17 Burst results for "Siddall"

"siddall" Discussed on VUX World

VUX World

07:56 min | 4 months ago

"siddall" Discussed on VUX World

"And that was across the entire store estate. And one of the other interesting things is that although the business case was only built for store calls, initially. One of the interesting things is we then pretty quickly started to then leverage the same technology for calls to our contact centers as well. So from the commerce site, all the numbers that come off the ecommerce site, we then started to leverage taking the same approach. We'd use for stores, interestingly off, totally different contact reasons that we get when someone's trying to ring the store versus someone who's trying to get some of the same, but we have to build a slightly different intent model at first. So we had two intent models going to star one and out what we referred to as a contact center one. And then over time, we've merged those into a single intent model where we leverage and things we know about the call to sort of infer what is which intent it's most likely to be dependent on where you call in from. Interesting, interesting. So how is it performing? You mentioned they obviously put together the business case, went through the whole process. Inevitably it's a living breathing thing now that's been implemented and maybe we'll get onto the next steps around the API access and integrations and stuff like that. What were the results essentially against the business case? Yeah, so if you look at the store business case, I think our sort of self service call servicing objective wasn't massively ambitious. We were sort of looking at sort of 10%. Of course, that we were trying to get in there. The primary use case was called accurately route the call. And that was achieved. At the end, really quite soon in the project really. So we were, as I say, we were getting that intent utterance accuracy up to the high 80s by the end of two or three months and in the intense that we had. And then that was pretty much the objectives achieved for the store piece. Now, obviously then you say it's a little thing. We then moved into the contact center piece, which was a different thing we were trying to achieve. That was sort of more focused on, well, accuracy of rooting, you know, one of the interesting things is there is that traditional DTMF IVRs, which everyone who works in telephony and contact centers will be familiar with. We had across our lives here, we had a number of DTMF IVRs. You ring this number, you get 6 options, choose an option. Off the back of that. One thing that really great brought home was that how pull traditional IVRs are actually. Doing what they're trying to do, which is trying to sort of go, you're trying to do that. Why is this person calling and getting them to the right place? So we went, for example, we had several at two or three IVRs, each with three to 6 options. Depending on where you call him out furniture, was it about store? Was it about ecommerce type activity? We, when we did our model, we then went from that number of options to a 160 different intents. And that just sort of then gets it across this to how it's nearly impossible to build a DTMF IVR that will cater for all of those scenarios that are customers got in their head when they ring you. And everyone will be used to this in terms of when you get an idea. You got your intent, what you're trying to do in your head. And what you're trying to do is you're listening to the options on the IVR. And this is the best case scenario. Some people just click one and take their chances. You listening to the options and you go in, does what I'm trying to do match option one better or does it match option three better? And so that's sort of my coping mechanism. But it just brings home the fact that how really inefficient they are doing this type of thing. If you take a look at all your contact reasons and then go, how do you build an IVR for all those contact reasons? Without completely overloading someone with huge messages, huge companies have allowed that they're just not going to say that. And that's a value of conversation in general, to be honest. Because you could argue that a website is the same thing. You've only got so much screen real estate. You can only have so many menu items before people get overwhelmed or whatever. Then the challenge is, how do you then deal with the breadth of language? And I think that there's a lot of companies that are a little bit afraid of that because they think it's a really big challenge. How are we going to try and understand everything that someone could possibly see? When you think about it, though, as a business, how could you not go through that exercise? Because you will have insects now on what your customers are actually talking to you about what the actual real needs are and you'd have categorized and quantified those, whereas other companies that haven't gone down this path haven't, they just think that a web click on a web on a menu item is a signifier of interest and intent when it's not really, because the relying on the label what the label is called. And whether that's translated into the mind of the user. So the challenge seems big, but it's almost like I'm bound to say this because I'm hugely biased, but it almost seems like an inevitable challenge that has to be gone through. Does it not? Yeah, I mean, and as well. And that's just talking about getting the contact, the customer to the best place to actually answer that question. So even if you're not trying to automate anything, that's a huge challenge for contact centers anyway, be it in voice has some additional challenges with cognitive load versus a website in terms of time and stuff like that. But it's a challenge anywhere. And that's even before you then start thinking about how do I then look at opportunities to automate these contacts because you can not automate a contact until you've understood what it is that customer is actually trying to achieve and you can not do that in the voice channel. Website slightly different, but you are again, as you say, you rely on a person looking at all the information that's available there and making the right judgment based upon what your information you're giving them there on the screen and conversational interfaces is just better at getting to the heart of the problem. Yeah, definitely. In order to do that automation and understanding the front end is one thing, understanding what someone's talking about and what their query is and understanding and being able to classify that intent is one thing. The other thing is being able to have the infrastructure and the career capabilities to be able to facilitate that automated transaction, you kind of alluded to this earlier on around the next step being working more closely with the developers and our kind of stuff. How much of that window have you been shed light on the current situation at M and S in any kind of advice you would have on companies approaching that automation stage and the importance of having your kind of House in order when it comes to those API availability and all that kind of stuff. Yeah, I mean, obviously it depends on your organization. M and S being around for so long, we suffer from what a lot of companies suffer from.

