was was there a significance to you? This is the 7th day since my 80th birthday. And you have to be the first person to ask. It makes me feel good. That I have attended to some of my responsibilities over the years. I have my children, my wife, and my Friends. So it feels wonderful. Getting to be 80. I still to this day when I call them just a little nervous joy. And sometimes she'll say, he just went to the supermarket. He went to the sun. Yeah. And whole foods. I had my wife's wife. Bring out the gifts for our guests. Yes, I love a present on a silver day. Yes, I do. I know. It's what I do really extraordinary to have you all here. And the journey that it took to be here. Yes, ma'am. It's an absolute honor. The day that I picked up the book, this is a corny story. I had Chinese food, and I had fortune cookie. And I opened the fortune cookie and with the fortune said to me, was what you will discover as yourself. And I thought that was really interesting. And I kept that fortune. And what happened, I kept reading the book, looking for things to tell my sons. And what I found was me. And my dignity through you and I want to thank you for that because that is the gift I can pass to my boys. So thank you. Thank you. Very much. Thank you. Everybody, thank you. Thank you back to your home. Thank you. Thank you. I'm Oprah Winfrey and you've been listening to The Oprah Winfrey Show, the podcast. If you haven't yet, go to Apple podcasts and subscribe rate and review this podcast. Join me next week for another Oprah show. The podcast. And I thank you for listening..

Sidney Poitier Academy Award Oprah Winfrey Apple Oprah
"sidney poitier" Discussed on The Oprah Winfrey Show: The Podcast

The Oprah Winfrey Show: The Podcast

07:14 min | Last week

"sidney poitier" Discussed on The Oprah Winfrey Show: The Podcast

"Do you have favorites of your own? Favorites? Yeah. I have 6 favorite films out of 56. Okay, what are they? Is that one of them? That's one of them. Okay. I won't tell you the other four, because the more I narrow it down, then there will be so many films that will be left out and so many people I've worked with and I don't want to make that kind of thing. You are entitled to have your favorite sex. It's got to be they call me mister dead. That's one. That's also what. Okay. Let's talk about the slap scene in there. The slapping scene in there. It originally, it was not written so that you slapped him back. Is that correct? Correct, yeah. And you said, I said that I wouldn't play it that way. Because. Because. The guys who wrote the script, well intended, though they were. They were extending an old stereotypical pattern. Two extremes. I mean, that was the epitome of turning the other cheek. The situation. And I thought this was a modern man. This was a lieutenant of detectives in the homicide division of the Philadelphia police department. And this guy, without reason, slaps him across the face. And I said to the director and the producer, if you want to make really good cinema, if you want to have a scene that will be remembered, and if you want me in the picture. Then you will rewrite it so that within a nanosecond, as soon as he slaps me, he gets slapped right back. So I would think that would have made you even angrier when you get charges that you're not standing up. You're not black enough because you have in your own way behind the scenes and on the screen been standing up for that what you believe to be true and right. Yeah, but you know history passes the final judgment. And in my case, the body of work stands for itself. I have not made a film that I was ashamed of. I have made a film that my mother could see and feel very good. I have made 56 motion pictures. I've been a principal player in motion pictures for 50 odd years. And I think that my work has been representative of me as a man. And I think as a man I've been representative of the values I hold dear. And the values I hold here are carryovers from the lives of my parents. So I'm okay. With myself with history, my work who I am and who I was. How do you look so good? What are you doing? I mean, we have a special herbs and spices or how do you look so good? Well, thank you. I mean, I'm not aware that I look that good. You look good. When Sydney Poirier remembers his spirit, his mind wanders back to The Bahamas where he grew up. The values he learned from his parents have kept him connected to the powerful inner spirit that continues to guide him. During my earliest years, I was constantly exposed to nature. There were, for instance, not automobiles, no motorized vehicles at all. Boats are trucks or cars. So the sounds that came to me when I was a boy. Were the sounds of the environment where the sounds of insects singing and the sounds of water against the shore. But then when I went to places where there were cars and traffic and people, I began to realize the difference. I could walk on a beach for hours and hours by myself. I used to do that, but and I would listen to the sounds of all of which were natural sounds. There was a purity, there was a closeness to nature. I know that it was a most powerful influence on the rest of my life. I honor my spirit when I think of the core values of my parents. My father didn't define his core self by material things. He didn't loved us, and he cared for us, and he talked to us and he nurtured us. My mother's spirit is always around me. Always there. Guiding me of loose. I can sense it. I first felt that sense of connection with my parents on cat island. And I never lost that. My spirit is honored. When I think of my connectedness to the universe, I feel I'm a part of everything. I'm a part of nature. Thank you so much. This is a full circle moment for me. Just for me as well. Thank you. Thank you so much. Thank you. I'm Oprah Winfrey and you've been listening to The Oprah Winfrey Show the podcast. If you haven't yet, go to Apple podcasts and subscribe, great and review this podcast. Join me next week for another Oprah show. The podcast. And I thank you for listening. This podcast is sponsored by better help online therapy. We take care of our bodies with the gym, the doctor, and nutrition. We should be focusing on our minds just as much. Better help is customized online therapy that offers video, phone, and even live chat with your therapist. It's more affordable than in person therapy, and you can be matched with a therapist in under 48 hours. Give it a try and see why over 2 million people have used better help online therapy. Podcast listeners get 10% off their first month at better help dot com slash stitcher. That's better HELP dot com slash stitcher..

