20 Burst results for "Sidney Kimmel"

"sidney kimmel" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

The Business of Fashion Podcast

05:19 min | 2 months ago

"sidney kimmel" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

"I asked him to come and tell me what what i should do. And i wouldn't even show it to sidney kimmel that's out there wasn't he said they're telling me i have to do this. Just give me an idea of what it is and two weeks later. We hadn't deal negotiated the deal. My sow that's how naive. I was but i i spoke to this lawyer friend and i said so. What is the license agreement. And what are you ask for any set asks for this percentage this royalty this bathinda that and i had a little notebook you know. It looked like sat meister niagara notebook. And i am. He said so. Wanna do this what he want. I said okay one mile an eye so silly. But i just called off everything he said. Okay let's do it and we did end. Yes that was the beginning The door opening for licensing. So i had a japanese license for twenty five years. I had had a shoe license sneaker license. Because i did converse sneakers. I did high heel sneakers in eighty two. I did a whole bunch of really fun hat licenses. Kids everything for that and it. It got me to understand how to monetize a design. How a design could really create a business how it could be some structure for business. And of course every jack kay away Business changes the way. You've show business way you south away design all of that changes so heart of being relevant and having longevity is to immediately now when he needs to transition to find another way maybe licensing isn't it may be something else and so. I've had extraordinarily experiences including doing a collection for walmart that i never even been to walmart. I have lots of business meetings. And i don't do all of them but i find them informative and i learn a lot from them and i'm matt a really great guy who we just really were in in the same mindset about certain things about fashion and a year later. He was running walmart women's division. Any contacted me any said you have to come to walmart. I said you know. I think you would make guy. I don't think you're on the right path here is i. Don't even know what a walmart looks like. I'm a city girl. I don't even drive so Not fit and he said. I'm telling you get on a plane income tibetan note you gonna want this experience whether you say yes or no. Just come and he was so right. I am a walton fan. I read his biography. I love you know. American ingenuity. And so i was really taken by. What a superstar looks like. But the deal. They offered me to design a fashion collection for walmart. I sit you guys. I don't think so this..

walmart twenty five years walton two weeks later converse a year later one mile eighty japanese American meister niagara two
"sidney kimmel" Discussed on FOCUS on POCUS?

FOCUS on POCUS?

08:29 min | 3 months ago

"sidney kimmel" Discussed on FOCUS on POCUS?

"Okay poke is for. Hospital is gaining more traction. Today's guest is dr rebecca davis who is actively involved in bringing the pocus fellowship to hospitals. Becca is an internal medicine physician. Thomas jefferson hospital and assistant professor at the sidney kimmel medical college. She has done her medical training and internal medicine residency at the university of pennsylvania where she went on to be chief resident before making the move to jefferson. She is currently an assistant program. Director for the internal medicine primary care residency and associate program director for the internal medicine focused fellowship which just started this year at thomas. Jefferson medical school. She worked closely with the emergenc- department and critical care teams to help spread her passion for pokes across department and participates in the institutional point of care ultrasound. Committing right now. Dr davis is working to create a formalized pocus curriculum and electives for the residency and to develop clinical pathway for hospitals to gain poke skills in addition to her fellowship and clinical responsibilities. How are you. Today rebecca emigrate. We both have worked all over that campus there jefferson and everybody makes the move across the schuylkill either there at pin and they come to jeff jeff and they go to penn inter-institutional collaboration and support definitely well. That's good that's good. I'm glad you took the high road on so I you know. So you the first question that's popping up in my mind. So how do you develop your polka skill set. If there's really no one around who's already trained and maybe tell me a little bit about that. yeah So i was fortunate enough to have Some leadership in clinic through dr. Barry's earring who really wanted to get pocus. Started in our outpatient ambulatory clinic and honestly there was no one around who was interested Except for me and doctors earring so i quickly volunteer to ticket involved but we realize that there was no-one currently in our hospitals grouper internal medicine. That was already doing focus and we had One or two critical care physicians who are credentialed So doctors during helped me by buildings and bridges and i reached out to our emergency medicine team With of doctor reza lewis. Dr arthur al And dr kelly good south who really took me under their wing And help put me on the right path to getting trained as well as to incorporating incorporating me into their team pocus team So the first thing that they recommended was taking a quick course so that i would get oriented so i had actually gone down to the university of south carolina and then their weekend course when you could still do in-person weekend training actually too. It's great to do. Is the primary care physician one or the weekend. When kind of based on my area practice just primarily in the ambulatory setting I wanted one. That was a little bit. More focused on ambulatory procedures. Ambulatory care and incorporated Some in addition to hospitalised and Inpatient internal medicine physicians some family medicine physicians who are also doing a lot of outpatient pocus which University of south carolina does a lot of So that we can. Of course as a great intro which. I think got me familiar enough that i was able to then spend some time with the er team and start scanning on my own and bringing my images to my colleagues for review And the biggest thing that biggest asset they had with really my partnership with the emt and using essentially my free time My advent to go and work with them and sit in every week on their. Qa and their image review and learning to you know all the different facets of how they're reading the quality what they're looking for Learning some scans. I don't do very much Because they do them in the are not doing fast. Examine my outpatient clinic but it was excellent learning excellent learning and they helped me build my skill set So that i could become part of the. I am kind of ood pokes leadership at jefferson to really move that forward and start to hopefully develop other individuals scott fat at jefferson. You're champion that. Because i can almost see a timeline sort of evolution so cinematographers and then the emergency department which is innovative and then when it was sort of in the physicians fear in the emergency department watched it filter. I two hospitals and now more and more into family medicine practice so Of course supports. Madison's always been there with a lot with ms msk. But that's great. Let me ask you sent to. What do you guys do. A lot of ventilator management with your polka scans isn't that pretty key for hospitals so it i the ventilator management. It's not something that i do a lot of but When it comes when i speak with me west. Who's one of our pokes leaders. Who's in the critical care realm. She actually does try to scam. Patients were ventilated. And she uses that the her lungs skins to kind of assess the success of the peop- whether you know Getting a good sense of what's going on the lungs and help with some of the titrate there so she definitely does do a lot of that. Wow and is this. I gotta ask again. Everybody's thinking that may west is that right. That's great well. I heard she goes. I really france they west but she goes by may west. Wc fields in there scanning or anything like that. It's amazing that kind of lung scan. That's a pretty amazing in especially for hospitals to really nail that that lung scan for what they do and stuff so once. You're trained in how do you. How do you build a polk program for faculty and residents so. I think that this requires a lot of leadership by in And again you need to accrue of advocates and support from other departments. That have successfully done it. So if you're the for a here at jefferson and internal medicine As i said we kind of have a very small crew of people who have been pocus trained or who who have as we at jefferson were working on are getting our credentialing process kind of running so it's a very small crew of people who are ready to go and and use pocus in the clinical setting so we actually used a lot of support from emergency medicine colleagues who have a more robust Pocus curriculum and are really well established. They helped us go to our leaders. including dr gregory kane who immediately Was really interested in hearing more about this and then very supportive of us trying to grow a program. I think the question. We always ask ourselves as you hire somebody from the outside. Who's already trained or do you try to develop your faculty who are already there and have a vested interested or a real interest in learning pocus And so we kind of went with the faculty development route or felt that that would be a really great sustainable option And i think a lot of it was really burdon by our covid. Pandemic where a lot of our hospitals were saying. Listen i need to know how to assess a patient in the hospital quickly. Who is becoming more high parker having more respiratory distress. I want this as a tool in my back pocket. That i can quickly get a you. Know other than using my excellent physical exam cells. Bring out the The the ultrasound and makes them more advanced More rapid decisions and get the right teams whether it's You know the radiology team to get more imaging or whether it's our cardiac team or whether it's our poem creek care team involved quickly based on my scan assessment.

Becca davis reza lewis One University of south carolina rebecca davis arthur al Today france first sidney kimmel medical college gregory kane first question this year jeff jeff jefferson university of south carolina Barry both Thomas jefferson
"sidney kimmel" Discussed on Medicine, We're Still Practicing