"siddall" Discussed on VUX World

VUX World

07:10 min | 4 months ago

"siddall" Discussed on VUX World

"Here and there. How was the kind of process around the kind of gradual implementation? Because some organizational cultures have a culture which is very much about the kind of Big Bang approach. Spend months of developing it, then Big Bang launch, other companies have that more of an agile culture whereby there are more interested and up for doing a more incremental rollout. With conversational AI, it's very difficult to do a Big Bang report because especially if you're starting chord with no data whatsoever, you need to do an exercise together that train and be it through call recordings or as you launch it and capture in live data. And then you need to then prioritize that on you. So which ones are we going to start with, which calls are we going to root first? Which ones are we going to introduce kind of some degree of self service with first? And then when you've done that, you've then got the incremental improvement of the models on top of it. So it's very difficult to have that kind of Big Bang approach. Yeah, a lot of organizational cultures work in that way. So I wonder whether you might share a little bit around how M and S and the culture and from your involvement in the project was that kind of incremental approach did it take some kind of convincing or was it as M and S already got that kind of incremental culture? MS in terms of, I guess, our product teams, we have that in terms of in agile methodology anyway. I think even outside of. Conversation I think as a general culture with a test and learn principle and that's what we try and we try and do part of that I think comes from the sort of M and S as a company in terms of we've always got customer in the front of our minds when we're doing this type of stuff. So there is a little bit of a fierce sometimes then to this is such a big change for customers and especially with the nature of M and S customers, historically, maybe they had a slightly older demographic than. You new ecommerce retailers and in the marketing, perhaps a younger demographic. So I think there's always that care aspect in terms of we want to go carefully with this type of stuff. Let's do it on a smaller scale first of all and grow from there once we start seeing what sort of response we're going. So one of the measures that we actually had at the start was one of the things we were worried about, what would people actually willingly interact with the bots? So interesting enough, that was one of the things that we had at the start was what percentage of people just didn't say anything when we asked them. The question. And then we then sort of initially, we went, okay, well, if they've not said anything, we'll just send you three through to a colleague. Fine. And then over time, gradually we introduce a follow-up question to sort of go, sorry, didn't hear that. Could you tell us why you're calling today? And then we got an extra. We got an incremental increase in people who then interacted with we're willing to interact with the service. And then again, over time, we then go and I think we started at like 30% of people just didn't say anything. But what is interesting is over time as people get used to it, because obviously you can see the same, we've got a lot of people who ring once a week, customers lies. You see more and more people then getting used to it. What are the interesting things we saw was that you asked a question, especially when you first make the change in the first time a customer encounters this new experience. Get a lot of people hanging up. And then what we noticed was that the ring back a few minutes later. And then they say something. And I think what it was was that people were, they weren't expecting it. They didn't actually know what to say. And then they sort of go away. Have a bit of a think about what they were going to say and then bring back. And then they were very articulate. They were quiet. It was quite articulate. And it's interesting as well. Some people complete opposite that, and then we would get in sort of a bit of it. We were getting sort of a couple of paragraphs. So there was one I remember particularly where we got a story of why they said, oh, I went into so I bought this jacket, but I got a jacket at home. It started its tag on. And watch it want to know, and that was what we're interested in. And that makes it really difficult for the CAI because it's got this what's going on here. There's all sorts of things that this particular call is talking about. But people do learn how to use the technology over time. As well. So that was quite interesting. But I think that I couldn't imagine M and S doing something like this as a Big Bang approach because it's too risky. And we can move quite quickly once we've got a little bit of information. It's sort of, let's learn a little bit, see what we find out. Make a change. And we can add new functionality in quite quickly as we move along the journey. But we got our first intent model after the intent capture. We had an intent model within four weeks. Once we started with this sort of low number of stores, we had that intent model, and it was live. It wasn't routine, but we were able to start measuring its quality, how good it was. And we actually started routing, I think, within a couple of months. And then over time, then growing and growing and growing and growing, but we sort of, where we're now, where we're at now is sort of now we need more support from the new traditional development teams because to get the full value now, we need to start integrating with APIs for better or the tracking for amending orders for the stuff that way you've got to do your, it's not just about surfacing some information. It's actually about linking it to you as an individual. Yeah, definitely. How long did you do that initial data capture piece for? And four weeks. All right, so you've had the four weeks of initial data capture plus four weeks of building an intent model plus a period of time where you were just basically running the intent model for not escalating just checking attack you were seeing it improve it and stuff like that and then eventually rolled out the ultimate. The whole project to sort of get it to its initial business case business case with 6 months. We moved pretty quickly in that first month or two where we were started to route at the end of month two..

CAI
"siddall" Discussed on VUX World

VUX World

06:29 min | 4 months ago

"siddall" Discussed on VUX World

"Is my order might have been delivered anyway? Yeah. Yeah, of course, yeah, yeah. There's something to be said maybe for ultimate and emails using some NLU solutions, but the challenges that they tend to be tend to draw on a little bit. So you need to do a lot of work in trying to realize which part of the email is important. But yeah, that makes total sense of that. So to wrap up on the chatbots out of things, it sounds as though it's definitely solving a real problem around the Q&A and that kind of stuff. I think you mentioned that it's starting to get into transactional use cases here and there. You're working on making it more proactive and stuff like that. What's the kind of impact being on the business from having that chapter in place? How does the business determine whether it's working? Yeah, so we've got a number of number of measures. And these are sort of continually evolving. So interestingly enough, we've been in the last year, we sort of moved away from the nuanced chatbot to a different bar. And that's got some that's allowed us to achieve a better service rate, I guess, you know, successful service service rate book. I think probably what, over time, we've sort of evolved this. So when we started with this, we looked at it very simplistic, but as in, well, if you've not, if you've not escalated out of the bar, clearly problems been started, whereas it's not quite that it's not quite that clear cut. So you can't just look at transfer rates to escalations to colleagues. So what we might then do, what we then do is we sort of look at other things that indicate that so, for example, we'll ask a question at the end of that conversation. Just as we do with a colleague, but we might then, but we ask different questions. So for example, for our chatbot, we sort of ask, well, did we answer your question? As opposed to a colleague post and post interaction survey would be more around a traditional brand and we are colleague and PS as well. But that's we use that in conjunction with okay. Well, this is the transfer rate out of that particular journey. But what are these other things that are saying that they're saying, you know, what is the what proportion of customers in that journey are saying you've actually answered my question because sometimes what you can get is that frustration with the journey. So a customer just gives up on the conversation because they feel it's not, it's not working for them. And then they might appear down in a lot of the contact channel. So what we've started to do now is sort of look at those, okay, well, I've reached out in I've reached out in the chat box or the voice box, for example, it appears that we've answered your question because you've chosen to hang up that journey. You've gone away. But then do we see you appear in another contact channel such as email, within a certain space of time. And then this allows us then to sort of get a more rounded view for just because it's not been transferred. It doesn't mean that we've actually answered you question. And started to look more about how you feel about that conversation as well. So looking at those looking at the conversation itself and looking for sentiment, what's the sentiment off the back of that conversation? And we look and we might be looking for frustration in that conversation. And all these factors then sort of need to be looked at in the round to sort of then judge how well that conversation is going from a customer perspective. As well as combining it with what we're trying to achieve from a business perspective. Nice. Interesting. So on The Voice side of things then. So you mentioned that that project started from looking at how to augment the switchboard and how to make rooting calls more effective, not a kind of stuff. What if you can kind of walk us through that journey? So you've identified a problem that maybe customers are getting either sent to the wrong places. I was ticking up a lot of resource to try and manage these cars. It had a lot of time onto an average call time. Et cetera, et cetera. Where did you start with with how to approach that kind of particular part? Yeah, so it's worth calling out that this was a big project in M and S and I was part of the project, but it was a whole cross functional team that were involved in that. You've got domain experts who know about customer and you've got people who know about how the switchboard work, then you've got technical resource, development teams, and initially this will sort of the problem statement with sort of built collaboratively. Between the business problem and then the tech, the true technical people, sort of went out and looked to see, okay, we think this is possible. We've got a hypothesis to sort of say we can replicate this. We can build this using technology and automate this routing journey based upon what it is you're trying to do as a customer in the lifetime. And a lot of different products were looked at using a lot of different. More managed service style approaches versus you sort of citizen developer type solutions. And there was a lot of work for looking at that and what would be the best, the best thing for our particular use cases. One of the most important things for us as I guess the contact center operations is that we needed to retain quite a lot of control and flexibility in terms of once we deliver this, we have to be able to administer it ourselves and make changes to it quite often at short notice depending on what's happening within a particular store within a particular. Contact reason as.