Philadelphia police department Sydney Poirier The Bahamas Oprah Winfrey Oprah Apple
"sidney poitier" Discussed on The Oprah Winfrey Show: The Podcast

The Oprah Winfrey Show: The Podcast

08:35 min | Last week

"sidney poitier" Discussed on The Oprah Winfrey Show: The Podcast

"The year was 1946 in Sydney poitier was an understudy with New York's America Negro theater. On opening night, the lead actor, a young Harry Belafonte, couldn't perform. So at the last minute, Sidney Poitier took his place. And as fate would have it, a major casting director was in the audience and made him an offer. I couldn't escape the feeling that not only was I one lucky youngster, but something more had to be at play here. I had grown up in a culture where unseen forces lurked just outside of you. You described yourself as lucky a lot the point a and in the book. How do you feel about the word luck? It sounds like the reading it, you were more prepared than lucky. Because you believe in that definition that I believe in that I believe there's no such thing as luck that it's preparation meeting the moment of opportunity, but he does use the word lucky a lot. Yeah, well, I think I think Locke is akin to serendipity. It implies that out of nowhere, serendipity dips down and kisses us on a cheek and wonderful things happen to us. And these forces are influential in our lives. They help to mold us and to shape us. I believe that we have free will. I believe, too, that free will operate within this frame of nature and God. If you will. But we have responsibilities. It is not that we can sit back. Tell the schoolboard you were telling me you were saying that even now you still see things through the eyes of your mother. Yes, I do. The whole experience that my mom had with the soothsayer. Yes. Tell us that. Tell you that. Read the book. Well, she was as you know. I was born prematurely by more than two months. And I was less than three pounds. There were no doctors. There were midwives in those days. For us. It didn't look good, obviously, for me, but by the end of the following day, there seemed to be absolutely no hope. So she stopped at this. They sat down. And this was in some kind of trance. And she stayed in it for a while. And when she arrives flew open, she said some things to my mother. She said, don't worry about your son. He will grow up to travel to most of the corners of the earth. He will walk with kings, your name will be carried all over the world. For 50 cents, my mother found the support she needed for backing a long shot. So here your mother was as poor, you know, wife of a tomato farmer. On cat island and she told her that you would see the world and that you would walk with kings. Come on, say it. Says the soothsayer. Yeah. I'd like to get her in here today. I have to assume. At least I'd had to assume that I am left with the responsibility to effectuate my own survival. I was lucky, though, too, you know? I can't. I think that there are things way beyond our understanding. Yes. Do you think that that force was working with you when you first moved to New York City, arriving in the city, not even having adequate clothing and the turns cold and you're in New York City, sleeping on the rooftops with not even a coat? I don't think that we make many moves without the force knowing about it. Yeah. If you call it God. If you call it, I don't know. We still have responsibilities. Isn't it amazing astounding that he was just this boy alone basically? Boy, he was a boy. Alone, moving, you know, on the train, arriving in New York City I was trying to figure it out. Right. And in figuring it out, you came to this profound idea. This is profound theory of life that you are responsible for you. Right. And that's really how does that happen? I wish you'd tell me. It was 1968 and doctor Martin Luther King had been assassinated. During this turbulent time, Sidney Poitier was breaking down social barriers by starring in the top three films of that year. He made history by playing the romantic lead in a film that was banned in many parts of the south called guess who's coming to dinner. This was the first film to feature an interracial romance in a positive light. I'm married to an African American man and he was bust into white schools and he has been accused of talking white or thinking he's better, whatever. Anyway, we just go about our lives, you know? And if we run into anyone who looks askance or doesn't want to see us, I just think, well, that just told me something about them. And it never occurs to me or to my husband, John to think, oh, maybe there's something wrong with what we're doing. You know, it's funny when I read the same passage and knowing who you are. You know, I had an incident when I was 8 years old and was told I couldn't swim in my friend's pool, his dad came home from work early, saw me in the pool and told me to get out. Why did he tell you to get out? Because I was black. He said my hair would clog up the pool. And he was kidding. At first, you had said in your book, I waited for the punch line. Yeah. And when the punchline didn't come, I got out of the pool, and I walked home, I thought bad about myself. You know, from that moment on, I was like, something's wrong with me. And I carry that until yesterday. Really? You know, it's been a life long term. It's been truly a lifetime journey for me. So you've raised 6 daughters? Yep. And what was your philosophy for raising 6 daughters? Yeah. Girls were. Problematical in that. They have to be protected because there are things out there in the world. In schools that can be problematic. Are you talking about boys? Yeah. Okay. My girls have grown up wonderfully well and they're doing quite nicely they have given me 5 grandchildren and a great grandchild. And I'm happy with them as people though, especially happy with them as people. This is what I understand that the birthday was last week and all of them were here. Yes. I know all of them were here because we gathered all of them together to ask them a few things about you. You're kidding. You are kidding. Surprise daddy. Happy birthday. We love you. I think my dad passed on to me and to all of his children. To really have a sense of who you are and a sense of self. He has such a strong moral and ethical core that growing up we try to emulate that. I used to think, my God. He's God. He knows everything. And I was just marveled at him. He always will be amazing to me. One of the fondest memories I have of daddy was when I was in elementary school and my sister Beverly and I were on the bus. And someone had called Beverly a name. The next day that he got on the bus and he looked around at all the kids on the bus and he said, now you know, it's not very nice to call somebody else at me. It hurts their feelings. And it was amazing. They took it as a great learning lesson and so did I he has a lot of patience to have 6 daughters. Yeah. You have to have patience. You know? Don't you think Sydney? Yes, I do..

America Negro theater Sidney Poitier Harry Belafonte New York City Locke Sydney New York Martin Luther King John Beverly
"sidney poitier" Discussed on The Oprah Winfrey Show: The Podcast