Medicine, We're Still Practicing

06:31 min | 3 months ago

"sidney kimmel" Discussed on Medicine, We're Still Practicing

"Well i of course. Our hosts quadruple board. Certified doctor of internal medicine pulmonary disease critical care and neuro critical care and still fighting on the frontlines over the war on. Covid my very good friend. Dr steven tae back. How you doing steve. I'm well thank you as you've heard joining us from johns hopkins medicine. Doctor kenneth pinta. He's the director of research for the james buchanan. Brady urological institute. He's the co director prostate cancer research program for the sidney kimmel cancer center. He's a professor of urology. He's a professor of oncology. he's a professor of pharmacology and molecular sciences. Welcome dr to. What do you do with all your spare time can. This is not meant to be a softball question. But it's going to sound that way. I'm trying to understand from your inside. Perspective. what is it about the environment you work in a johns hopkins that produces these kind of outcomes. These ratings and the international recognition part of it is tradition. Johns hopkins was founded as the first research university in the united states and we've always placed the tripartite mention of patient care education to students and research on equal footing. So that we're always seamlessly combining those and the other piece of tradition is johns hopkins hospital in the medical school itself. We defined american medicine at johns hopkins with william oastler. Starting out saying we're gonna do medicine differently. Use the term. Medical residents started at johns hopkins. Because ostler made. The doctors live in the hospital to be trained in. So that's where the term came from. You know we have this dome at the hospital. With with the wings of the building and medicine rounds what referred to the fact that they would go round and round the dome to the different wards. And you know we carry that sort of tradition with pride and people love to work there and we've always attracted really smart people who love madison in love taking care of people and really love combining that with the research that powers the next generation of medicines. Forward dr parton. Your department chair talked about. While other hospitals use reports for urological surgery hopkins actually makes their own. Robots isn't making davinci robot. No we use a commercial robots like everyone else but what we are doing is creating the next generation of robots to work with mri machines. We have danced in. Our department is making a special robot that does that. The hopkins whiting school of engineering is developing the next generation of robots to integrate imaging with robotic surgery. A lot of that is not just hardware. it's software we're living in a pretty high tech era. We've come a long way in medicine but still so many men die of prostate cancer. What are we messing up here in. We have to do to fix this. So you know in this time of covid and so many people dying of kobe. You know it's an infectious disease. We gotta do better and we tend to forget about these other illnesses that are plaguing the planet you know if you look around the world. Ten million people a year are dying of cancer in the us. Six hundred thousand people are dying of cancer. Thirty thousand men die of prostate cancer. Every year and cancer of all kinds including prostate cancer is curable if you find it in time because we can do surgery or radiation in jewelry you but unfortunately in about fifty thousand men per year we find the cancer too late. We find the cancer. After it is escape the prostate and metastatic cancer virtually of all kinds is incurable and prostate cancer. Unfortunately metastasized spreads to the bones as first sight and it causes a lot of problems for guys in the bones including pain and eventually kills them and we can talk about how that happens but essentially we fail because we don't cure people because we don't find the cancer in time. Let me ask you a question about that. Actually because i've been quoted by colleagues that if you're fifty years old you have a fifty percent chance that you actually have prostate cancer and at sixty sixty percent chance that you've probably already have prostate cancer and so on and so forth and it would beg the question. Would it not make sense to prophylactically. Remove the prostate. And then obviously the the major impediment to that is the major side effects. What does the thought process about that in. Where are we in terms technologically of mitigating the terrible side effects of impotence and incontinence. So i think there's two aspects to that question steve that we just need to touch on because the other thing you hear. All the time is that oh prostate cancer. You don't have to worry about it. You're going to die with it not from it. You know we do see that. Eighty percent man age eighty if you look in their prostates. If they've gotten killed by a car accident you'll see prostate cancer. So essentially prostate cancer exists in two forms one form. Is this indolent slow growing low grade cancer. That probably shouldn't even be called the cancer. But it still is in we find it by screening and and those are the guys that can be treated with active surveillance. We don't need to treat their cancers where a lot smarter about that now than we were even a few years ago. The other kind of cancer is the aggressive prostate cancer. That is not the kind you find on all types whereas the kind that's growing quickly that we have to get out before it spreads so prostate cancer is definitely has a hereditary component. If you have a father or an uncle who had prostate cancer your your risk of developing prostate cancer is double if you have to family members. It's quadruples you had three family members. You're gonna get it so it is familial. There are some genetic drivers. Like vr rca to that lead to a higher incidence of prostate cancer. And we definitely say if you've have family history us should start screening sooner.

william oastler fifty percent kenneth pinta steven sixty sixty percent steve Six hundred thousand people Thirty thousand men united states Eighty percent fifty years old james buchanan johns hopkins Brady urological institute two aspects kenneth inte today forty five hundred hospitals first sight three family members
Pinning Down Prostate Cancer

Medicine, We're Still Practicing

06:31 min | 3 months ago

Pinning Down Prostate Cancer

"Well i of course. Our hosts quadruple board. Certified doctor of internal medicine pulmonary disease critical care and neuro critical care and still fighting on the frontlines over the war on. Covid my very good friend. Dr steven tae back. How you doing steve. I'm well thank you as you've heard joining us from johns hopkins medicine. Doctor kenneth pinta. He's the director of research for the james buchanan. Brady urological institute. He's the co director prostate cancer research program for the sidney kimmel cancer center. He's a professor of urology. He's a professor of oncology. he's a professor of pharmacology and molecular sciences. Welcome dr to. What do you do with all your spare time can. This is not meant to be a softball question. But it's going to sound that way. I'm trying to understand from your inside. Perspective. what is it about the environment you work in a johns hopkins that produces these kind of outcomes. These ratings and the international recognition part of it is tradition. Johns hopkins was founded as the first research university in the united states and we've always placed the tripartite mention of patient care education to students and research on equal footing. So that we're always seamlessly combining those and the other piece of tradition is johns hopkins hospital in the medical school itself. We defined american medicine at johns hopkins with william oastler. Starting out saying we're gonna do medicine differently. Use the term. Medical residents started at johns hopkins. Because ostler made. The doctors live in the hospital to be trained in. So that's where the term came from. You know we have this dome at the hospital. With with the wings of the building and medicine rounds what referred to the fact that they would go round and round the dome to the different wards. And you know we carry that sort of tradition with pride and people love to work there and we've always attracted really smart people who love madison in love taking care of people and really love combining that with the research that powers the next generation of medicines. Forward dr parton. Your department chair talked about. While other hospitals use reports for urological surgery hopkins actually makes their own. Robots isn't making davinci robot. No we use a commercial robots like everyone else but what we are doing is creating the next generation of robots to work with mri machines. We have danced in. Our department is making a special robot that does that. The hopkins whiting school of engineering is developing the next generation of robots to integrate imaging with robotic surgery. A lot of that is not just hardware. it's software we're living in a pretty high tech era. We've come a long way in medicine but still so many men die of prostate cancer. What are we messing up here in. We have to do to fix this. So you know in this time of covid and so many people dying of kobe. You know it's an infectious disease. We gotta do better and we tend to forget about these other illnesses that are plaguing the planet you know if you look around the world. Ten million people a year are dying of cancer in the us. Six hundred thousand people are dying of cancer. Thirty thousand men die of prostate cancer. Every year and cancer of all kinds including prostate cancer is curable if you find it in time because we can do surgery or radiation in jewelry you but unfortunately in about fifty thousand men per year we find the cancer too late. We find the cancer. After it is escape the prostate and metastatic cancer virtually of all kinds is incurable and prostate cancer. Unfortunately metastasized spreads to the bones as first sight and it causes a lot of problems for guys in the bones including pain and eventually kills them and we can talk about how that happens but essentially we fail because we don't cure people because we don't find the cancer in time. Let me ask you a question about that. Actually because i've been quoted by colleagues that if you're fifty years old you have a fifty percent chance that you actually have prostate cancer and at sixty sixty percent chance that you've probably already have prostate cancer and so on and so forth and it would beg the question. Would it not make sense to prophylactically. Remove the prostate. And then obviously the the major impediment to that is the major side effects. What does the thought process about that in. Where are we in terms technologically of mitigating the terrible side effects of impotence and incontinence. So i think there's two aspects to that question steve that we just need to touch on because the other thing you hear. All the time is that oh prostate cancer. You don't have to worry about it. You're going to die with it not from it. You know we do see that. Eighty percent man age eighty if you look in their prostates. If they've gotten killed by a car accident you'll see prostate cancer. So essentially prostate cancer exists in two forms one form. Is this indolent slow growing low grade cancer. That probably shouldn't even be called the cancer. But it still is in we find it by screening and and those are the guys that can be treated with active surveillance. We don't need to treat their cancers where a lot smarter about that now than we were even a few years ago. The other kind of cancer is the aggressive prostate cancer. That is not the kind you find on all types whereas the kind that's growing quickly that we have to get out before it spreads so prostate cancer is definitely has a hereditary component. If you have a father or an uncle who had prostate cancer your your risk of developing prostate cancer is double if you have to family members. It's quadruples you had three family members. You're gonna get it so it is familial. There are some genetic drivers. Like vr rca to that lead to a higher incidence of prostate cancer. And we definitely say if you've have family history us should start screening sooner.

Prostate Cancer Pulmonary Disease Dr Steven Tae Cancers Kenneth Pinta Brady Urological Institute Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center First Research University William Oastler Johns Hopkins Dr Parton Johns Hopkins Medicine James Buchanan Hopkins Whiting School Of Engi Johns Hopkins Hospital Ostler Metastatic Cancer Steve
"sidney kimmel" Discussed on WBSM 1420