"siddall" Discussed on VUX World

VUX World

08:08 min | 4 months ago

"siddall" Discussed on VUX World

"What kind of so you mentioned the chatbot there started as a way of handling some customer support and stuff like that. What is the, how are you kind of measuring that? Because you mentioned there that it's quite difficult to determine whether the chatbot does prevent kind of website traffic from the car. So how are you approaching figuring out how the chatbot is performing? Yeah, so what we try and do and there's a lot of tools out there that can do this, I guess that digital insights type piece and there's a lot of website analytics programs available for that. But what we our vision around this, I guess, is sort of more around, okay, well, once you can sort of understand where those journeys are going wrong, do you then have the ability to intervene in those journeys based upon what you understand, where you can sort of go, well, I'm going to intervene in this journey, but I'm not going to intervene in that journey, because it doesn't quite meet the criteria. So what we do is we look at behavioral stuff on the website to sort of go, okay, well, where are customers reaching and a contact journey for example? So they're coming into an email. And so they're emailing us. So can we trace that customer's journey? Back up to the funnel, to sort of understand okay. So this customer here, they came into an email. They actually emailed us. But where did they start? Why are they emailing us? And obviously, you can sort of understand that from the intent of the email, the subject matter, what's in there. But then you have to combine that information with what you know about that journey that that particular person talk to get to that journey. And the same applies for voice, the same applies for a chat. And that's where we sort of got a good understanding of what's going on around the help pages. But we want to grow that level of understanding is what did they do before they got to the help page, and then did that did not trigger a contact start outside of the website. So for example, as with any sort of ecommerce retail, where's my order is obviously a huge driver for contacts and in our operations. And that trigger for that customer to contact us. Probably doesn't happen on the website because they bought the product two or three days ago or some weeks ago. So everything up to that point went well. They didn't have to contact a sport where they have to then decide to make a contact who was because they're waiting for the audience. It's not arrived on time. Then we need to be able to leverage that information when that customer is coming into that where's my older journey so that we can sort of go and that's where you can start to do some really kind of stuff if you've identified that person. You can sort of leverage that to change the either the author or what you're actually saying to the person so for example, if we know that you have ordered something and we can see it's not it was meant to be delivered at a certain time certain day we see you coming into that coming into that journey can we then leverage that information to sort of give you a more tailored start to that conversation to sort of go high speed we can see you've ordered this product with us. Are you contacting us to sort of find out where this is? Where we can sort of start to really then so the customer doesn't have to tell us. We sort of trying to inform them about what we think is most likely they're going to be contacting us about similar stuff. Maybe stuff that's going on in stores as well. Where a customer might have purchased something in store. Interesting. We had a conversation with kishore already from CTO of yellow AI. And he was talking about in this case where it's almost like the reverse or the back end of what you've discussed there, so rather than somebody coming onto the website. You've already got some information about them. You can preempt what their query might be about and then deliver that proactive kind of interaction. He was talking about a situation where the kind of customer is engaging with the chatbot, then decides to drop out for whatever reason. And then using that kind of data is that in the right place to drop out, did they get to the end of a conversation? And if not, triggering like a follow-up SMS text, this is we know you got to hear. Do you want to continue the conversation here? And so I kind of got me thinking a little bit about using other modalities and other channels to your advantage. And as you were kind of explaining there, someone mix an order of deliveries later, whatever. The chatbot needs to understand where to go to look for the information that says Italy and what the new expected delivery data is. So I suppose there's a question around is there a time when you think that other channels may be used to support that chatbot? Because for example, there's no reason why that couldn't be a proactive text message that says, hey, sorry, we know your package is delayed. It's going to be arriving within the next days. How is your thoughts thinking around the usage of other channels and that kind of omnichannel automation journey? Yeah, I mean, we definitely feel that like more proactive journey generation is definitely going to play a part in our strategy so that obviously it's doing a lot of the standard stuff to sort of go and your order is not going to arrive on time and stuff like that in conjunction with our delivery partners. But then one thing that we think there's an opportunity there, but we need to do a lot of work to sort of understand it more. What a better journey than be inviting that customer into a conversation with either a colleague or some sort of some sort of art to sort of help them should they choose to reach out with that as opposed to sort of leaving it very open to sort of go, well, we let you know that there's a problem, but we're not giving you we've not suggested the best, the way that we might want you to get in touch with us if you see what I mean. So leave it open to a customer. They'll choose whatever suits them, which might not be the best way to service them from that perspective, and it also might not sue M and S as a business. We might want to direct certain customers to a particular channel. It's also to do with the time of day as well, you know, some of the stuff that we're looking at in terms of not specifically with conversational AI, but where if you look at contact as options on the website, what we want to do is sort of offer the best the best way of contacting those dependent on what should I actually what's going on in the contact center right now. So if we know wait times on voice at three, four minutes or so, but we know charts quite it. We then leverage that information to then offer the most approach offer a different contact option dependence on what it is you want to contact us about. For example, we still got a lot of customers who get in search with us about where's my order. Via email. But email obviously because of its nature, it tends to be it's going to be sometimes up to 24 hours before we get back to you. So would a better journey to be off earth offer a where's my order? Intent would that be better sent into a real time channel because then we can actually give you the information in real time because quite often by the time we get to an email saying, why.

kishore Italy
"siddall" Discussed on VUX World

VUX World

07:52 min | 4 months ago

"siddall" Discussed on VUX World

"I'm just going to get rid of this cable. Where we're going to be talking to Steven siddal, who is the contact systems leader, M and S, marks and spencers. For those of you that don't know mouse and Spencer's is one of the UK's largest retailers has been using conversational AI for quite some time in a bunch of different channels and we're going to be climbing into exactly how would you use what the lessons have been from Steven and his team and how you can apply the same lessons to improve your conversational AI initiatives. But before we do that, I'd like to give a shout out to deep Graham, Dave Graham is industry leading speech recognition technology. Companies up and down the world and all over the place I use in deep grams proven industry proven automatic speech recognition to power a conversational AI voice bots and a whole manner of other transcription requirements from call recordings and transcriptions to meetings and transcribing meetings and assigning actions to people automatically in a whole bunch of other things can be enabled further down the pipeline, but it all starts with getting accurate transcription, especially when you're working with voice assistant technology. Most organizations don't even read in their speech recognition models and they wonder why their bots not perform as good as it could. And so with deep gram you can retrain your models based on your specific industry demand based on the weather your customers speak based on your products and services, the accuracy is immense. It's incredibly cost effective. The speed is unbelievable as well. So do check out deep gram dot com forward slash VU X world if you do have some speech recognition or ASR requirements that is deep gram dot com forward slash VU X world shout out to deep ground. Okay, so without further ado, let's welcome today's guest Steven sidon of Martin Spencer, Steve. Welcome. Nice to meet you. Nice to see you. Yeah, likewise. Likewise, how's things? Good, thank you. As always. Yeah, that's where we like it. No rest for the wicked as they say. Well, thanks for joining us. I appreciate you joining us. I know that you've all been busy, and I know that you've got a whole lot of stuff on your plate, especially when it comes to the conversational AI side of things. A lot of stuff going on at M and S, a lot of players spinning and stuff like that, but I'm definitely excited to share with the audience today a little bit about what you're up to and stuff. So maybe it's a kick it off, be good to maybe introduce yourself. And for those who are maybe a bit further revealed, might not be aware of marks and Spencer in the U.S. and broadly and other parts of Europe and whatnot. Might be interesting also to just introduce M and S at the same time. Yeah, it's just a bit of an estimate. So yeah, so if you're familiar with M and S, so M and S is been around for a long time in the UK since the late 1800s. And we started as a sort of a penny bizarre in lead market and grow from there really. And we've got a long tradition of in the UK of being synonymous with quality, innovation, and we operate in a number of international markets as well. But broadly, we're in the retail space. Clothing, home, food, and all that, all that good stuff that everyone likes, really. There's an interesting story on the website of our history about one of the first retailers to sell avocado pairs. In the UK and there's a story, I don't know, it's true on it, but there's a story of a customer who tried to serve this avocado pair with custard. Quite interesting. But I was having a lot before this. There's quite a lot of recipes now for avocado pairs with custard on the Internet. Really? Yeah. Avocado pears. Are you talking about two avocados or a certain type of avocado pear? No, another cando has in the stuff you make the guacamole for them. All right. All right, well, wow. Interesting. Interesting. Avocado, of course, I don't know if I would mind you, banana, because it goes well. So the thing is, it's interesting, but yeah, that's sort of a bit better. I'm an S really. So a bit about myself. So I've worked in contact centers for about 30 years now in a variety of different sort of organizations, you know, worked embedded in the operation, at worked for third party suppliers, I've worked for outsourced contact center operations for all broadly always in the field of the systems that sit around contact centers to use as we make contact centers work. I've been with M and S about 6 years and about four years ago is sort of where we sort of started our conversation AI journey. But I've been exposed to it on and off in my career before it was even known as conversational AI in the days where, to be able to leverage speech, you had to be able to code. Voice XML and all that kind of stuff. Yeah, yeah. Interesting. So where did your first kind of exposure or interest come from in this field then? As far as M and S goes. So we've sort of had a we started so I guess with the nuanced chatbot. About 5 years or so ago and that's sort of involved over time and that was sort of very much in the chat area. About two or three years ago, we started on our voice journey and that was for a very, very specific use case to do with our store estate, where we believe there was an opportunity in the way that we set up our stores. And so the historically what happened is we ran an M and S store, you sort of went through to 13 sort of centralized switchboards, and that was sort of a room in a number of stores across the UK, where someone would answer the car, answer your call, and ask you what you wanted to what you were trying to do. And they would take that information and then broadly speaking, always just transferred you on manual transfer to the right area of M and S, that might be within the store. It might be to us to the contact center operation or it might even be to a third party. And that was sort of locked up. We felt that there was an opportunity there to sort of go, okay, well, could we take that switch forward operation and turn that into an automated way of where someone could actually say what it was that they wanted to do? And then we would transfer that call to the right place. And that sort of where we started on our I guess our natural language voice journey as it were. Interesting. And what was the kind of behind that was it that you had lots of these switch boards dotted around all over the place and the experience was a bit inconsistent. What was the conversation? It was a lot of things driving it, a lot of benefits that we built into the business case. And some of it was about, okay, well, some of it was about leverage. Was the destination we were sending like that call to that contact to the right, the best place to service it. So we always had that sort of customer service element in there. And consistency is obviously quite important about that. Anyone who works in contact centers is aware that when you're trying to work with people, sometimes there's a lot of processes that set around see what those colleagues are doing, measuring their effectiveness, you know, you're always sort of looking at colleague transfers in a contact center. And we felt that having a bot doing that for us was in way of both consistently and efficiently efficiently sort of getting that done really. And that was sort of a bit of a gateway then to was there other ways then that we could then improve the customer journey by trying to automate those conversations a little bit more and getting the getting.