The Oprah Winfrey Show: The Podcast

08:09 min | Last week

"sidney poitier" Discussed on The Oprah Winfrey Show: The Podcast

"Hello, everybody. And welcome to the famous spago restaurant. I'm here in Beverly Hills, California, where we've just put the final touches on our dinner of a lifetime, because today we get to honor someone I've admired my entire life. I'm happy to be able to call him my friend and a personal hero. Sidney Poitier. During some of the most racially turbulent times in our American history, city Poirier shattered stereotypes by becoming Hollywood's first black leading man. In 1964, by winning the Academy Award for best actor, he became the first African American man to be given that honor, and he redefined what was possible for generations to come. So now, as he marks the 80th year of a legendary life, Sidney Poitier shares some of his lessons and virtues in his beautifully crafted bestselling spiritual autobiography, the measure of a man. What do you think mister poitier that all of us are gathered around this table here in the year 2007 to talk about a book that you wrote several years ago? And also a book that really is an extension of the first book, this life that you wrote, I don't know when in the 60s. What do you think of that? Well, it would be the 6th time I have pinched myself. Because of this gathering, I am greatly honored by it. I'm greatly honored by your presence and I'm looking forward to the exchange. It isn't just the dinner that brought me here. I've heard about you. People, and I find what I know of you to be very impressive. And I thank you for coming. Well, Don, I understand that you are probably the only person at this table other than myself who had read the original biography this life many years ago. Why? What was it that had you drawn to Sydney poitier? Well, when I was 8, I had a special love affair. My own love affair with mister poitier. Oh, wow. She tells me when I'm 80. 25 years ago, as a young single mother with two boys, Don says she drew from Sidney Poitier's life to inspire them to greater heights. Every time I wanted to make a point, I would say, you know, if I wanted to stress education, I wanted to stress that they can do anything that they wanted to do. I would always tell them about you. And then there is Tiffany whose mother was doing the same thing to her as you were doing to your sons. Is that not right? That's definitely true. He was the model mister 48. You were the model for being well presented, being well articulated. Even when I was being made fun of and you know in school for talking white, you know, you were that model. And through reading the book, I was so just amazed with, again, what you had to go through and everything that you championed. In the 1967 classic in the heat of the night, Sidney Poitier plays a black detective trying to solve a murder in the deep racially explosive south. The original script called for a white business owner to slap Sidney's character in the face. It was then that Sydney portier made a stunning suggestion. I told the director that the script needed to be changed. He said, well, what do you suggest? I said, shoot this scene so that without a nanosecond of hesitation, I whacked him right back across the face with a backhand slap. You know, I love the parts of the book where you had artistic control. When no black actor was doing that, was revising scripts was suggesting, you know, I don't like this or I should turn around and slap him back. But was it artistic control or was it just a decision that you had made? It was a decision I had made in the absence of artistic control in a way. I didn't have the power in those days to say, and I truly didn't to say, well, I won't do that unless you fix it. I could only say I won't do that as it stands. But this is very interesting. I've always thought after reading measure of a man, I've wondered, what would have happened had you come to the United States at a much younger age? There are many places in the book where we see that your sense of self and character had already been defined by the time you reached the segregated Jim Crow United States. Sidney Poitier's life began on a remote island in The Bahamas called cat island. He was the youngest of 7 children raised by poor hardworking parents. Evelyn and reginald. They taught by example the strong values of pride and integrity that have always guided him. Sidney says he never considered the color of his skin while living on cat island. But when he was 15, he left The Bahamas for Miami, where a dangerous world was waiting to define what a black boy could be. Did you ever think about what would have happened if you had been 7 years old and not 15? I think it would have had an effect on me. But because you were 15, your identity was already formed. The identity was formed. I knew largely who I was. And who I was, was not different from who my father was. And my mother was. So that when Florida said to me, that you are not who you think you are. I said to Florida, I am not what you think I am. Young Sydney got a job as a delivery boy for a drug store when he was 15, but nobody had explained the rules that came with his job and his skin color. I went to the front door and rang the bell and a lady came to the door and said, what do you want? Good afternoon, ma'am. I said, I've come to deliver your package from the drugstore. Get around to the back door where you belong. She snapped. I couldn't figure it out, so I left the package on the step. Then you go home and then there's the Klan waiting for your family. They assumed he is a black boy in Florida. He would know his place. Right. And he had just arrived and coming from a community where his place was to be wherever he wanted to be. Front door. I thank God that pharmacist didn't tell you. Thank God he didn't tell you to go the back door. You know? 'cause your life may have turned out completely different if you didn't know him. If enough people had told me that over time, I suppose it might have begun to sink in. Well, this is what I loved about Tommy. He has four sons for a cute little boys. And you've now taken measure of a man to be your manual for fatherhood. That's right. How so? Well, um, I mean, I read a bit of father 7 years now. And I only get one shot. You know, and I got to do it right. This is everything. I've been looking for in a how to manual on how to raise men. Not boys. Men. I'm raising men. There's enough grown boys walking around here. So, you know, I just, you know, I thank you because the book is just when you read when you read the antidotes about strength and dignity and character, these are this is what I want to teach my boys. You know, one of the main points that I've already shared with them is know who you are. You know, the very simply, just know who you are. So when someone calls my oldest son Ori, a name in school, what you know who you are. So that does not mean you. You let it fall away like a, like an autumn leaf because you know who you are. Beautiful..

Sidney Poitier mister poitier Sydney portier Poirier Don Academy Award Sidney Beverly Hills The Bahamas Hollywood Young Sydney Tiffany California Sydney cat island United States Florida Jim Crow reginald Evelyn
"sidney poitier" Discussed on The Oprah Winfrey Show: The Podcast

The Oprah Winfrey Show: The Podcast

03:27 min | Last week

"sidney poitier" Discussed on The Oprah Winfrey Show: The Podcast

"You again. Every single person you ever will meet, shares that common desire. They want to know. Do you see me? Do you hear me? That's what I say mean anything to you. You are listening to The Oprah Winfrey Show. The podcast. Today we have Sydney 48. Really? I'm gonna try not to weep. But he is a very special guest for me. He's a man who I have admired and literally adored since I was a little girl. I remember sitting on my linoleum floor, same one I was watching Diana Ross with on The Ed Sullivan Show. But I remember I was ten years old at the time. My mother worked as a maid. We were on welfare. And I was watching the Academy Awards. And I saw him. We were colored at the time. So a color man. I saw him and saw a colored man get out of a limousine. And was just in awe of that. And then that night, he won the Academy Award for lilies of the field. And what that did for me. As a little girl watching on my linoleum floor, it's said to me that is possible that it's possible you can be colored and that can happen to you. And you can also be black and that can happen to you. He is a one of the most honorable people I know and one of the finest actors of our time and a courageous trailblazer who forged the way so that people like me could dream bigger dreams. Denzel Washington recently put it this way, Sidney Poirier didn't just open doors. He tore them off their hinges. Sydney poitier, personifies dignity, strength, integrity, and grace. And for 50 years, this brilliant, not to mention, also hand to actor, has not just earned our respect. He has commanded it. Always a powerful symbol of courage. Sidney Poitier has been breaking through social barriers from the moment he set foot in Hollywood. Every character he's played has had something important to say. In 1958, Sidney Poitier broke down another barrier when his work in the defiant ones earned him an Academy Award nomination. He was the first black man ever to be considered for that honor. 5 years later, another first, he took home an Oscar for his performance in one of my favorite movies of all time. Lilies of the field. By 1967, Sidney Poitier was the most popular movie star in America with the top three box office hits. Guess who's coming to dinner in the heat of the night and to sir with love. Even today, his legendary body of work has people applauding from presidents to Hollywood's biggest stars, Sidney Poitier is still earning respect. He was honored with the coveted screen actors guild, lifetime achievement award for his tremendous contributions to the film industry. He usually keeps.