WBSM 1420

04:21 min | 1 year ago

"sidney kimmel" Discussed on WBSM 1420

"The results thus far who do you most want to see in an orange jumpsuit Brennan clapper Comey page struck or McCabe I'm still gonna say call me but again it's it's really tough to make a choice big game James Comey is still in the lead at sixty five percent Brendan is second at twenty and Peter struck is holding third at nine percent well he's a loathsome character that Peter Strzok third generation of corrupt Boston FBI agents let's hope there isn't a fourth one eight four four five hundred forty two forty two probably won't be unless he and pitching it as conjugal visits all right this is this is a great summation of Neil Ferguson I mean the guy who is one of the main characters whose put us into this mess you know what the horrible lot fourteen point seven percent unemployment rate twenty and a half million jobs lost last month because of this fools modeled this guy and this guy is it is not just a hypocrite but he's a he's a fool on this the guy in the in the of course is now had to resign from his job as a job as an adviser to the British government because he he got caught violating his own lockdown rules by bringing in his merry part girlfriend you know in violating all of his own even though he tested positive Ferguson's hypocritical violation of his beloved lockdown right John fund of National Review was the least of his errors in judgment his incompetence and insistence on doomsday models as far worse we talked about this by just just in case you you weren't weren't with us when we were talking about this this guy is he's been in totally incompetent and driving panics with the stupid models for almost twenty years you on mosque calls Ferguson and other tool who does absurdly fake science J. Schnitzer an expert in vascular biology and a former scientific director at the Sidney Kimmel cancer center in San Diego tells me I'm normally wrist reluctant to say this about a scientist but Ferguson dances on the edge of being a publicity seeking Charlotte than indeed Ferguson's imperial college model has been proven wildly inaccurate to cite just one example it's all sweet and paying a huge price for no lockdown with forty thousand cobra dust by may first on a hundred thousand by June that's less than four weeks away now Sweden now has twenty eight hundred fifty four deaths and two weeks ago indeed Ferguson has been so wrong in the past that some of his fellow modelers column the master of disaster Ferguson was behind the disputed research that sparked the mass culling of eleven million sheep and cattle during the two thousand one out outbreak of foot and mouth disease he also predicted up to one hundred and fifty thousand people could die there were fewer than two hundred deaths in two thousand two Ferguson predicted that up to fifty thousand people would likely die from exposure to mad cow disease in beef one hundred and seventy seven deaths how we yes can I make a tiny plug for my column that will be in the Boston Herald this weekend because professor Ferguson makes an appearance he's a star some might say he doesn't come into the calm to the end I basically go over all the biggest hypocrites in this pandemic and he is he's a winner for sure thank god this Chris Cuomo when they're in George that the Stephanopoulos if you mean Fredo Cuomo yes he too takes up a good amount of my one of my seven hundred words in two thousand five Ferguson the star of grace's column predicted that up to one hundred and fifty million people could be killed from the bird for one hundred fifty million two hundred eighty two total in two thousand nine a government estimate based on Ferguson's advice set a reasonable worst case scenario was that swine flu would lead to the death of sixty five thousand Britons sixty five thousand final death toll four.

Brennan clapper Comey
"sidney kimmel" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

11:40 min | 1 year ago

"sidney kimmel" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"We are hyper focused. On on value based care and consumerism and healthcare some super excited for a doctor Robinson's perspectives. In addition to to his previous roles he's also an associate professor of medicine at the Thomas Jefferson University Sidney Kimmel Medical College and he's also a practicing physician so It is truly a privilege to have him as not only a health industry leader but also a practicing physician to talk about some of these trends and healthcare with that at Mondo. I WanNa give you a warm welcome. Thanks for joining us being over me. So what is it that got you inspired to do the work that you do that Robinson and had as you said I'm reading my bio a little bit? I had a few different roles and my inspiration has always been consistent. It's I truly want to make a difference. I knew it seems Corny. But you know it's it's one of the drivers I think there's so much opportunity in healthcare to affecting improve people's lives in one of his. Why continue to practice that one on one interaction where you are truly little hospital so literally? Saving someone's life that is inspiring and then even as I think about digital in the opportunity to improve affect people's health across steeled across a large population continues to inspire me. It's it's the the one on one. Interactions the interactions as well as the N. Equals many interactions To me they inspire me in different ways but at the end of the day. We actually truly helping people in that. That's a good reason to get out of bed morning. Totally agree with you and my head and heart are in the same place. I don't think it's Corny. I think it's a great thing to be moved by. And and so I'm curious. Now you know with the work that you're doing there at the cancer center however you guys adding value to the healthcare ecosystem. What's different and better about what you guys are doing is interesting the goals here at MCI designated Comprehensive Cancer Center or nothing less than curing cancer. It's not a ambiguous. Goal is to Jimmy to the provincial tour of cancer. So you know when you when everyone has is is lockstep with that that focus. It's very refreshing right. You know what your goal is my job on the digital side say how do I leverage digital for that same goal right? So what does that look like? And we all have the same goal I bring in digital so you start thinking about those areas like how do I improve outcomes? How do I use things like machine learning and hey I to improve clinical outcomes of those folks that we that we serve? How do I use digital to drive? Cost drive down cost. We can cure cancer cheaper And make it more accessible thinking about robotic process automation. Those kinds of things improving operations. And how do I do all of that? With an even better experience for patients it had delivered digital to skill that improved experience Across the entire population that we serve. So those are those. That's how we how we approach from a digital perspective the opportunity to contribute to the provision cure cancer. I love it and so as as we wrap our heads around this digital theme. How does that translate into? Say The work that you've done in consumerism. And and and you know. How does that translate to the physician level? That's providing care all the way down to the the patients that you guys are taking care of interesting. I like to. It's great great question. I'd like to start with the patients in and go back or go the other way. And actually you mentioned consumer and so there's different ways of defining who we serve honestly even though I've had the title consumer may not be the most comfortable for me but there needs to be some acknowledgement that there are people who are engaging in health and health behaviors and improving their health. They don't see themselves as patients and so we have to figure out. How do we how do we want? How do we engage with them? And then and then what do we call them? So right now the best definition that they have we have the best kind of description that we have is consumer twice until I hear something better than people as a new people so people have said okay. Let's just people which I did but it's a little it's a little loose um so I think I like consumer healthcare to me feels a little bit better than just. Kinda brought people that being said. Now how do you engage with consumers? Well the way everyone else. Every other extreme these consumer digitally right. That's that's the way you engage with them whether it's online or SMS text or or it's mobile APPS and so we're that's how you engage with people it's not complicated conceptually. It's complicated in execution in so anyone disagrees with the idea that you engage with consumers Digitally that's certainly how you skill. Now there's certainly aspects of what we do in healthcare and other industries as well where you need a physical need a physical component to that so now we start talking about the operation talking about the physicians and so forth. So how do you then convert you know? It's almost clicks to bricks. How do you convert those digital interactions into those physical interactions with necessary? And it's not always necessary and you think about things like virtual care and so now he's saying well. How do we optimize our operations so streamline that we can focus on those physical interactions when necessary into a really good job at that and then? How do we bring everyone along? Who's been a traditional healthcare system for decades right? How do we bring those folks along to this digital age? So that's part of that's part of the work that's the work of digital and if you ignore as a digital person as a as a digital innovator ignore the people part of the operations and the clinical piece you will fail Absolutely must focus on those people. Whether it's the frontline staff back the operations and certainly the clinicians physicians nurses pharmacists and so forth that needs to be a high focus. And so you know there's this title of digital in this time of innovation but at the end of the day is it's about people about people and it's about people love it it's a it's a great call out. And and what do you believe makes what you do and what? The Cancer Center does better than what's available today. There are many opportunities to leverage on digital. You think broadly about how do you leverage digital? We've got some really really talented people that are working in the digital realm. And when I when I called JOE FROM FOR MOFFITT IN. Our team includes the entire. It shop Includes Informatics and includes data in here as well as the war to things that people think about digital in terms of you know virtual care and an absence so forth so think about informatics thinking about the opportunity to refine the way that clinicians interact with the electronic medical record. I mean you can have a whole separate broadcasts. I'm a podcast about the electronic medical record the pros and cons and you'll spend more time on the cons by the way and so that's a whole so. Don't just refining right. So you're familiar with his right. I just. We're finding that in Iran finding that interaction and so that you can actually focus on the people Both who are delivering the chairs for the people who are receiving here in receiving those. Those interactions In so there's that piece there's also you know how you leverage data to optimize outcomes whether it's refining your your interaction so you know you have a list of people who potentially could have some kind of intervention. But you're leveraging data big data in this way to say it but it's really this subset of those people who are truly going to benefit can. That's leveraging use use machine learning and in some cases around around that you can do that as well in imaging as well where you actually have a algorithms that are that are looking at your films in supporting the radiologists in optimizing that outcome in you know so. The operations clinical operations. The wins this is interact with the electronic medical record. And then against the way that patients and consumers engage with the system itself whether it's through Piece of portals which I'm not saying by the way so I think I think about the way we engage much more broadly than that you know everyone starts with Dr Google Right. So so what are you doing around that when you're doing an online search what are you doing around our? Seo Sem and all those kinds of concepts as well that entire package right of digital web going from the interactions with a patient and consumers all the way through the clinical operations and operations all the way through to the to the hardcore kind of big data components data. Tighter action is the value that we bring by leveraging digital to improve the ultimately improve outcomes. Yeah I think it's interesting and and then there's the spectrum right Dr Robinson I'm thinking on the one hand folks like yourself that are well versed and understand how to operationalize these these things and then on the other end is folks that don't understand a how to do it. What what advice would you give to other hospitals wanting to take some of this digital up and don't know really where to start? Yeah so it's a great question and there's there actually are levels to that conversation. What are the challenges in? Us Healthcare is you've seen one helsing health system so the answer to your question actually depends on the health system. There are a couple of things I think that are in there though. Is that quite frankly? I can pretty much guarantee that you've probably underinvested in digital. That's that's that's going to be. You know whatever whatever health system I'm talking to you underinvested. And so Just realized that building out digital is going to require an investment. It reminds me of this idea of you. Know we're going to imagine houses and says hey we want to grow our our surgery business we. Let's say we want to grow our joint replacement business And so they say. Hey we're GONNA WE'RE GONNA grow replace. Let's go you know. Maybe let's hire some hire someone or something but they did to build operating rooms in hospitals and or equipment in those kinds of things. We don't need any of that so we just going to hire the docs you. Can't you have to build the infrastructure if you want to grow that business the same is true for digital you actually have to invest in the infrastructure around digital? If you actually want to grow that business you can't just say hey we're digital. How does it work that way? And so again. Almost guaranteed that they underinvested in digital part of the reason is because it's much easier to get money to build a building bonds. You know tons of health is going up for bond rather than the Rachel Crane tons of. It's much easier to do that for buildings to build a digital or it right so that's it so there's reasons fine but quite frankly you've probably already under underinvested until you actually have to have some dedicated resources around..