Steven siddal UK Steven sidon Martin Spencer Spencer Dave Graham Steven Graham Steve Europe U.S.
"siddall" Discussed on WBUR

WBUR

03:57 min | 1 year ago

"siddall" Discussed on WBUR

"Will know what the states are. That is for California Governor Gray Davis. Governor Davis. Thank you so much for talking with us. My pleasure, Michel. You're listening to NPR news. For a lot of workers. It's been a year of questions about the future. And that's also true of office workers who may not be on the front lines, but I've still had to adjust to new realities. If you're someone who's been working from home, you might now be asking Can I continue to do so? Can I split my time between home and office permanently? NPR's live kid has been thinking about the shift to a hybrid work schedule and has some tips on how to make it work. Here's NPR's Andrea Hsu. First thing to know about hybrid work, not everyone is going to be able to do it. Some bosses have embraced the idea. Others have already asked people to be back at their desks full time. Saddam nearly is a professor at Harvard Business School and author of the book Remote Work Revolution, succeeding from Anywhere. Fortunately, Neely says, there has never been a better time to speak up about what you need to be happy and productive at work. I think people have proven and even the words that I use nowadays is they have earned the right to ask for flexibility. So our first tip is about how to ask for flexibility. Be prepared to make your case and expect a negotiation. Teresa Horton is a vice president at the tech company Cisco, she says it's always good to start with an open conversation. My recommendation is to start with all of the things that you are excited about with your job with your company and that you appreciate because I think it's important that they know you're coming from a place of I want to find a compromise that works and then from there, just explaining what your concerns and needs are for you to continue moving forward. Okay? Assuming you've gotten some kind of go ahead, let's move on to our second tip. Connect with your colleagues early and often and be intentional about it. We all missed the spontaneous moments that just happened in the office. The off the cuff gut checks the quick chats in the lunch line, while Larissa Horton says You can bring those moments back in a hybrid work setting many messaging apps have a feature that allows you to update your status. You know whether you're online and available or away. Horton uses that whenever she needs a quick vent session or brainstorm, I can find someone who's free and say, Do you have five minutes? That's super helpful, and that's the stuff that people try to replace with scheduled meetings. But then we just got caught in, like 12 hours of scheduled meetings and really, you needed five minutes. Frequent check ins with your boss are also important when you're not face to face every day, Siddall Neely says. Don't wait for your six month review. People have to have these active conversations. The onus is both on managers and employees to make sure that they happen. Third tip. Now, if you're splitting your time between home and office, make sure your workspace works for you in both places. The last thing you want is to be your own tech support every day. Of course, replicating your office set up at home can cost money, especially if you're someone who has say a standing desk, Horton says. It's worth finding out. If your company has a budget for such items, she says many companies may be saving money by not having everyone in the office all the time. So it's really taking that savings and reinvesting it into a workplace that is designed for hybrid workers that is designed for people who are going to be coming in and out. Now, a last tip from Professor Neely Build trust with your colleagues, and that starts with being reliable. Do as you say, you show up when you need to virtual or not on time. Follow up, but also get to know your colleagues. Let them get to know you. Although zoom calls from our homes, they gave us a window into each other's lives, and that led to greater empathy..

Teresa Horton Michel Larissa Horton Andrea Hsu Cisco Neely Siddall Neely Horton 12 hours six month Saddam Harvard Business School five minutes second tip NPR Remote Work Revolution Professor first tip Third tip Governor Davis
"siddall" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