"sidney poitier" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:43 min | Last week

"sidney poitier" Discussed on WTOP

"Your home for original reporting I'm Tom 40 It was sentencing day and Brunswick Georgia for Greg and Travis mcmichael and their friend William Bryan three white men convicted of chasing and killing on our black man ahmaud Arbery CBS News correspondent Mark strassmann was there We are all accountable for our own actions I countability in America's latest moment of racial reckoning Three life sentences two without chance of parole In a relieved Georgia community Ahmaud Arbery's family still churns When I close my eyes I see his execution in my mind Over and over I see that for the rest of my life The 25 year old Arbery went jogging and ended up running for his life Ron William Bryan will have to serve at least 30 years before becoming eligible for parole At least one person is missing and presumed dead neural Impala Washington This is snow turned terrain deluging the Pacific Northwest a week after a most unusual but devastating wind driven wildfire wiped out about a thousand homes and businesses in Colorado President Biden went there to Lewisville Colorado to see what he could do to comfort victims He noted more land as burned in the United States from California up into the Idaho and here in Colorado and parts of the south then make up the entire Lake reach is the entire state of New Jersey They promised federal help to rebuild from Colorado's worst ever wildfire calling it a code red climate warning Earlier back in Washington mister Biden reacted to something of a mixed December jobs report from the Labor Department The president boasted of the Labor Department report showing 3.9% unemployment I think it's historic day Mister Biden noted more jobs were added in 2021 6.4 million than in any year on record He argues his economic plan is working and to critics who say he's not focused enough on inflation malarkey He went out of his way to make this point A stock market the last guy's measure of everything It's about 20% higher Steven portnoy CBS News The White House Groundbreaking actor Sidney Poitier has died at age 94 A major film star from the 1950s on Sidney Poitier was the first African American man to be nominated for an Oscar and the first to win one His career filled with roles that defied decades of Hollywood stereotypes of black men All I wanted to be able to stand in front of my boy like my father never was able to do to me and tell him that he would beat somebody in this world besides the servant This is CBS News Double this EP.

Travis mcmichael William Bryan Mark strassmann Ahmaud Arbery Arbery Colorado Ron William Bryan Georgia CBS News entire Lake Brunswick mister Biden Labor Department America Greg Mister Biden Washington Tom Lewisville
Oscar History-Maker Sidney Poitier Dies at 94

The Larry Elder Show

00:33 sec | Last week

Oscar History-Maker Sidney Poitier Dies at 94

"As mentioned, the great city Poirier has died, 94 years old what is it about people dying at the end of the year like this? Make it through Christmas with their family and then that's it, I guess, John Madden died, Betty. Very white died. Somebody else too. I said John Madden. John Madden. Dan, yeah, Dan Reeves died. The former player and coach. And now city poitier at 94 years old

John Madden Poirier Dan Reeves Betty DAN
"sidney poitier" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:09 min | Last week

"sidney poitier" Discussed on WTOP

"All for Greg and Travis mcmichael Their neighbor Ron Bryan was granted a chance for parole after at least 30 years in prison Today the defendants are being held accountable for their actions here in superior court Today demonstrates that everybody is accountable to the rule of law Taking the law into your own hands is a dangerous endeavor All three are also awaiting trial on separate federal hate crime charges Today the Supreme Court heard challenges to the Biden administration's vaccine requirements Missouri Deputy Attorney General Jesus ose argued that it could cost healthcare workers their jobs These same workers are now forced to tune between losing their jobs and complying with the government's vaccine mandate On behalf of the Biden administration Brian Fletcher argued removing the vaccine requirement could cost lives We know that this urgently needed measure is not going to be in effect to protect Medicare and Medicaid patients Separately justice has heard a challenge to the Biden administration's vaccine or testing requirement for large companies Linda kenyon CBS News Washington The president is feeling good today about the December jobs report 3.9% unemployment rate Years faster than experts said it would be able to do it And we have added 6.4 million new jobs since January of last year President Biden has accepted House speaker Nancy Pelosi's invitation to deliver his first State of the Union address to a joint session of Congress on March 1st After Sidney Poitier has died according to the bahamian minister of foreign affairs we take a look back at his life Sidney Poitier acted in more than 50 movies from his breakthrough role as a high school student in blackboard jungle He teaches To his Oscar winning role as a handyman who builds a church chapel in lilies of the field Build you a shop Decades later he played Nelson Mandela in a television film For more than 300 years you have been dominated by legs Sidney Poitier said his choice of roles was motivated by the characters he played He did not want to portray anyone who was immoral or cruel If you go through.

Biden administration Travis mcmichael Ron Bryan Deputy Attorney General Jesus Brian Fletcher Linda kenyon superior court Sidney Poitier Greg President Biden Supreme Court Missouri CBS News Medicare Nancy Pelosi government Washington Congress House
"sidney poitier" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