Dr Robinson Cancer Center associate professor of medicin Thomas Jefferson University Si Comprehensive Cancer Center Mondo Rachel Crane Jimmy MCI Us JOE Iran
Edmondo Robinson, Associate Professor of Medicine at Sidney Kimmel Medical College

Outcomes Rocket

09:22 min | 1 year ago

Edmondo Robinson, Associate Professor of Medicine at Sidney Kimmel Medical College

"We are hyper focused. On on value based care and consumerism and healthcare some super excited for a doctor Robinson's perspectives. In addition to to his previous roles he's also an associate professor of medicine at the Thomas Jefferson University Sidney Kimmel Medical College and he's also a practicing physician so It is truly a privilege to have him as not only a health industry leader but also a practicing physician to talk about some of these trends and healthcare with that at Mondo. I WanNa give you a warm welcome. Thanks for joining us being over me. So what is it that got you inspired to do the work that you do that Robinson and had as you said I'm reading my bio a little bit? I had a few different roles and my inspiration has always been consistent. It's I truly want to make a difference. I knew it seems Corny. But you know it's it's one of the drivers I think there's so much opportunity in healthcare to affecting improve people's lives in one of his. Why continue to practice that one on one interaction where you are truly little hospital so literally? Saving someone's life that is inspiring and then even as I think about digital in the opportunity to improve affect people's health across steeled across a large population continues to inspire me. It's it's the the one on one. Interactions the interactions as well as the N. Equals many interactions To me they inspire me in different ways but at the end of the day. We actually truly helping people in that. That's a good reason to get out of bed morning. Totally agree with you and my head and heart are in the same place. I don't think it's Corny. I think it's a great thing to be moved by. And and so I'm curious. Now you know with the work that you're doing there at the cancer center however you guys adding value to the healthcare ecosystem. What's different and better about what you guys are doing is interesting the goals here at MCI designated Comprehensive Cancer Center or nothing less than curing cancer. It's not a ambiguous. Goal is to Jimmy to the provincial tour of cancer. So you know when you when everyone has is is lockstep with that that focus. It's very refreshing right. You know what your goal is my job on the digital side say how do I leverage digital for that same goal right? So what does that look like? And we all have the same goal I bring in digital so you start thinking about those areas like how do I improve outcomes? How do I use things like machine learning and hey I to improve clinical outcomes of those folks that we that we serve? How do I use digital to drive? Cost drive down cost. We can cure cancer cheaper And make it more accessible thinking about robotic process automation. Those kinds of things improving operations. And how do I do all of that? With an even better experience for patients it had delivered digital to skill that improved experience Across the entire population that we serve. So those are those. That's how we how we approach from a digital perspective the opportunity to contribute to the provision cure cancer. I love it and so as as we wrap our heads around this digital theme. How does that translate into? Say The work that you've done in consumerism. And and and you know. How does that translate to the physician level? That's providing care all the way down to the the patients that you guys are taking care of interesting. I like to. It's great great question. I'd like to start with the patients in and go back or go the other way. And actually you mentioned consumer and so there's different ways of defining who we serve honestly even though I've had the title consumer may not be the most comfortable for me but there needs to be some acknowledgement that there are people who are engaging in health and health behaviors and improving their health. They don't see themselves as patients and so we have to figure out. How do we how do we want? How do we engage with them? And then and then what do we call them? So right now the best definition that they have we have the best kind of description that we have is consumer twice until I hear something better than people as a new people so people have said okay. Let's just people which I did but it's a little it's a little loose um so I think I like consumer healthcare to me feels a little bit better than just. Kinda brought people that being said. Now how do you engage with consumers? Well the way everyone else. Every other extreme these consumer digitally right. That's that's the way you engage with them whether it's online or SMS text or or it's mobile APPS and so we're that's how you engage with people it's not complicated conceptually. It's complicated in execution in so anyone disagrees with the idea that you engage with consumers Digitally that's certainly how you skill. Now there's certainly aspects of what we do in healthcare and other industries as well where you need a physical need a physical component to that so now we start talking about the operation talking about the physicians and so forth. So how do you then convert you know? It's almost clicks to bricks. How do you convert those digital interactions into those physical interactions with necessary? And it's not always necessary and you think about things like virtual care and so now he's saying well. How do we optimize our operations so streamline that we can focus on those physical interactions when necessary into a really good job at that and then? How do we bring everyone along? Who's been a traditional healthcare system for decades right? How do we bring those folks along to this digital age? So that's part of that's part of the work that's the work of digital and if you ignore as a digital person as a as a digital innovator ignore the people part of the operations and the clinical piece you will fail Absolutely must focus on those people. Whether it's the frontline staff back the operations and certainly the clinicians physicians nurses pharmacists and so forth that needs to be a high focus. And so you know there's this title of digital in this time of innovation but at the end of the day is it's about people about people and it's about people love it it's a it's a great call out. And and what do you believe makes what you do and what? The Cancer Center does better than what's available today. There are many opportunities to leverage on digital. You think broadly about how do you leverage digital? We've got some really really talented people that are working in the digital realm. And when I when I called JOE FROM FOR MOFFITT IN. Our team includes the entire. It shop Includes Informatics and includes data in here as well as the war to things that people think about digital in terms of you know virtual care and an absence so forth so think about informatics thinking about the opportunity to refine the way that clinicians interact with the electronic medical record. I mean you can have a whole separate broadcasts. I'm a podcast about the electronic medical record the pros and cons and you'll spend more time on the cons by the way and so that's a whole so. Don't just refining right. So you're familiar with his right. I just. We're finding that in Iran finding that interaction and so that you can actually focus on the people Both who are delivering the chairs for the people who are receiving here in receiving those. Those interactions In so there's that piece there's also you know how you leverage data to optimize outcomes whether it's refining your your interaction so you know you have a list of people who potentially could have some kind of intervention. But you're leveraging data big data in this way to say it but it's really this subset of those people who are truly going to benefit can. That's leveraging use use machine learning and in some cases around around that you can do that as well in imaging as well where you actually have a algorithms that are that are looking at your films in supporting the radiologists in optimizing that outcome in you know so. The operations clinical operations. The wins this is interact with the electronic medical record. And then against the way that patients and consumers engage with the system itself whether it's through Piece of portals which I'm not saying by the way so I think I think about the way we engage much more broadly than that you know everyone starts with Dr Google Right. So so what are you doing around that when you're doing an online search what are you doing around our? Seo Sem and all those kinds of concepts as well that entire package right of digital web going from the interactions with a patient and consumers all the way through the clinical operations and operations all the way through to the to the hardcore kind of big data components data. Tighter action is the value that we bring by leveraging digital to improve the ultimately improve outcomes.

Cancer Center Robinson Thomas Jefferson University Si Associate Professor Of Medicin Comprehensive Cancer Center Mondo Iran MCI Jimmy JOE
Steven Spielberg takes on West Side Story

The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

01:30 min | 1 year ago

Steven Spielberg takes on West Side Story

"Are you what are you working on next? I know that there's a Yoko Ono John Lennon project and a BG's project possibly where are you on those two the titles yet You I know that they're both set up once with the Jesus with paramount Being produced at least by Steven Spielberg and The John Lennon Yoko sit up universal and John Mark Ballet Dude Dallas buyers club. Very much yes yes Yeah he's he's he's down to direct So hoping to shoot that next year and I'm doing a musical on Broadway of Neil Diamond Neil sweet caroline diamond. Wow so I go from here to get into workshop on that So we're hoping to bring that to Broadway is other non musical things kicking around that. You're working on. Yeah I'm doing the adaptation of three identical strangers which was Stunning documentary which My agent Coleman said would you be interested and I said look Chinese another job like a hole in the head And he's just check it out. What's the Steve? I was so blown away. By this documentary about three identical twins who reunited and and find triplets yet and they re triplets in and then they find that they're all pot of really nefarious study pretty and IT GETS Super Creepy I. It was a great movie. Yeah that's settled with With Sidney Kimmel entertainment and film four in the

John Lennon Yoko Yoko Ono John Lennon Neil Diamond Neil Sidney Kimmel Steven Spielberg John Mark Coleman Steve
"sidney kimmel" Discussed on Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

03:06 min | 2 years ago

"sidney kimmel" Discussed on Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

"Too. So this is a science story that came with it come up and the media loved, that's exactly the arc everyone wants. And it explains why you would move to France where. Mean the French different people totally forgot about them. New York Post done. But cold fusion to this day it remains a shorthand for a pathological science. I mean I ended up making reference to it periodically as just an example of what can and will go wrong. If you if you're hope gets ahead of your process. It also seems like it's a PR hubris moment, right? Like if the scientists had just on their due diligence in their peer review. None of this ever would have happened. The university of Utah prompt. That's what I'm saying. Like non-scientists got their fingers in the pie. Have you noticed like it's kind of a thing I notice on the internet, where I used to love science, you headlines and I felt like I was a fan of science because I would notice when the paper said is chocolate good for you. Or whatever these, these stories, are you subscribe to discover exactly. And discover now has some like worst science article of the week thing because this happened so frequently the somebody will publish something academic one piece of it will become reported in the popular press, and we'll just one guy gets some kind of seafood parasite, then the first popularization of it includes they call up a guy and he's like well sushi consumption is on the rise. So, and then suddenly, the next article says with sushi consumption on the rise. We could see thousands of cases of this parasite here, the girls pictures, and it becomes a game of telephone where you're seeing headlines that have very quickly within a week that have nothing to do with the actual published research, and no one's the wiser well. And we see this. So much now in social scientists. Yeah. Because all it takes you. All you have to do is have a theory that, that guitar music is his bad for women and two weeks later. It's like wasn't. There is a study of how many social science findings are replicable and it's like it's a half forty percent or so it's not great well in the case of cold. Fusion, despite no one, having produced any real measurable energy from it as recently as two thousand twelve a, a millionaire by the name of Sidney Kimmel gave five and a half million dollars to the university of Missouri to fund and found the Sidney Kimmel institute for nuclear renaissance skimmer, which is Skinner. Yeah. With with the stated intent of pursuing cold fusion research, now in Missouri. So fortunately, like less of a religious community just take it away. The Mormons for a minute. So it's become kind of a fringy thing, where somebody's always going to be like these guys trying to get a car to run on water. There's always going to be not particularly qualified people trying their hand at cold fusion. I mean it's modern day alchemy and you know, alchemy was fairly well, debunked in the eighteenth century, but I.