05:50 min | 1 year ago

"siddall" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"A week. I lived in a building on by some kind Libyan people who rented rooms to refugees to cheer themselves up. Sid Alana Roommates also error train girls watched video clips of Charlie Chaplin. On the mobile phone. They shared night channel list happiness. He's so goofy, she says. It was nice to laugh. This fragile existence ended when the pandemic hit last spring, said a lost her cleaning job. She couldn't afford food. And worst of all, the trafficking gangs had begun terrorizing her neighborhood brush at me, Mr Shit, but actually the worst years of my life for with these gangs, they do whatever they want with you. Was very desperate on. I tried to find a way out saddles, friends paid a smuggler to take her on an inflatable raft across the Mediterranean to Europe. On April 9th. She squeezed onto the raft with more than 60. Other migrants. She had to cross at least 100 miles of sea to reach the closest European nations, Italy and Malta. The one able suddenly there they were crossing for democracy in Europe. Maybe I can work or even go to school. Maybe I can learn to help other girls like me who have been abused. I'm just going to have lunch with Robert Work, said all huddled with a few women in two babies in the middle of the raft. Young men bundled in thick jacket sat along the edges, shielding the women and babies from the sea's cold waves. The scene is captured on a video taken by another young There were train onboard. Abdou must mood AB deuces. The passengers optimism cracked when the wrath engine stopped two days into the journey. He says. Everyone panicked. A lot of mankind. Without that. He found a way we realized we couldn't control the boat anymore. We were left to the mercy off the waves and the wind. They called Italy's Coast Guard Maltese Coast guard, No one answered. Finally, someone called alarm phone, a human rights group that runs a hotline for migrants stuck it see So in case off distress in the Mediterranean alarm phone volunteers were already on the phone with other desperate migrants in the Mediterranean. Don't have it all. There were four boats and they were all neglected and abandoned. That's my free steal off spokesman for Alarm phone, He says the boats were in a search and rescue zone. That's Malta's responsibility. So his colleagues tried in vain to call Malta's armed forces, and I mean it's incredible, right. It's an emergency hotline and they don't pick it up. When the mall peace finally did answer, they said multi sports were closed due to covert 19, and this is also applied to people in the stress that see that nobody could end to Marty's territory and so on. It was an excuse back on the raft. The passengers were so thirsty somewhere drinking seawater. Abdu remembers two teenage boys who seemed to be hallucinating. They know when the ferry not even believe they jump into the sea and yelled, I'm going home. They were trying to swim toward something that wasn't there. The boys drowned. The raft started taking in water. Said all grab an empty Jerry can and held it close. Look in. Mr Moon has a lot of e. I told myself if we sink then I will hold this and float as long as I can and hope that God will be with me. 12 of saddles, fellow passengers would die on this journey. The sea route between North Africa and Europe is the deadliest in the world for migrants. According to Safar, Miss Haley of the International Organization for Migration, and she notes under international law and maritime Convention states are under the obligation to prioritize saving lives at any cost. But it wasn't the Maltese Navy that showed up to aid saddles raft, but a couple of fishing boats And they took the survivors not to Malta to claim asylum. But back to Libya back to the place adult had fled. I did not want to get off that boat. I tried to hide so the crew wouldn't find me, but they did, and they dragged me out. It turned out that Martha had hired the fishing boats to push the migrants back to Libya. Which is illegal under international law, Vic, you coma kinship very multi. In a televised statement, Prime Minister Robert Abella admitted Malta push the migrants to Libya, although he called it a rescue. Maltese authorities did not respond to NPR's requests for further comment. Malta, Greece and Italy all argue that they cannot take in any more migrants. And that the European Union does not help with resettling. Gillian Triggs of the UN's refugee agency says that's no excuse. These are fundamental britches of refugee law and very worrying. My concern is that as covitz subsides, and it must Eventually, many of these countries will leave these restricted border practices in place. The UN's refugee agency is moving the most vulnerable asylum seekers out of Libya. So I don't know, Wonder what 15 year old saddle is now in a U. N camp in Rwanda, waiting for a third country to take her in And she's got a lawyer, Paul board Olivia, who's suing the Maltese government on behalf of Siddall and the other asylum seekers on her raft, most of whom are still trapped in Libya. The aim is to defend the migrants, but at the end of the day Defend also the right to seek asylum and the rights to life. The pandemic, he says, must not be an excuse to eliminate these rights forever. For NPR news. I'm Joanna Caucasus..

Malta Libya Europe Italy Mediterranean Sid Alana Roommates UN Coast Guard Maltese Coast Maltese Navy NPR Gillian Triggs Robert Work Charlie Chaplin Mr Shit Abdou Rwanda Joanna Caucasus Maltese government
"siddall" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:41 min | 1 year ago

"siddall" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Online. Learn more at progressive dot com or 1 800 Progressive. Now that's progressive and the listeners of KQED. From NPR news. This is all things considered. I'm Mary Louise Kelly and I'm Ari Shapiro. The pandemic has changed nearly everything, including the right to claim asylum. The UN's refugee agency says many countries they're using the coronavirus as an excuse to close borders to migrants. Delay rescues at sea or repeatedly push asylum seekers back to dangerous places. Joanna Caucasus has this story of one teenage survivor and a warning It contains a description of sexual assault. Saddam was 15 years old. Since she's a minor whose life is often in danger. We are not using her full name. She's been on her own since she was 11, and she has been searching for refuge since she was eight. That's when she and her dad fled their native Eritrea and East African country run by one of the world's most repressive governments. Oh, I don't know he didn't handle Maria. I remember. My father said the government was chasing him that he had written something they didn't like, and they wanted to put him in jail. I'm thinking, she says they lived in Sudan for three years, but her father could not find enough work. So they moved again, this time to Libya. Saddle, remembers holding her dad's hand as smugglers, lead them and other migrants across a big desert. Oh, so that even in a way, walked for 10 days, I remember there was very little water and food. My father had diabetes. He collapsed. He died. The smugglers left her dad's body on the side of the road. They told Siddall you belong to us. They litter handed her over to trafficking gangs who sold her toe Libyan men who repeatedly raped her lesson. So we've been gula. They would bring four or five million to abuse me. They also beat me. This was my life saddle escaped at the end of 2019. With the help of a local Libyan doctor. The doctor helped her get to Libya's capital, Tripoli on someone see what happened was that I said, Honey, I found work cleaning a pharmacy for a few hours a week. I lived in a building on the bison kind Libyan people who rented rooms to refugees to cheer themselves up. Sid Alana Roommates also error train girls watched video clips of Charlie Chaplin. On the mobile phone. They shared night channel list happiness. He's so goofy,.

Saddam Libya Maria Charlie Chaplin NPR Sid Alana Roommates KQED Mary Louise Kelly UN Joanna Caucasus Eritrea Ari Shapiro Sudan Siddall assault Tripoli Honey
"siddall" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:20 min | 1 year ago