03:03 min | Last week

"sidney poitier" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Your arm for any big thank yous but I'm through feeling small Poitiers made history with lilies of the field In 1964 the same year as the passage of the Civil Rights Act he became the first black male ever to win an Oscar for best actor In 1967 poitiers became the top box office draw with three popular movies out the same year to sir with love guess who's coming to dinner and in the heat of the night Let me understand these You two came here to question me Sidney Poitier plays big city detective Virgil tibbs He questions a murder suspect a wealthy plantation owner We were just trying to clarify some of the evidence Was mister Colbert ever in this greenhouse a last night about midnight The plantation owner slaps tibbs and the detective immediately slaps him back The white man is taken by surprise and so were many moviegoing audiences There was a time when I could have had you shot That scene became an icon of American movies Sidney Poitier told W H Y's fresh air back in 2000 that the script had called for tips to be slapped and then leave Poitiers says he refused to turn the other cheek To him it was an opportunity to show real anger at a white man for his mistreatment It held meaning far beyond the movie houses of 1967 That kind of a scene which would be electrifying on the screen was always either avoided not thought of and I insisted that if they wished my participation in the film that they would have to rewrite it to exemplify that There was a time in movies where there was just for audiences black audiences the enormous amount of pride that we took and just seeing a black face on screen who wasn't bringing a tray into a room And that was something that city project got the represent for a long time Film critic Elvis Mitchell is the host of the treatment a member station KCRW Mitchell says this satisfaction with the civil rights movement and poitiers mostly non threatening roles made him an easy target He's suddenly went from being the lone representation of his race to being unfairly castigated as the man who apologized for being black And he was just working He wasn't in control of the movie business He didn't choose to make the movies he chose to be in them because he just wanted to work Against the hot wind of criticism Sidney poitiers said a new course he claimed new territory for African American performers He starred in and directed comedies with large black castes the best known are uptown Saturday night and let's do it again There was a romance for the love of ivy in which he played opposite the late singer and actress Abbey Lincoln His debut is a director was buck in the preacher a western with comic touches about black homesteaders out west As he moved further away from acting he directed Gene Wilder and Richard Pryor in stir crazy in 1980 It was his biggest commercial success as a director Sidney.

Poitiers Sidney Poitier Virgil tibbs mister Colbert tibbs Elvis Mitchell Oscar KCRW Mitchell Sidney poitiers Abbey Lincoln buck Gene Wilder Richard Pryor Sidney
"sidney poitier" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

03:12 min | Last week

"sidney poitier" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Implement weekly testing requirements Are they going to bring back masks even sitting at your desk They really have to make some of these tough calls because pretty soon I'll start getting osha will start finding them if they don't So this is just the beginning I think we're going to see a lot more of this from a lot of different companies And for those companies like cities that have folks all over the country it's not an easy path It'll be interesting next week as you said we're going to be hearing from all of the big banks and see what they have to say about certainly COVID and some of their policies following on this city news Jenny thank you so much Really appreciate it Jenny serene Finance reporter at Bloomberg news on the phone in New York City her story it is the most read on the Bloomberg terminal in the past 8 hours But again you're seeing companies at this point Here we are what in our third year Yeah Taking policies and taking steps to be able to really open up their companies I anticipate we're going to see more of this not just from banks but from other big companies And I also think that boosters are going to be a big part of this too How are companies going to incorporate boosters into their policies And I feel like I'm going to get ready for a fourth booster right Whether it's in 6 months or it's just real's already doing it Exactly exactly All right our thanks to Jenny Let's get back to the national news for that Back to D.C. and Nancy Lyons Hey Nancy Thanks Carol the first black man to win the Oscar for best actor has died The bahamian minister of foreign affairs confirmed that actor Sidney Poitier has died at the age of 94 He won the Academy Award for best actor in a leading role for lilies of the field Poitiers also received critical acclaim for playing a black doctor engaged to a white woman in guess who's coming to dinner starring opposite Catherine Hepburn Doctor apprentice I'm so pleased to meet you I'm pleased to meet you this is drain I take a Joanna's already busted out with the big news Well if he has um Told me a good year Oh very quickly too Point a died in his native Bahamas with the deputy prime minister calling him a national treasure A public memorial service for legendary football coach John Madden will be held next next month The NFL says it'll take place February 15th in Oakland California The league says more details will come out later The three white men convicted of killing black jogger ahmaud Arbery are waiting to receive their sentence Travis and Greg mcmichael along with roddy Bryan all face a minimum of life in prison testifying ahead of the judge's decision Arbery's mother wander Cooper Jones asked the judge to impose the maximum sentence for all three Never say they were to them He never threatened them He just wanted to be left alone Lawyers for the defendants who plan to appeal their conviction had argued their clients had legal grounds to apprehend Arbery on suspicion of burglary Global news 24 hours a day on air and on Bloomberg quick take powered by more than 2700 journalists and analysts in more than 120 countries I'm Nancy lions Burden LL Susan it's so great to finally be able to get together again Oh it's short is And I really appreciate you picking up the bill I'm happy.

Jenny Jenny Let Nancy Lyons Nancy Thanks Carol Bloomberg news osha Catherine Hepburn Sidney Poitier New York City ahmaud Arbery Academy Award Greg mcmichael roddy Bryan Oscar D.C. John Madden Cooper Jones Joanna Bahamas Oakland
Oscar winner and groundbreaking star Sidney Poitier dies

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | Last week

Oscar winner and groundbreaking star Sidney Poitier dies

"Sidney Sidney Potier Potier has has died died in in the the Bahamas Bahamas he he was was ninety ninety four four twenty twenty eight eight transform transform how how black black people people were were portrayed portrayed in in movies movies they they call call me me Mister Mister Tibbs Tibbs he he was was the the first first black black actor actor to to win win an an Oscar Oscar in in nineteen nineteen sixty sixty four four for for lilies lilies of of the the field field in in two two thousand thousand two two before before me me there there was was no no one one party party received received an an Oscar Oscar for for lifetime lifetime achievement achievement if if you you came came to to this this venue venue tonight tonight and and saw saw the the array array of of of of minority minority actors actors headed headed by by some some rather rather extraordinary extraordinary people people I I you you would would know know that that there there has has been been change change in in two two thousand thousand nine nine the the nation's nation's first first black black president president Barack Barack Obama Obama presented presented Sidney Sidney Potier Potier with with the the medal medal of of freedom freedom he he pointed pointed out out it's it's been been said said twenty twenty eight eight doesn't doesn't make make movies movies he he makes makes milestones milestones while while stones stones of of artistic artistic excellence excellence milestones milestones of of America's America's progress progress I I made made Donahue Donahue

Oscar Oscar Sidney Sidney Potier Potier Bahamas Bahamas Mister Mister Tibbs Tibbs Barack Barack Obama Obama America Donahue Donahue
New milestone for Sidney Poitier: Namesake of a film school

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | 1 year ago

New milestone for Sidney Poitier: Namesake of a film school

"Arizona State University has named its new film school after actor Sidney Potier I marches are loaded with the latest Arizona state president Michael M. crow says Sidney Potier story is about a person who found a way and the school wants to help young people find their ways the school is expanding its existing film program with physical resources an online study it will move to a new facility in downtown mesa in twenty twenty to enter the new center in Los Angeles parties daughter Beverly says her father who is ninety three is doing well and is honored at the film school will be named for him