Sidney Kimmel Sidney Kimmel institute New York Post France university of Utah Missouri university of Missouri Skinner million dollars forty percent two weeks
"sidney kimmel" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

02:40 min | 2 years ago

"sidney kimmel" Discussed on 600 WREC

"They have a slightly different physiology and a different understanding of what their environment might be kind of doing to on their treatment. So we need to be able to expand that out. I think that's important because some groups respond differently to certain drugs than other groups, do Dr Julie Bremer is co director of the upper aero digestive department at Johns Hopkins university's Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center. So you Most actually common example believe that we see four that different drugs the having lifts different effects that are in seen patients in, ma'am. By come the way, from at I least see in him. Now. lung cancer I I patients I went no come come from on. differences You know, and just drug give me a metabolism. big foot. Let Or how me let drugs me find a are degraded an. in our You know, bodies a patients who are imprint of of the Asian real descent big foot or foot live in the in Asia sand or dirt somewhere, tend which is to have very hard. a Everything's slower gotta metabolism be just perfect to get of certain that. Right. drugs. And so But they then can be more so prone much easier to to find the side glimpse effects in the structures. from those type of drugs And if their they're levels mess. are Now, higher, they messages and so to you when we're developing and me drugs, we who do come have to across be aware them of or that they as messages well. to So each other. I think. This really does have real world Well, application. Studies funded by I the don't national professional institutes everything of health require about what they minority are for participation. for them But those because trials make up they less than ten can't communicate percent of telepathically clinical trials and in whatever the United to right. States So overall, sometimes you wonder Asians, why African Americans would they need and to other use minorities gloves? are especially So. underrepresented in cancer That's. clinical studies to large trials on immunotherapy are a fairly recent example, according to an analysis in the New York Times roughly ninety percent of participants in both trials were white. And in one of the study is only one percent was black minorities. Face extra hurdles to getting into trials. Bremer says a big one is proximity. So if someone has to drive a long ways to get to a place that has a clinical trial, or if they don't have the available transportation, if they don't have a car and can't drive in and they're relying on public transportation. They have to be able to get to a place that is on their public transportation line. So we do have to be. Be aware of that. And here at Johns Hopkins, we're trying to do things that make it easier for patients to get here. Bremer says some minority populations have a higher incidence of serious disorders such as heart and kidney disease, which would disqualify them for a clinical trial, and some doctors simply assume that minorities would not be interested. But a heard says the biggest obstacle for them or for any patient is simply making them aware that studies exist that are appropriate for them money for promotion is scarce as a clinical trials dot gov website supported by. And I h and NCI which does provide information on trials, and that's been a helpful addition..

Dr Julie Bremer Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Ca Johns Hopkins university Johns Hopkins director Asia New York Times NCI ninety percent one percent
"sidney kimmel" Discussed on NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

03:30 min | 2 years ago

"sidney kimmel" Discussed on NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

"The disease is occasionally observed to affect women in families in a manner that suggests an autosomal dominant trait and usually manifests clinically after intense hair grooming, these investigators used XM sequencing in a group of women with alopicia discovery set, then performed direct sequencing and finally used a replication set that consisted of women with C C A to confirm the data obtained with the discovery set in the discovery set which included sixteen patients. The investigators identified one splice site and three heterogenous miss sense mutations in Patty three in five patients. Thirty one percent. The approximate prevalence of the disease is up to five point six percent. Immuno fluorescent staining, showed decreased expression of Patty three in biopsy. Samples of scalp skin obtained from patients with C C A the investigators then directly sequenced Patty three in an additional forty two patients replication set and observed genetic variants in nine of them opposed hawk analysis of the combined data sets showed that the prevalence of Patty three mutation was higher among patients with C C A, then in control cohort of women of African ancestry mutations in Patty three which encodes a protein that is essential to proper hair. Shaft formation were associated with CCC a Yoni Alito from the Sidney Kimmel Medical College. Philadelphia writes in Annetta to'real that the observations by Malki and colleagues suggest that Patty three mutations predisposes persons to see see a which is then clinically manifested when hairstyling practices damage the hair, thus in the familial setting such practices should be discouraged in both symptomatic and ASEM dramatic family members, although Patty three mutations would appear to predispose women to see see a the screening of a symptomatic women for pathogenic mutations in Patty three would be premature. Perhaps once the association is tested in larger groups of women and the effect on risk is better. Understood and there is a comprehensive genomic landscape of CCC a. That is other risk variants and genes are identified and their effect on risk delineated, Gino typing of ASEM dramatic women would be warranted. The presence of variants in Patty, three in both CCC, a and uncall- mobile hair syndrome, suggests that this gene has a plea atropine effect on the determination of hair texture and the finding holds implications for future development of therapy, such as the restoration of Patty three activity. Molecular support for hetero. Go nieces resulting in says squeeze I gotta twinning by Michael Gabbard from Queensland University of technology Brisbane. Australia says squeeze I gotta multiple pregnancy is an exceptional intermediate between Mahnaz Godich and dies..

Patty CCC hair syndrome Sidney Kimmel Medical College Yoni Alito Australia Mahnaz Godich Michael Gabbard Queensland University of techn Gino atropine Annetta to'real Malki Philadelphia Thirty one percent six percent
"sidney kimmel" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

09:40 min | 2 years ago

"sidney kimmel" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"One to call timeshare exit team today. Rockstars. I'm Alex Worley. Welcome to the show. Joining me right now, Trent kisser, he is the president co founder of Madison wells media. Thanks for being here. You could start out by giving us an overview of your entrepreneurial journey, and what is Madison wells media. So about three years ago. I was burning businesswoman. Legendary pictures than we have been working on tentpole movies and immersive VR AR. And I started to notice that those organizations aren't fully resources to really take advantage of how fast technologists changing the way consumers behave. And so I made a call to go and chase immersive content specifically B R A are trying to create a platform where storytellers could take advantage of and IT could be valued in the right way with immersive content. So everyone has seen VR and somewhere another now. But at that point a lot of the business opportunity around it was really showing the world's best storyteller is what can be done in VR. And so I made the call to jump and go do that. And almost exactly the same time. I met my partner Judy Pritzker. Who was in the process of figuring out how her businesses in film, and TV and live events all fit together and all relate to the way that conservative. You're is changing as a result of technology. And so she and I had a series of really great thoughtful meetings about how do you build value in a business multigenerational instead of looking for a short term flip? How do you create a platform given where Facebook and Instagram, and and others who are getting into digital video content and are starting to go. And then how do you think about film and TV and some of that traditional media, given how important that still is the world's best storyteller? So long way of saying we both started seeing the world the same way. And we started to look at how we can organize the resources we have to address film TV live events. We are in a platform that serves the world's best storytellers, delivering content at the speed of technology. So part of this is my own journey and farther. This is a little bit the story of the journey that DeeDee, and I've had together and building this thing. Yeah. So you had a very big vision from the very beginning. Tell me a little bit about that transition from working for another company to starting your own. Everyone has a different philosophy about starting their own business. Some are like let's burn the ballots. Some are very methodical about taking certain steps and making a very smooth and seamless transition. So what was it like free? Mike concern was that I was late. I felt I just had this impulse. That felt like if I don't do this. Now, if I don't take this chance now, I can miss this. I can miss the way that technology's changing how storytelling is done. I could miss this. And so I think it's always a little bit of the fear and greed cycle. But I might my part of it was seeing the world and learning Judy saw the world the same way as I did. But also, it was I felt like I could miss it. I felt like if I didn't move out I could miss it. Although there were pretty quickly. I did. But I also there were many many times when I would just walk around like talking to the tree is and be like, I don't know what I'm doing here. Like, I don't out. So there's plenty of uncertainty that goes with it in certain plenty of moments where you just don't know what happens next. And so there is that fear, but about that a little bit especially in those first months where you are going. Oh my gosh. What am I doing here? You're trading something from nothing, basically. That's what being an entrepreneur is. So how did you deal with that fear uncertainty and just kept moving forward? The short answer is meditation. Meditating these two, and I don't I honestly don't know how I would function without it to be honest with you. But a big part of it is just learning to see the difference between something happened, and it's bad. So like when you say something bad happen. Something happened. And it's bad is actually two separate processes learning that something happened and judging it as bad as two separate things. And so like seeing that first thing and saying, what can I learn from this thing that just happened? This totally unexpected crazy thing that submarines all the ideas that I had today that I was gonna do applying kind of a filter to how do we use this to learn and grow and build from it? That's that's part of it. And a lot of is just talking to a lot of is just, you know, sharing concerns sharing ideas that helps oh partner really helps to have a partner. Yeah. So I provided my definition of being on pure creating something from nothing. What is your now that you've been an entrepreneur creating something from nothing has a pretty good one. But I think that that also sort of implies that it's sort of a a singular effort, right? It's just one humans effort. I think I would say building something from nothing with a collective set. If humans is actually kind of the how I would think about it because I. Think although it started with the DNR thinking about it. You know, we had Heller high water, for example, and the best picture nomination that. That's a whole crew extraordinarily talented people to be able to do. And so it is about the collective humans working together to do it. So I think it's it's it's it's being the force behind helping humans realize what they can do together as power to it. Yeah, let's use hell or high water as an example, tell me a little bit about the behind the scenes from the time. It was an idea to the execution and really how your business helps this movie become a great success rate. So you can think of our business is a one that enables storytelling. Right. So in the case of hell or high water our partners at Sidney Kimmel entertainment had spent some time developing the story, and we jumped in to develop it and a pretty sit with them. And then along the way just to give you an example of how many people it actually takes or something like that to be successful. So our our platform plus kennel, plus Lionsgate plus CBS to get it out into the world. So all of those people played an extremely important role in picking up where the other had left off fundamentally working. Together to make it succeed. So someone was Tony the day that they they saw it and it really resonated with them. And it's tempting to think that like there's one singular place where that comes from. You know, it is it's a it's a team effort. And and, you know, see best lines create about in and out in the world. Amazing. So he can go back in time to this. First few months being an entrepreneur, what advice would you give your early entrepreneurial south has a great question medicine for sure medicine work. I would say I would say have have a morning routine meditate and work out. And then everything else follows it really is like that. Because I think part of what's important as priming your system to be able to address. It's quite a scary thing to sit in front of a blank paper and try to figure out like how am I going to do this today? I've never seen half of these problems before have absolutely no information about them. So getting yourself in a place where you can address them and feel good about it being a process meditating morning routine and working out. Our our start there. It's all about working smarter versus harder has become a little bit of a cliche. But it's a true one. Because if you really as you said fine yourself to work on the right things and stay focused. You're going to be so much more. I mean, and also I think a big part of it is not don't don't kill yourself. Like, I don't think we're I'm by far, my my my my worst critic, and I think we all to some extent or another. And so I feel like giving yourself a break, you know, not not being so hard on yourself that you derail the whole process. Learn from mistakes mistakes you make but giving yourself a break, and allowing yourself to sort of address it with sort of an open mind. Feels like I I picked those lessons up over time. But I would have been someone told me that from the okay aside for meditation and a morning routine. What are three things every entrepreneur needs. This could be tangible technology it could be intangible characteristic a habit. What are three things I think that first thing is pattern recognition the ability to recognize pattern. Earns positively for your business both from developing a business case standpoint, but also recognizing when something isn't working, right? So understanding I've seen this before a pretty good sense of where this goes either gonna follow it because it's productive for. I'm going to let it go because it's not productive. But understanding those patterns, right? Like, we've had this meeting before I know the response to this already we need to change how we're approaching it. And and and not trying to, you know, learning I guess the other way to say that is just learning at unpacking stakes learning from them. I think the second thing is a really great sounding board. Find a human who doesn't necessarily know your business, but his judgment you trust really judgment that it could be absolutely no industry expertise, but his judgment you trust. And just and and and and say, here's where I am. I am absolutely no idea. What I'm gonna do? I've always people depending on me. What do you think about this idea and finding that one person a lot of people think of that as a mentor, but finding that one person is a really important piece of the equation. And I would say the third thing is just time for yourself at least things become twenty four hour life. Experiences. Not jobs. And so breaking that time for yourself away. That really is your own time. We got three and they were great. So thank you so much. We're gonna take a quick break. When we come back and talk about building the business. We are the biggest entrepreneur platform on the planet. This is Business Rockstars..