"siddall" Discussed on KCRW

"To claim asylum. The UN's refugee agency says many countries they're using the coronavirus as an excuse to close borders to migrants. Delay rescues at sea or repeatedly push asylum seekers back to dangerous places. Joanna Caucasus has this story of one teenage survivor and a warning It contains a description of sexual assault. Hello, sir. Dollars 15 years old, Since she's a minor, whose life is often in danger. We are not using her full name. She's been on her own since she was 11, and she has been searching for refuge since she was eight. That's when she and her dad fled their native Eritrea and East African country run by one of the world's most repressive governments. Oh, I don't know He didn't remove you. I remember my father said the government was chasing him that he had written something they didn't like, and they wanted to put him in jail. She says they lived in Sudan for three years, but her father could not find enough work. So they moved again. This time to Libya, said all remembers holding her dad's hand as smugglers, lead them and other migrants across a big desert. Oh, so that even in a way, walked for 10 days, I remember there was very little water and food. My father had diabetes. He collapsed. He died. Smugglers left her dad's body on the side of the road. They told Siddall You belong to us. They later handed her over to trafficking gangs who sold her toe Libyan men who repeatedly raped her lesson. So we'll bill Gula. They would bring four or five men to abuse me. They also beat me. This was my life saddle escaped at the end of 2019 with the help of a local Libyan doctor. The doctor helped her get to Libya's capital, Tripoli on the pharmacy. What was that? I said Hemi e found work cleaning a pharmacy for a few hours a week. I lived in a building and buy some kind. Libyan people who rented rooms to refugees to cheer themselves up. Sit all in a room mates. Also error. Train girls watched video clips of Charlie Chaplin. On the mobile phone. They shared night Char list happiness. He's so goofy, she says. It was nice to laugh. This fragile existence ended when the pandemic it last spring. Saddle lost her cleaning job. She couldn't afford food. And worst of all, the trafficking gangs had begun terrorizing her neighborhood. Brock shopping, Mr Shit, but actually the worst years of my life for with these gangs, they do whatever they want with you. I was very desperate on. I tried to find a way out saddles, friends paid a smuggler to take her on an inflatable raft across the Mediterranean to Europe. On April 9th. She squeezed onto the raft with more than 60. Other migrants she had to cross at least 100 miles of sea to reach the closest European nations, Italy and Malta. The one able suddenly democracy democracy in Europe. Maybe I can work. Even go to school. Maybe I can learn to help other girls like me who have been abused. I'm just someone that I love, Robert Love said. All huddled with a few women in two babies in the middle of the raft. Young men bundled in thick jacket sat along the edges. Shielding the women and babies from the sea's cold waves. The scene is captured on a video taken by another young, There were train onboard abdomen. Mood AB deuces. The passengers optimism cracked when the wrath engine stopped two days into the journey. He says. Everyone panicked. A lot of mankind without the here kind of thing has happened. We realized we couldn't control the boat anymore. We were left to the mercy off the waves and the wind. They called Italy's Coast Guard Maltese Coast guard, No one answered. Finally, someone called alarm phone, a human rights group that runs a hotline for migrants stuck it see So in case off distress in the Mediterranean alarm phone volunteers were already on the phone with other desperate migrants in the Mediterranean. We don't have it all. There were four boats and they were all neglected and abandoned. That's my fairy steal off spokesman for alarm phone, He says The boats were in a search and rescue zone. That's Malta's responsibility. So his colleagues tried in vain to call Malta's armed forces. I mean, it's incredible, right. It's an emergency hotline and they don't pick it up. When the mall peace finally did answer, they said. Multi sports were closed due to covert 19, and this is also applied to people in the stress that see that nobody could enter Marty's territory. Ins on It was an excuse back on the raft. The passengers were so thirsty somewhere drinking seawater. Abdu remembers two teenage boys who seemed to be hallucinating. They know when the federal or even believe they jump into the sea and yelled, I'm going home! They were trying to swim toward something that wasn't there. The boys drowned. The raft started taking in water said all grab an empty Jerry can and held it. Close looking custom E. I told myself if we sink Then I will hold this and float as long as I can and hope that God will be with me. 12 of saddles, fellow passengers would die on this journey. The sea route between North Africa and Europe is the deadliest in the world for migrants, according to Safar, Miss Haley of the International Organization for Migration, and she notes under international law and maritime Convention states. Are under the obligation to prioritize saving lives at any cost. But it wasn't the Maltese Navy that showed up to aid saddles raft but a couple of fishing boats and they took the survivors not to Malta to claim asylum. But back to Libya back to the place adult had fled. I did not want to get off that boat. I tried to hide so the crew wouldn't find me, but they did,.

Malta Libya Europe Mediterranean Italy UN Eritrea Joanna Caucasus Sudan Maltese Navy assault Tripoli Robert Love Coast Guard Maltese Coast Charlie Chaplin International Organization for Abdu Brock shopping
"siddall" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

02:35 min | 1 year ago

"siddall" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"From NPR news. This is all things considered. I'm Mary Louise Kelly and I'm Ari Shapiro. The pandemic has changed nearly everything, including the right to claim asylum. The UN's refugee agency says many countries they're using the coronavirus as an excuse to close borders to migrants. Delay rescues at sea or repeatedly push asylum seekers back to dangerous places. Joanna Caucasus has this story of one teenage survivor and a warning It contains a description of sexual assault. Saddam was 15 years old. Since she's a minor whose life is often in danger. We are not using her full name. She's been on her own since she was 11, and she has been searching for refuge since she was eight. That's when she and her dad fled their native Eritrea and East African country run by one of the world's most repressive governments. Oh, I don't know. He did any, It'll move you. I remember my father said the government was chasing him that he had written something they didn't like, and they wanted to put him in jail. She says they lived in Sudan for three years, but her father could not find enough work. So they moved again, this time to Libya. Saddle, remembers holding her dad's hand as smugglers, lead them and other migrants across a big desert. So that even in a way, walked for 10 days, I remember there was very little water and food. My father had diabetes. He collapsed. He died. Smugglers left her dad's body on the side of the road. They told Siddall You belong to us. They later handed her over to trafficking gangs who sold her toe Libyan men who repeatedly raped her lesson, so it will go up. They would bring four or five men to abuse me. They also beat me. This was my life saddle escaped at the end of 2019 with the help of a local Libyan doctor. The doctor helped her get to Libya's capital, Tripoli on the pharmacy. What was that? I said E found work cleaning a pharmacy for a few hours a week. I lived in a building on by some kind Libyan people who rented rooms to refugees to cheer themselves up. Sid Alana Roommates also error train girls watched video clips of Charlie Chaplin. On the mobile phone. They shared night channel list happiness. He's so goofy, she says..

Saddam Libya Sid Alana Roommates Mary Louise Kelly Charlie Chaplin NPR Ari Shapiro UN Joanna Caucasus Eritrea Sudan Tripoli assault
"siddall" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:45 min | 1 year ago

"siddall" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Explorer tool. Custom quotes and rates are available online. Learn more at progressive dot com or 1 800 progressive Now that's progressive. From NPR news. This is all things considered. I'm Mary Louise Kelly and I'm Ari Shapiro. The pandemic has changed nearly everything, including the right to claim asylum. The UN's refugee agency says many countries they're using the coronavirus as an excuse to close borders to migrants. Delay rescues at sea or repeatedly push asylum seekers back to dangerous places. Joanna Caucasus has this story of one teenage survivor and a warning It contains a description of sexual assault. Hello. Saddam was 15 years old. Since she's a minor whose life is often in danger. We are not using her full name. She's been on her own since she was 11, and she has been searching for refuge since she was eight. That's when she and her dad fled their native Eritrea and East African country run by one of the world's most repressive governments. Oh, I don't know He didn't need a movie. Oh, I remember. My father said the government was chasing him that he had written something they didn't like, and they wanted to put him in jail. She says they lived in Sudan for three years, but her father could not find enough work. So they moved again. This time to Libya, said all remembers holding her dad's hand as smugglers, lead them and other migrants across a big desert. Oh, so that even in a way, walked for 10 days, I remember there was very little water and food. My father had diabetes. He collapsed. He died. Smugglers left her dad's body on the side of the road. They told Siddall You belong to us. They later handed her over to trafficking gangs who sold her toe Libyan men who repeatedly raped her lesson. So we've been Gula. They would bring four or five men to abuse me. They also beat me. This was my life saddle escaped at the end of 2019 with the help of a local Libyan doctor. The doctor helped her get to Libya's capital, Tripoli on someone see what did I said Hemi e. Found work cleaning a pharmacy for a few hours a week. I lived in a building and buy some kind Libyan people who rented rooms to refugees to cheer themselves up. Sid Alana Roommates also error train girls watched video clips of Charlie Chaplin. On the mobile phone. They shared night channel list happiness. He's so goofy,.