Sidney Potier Michael M. Crow Arizona State University Arizona Mesa Beverly Los Angeles
The lie that invented racism

TED Talks Daily

05:18 min | 1 year ago

The lie that invented racism

"What is up with US white people? I've been thinking about that a lot the last few years and I know I have company. Look I get it. People of Color have been asking that question for centuries. But I think a growing number of white folks are to. Given what's been going on out there In our country. And notice I said what's up with US white people. Does right now, I'm not talking about those white people. The ones with the swastikas in the hoods and the tiki torches. They are a problem, a threat, the perpetrate most of the terrorism in our country as you all in Charlottesville better than most. But I'm talking about something bigger more pervasive. Talking about all of us. White folks writ. Large. And maybe especially people sorta like me. self-described progressive. Don't WANNA be. Racist. Goodway people. Any good white people in the room? I was raised to be that sort of person. I was a little kid in the sixties and seventies, and to give you some sense of my parents actual public opinion polls at the time showed that only a small minority about twenty percent of white Americans approved supported. Martin Luther King and his work with the civil rights. Movement. Wild. Dr King was still alive. I'm proud to say my parents were in that group. Race got talked about in our house. And when the show's about the dealt was raised with come on the television, they would sit us kids down made sure we watched the Sidney Poitier movies roots. The message was loud and clear and I got it. Racism is wrong. Racists are bad people. At the same time we lived in a very white place in Minnesota. And I'll just speak for myself I. think that me to believe. that. Those white racists on the TV screen were being beamed in from some other place. Wasn't about US really. Did Not feel implicated. Now I would say I'm still in recovery from that early impression. I. Got into journalism in part because I cared about things like equality. Justice. For a long time racism was just such a puzzle to me. Why is it still with us when it's so clearly wrong. Why such a persistent force. Maybe. I was puzzled because I wasn't yet in the right place or asking the right questions. Have, you noticed that when? People in our mostly white. Media Report on what they consider to be racial issues what we consider to be racial issues what that usually means that we're pointing our cameras and our microphones are gaze at people of Color. Asking questions like. How are black folks or native Americans Latino or Asian Americans how are they doing? In a given community or with respect to some issue, the economy education. I've done. My share of that kind of journalism over many years. But then George Zimmerman killed. Trayvon Martin. Followed by this unending string of high-profile police shootings of armed black people and the rise of the black lives matter movement. dylann roof in the Charleston. Massacre. Oscarssowhite. All the. Incidents from the day to day of American Life. These overtly racist incidents that we now get to see because they're captured on smartphones sent across the Internet. And beneath those visible events the stubborn data studies showing. Systemic racism. Every institution we have. Housing Segregation. Job Discrimination. The deeply racialist inequities in our schools and criminal justice system. And what really did it for me? I know I'm not alone in this either. The RISE OF DONALD TRUMP. And the discovery that a solid majority of white. Americans. would embrace or at least accept. Such a raw bitter kind of white identity politics. This is all disturbing to me as a human being. As a journalist I found myself. Turning the Lens around. thinking. White folks so the story. Whiteness is a story. And also thinking. Can I do that? What would a podcast series about whiteness sound like?

United States Martin Luther King Trayvon Martin Sidney Poitier Donald Trump Minnesota Charlottesville George Zimmerman American Life Charleston
Film Academy Announces New Diversity Requirements For Best Picture Nominees

All Things Considered

00:30 sec | 1 year ago

Film Academy Announces New Diversity Requirements For Best Picture Nominees

"Academy has long relied on the film industry to make diversity central to its process and has long been embarrassed at the results. Hashtags Oscar's so White and Oscar's so mayl have greeted recent telecasts. But it's hardly a new problem. Back in 1988 Eddie Murphy took a moment while announcing the best picture nominees to say he almost didn't agree to do it because in 60 years, the Oscars had only three times honored black performers. Hattie McDaniel, Sidney Poitier and Lou Gossett Jr now

Oscar Eddie Murphy Lou Gossett Jr Hattie Mcdaniel Sidney Poitier
2020 Golden Globes: Winners and Losers