partner Judy Pritzker Madison wells Alex Worley Trent kisser Facebook DeeDee Mike concern DNR president Lionsgate Heller Sidney Kimmel Instagram co founder Tony CBS twenty four hour three years
"sidney kimmel" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

10:13 min | 2 years ago

"sidney kimmel" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Eight five eight five eight zero six. Rockstars. I'm Alex Worley. Welcome to the show joining me right now Clint kissed her. He is president and co founder of Madison wells media. Thanks for being here. Fewer much be there. So you could start out by giving us an overview of your entrepreneurial journey, and what is Madison wells media. So about three years ago. I was running business development at legendary pictures than we had been working on tentpole movies and immersive VR AR. And I started to notice that those organizations aren't fully resource to really take manager of how fast technologists changing the way consumers behavior. And so I made a call to go and chase immersive content specifically B R A are trying to create a platform where storytellers could take advantage of and IT it could be valued in the right way with immersive content. So everyone has seen VR and somewhere. Another now. Now. But at that point a lot of the business opportunity around it was really showing the world's best storyteller is what can be done in VR. And so I made the call to jump and go do that. And almost exactly the same time. I met my partner Judy Pritzker who was in the process of figuring out how her businesses in film, and TV and live events all fit together. And all relate to the way that consumer behavior is changing as a result of technology. And so she and I had. A series of really great thoughts will meetings about how do you build value in a business multigenerational instead of looking for a short-term flip? How do you create a platform given where Facebook and Instagram, and and others who are getting into digital video content and are starting to go. And then how do you think about film and TV and some of that traditional media, given how important that still is? So the world's best storyteller. So it's a long way of saying we both started seeing the world the same way. And we started to look at how we can organize the resources. We have to address film TV live events. We are a are in a platform that serves the world's best storytellers, delivering content at the speed of technology. So part of this is my own journey and far this is a little bit the story of the journey that and I've had together and building this thing. Yeah. So you had a very big vision from the very beginning. Tell me a little bit about that transition from working for another company too. Starting your own. Everyone has a different philosophy about starting their own businesses. Some are like let's burn the boats going for it. Some are very methodical about taking certain steps making a very smooth and seamless transition. And so what was it like my concern was that I was late like I felt I just had this impulsive at salt. Like if I don't do this. Now, if I don't take this chance now, I can miss this. I can miss the way that technology is changing how storytelling is done. I could miss this. And so I think it's always a little bit of fear and greed cycle. But I my heart was seeing the world and and learning GD saw the world the same way as I did. But also I felt like I could miss it. I felt like if I didn't move now I could miss it. Although there were active pretty quickly. I did. But I also there were many many times when I would just walk around like talking tree isn't being like, I don't know what I'm doing here. Like, I don't have. So there's plenty of uncertainty that goes with it and certain plenty of moments where you just don't know what happens next. And so there is that fear. But. Talk about that a little bit. Especially those first months where you are going. Oh my gosh. What am I doing here? Just here. Trading something from nothing, basically. That's what being an entrepreneur is. So how did you deal with that fear that uncertainty and just kept moving forward? The short answer is meditation. Meditating, and I don't I honestly don't know how I would function without it to be honest with you. But a big part of it is just learning to see the difference between something happened, and it's bad. So when you say something bad happened something happened, and it's bad is actually two separate processes learning that something happened and judging it as bad as two separate things. And so like seeing that first thing and saying, what can I learn from this thing that just happened? This totally unexpected crazy thing that submarines all the ideas that I had today that I was gonna do applying kind of filter to how do we use this to learn and grow and build from it? That's that's part of it. And a lot of is just talking to a lot of it is just, you know, sharing concerns sharing ideas that helps partner really helps have a partner. Yeah. So I provided my definition of bringing on. You're creating something from nothing. What is your? That's now that you've been an entrepreneur creating something from nothing a pretty good one. But I think that also sort of implies that it's sort of a singular effort one humans effort. I think I would say building something from nothing with a collective set of humans is actually kind of the how I would think about it because I think although it started with the way and thinking about it, you know, we had. Hell or high water, for example, and the best picture nomination that you know, that's a whole crew extraordinarily talented people to be able to do. And so it is about the collective humans working together to do it. So I think it's it's it's it's being the forest behind helping humans realize what they can do together as our despondent. Yeah, let's use hell or high water as an example, tell me a little bit about the behind the scenes from the time. It was an idea to the execution and really how your business and helps this movie become a great success rate. So you can think of our business as a platform that enables storytelling, right? So in the case of hell or high water our partners at Sidney Kimmel entertainment had spent some time developing the story, and we jumped in to develop it and appreciate with them. And then along the way just to give you an example, how many people it actually takes for something like that to be successful? So our our platform plus kennel, plus Lionsgate, plus CBS. To get it out into the world. So all those people played an extremely important role in picking up where the other had left off and then fundamentally working together to make it succeed. So someone was Tony today. The they saw it and it really resonated with them. And it's tempting to think that like there's one singular place where that comes from. It's you know, it is it's a it's a team effort. And and, you know, see best lines were great about in and out in the world, you mazing? So he could go back in time to this first month's being an entrepreneur. What advice would you give your early entrepreneurial south? Great question. Meditate for sure medicine work. I would say I would say have have a morning routine it and workout. And then everything else follows it really is like that. Because I think part of what's important as priming your system to be able to address. It's quite a scary thing to sit in front of a blank paper and try to figure out like how am I going to do this today? I've never seen half of these problems before at absolutely no information about them to getting yourself in a place where you can address them and feel good about it being a process meditating morning routine and working out our our start. It's all about working smarter versus harder has become a little bit of a cliche, but it's true one. Because if you really as you said prime yourself to work on the right things, stay focused. You're going to be so much more. I mean, and also I think a big a big part of it is not don't don't kill yourself. Don't they where I am by far? My my my my worst critic, and and I think we all to some extent or another. And so I feel like, you know. Giving yourself a break. You know, not not being so hard on yourself that you derail the whole process. Learn from what mistakes mistakes you make. But but giving yourself a break, and allowing yourself to sort of address it with sort of an open mind feels like I I picked those lessons up over time. But I would have been go. Someone told me that from the okay aside from meditation and a morning routine. What are three things every entrepreneur needs. This could be tangible technology it could be intangible characteristic. A habits what are three things I think the first thing is pattern recognition an ability to recognize patterns, positively for your business both from developing a business case standpoint, but also recognizing when something isn't working, right? So this understanding I've seen this before a pretty good sense of where this goes, I'm either gonna follow. It is it's productive or I'm going to let it go because it's not productive. But understanding those patterns, right? Like, we've had this meeting before I know the response to this already. We need. Change how we're approaching it. And and and not trying to, you know, learning I guess the other way to say that is just learning and unpacking stakes learning from them. I think the second thing is a really great sounding board. Find a human who doesn't necessarily new your business, but whose judgment you trust really judgment. You know, it could be bec- that absolutely no industry expertise but his judgment trust. And just an and say, here's where I am. I am absolutely no idea. What I'm gonna do? I have all these people depending on me. What do you think about this idea and finding that one person a lot of people think of that as a mentor, but finding that one person is a really important piece of the equation. And I would say the third thing is just time for yourself. These things become twenty four hour life experiences. Not jobs. And so breaking that time for yourself away. That really is your own time got three and they were great. So thank you so much. We're gonna take a quick break. When we come back in building the business. We are the biggest entrepreneur Pat form on the planet. This is Business Rockstars. Why.