Saddam Libya Charlie Chaplin NPR Sid Alana Roommates UN Mary Louise Kelly Joanna Caucasus Eritrea Ari Shapiro Sudan Gula assault Tripoli
"siddall" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

08:26 min | 1 year ago

"siddall" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"From NPR news. This is all things considered. I'm Mary Louise Kelly and I'm Ari Shapiro. The pandemic has changed nearly everything, including the right to claim asylum. The UN's refugee agency says many countries they're using the coronavirus as an excuse to close borders to migrants. Delay rescues at sea or repeatedly push asylum seekers back to dangerous places. Joanna Caucasus has this story of one teenage survivor and a warning It contains a description of sexual assault. Hello, sir. Dollars 15 years old, Since she's a minor, whose life is often in danger. We are not using her full name. She's been on her own since she was 11, and she has been searching for refuge since she was eight. That's when she and her dad fled their native Eritrea, an East African country run by one of the world's most repressive governments. Oh, I don't know He didn't remove you. I remember my father said the government was chasing him that he had written something they didn't like, and they wanted to put him in jail. She says they lived in Sudan for three years, but her father could not find enough work. So they moved again. This time to Libya, said all remembers holding her dad's hand as smugglers, lead them and other migrants across a big desert. Oh, so that even in a way, walked for 10 days, I remember there was very little water and food. My father had diabetes. He collapsed. He died. Smugglers left her dad's body on the side of the road. They told Siddall You belong to us. They later handed her over to trafficking gangs who sold her toe Libyan men who repeatedly raped her lesson, so it will go up. They would bring four or five men to abuse me. They also beat me. This was my life saddle escaped at the end of 2019 with the help of a local Libyan doctor. The doctor helped her get to Libya's capital, Tripoli. On the pharmacy. What e found work Cleaning a pharmacy for a few hours a week. I lived in a building on by some kind Libyan people who rented rooms to refugees to cheer themselves up. Sid Alana Roommates also error train girls watched video clips of Charlie Chaplin. On the mobile phone. They shared night Channel list happiness. He's so goofy, she says. It was nice to laugh. This fragile existence ended when the pandemic it last spring. Said. I lost her cleaning job. She couldn't afford food. And worst of all, the trafficking gangs had begun terrorizing her neighborhood. Brock shopping, Mr Shit, but actually the worst years of my life for with these gangs, they do whatever they want with you. I was very desperate on. I tried to find a way out saddles, friends paid a smuggler to take her on an inflatable raft across the Mediterranean to Europe. On April 9th. She squeezed onto the raft with more than 60. Other migrants she had to cross at least 100 miles of sea to reach the closest European nations, Italy and Malta. The one able suddenly democracy democracy in Europe. Maybe I can work. Don't even go to school. Maybe I can learn to help other girls like me who have been abused. I'm just going to have lunch with Robert Work, said all huddled with a few women in two babies in the middle of the raft. Young men bundled in thick jacket sat along the edges, shielding the women and babies from the sea's cold waves. The scene is captured on a video taken by another young There were train onboard. Abdou must mood AB deuces. The passengers optimism cracked when the wrath engine stopped two days into the journey. He says. Everyone panicked. A lot of mankind without the here kind of thing that has happened. We realized we couldn't control the boat anymore. We were left to the mercy off the waves and the wind. They called Italy's Coast Guard Maltese Coast guard, No one answered. Finally, someone called Alarm phone, a human rights group that runs a hotline for migrants stuck it see So in case off distress in the Mediterranean alarm phone volunteers were already on the phone with other desperate migrants in the Mediterranean. Don't have it all. There were four boats and they were all neglected and abandoned. That's more free, steal off spokesman for Alarm phone, He says the boats were in a search and rescue zone. That's Malta's responsibility. So his colleagues tried in vain to call Malta's armed forces. I mean, it's incredible, right. It's an emergency hotline and they don't pick it up when the mouthpiece finally did answer, they said. Multi sports were closed due to covert 19, and this is also applied to people in the stress that see that nobody could end to Marty's territory and so on. It was an excuse back on the raft. The passengers were so thirsty somewhere drinking seawater. Abdu remembers two teenage boys who seemed to be hallucinating. They know when the ferry not even believe they jump into the sea and yelled, I'm going home. They were trying to swim toward something that wasn't there. The boys drowned. The raft started taking in water said Dog Rabbit Empty Jerry can and held it close. Look in, Mr Move, E. I told myself if we sink Then I will hold this and float as long as I can and hope that God will be with me. 12 of saddles, fellow passengers would die on this journey. The sea route between North Africa and Europe is the deadliest in the world for migrants, according to Safar, Miss Haley of the International Organization for Migration, and she notes under international law and maritime Convention states. Under the obligation to prioritize saving lives at any cost. But it wasn't the Maltese Navy that showed up to aid saddles raft but a couple of fishing boats and they took the survivors not to Malta to claim asylum. But back to Libya back to the place adult had fled. I did not want to get off that boat. I tried to hide so the crew wouldn't find me, but they did, and they dragged me out. It turned out that Martha had hired the fishing boats to push the migrants back. Libya, which is illegal under international law, Vic you coma kinship very multi. In a televised statement, Prime Minister Robert Abella admitted Malta push the migrants to Libya, although he called it a rescue. Maltese authorities did not respond to NPR's requests for further comment. Malta, Greece and Italy all argue that they cannot take in any more migrants and that the European Union does not help with resettling. Gillian Triggs of the UN's refugee agency says. That's no excuse. These are fundamental britches of refugee law and very worrying. My concern is that as covitz subsides, and it must Eventually, many of these countries will leave these restricted border practices in place. The UN's refugee agency is moving the most vulnerable asylum seekers out of Libya. So I don't know, Wonder what 15 year old saddle is now in a U. N camp in Rwanda, waiting for a third country to take her in And she's got a lawyer, Paul board Olivia, who's suing the Maltese government on behalf of Siddall and the other asylum seekers on her raft, most of whom are still trapped in Libya. The aim is to defend the migrants, but at the end of the day Defend also the right to seek asylum and the rights to life. The pandemic, he says, must not be an excuse to eliminate these rights forever. For NPR news. I'm Joanna Caucasus. This'll is NPR news..

Libya Malta NPR UN Italy Joanna Caucasus Europe Mediterranean Siddall Mary Louise Kelly Sudan Eritrea Ari Shapiro assault Gillian Triggs Maltese Navy Robert Work Tripoli Coast Guard Maltese Coast
"siddall" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:24 min | 1 year ago

"siddall" Discussed on KCRW

"To claim asylum. The UN's refugee agency says many countries they're using the coronavirus as an excuse to close borders to migrants. Delay rescues at sea or repeatedly push asylum seekers back to dangerous places. Joanna Caucasus has this story of one teenage survivor and a warning It contains a description of sexual assault. Hello. Saddam was 15 years old. Since she's a minor whose life is often in danger. We are not using her full name. She's been on her own since she was 11, and she has been searching for refuge since she was eight. That's when she and her dad fled their native Eritrea and East African country run by one of the world's most repressive governments. Oh, I don't know He didn't It'll move you. I remember my father said the government was chasing him that he had written something they didn't like, and they wanted to put him in jail. She says they lived in Sudan for three years, but her father could not find enough work. So they moved again. This time to Libya, said all remembers holding her dad's hand as smugglers, lead them and other migrants across a big desert. Oh, so that even in a way, walked for 10 days, I remember there was very little water and food. My father had diabetes. He collapsed. He died. Smugglers left her dad's body on the side of the road. They told Siddall You belong to us. They later handed her over to trafficking gangs who sold her toe Libyan men who repeatedly raped her lesson. So we've been Gula. They would bring four or five men to abuse me. They also beat me. This was my life saddle escaped at the end of 2019 with the help of a local Libyan doctor. The doctor helped her get to Libya's capital, Tripoli. On the pharmacy. What e found work Cleaning a pharmacy for a few hours a week. I lived in a building and buy some kind. Libyan people who rented rooms to refugees to cheer themselves up, said all in a room mates. Also error. Train girls watched video clips of Charlie Chaplin. On the mobile phone. They shared night char list happiness..