The Big Picture

13:20 min | 2 years ago

2020 Golden Globes: Winners and Losers

"This is the big picture a conversation show about the seventy seven. Th annual golden in global wards. Amanda here we are once more. We think we know what we're talking about. Enter these things with great confidence even knowing that the Golden Globe boards are famous famously. wonky messy goofy silly stupid and they have shocked us once more. Nineteen eighteen seventeen has won best drama. which I don't think either one of US predicted we in fact you did not pick that I think we thought all four of the other contenders had a good story story? I I do want to say you and I washed together and you. I believe pitched picked joker on our podcast Dixie Irishman. And at one point you shared with me that your wife was going with marriage story and and we watched a two popes commercial and I was like well it could be two popes and you said you. We've now talked about the possibility party of four of the five winners which means it'll probably be nineteen seventeen now. Look you and I are very lucky to have these jobs. We are but I do not claim to know anything like. I'm just going to put this on the table here. I don't I don't know anything. I know people who knows stuff but I don't know anything and this is an example of having any confidence about doing any of this stuff. I thought a lot of Adam. Sandler's character from uncut gems. When that moment happening where I was like this is what must be like to be an awful gambler? I think I went like four for fourteen tonight. Some brutal number. I think you and I are luckily tied at four hundred fourteen. I just WanNa remind you that I very confidently set on the podcast. I I think I got four wrong. That's true and I thought that would have been impressive. It's only get four rowing and four wrong would have been absolutely extraordinary. You would have been going straight to the damn. Am Bank on forum is tough interesting. Telecast tonight I actually thought it was quite a dull show for most of it. There were some head-scratching picks. There were some entertaining speeches. Let's let's we'll get back to nineteen seventeen and all the races. We'll go through race by race but before we do that. Let's just talk. About the telecast itself Ricky Gervais returned earned as the host fifth time he brought a a unique energy the show this year an energy I would describe as fuck all. He really did not seem to care. Think he literally did describe it as that multiple times when he told the audience to go fuck themselves. He was mercilessly bleeped. Throughout out the night He really had the attitude of a person who would be happy to be anywhere else but at this award show I'll be honest. I know it's not cool to set kind kind of enjoyed it you did I. I kind of enjoyed it not because I thought he was funny or useful but just because it was different. I've never really seen that before. There was a train wreck vibe to it you. You kept cackling at like you. Would just he would say something and it would be silent and then and then you would react to the fact that nothing was happening but him just like melting down. I love the idea of people who work at network or a famous person in the audience watching just like quietly recoiling at everything happening onstage on stage. There's something kind of joker ask about that and I I thought your race was kind of like fake provocative. Most of the night and a lot of the jokes. We're kind of like ooh look at me but not actually with anything deep to say about anything which is a lot of his humor in the last five to ten years but he definitely succeeded in bringing just the sheer shear nihilism to the performance. Yeah and I thought that was the one thing that was a mistake. I don't really care about Ricky Gervais xl. I didn't think he was very funny but I wasn't offended ended. My main thought process there is monologue was like oh I really don't like comedy like I don't like the active comedy or anyone who thinks that they're a comedian. It's just like not for me so you know. Yeah that's that's how I spent my time tonight but bio for you by the way comedy. Not For me. It's really not just don't care. I don't think it's funny but I agree that the show is boring and it felt like purposeless a lot of the time and some of that you remarked as we were watching all the commercials for like whatever weird. NBC Plane Show. They were debut and it would say when it was airing on NBC would say like an streaming the next day and there were commercials for Peacock. Doc and Amazon and ethics and all of the platforms and it was just very clear that this is a network. TV like dying right in front of our eyes yes it was a stegosaurus. Soroush slowly falling to its dinosaur needs so hiring someone to stand up on stage and be like this doesn't matter on the one on hand it's true it really doesn't. It's very putting his finger on the truth of the thing but you know they're still trying to get people to watch the show for three hours in order to cover. The advertising is and and to save their network and it I just did. Your Vase just reminded me of like this. Like this is an outdated form like. This actually has no relevance it didn't make me feel feel bad about committing my time to it though for some reason maybe that's just a six drain of my personality. But I I never felt like well I do. Think the show at Townsville purposeless. I didn't think think that his like ruthlessly blase approach to everything. I I just I. I liked it. There was. It was not the same old like back patty glad handing and and also the same Tina fey and amy poehler ask like were above it but will also do the show Biz dance thing you know that. That was raised a characteristic of their three times hosting. I think all of which were pretty fantastic. I I love them as hosts but the tonality of their hosting was always like. Isn't this stupid but also I will perform for it. This was the first time I ever saw anybody in this job. Go like fuck it. I don't care yeah I guess that's interesting as a one one time thing. I don't think you can ever do it again. Right couldn't run it back. Yeah and he swore up and down that he would not be back. I just I understand that reaction. I spent the whole time being like I'm being reminded so many different ways that I have complete control over what I want to watch now and what I content I want to take in and I just. I really really don't need to be listening to ricky surveys right now. which is now because she was defending me or because he was spectacularly unfunny? I was like I don't need this it's a great point I wonder how what what percentage of humans who are watching television. I chose actively to just throw on a streaming service instead of watch this award. Show which is what they would have done. Yeah say fifteen years ago to fascinating thing anything else else to say about your vase. I mean he really just gave his monologue and then came out. And kinda deep side his way through a couple of introductions and that was really the whole show that is true I they will say that the only kind of provocation that I was like I'll give him credit for or the I will remember is every time he would just yell back at the audience. Yes you did it not me. Shades of Amanda hosting play. Yeah it was. It was unusual. I look forward to the future hosts of the Golden Globes. I think we have now served our ricky surveys time. Yes other notable things things from this. TV Show Ellen was was fitted with a with a big old tribute. The Carol Burnett Award which is now an annual award which I guess last year was the first year Carol Burnett won this award and It was interesting I I think on the one hand Ellen. Degeneres is a hugely important figure socially because when she came out that sort of change changed the perception for a lot of people of the gay lifestyle in America and what a celebrity could be in the future. Twenty years of career has been much more about being a extremely extremely rich famous person and posting talk show and I couldn't help but notice an American Express logo in the middle of the montage that to her that did happen and a career highlight montage included her being an American Express commercial. That seemed like Perhaps a subtle metaphor to a lot of the things happening in such an image is to Ellen's career. Yes I agree with that. I will say I thought they keep Mckinnon speech to her was very moving and funny. That was the one time I was like. Oh I do like comedy and and you can see Ellen. Being moved by that. And and that's why she was on the stage. I think I think that's the reason that they can give her the award. Or that's that's the stated reason and then it is also because she's just been on. TV for seven years like printing money for various people. Yeah you the Hollywood. Foreign Press gives out a lot of awards on the night they give out awards to actors and actresses and writers and directors and even composers and Ellen doesn't really do any of those things. She hosts a TV show but there is no best variety show category so she used to be on the Sitcom but that it was a long time ago. Why why was Ellen at the Golden Globes because people who would not otherwise watch the Golden Globes like Ellen and they watch every day on TV and they watched the clips on answering? I gotTa tell you on the instagram explore tab like an interview with someone POPs up. I'll watch that. I'll watch that stuff steph. Every time I wash it into minute increments you know. I also have a lot of thoughts about Ellen's Politics in the last ten years that I'll keep to myself so but but I think did they give her the award because it brings a different audience. Let me ask you this. Where was Dakota Johnson? That's what I want great question that is so good for those of you. Who Don't know there's a legendary moment on the Ellen Show in which she interviewed Dakota Johnson to Johnson Mentioned that she was having a Christmas party. And Ellen said where's my invitation to send it to you. And she said I never got got it. And then they had a bit of a showdown and I think Dakota came out on the other side of that one. The champion is she did because Allen had been invited I believe it to her birthday party. Ellen was out of town and do you know where L.. It was the weekend of Dakota Johnsons Birthday Party. I was she in Amarillo. Texas with George. Yes she was there you go so yeah Ellen was celebrated. That was fine. I tend to enjoy these lifetime. Achievement awards I think one of the sadnesses sadnesses of where the Oscars now is. Because you know no offense but demons like you complain about how long the show is and so we have to lose things. He's like a lifetime. Achievement awards out of the Oscars which gets into the governor's awards which happened months ahead of time. And we don't get to hear about the great works of I don't know Sidney Lumet or Sidney Poitier gay or other great men named Sydney and unfortunately we don't see that at the Oscars we do see it at the Globes and we saw another great tribute to another great great man not named Sydney. This man is named Tom's names. Tom Hanks this was a this was lovely. I was very moved by it. I'm just moving past all the slander. We'll relitigate the Oscars for two and a half hour. Make them you know. Don't link continuous. Shot make a good TV show making good TV. Show that people WANNA watch all the way to save movies. It's the only way to save TV. It's the only way to save like I don't know celebrities and rooms together just make TV. Show anyway. I thought the time hanks was good TV. Because you know who's Great Tom. BUGGING HANGS AMERICA'S SWEETHEART GETS UP. There starts crying two seconds because his family sitting in the wrought Edison because he was on. I think he's a nice person. And he was like someone had fed him Hypno- and he was he was fading out and then he just goes goes into like your uncle who knows a lot about making movies and wants to give you advice mode. It was great told you all about the gate. Yeah the gate cleans. The closing properly is a I also just watching the montage. I just pointed out to me I just really love Tom. Hanks his work and also I was thinking about our podcast and the hall of fame. And I'm really really mad that I caved on. You've got mail. I should have put it in over sleepless in Seattle. I'm just saying that now. I'd like to apologize to the many people who reach out to let me know that they would have supported. Did that decision. I let you guys down. I will say I have not thought about that one. Since can I have thought frequently about how we left Saving Private Ryan off. which was you? It was my fault but I was reminded instantaneously upon that podcast publishing. In fact that podcast went live and I felt like three seconds later. People were like where saving private private Ryan. Even though they had not listened to it we next it saving private Ryan did make an appearance in this montage Tom Hanks's made like thirty bad movies. And it doesn't matter because his good movies are so good in so meaningful to people and his funkier sincere just general good guy nece makes people feel good and he happened to be in a good movie this year which is very helpful. He did not win unfortunately though he was nominated for best supporting actor for Beautiful Day in the neighborhood I thought it was great. I thought you know. That's not really surprising. He he is professionally decent and he seemed like a good person. He was very happy to have his family there. He was very happy to pay a lot of respect to Martin. Scorsese I believe. He gestured towards him three times during his speech which was adorable. You know I just. I wish that there were actually more things like yes. I like to be reminded of the people I like making these movies. That's the whole point of these award. Shows it's not to like breakdown whether nineteen seventeen is going to win at the Oscars like that's rusted. Do the awards shows themselves are to celebrate the great people in the great stuff. I still like that.