partner Madison wells Alex Worley Clint president Facebook Judy Pritzker Lionsgate Pat co founder Sidney Kimmel Instagram Tony CBS twenty four hour three years
"sidney kimmel" Discussed on NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"sidney kimmel" Discussed on NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

"Could this patient have hairy cell leukemia, his overall presentation with sub acute symptoms site, a PINA splint omega early and infection due to immuno compromise would be consistent with this diagnosis affected patients are most commonly middle aged men who seek medical attention when they have symptoms related to massive split omega Lee or Sida Pena. Cycling dependent, kindness, twelve, immunity, and prostate cancer. A clinical implications of basic research article by Emmanuel Antonio Rockies from the Johns Hopkins University, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center. Baltimore. The authors of a recent study described a new molecular subclass of advanced prostate cancers. Those defined by by Oli somatic loss of function mutations of the tumor suppressor. Gene CD k. twelve which encodes cycling dependent kinase twelve. The authors found that biologic loss of function mutations in CD k. twelve cause inactivation of the cycle, independent kindness, twelve protein, which leads to a unique pattern of chromosomal instability characterized by widespread focal tandem duplications that are approximately two point, five mega bases or zero point five mega bases in size. These duplications may result in gene fusions and potential fusion induced Neo antigens that are created by KAI Merrick, amino acid sequences. These findings support the hypothesis that prostate cancers with variants CD k. twelve will have a response to immune checkpoint blockade therapies. The clinical implications of the study are profound and immediate. The tobacco master settlement agreement strategic lessons for dressing public.

prostate cancer Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Ca Gene CD Sida Pena Emmanuel Antonio Rockies Johns Hopkins University KAI Merrick Baltimore Oli
"sidney kimmel" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

06:11 min | 2 years ago

"sidney kimmel" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Four you Johnny Carson fan Giovanni Johnny Carson Yeah I don't know who I don't know if anyone who didn't. I just thought he was the pit Amee of a, talk show host class yeah I thought he really was just tremendous, of funny in a little body and you never knew. When he was quite gonna explode everyone realized he was. Kind of an odd. Guy, personally. But There was a terrific book that was written you know dependent if he had been drinking or not if you. Got the good Johnny or the, bad Johnny really. I mean that's the way he was but? I wonder how he would fare in today's. Climate for example Jimmy Fallon who? Followed the tradition. Of. Jay Leno Johnny Carson tried to stay apolitical and finds himself. Getting swamped in the ratings by Stephen Colbert who's very political and very anti. Trump, can you imagine if Colbert competition we're Johnny Carson how Johnny would adapt, to this political climate I don't know who would begs. The question can you be neutral and successful I don't, know To choose a side right now he's certainly. Doing the cable network wars go see. You have, your followers, based on what side. You taken and I guess applies to talk. Shows as well but it's really interesting Carson, you'd never, knew what his politics were no he'd have. Both sides on you know and I don't think we, were. As partisan, backup probably not yeah now, sensitive fascinated by the story he was always known he. Lived in, Malibu well apparently in nineteen Eighty-four he bought his. Estate for nine point five million dollars it's four acres right on the ocean and there's a shot of the view from his pool. Which is the Pacific Ocean spectacular, in Malibu nine. Million dollars that's a lot of money back? Then nine point five million nine hundred eighty. Four his widow sold it in? Two thousand seven Okay we'll see The people who bought his home also bought. Two adjacent parcels so I don't know exactly what his nine point five became because this group bought the that and two parcels, for Forty-six million but I don't. Know how much so let's say Carson's was at least half. Of. The money Twenty nine point five to at least twenty twenty-five whatever anyway so the people who own it now are, the Jones apparel group founder and. He's a film producer named Sidney Kimmel and his wife Caroline Their net worth according to Forbes one point three billion oh my, gosh what they ha they when they put it on the, market Two, years ago, they put. It on for, eighty one point. Five million wow now now it's on sale They they chop the price by twenty percents they've put as you can get a. Sixteen million dollar discount and you can, buy for sixty five, point two million according to the LA times she lets all chip in it's unbelievable includes a. Living room sunken fireplace media. Room and updated chef's kitchen indoor arboretum under, a thirty. Foot. High glass ceiling that's it Let's see elsewhere the manicured grounds. Sport and eight hundred and forty-three square foot guesthouse in oceanside pool, access to the beach but it really does. I mean look at you saw patacula justly anyway Johnny Carson's old house can be yours for just a peddling sixty five point two million big. Ones I'm sure some Russian oligarch will, buy it maybe yeah, Putin himself made a speaking of celebrities Leib. Schreiber is going to be in court today a. Long Island It's not Westchester Nyack no All right. I'm. Sure, is as Nyack okay yeah photographer had been following him around. Nyack, during filming of Radonovich. Yeah I love Ray Donovan it's coming. Back the promos of already started is. Going to be while October but it'll be here before you know it anyway he is charged with second degree harassment now. The photographer told the paper that Schreiber had. Pushed the. Photographer's camera away after a. Flash. Went, off in his face I can see where that would be. Annoying Yeah Yeah maybe maybe not used to the. Flashes I, dunno if, so, anyway he he's going to court today is attorney confirmed that the incident took place but maintained that the allegation doesn't rise to the level of any law being broken if it's just simply a matter of pushing the. Guy Aggressive come on you don't need to be going to court over that all right, maybe just, thought, he was Ray. Donovan we're. Just gonna deal is it like. Ray Donovan, would as you know Aretha Franklin and yeah. Poor, health, and now they say, she's undergone undergoing. Hospice care so it sounds like the. End. Is near for the seventy six, year old Queen of soul Aretha Franklin boy that's, too bad it is our song is just look it. I mean she's gonna live on in her music forever grandma hey you see. This one a long lost, Marilyn, Monroe nude scene has been discovered yes. In the, nineteen sixty, one, film the misfits was cut from the film because director John Huston said it was not necessary to the story even though stars in the movie like Clark Gable. Fought to have the scene apparently she was wearing a A sheet and on her own, she just decided to drop it it was her call. Was not in the surreal yeah no I was looking for their online doesn't. Exist I know it does Stayed in the films nineteen. Sixty one it would have been the first nude. Scene. By, Merrick and actress in a major, motion business. Somebody have it yeah Long. Lost in the closet somebody has it they haven't decided what they're gonna do with it I've. Sold to the. Highest Sold but, they say. Won't end up on YouTube anytime soon so. Stop searching for the long lost Marilyn. Monroe nude scene oh boy coming up next. All the news. You could ever want everyone. Has something to say about it we have all, the sound bites and more it's coming up hope you're enjoying.

Johnny Carson Ray Donovan Aretha Franklin Malibu Schreiber Marilyn Jimmy Fallon Guy Stephen Colbert YouTube Donovan Pacific Ocean Jay Leno Long Island Westchester Nyack Monroe harassment Trump Putin
"sidney kimmel" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

03:04 min | 2 years ago

"sidney kimmel" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"The unite the right to rally is being billed as, a white civil, rights rally. Meant to protest a civil rights abuse in Charlottesville WBZ news time three twenty, the torrential rain that caused severe flooding has moved on to the north shore but the south. Shore has been getting some heavy rain and the south coast to so far the Cape has been. Spared that looks to be out, of the range Of the fresh water that's moving in forecasters say this wet weather is, going to continue throughout the rest of the day and evening hours and in fact we can. Expect unsettled weather pattern to be with us for the next few days Well it's not the kind, of wakeup call anyone wants to get let alone on a Sunday morning a family and, hall was fast asleep at about two forty five when out of control SUV crashed into. Their home on, fifth street no one in the homeless hurt but the driver suffered a broken back Stoughton man found a loose, boa constrictor not once but twice this weekend WBZ's Charlie Sherman has that story you'll read spotted the. Giant snake Friday night when he, went to throw trash that on Saturday the boa constrictor popped up on the roof. Of his car this time he called police who brought the. Animal control officer the snake which can reach between three feet and thirteen feet in length is in the care of animal, control and if no one claims it they can keep it and. Take it on tours to show it to young children I'm Charlie Sherman WBZ, NewsRadio ten thirty state police in Springfield got a call this morning that a dog was seen, running up and, down route two ninety one sure enough a trooper spotted a. Doberman, puppy running in the left lane near. Exit five the pop came to a stop when the. Trooper called then took off again help arrived and troopers were able to slow traffic down while they tried to corral the ramp the, rambunctious dog a fast seeking trooper, through a stuffed animal to the dog Who stopped grab, it when the trooper commanded sits the dog did in that point troopers were able to get, the dog in, the cruiser returned home to its rightful owners who live nearby Singer John Mayer is Beverly Hills area home. Was robbed Iran and ransacked over the weekend police say the thief came in through a bedroom window and, took some, pricey items including music, watches and other stuff worth about two hundred grand they. Are joins a list of celebrity, burglary victims in the last year that include Atlantis Morissette David Spade former Lakers Derek Fisher and Byron Scott The former Malibu state of Johnny Carson is on the markets reporter Angela Anderson reports that the. Forty year old home has stellar views of the ocean a guest house a gym and a pavilion the. California state that once belonged to Johnny Carson is being sold for sixty, five million dollars. The Malibu. Home was built in nineteen seventy eight Carson bought the. Estate in one thousand nine hundred eighty. Four for nine and a half million dollars a. Day for about twenty years the. Third band to host the tonight show died in two thousand five at the age of seventy nine. The home is currently owned. By fashion mogul and film, producer Sidney Kimmel and his wife good morning this man.