Saddam Libya UN Joanna Caucasus Eritrea assault Sudan Charlie Chaplin Gula Tripoli
"siddall" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:57 min | 1 year ago

"siddall" Discussed on KCRW

"I'm Dave Mattingly. Today's the deadline for former President Trump to formally respond to the impeachment charge against him. Trump's trial in the Senate is scheduled to begin next week. The House accuses Trump of inciting insurrection at the U. S. Capitol on January 6 when his supporters stormed the building. Trump is the only president to be impeached Twice Emmy and Tony Award winning actor How Holbrook has died at the age of 95, his assistant says Holbrook died January 23rd at his home in California. Has Jesse Baker reports. Holbrook was a well known character actor on TV and in movies who was likely best known for his one man show about Mark Twain. Mark Tweens. Trademark white Suit was a look How Holbrook war well. He brought Tween toe life for over six decades through abiding monologues. This is his take on Congress from his one man show, Mark Twain. Tonight I had never seen a body of men with tongue so handed And information so uncertain, But they could talk for a week without ever getting rid of an idea from rules and dimly lit parking garages to the White House to civil war battlefields to the wonderful world of Disney. Kubrick was a character actor with great range with Mark Twain at the heart of it all for NPR News. I'm Jesse Baker in New York. This is NPR news from Washington. You're listening to KCRW. I'm cheering laser shoppers and Long beach may soon have fewer places to pick up their groceries. Kroger says one of its royal stores and a food for less Alba in the city will close in April. His KCRW's Larry Parole reports is due to a debate over so called Hero pay. Kroger says the closures are a response to a city ordinance requiring a $4 per our hero pay salary boost for some workers. Last month, Long Beach City Council gave initial approval to the law for companies with 300, or more workers overall and more than 15 employees per location, But the company says it runs afoul of the traditional bargaining process. Broker says they've done their part by investing $1.3 billion this last march to reward associates and implement safety measures in their stores. And now the company is laying the blame on the city, saying the real losers will be store employees and customers. California Groceries Association filed a lawsuit challenging the ordinance, but a judge declined to block it from taking effect. The United Food and Commercial Workers Union blasted Kroger's decision as an attack on employees. Union calls the closures a clear attempt to intimidate and discourage people from standing up for better working conditions for KCRW. I'm Larry Peral. L. A County's recently elected district attorney is getting significant pushback from members of his own staff. The union representing L. A county Deputy D A. S, is taking George Gascogne to court over his policy, the bars Pierre prosecutors in his office. From seeking sentence enhancements in most criminal cases. A hearing on the matter is scheduled for today. Eric Siddall is the vice president of the union, he told kcrw's greater L. A that go scones. New policy violates California's three strikes law, which requires prosecutors to seek longer sentences for defendants with previous convictions. What we're asking, basically, is that the D a followed the law that while we recognize and I think all courts recognized all parties recognize that there is why discretion there are certain things At the D A. Must you and, um This is one of those laws that he must follow. But Gascogne stands by the legality of his decision and says he's prepared to fight the lawsuit and court to have you know a system where you have Individual prosecutors determining when they're going to enforce what lost. They're going to enforce its not what the people voted for. Opponents have started organizing a recall campaign, which Gascogne says he's also prepared to fight..

KCRW Mark Twain Trump United Food and Commercial Wor Kroger Holbrook Jesse Baker George Gascogne president California NPR News Eric Siddall Dave Mattingly Senate Long Beach City Council California Groceries Associati white Suit Long beach Congress White House
"siddall" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:36 min | 1 year ago

"siddall" Discussed on KCRW

"They're to execute the law. Not to create it. And so if Mr Gascon doesn't like the policies that the voters implemented, then he should change the law like everyone else has to do. You mentioned that you, um only took issue. With a couple of pages of the many pages of reforms that Mr Gascogne came out with, right after he was elected and sworn in. What are some of the reforms that you guys like? I mean, we're this this lawsuit is not about whether we like a reform or dislike reform. Lawsuit is really about Whether he has the power to do what he is asking his deputies to Diogo and whether he is putting his deputies. In a position where they have to either follow his directives. Follow the law. You know, contrary to what Mr Gascon has stated publicly, And I think this was an art in an article in the L a times we don't swear loyalty oath to him. To implement what he wants. We swear an oath to the constitution to the state and federal constitution, and we swear an oath to uphold the law. So what We're asking this court to do is make a determination. What do we have to do? Do we have to follow his directives or do we have to follow the law as it is stated Gascon says he's not going to change course I suspect if a lawsuit or a judge or a jury Tells him you have to change course he will change course. But What do your plans for continuing to work? In the D A's office with him and and for him. I mean, do you have a sense of How you're gonna work together, going forward. If if there's this contention going into it, we're only we're not even two months into his administration at the D. A's office. The You know, the contention again is is a Is on a narrow set of his directives. There are many other areas. I think that that's everyone could collaborate on and we can listen to each other and and and find a Better road, but really this, you know, this lawsuit is about certain issues where The law says he does not have discretion. We're asking the court to weigh in because he's exercising discretion where he has left not legally permitted to exercise discretion. Eric Siddall, the vice president of the union, representing Ella's deputy district attorneys, Mr Siddall. Thank you..

Mr Gascon Mr Gascogne Eric Siddall Diogo vice president Ella
"siddall" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:38 min | 1 year ago

"siddall" Discussed on KCRW

"They're to execute the law. Not to create it. And so if Mr Gascon doesn't like the policies that the voters implemented, then he should change the law like everyone else has to do. You mentioned that you, um only took issue. With a couple of pages of the many pages of reforms that Mr Gascogne came out with, right after he was elected and sworn in. What are some of the reforms that you guys like? I mean, we're this this lawsuit is not about whether we like a reform or dislike reform. Lawsuit is really about Whether he has the power to do what he is asking his deputies to Diogo and whether he is putting his deputies. In a position where they have to either follow his directives. Or follow the law. You know, contrary to what Mr Gascon has stated publicly, And I think this was an art in an article in the L a times we don't swear loyalty oath to him. To implement what he wants. We swear an oath to the constitution to the state and federal constitution, and we swear an oath to uphold the law. So what We're asking this court to do is make a determination. What do we have to do? Do we have to follow his directives or do we have to follow the law as it is stated Gascon says he's not going to change course I suspect if a lawsuit or a judge or a jury Tells him you have to change course he will change course. But What do your plans for continuing to work? In the D A's office with him and and for him. I mean, do you have a sense of How you're gonna work together, going forward. If if there's this contention going into it, we're only we're not even two months into his administration at the D. A's office. The You know, the contention again is is a Is on a narrow set of his directives there many other areas. I think that that's everyone could collaborate on and we can listen to each other and and and find a Better road, but really this, you know, this lawsuit is about certain issues where The law says he does not have discretion. We're asking the court to weigh in because he's exercising discretion where he has left not legally permitted to exercise discretion. Eric Siddall, the vice president of the union, representing Ella's deputy district attorneys, Mr Siddall. Thank you. We appreciate it. Thank you so.

Mr Gascon Mr Gascogne Eric Siddall Diogo vice president Ella
"siddall" Discussed on Stories Philippines Podcast

Stories Philippines Podcast

04:59 min | 2 years ago

"siddall" Discussed on Stories Philippines Podcast

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