Ellen Ricky Gervais Oscars Tom Hanks Golden Globes United States Adam Golden Globe Amanda Dixie Irishman Sandler NBC Carol Burnett Dakota Johnson Townsville Ryan Dakota Johnsons Birthday Party Instagram Amarillo Texas
Oprah Brings Audience to Tears in Golden Globes Speech

Morning Edition

02:13 min | 4 years ago

Oprah Brings Audience to Tears in Golden Globes Speech

"It was a black woman who made history for her lifetime achievement award oprah winfrey brought the audience to tears and to its feet in standing ovations last night she began by talking about what it was like as a little girl to watch actor sidney poitier win an oscar and 19 64 i remember his tie was white and of course his skin was black and i'd never seen a black man being celebrated like fact and i've tried many many many times to explain what a moment like that means to a little girl a kid watching from the cheap seats as my mom came through the door bone tired from cleaning other people's houses winfrey noted that portia also wanna cecil b demille of gordon 1982 and it is not lost on me that at this moment there are some little girls watching as i become the first black woman to be given the same award winfrey said she was proud of an inspired by women who have shared their stories in hollywood and beyond speaking your truth is the most powerful tool we all have so i want to night to express gratitude to all the women who have endured years of abuse and assault because they like my mother had children to feed and bills to pay and dreams to pursue winfrey cited not just hollywood women but domestic workers farmworkers women and academia and politics and business she had a message for them and for all the little girls watching her that a new day is on even before she finished her speeds twitter erupted with calls for oprah winfrey to run for president in 2020 muenden than buckle npr

Oprah Winfrey Sidney Poitier Oscar Gordon Hollywood President Trump Massachusetts Lifetime Achievement Award Cecil B Demille Assault NPR
Oprah Brings Audience to Tears in Golden Globes Speech

Morning Edition

02:13 min | 4 years ago

Oprah Brings Audience to Tears in Golden Globes Speech

"Streisand presented three billboards with the best picture drama award and in doing so she slammed the hollywood foreign press association for not honoring more women filmmakers she noted that she's the only woman to have won a golden globe award for best director in 1984 that was thirty four years ago folks times up there was one man who did make history last night sterling k brown from the nbc series this is us he became the first african american actor to win in the best actor category in a tv drama he thanked his family and the show's creator dan fogelman therefore men who wrote a row four a black man but could only be played by black man and so what are pressured so much about this thing is that are being seen for who i am and bring appreciate it for who i am and it makes it that much more difficult to dismiss me or dismiss anybody who looks like him thank you again and it was a black woman who made history for her lifetime achievement award oprah winfrey brought the audience to tears and to its feet in standing ovations last night she began by talking about what it was like as a little girl to watch actor sidney poitier win an oscar and 19 64 i remember his tie was white and of course his skin was black and i'd never seen a black man being celebrated like fact and i've tried many many many times to explain what a moment like that means to a little girl a kid watching from the cheap seats as my mom came through the door bone tired from cleaning other people's houses winfrey noted that portia also wanna cecil b demille of gordon 1982 and it is not lost on me that at this moment there are some little girls watching as i become the first black woman to be given the same award winfrey said she was proud of an inspired by women who have shared their stories in hollywood and beyond speaking your truth is the most powerful tool we all have so i want to night to express gratitude to all the women who have endured years of abuse and assault because they like my mother had children to feed and bills to pay and dreams to pursue winfrey cited not just hollywood women but domestic workers farmworkers women and academia and politics and business she had a message for them and for all the little girls watching her that a new day is on even before she finished her speeds twitter erupted with calls for oprah winfrey to run for president in 2020 muenden than buckle npr

Oprah Winfrey Sidney Poitier Oscar Gordon Hollywood President Trump Massachusetts Lifetime Achievement Award Cecil B Demille Assault NPR