Johnny Carson Charlie Sherman WBZ Sidney Kimmel John Mayer Charlie Sherman Stoughton Atlantis Morissette David Spad Springfield California Iran officer Lakers burglary Derek Fisher producer Angela Anderson Byron Scott reporter five million dollars
"sidney kimmel" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"sidney kimmel" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Of Johnny Carson. Is on the, market as correspondent Angela Anderson reports the forty year old home has, stellar views of the ocean a guest house a gym and a pavilion California state that once belonged to Johnny Carson is being, sold for sixty five. Million dollars the, Malibu, home was built in nineteen seventy eight Carson, bought the estate in nineteen Eighty-four for nine and a half million dollars a day for. About twenty years the third band to host the tonight show, died in two thousand. Five at the age of seventy nine the home is currently owned by. Fashion mogul and film producer Sidney Kimmel and his wife Singer John. Mayer's Beverly Hills area home robbed and ransacked this weekend police say the thief came in through a bedroom window and took some pricey items including music watches and other stuff worth about two hundred thousand dollars mayor. Joins a list of celebrity burglary victims in the last year that list includes, Alanis Morissette EMMY, Rossum David Spade and former, LA Lakers Derek Fisher and Byron Scott actor Bryan Cranston heading back to Broadway he's going. To portray Howard Beale and the stage at daft. Tation of network the play is based on the nineteen Seventy-six movie directed by Sidney lumet Cranston has done the. Play before appeared network last year London's national theatre Bryan Bryan Cranston won a Tony award for his New. York stage debut as president Lyndon Johnson in all the way, back in, two thousand fourteen Rockabilly star Laurie Collins, died earlier this month in Reno Nevada.

Bryan Bryan Cranston Johnny Carson Sidney lumet Cranston Sidney Kimmel Angela Anderson Tony award Alanis Morissette EMMY Lyndon Johnson California Howard Beale Beverly Hills Reno Nevada Derek Fisher Lakers burglary London Laurie Collins Mayer David Spade York
"sidney kimmel" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:16 min | 2 years ago

"sidney kimmel" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"News time seven forty eight sixty nine or wet, and, soggy degrees our top stories security is high today in Charlottesville Virginia this weekend for the one year anniversary of the, violence during a white nationalist March that, left one woman dead. Meantime Washington DC is ready for the night a right to rally one hundred people expected to gather in Lafayette square near the White House and in Matt a. Pan and other shooting, man shot in his home on Manchester street several times last night he was, taken to an area. Hospital where he was pronounced dead The, former Malibu, stayed of Johnny Carson, is on, the market, as correspondent Angela Anderson reports the. Forty year old home has stellar views of the ocean guest house Jim and a, pavilion California state, that once belonged to Johnny Carson is being sold for sixty five million dollars the Malibu home was built in nineteen seventy eight Carson bought the estate in nineteen Eighty-four for nine and a half million dollars a day for about twenty years the third band to host the tonight. Show died in two thousand five at the age, of, seventy nine the home is currently owned by fashion mogul and film producer Sidney Kimmel and his wife singer John Mayer's, Beverly Hills home ransacked and robbed this, weekend police say the. Thief came in through a bedroom window and took some pricey items including music equipment watches and other stuff worth about two hundred thousand dollars mayor joins a list. Of celebrity burglary victims. In the last year that includes Atlanta's Morissette EMMY Rossum David Spade And former LA Lakers Derek. Fisher and Byron Scott actor Bryan Cranston is heading back to, Broadway to, portray Howard Beale in, the stage, adaptation of, network the play is based on. The nineteen Seventy-six movie directed by Sidney lumet cranston's done the play before he's appeared, in network last, year at London's national theatre Bryan Cranston won a Tony award for his New York stage debut as president Lyndon Johnson in all the way back in two thousand fourteen Rockabilly star. Laurie Collins died earlier. This month in.

Johnny Carson Bryan Cranston Sidney lumet cranston Pan White House Morissette EMMY Rossum David S Sidney Kimmel Howard Beale Charlottesville Virginia Washington Lafayette square Lyndon Johnson Tony award Laurie Collins burglary Beverly Hills Matt Angela Anderson Lakers
"sidney kimmel" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"sidney kimmel" Discussed on Here & Now

"A medical mystery and marlena orla is one of the doctors trying to solve it she's an oncologist at the sidney kimmel cancer center at jefferson health and philadelphia dr orlov do we have any idea why these cases are connected to these two areas no we don't and certainly that's you know obviously why there's some ongoing investigations you know we we see this cancer every day so even though the cancer is quite rare it's not necessarily rare to us however whenever i meet a patient i always ask them if they know anyone with the cancer and very commonly the answer is no i don't know anyone with cancer i didn't know you could get melanoma in your eye so obviously you know to our surprise we're really dealing with these two situations now where there's a number of people in the same community who have this rare cancer who know each other you calling it a cluster so we're we're not calling it a cluster and that's really because the term cluster is really a term from epidemiology and in order to really cl something as a cluster you need to have what's called in observed incidents higher the knick than the expected incident so really for any disease you would look to an area and look and see what the expected incidents would be and then if you're observed incidence is higher than that then you could potentially call it a quote unquote cluster but for a number of reasons we've not been able to prove that in these two situations part of the reason is because not all of the patients were living in the state at the time of diagnosis some have to do with the fact that they were diagnosed out of state in the cases might have not made it back or in a lag time in reporting so unfortunately we have not been able to really statistically prove that these are quote unquote clusters however we do think that the accumulations are of interest well concerning and the numbers keep climbing so that term cluster might yet come but we know for instance as we said three of the patients were in the same or neighboring sororities.

sidney kimmel cancer center jefferson health dr orlov marlena orla
"sidney kimmel" Discussed on Vogue Podcast

Vogue Podcast

03:45 min | 5 years ago

"sidney kimmel" Discussed on Vogue Podcast

"And I thought you know, what I'm gonna get quite grace. What's your fabric and to some cover-ups? It's great if you'll cozy I always love how a feels. So I did. So I started to make some tops. I made some cocoons. And then I thought wait, let me do skirt. Let me do jacket. Let me do dress. I'll do again. And before I knew it. I had thirty six pieces. And I thought I am not putting in the store. I'm not gonna look at Bloomingdale's. Having these full page ads with my stuff somebody else's name. And I'm trying to pay rent here. I am not doing that. So I put it in the back and. I thought I need some professional advice. So I contacted womenswear and I said I need help. And Michael Cody came to new said Colson people to come talk to you. I don't know if they're gonna like it, whatever it is. So Sidney Kimmel comes and I asked a friend of mine who was a lawyer. What do I don't know? What licensing is what this is. What do you ask? And he said here six questions to ask. So we sit down and Sydney says well, can I see the collection? I said actually, no you can't I said, I'm not ready to show. I'm not ready to show you the collection. This is how much didn't know. Right. And he said, well, okay womenswear seems to be very enthusiastic about this. So I'll trust them on it. And he said, you know, would you like to make a deal with me? And I said, yes, I get my notebook little stenographer notebook. And I said, okay. I would like six percent royalty on this. And I would like a minimum Garrett. Not. And I would like three percent for advertise. And and he said, okay, two weeks later, we had a deal. For many many many years. Yeah. It was so different from everything at the time that there were it was it was a time. Also when department stores were super healthy and made a ton of money. And there weren't these things called markdowns and stuff like that. And the buyers were on the floor selling, and we did huge huge business, and it was a fantastic experience. And I learned so much from working with Jones and Harrell, it was an incredibly structured company, and it really sort of taught me how to have a very structured. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. That's amazing. I cannot believe that it was Jones about let's talk about Michael Kors. He actually nominated you for. How's it feel to be acknowledged by such successful American fighters? Michael, Gordon, he's a big in there. And then he. The grace to acknowledge as amazing. Speaks so many values about who. He is that he nominate you. Well, I, you know, I'm on the board, and we were kind of going over all the categories. And so I'm thinking about the lifetime achievement. I'm thinking thinking, and then he first of all he's also hysterically funny. We have to say that makes him even more incredible. And so he says something extremely funny and witty and like, I know she's here. I don't wanna say anything. But are we not aware that norms here? And I was like oh my God. Oh my God. What is he saying? And he was extremely generous. And everybody was very generous. He's a he's very special special person. I think it's great..

Gordon Michael Michael Kors Jones Sidney Kimmel Michael Cody Colson Sydney lifetime achievement Garrett Harrell three percent six percent two weeks