19 Burst results for "Shishir"

"shishir" Discussed on This Week in Startups

This Week in Startups

02:51 min | 5 months ago

"shishir" Discussed on This Week in Startups

"And his case. It wasn't fifty miles. We literally moved into you. Know the space. Forty seven fifty sandhill. Where's dave a little office right underneath it. We office right. He's like. I want to be able to see what you come in and leave. I want to walk down the hill but the at the time argued with them. I'm like this like this is like so dumb. Like how boston's a great place and so on. And then you ask your later. And i would say there's something different about the The dynamics that allow for silicon valley to exist. It's funny when you to start really getting moving. And we started seeing people building real careers on youtube and so on this weird thing happen a lot of the move to la like a bunch of youtube creator all move. They didn't live in la and then we'll move and we'll why did they do that. Well in fact a lot of them live together. There's a lot of famous romances in marriages and out come out of that crew and but it was you know people like to be a bit around people a little bit density of the community and collisions. And all that that serendipity that occurs. I mean if you go to. There's ten thousand video editors and thousand operators who are available to you today to do a collaborative ration. We are at google at a very time. When i mean speaking and we're gonna date ourselves here but for young folks who are founders. Listening to this podcast used to be you had to come to live within x. Number of miles in your term. Sheet also founders. Who were young. I. i'm founders. Were not allowed to be. Ceo's of their companies and fact larry and surrogate google brought in professional. I'm using air. Quotes here eric schmidt and did a great job. They basically didn't think wall street will take larry surrogate seriously. They brought an eric schmidt. And then you were there with. Larry said you know what. I'm back in charge. I'm the captain now. And he had a view on remote work that he wanted to consolidate all the teams he was like enough of this distributed. Work i want maps and youtube and everybody in the same building and tell that story. Because i think it's pretty instructive. Oh boy this is So so you can be honest about it. Without burning burn relationship. With larry know they larry go to the best parts about larry. Is he tells you exactly what he thinks. And expect the same out of you. There's no there's no holding holding back. And i think is for anybody who spent time with. Larry he can make you think about anything. I mean he's got such a unique way of thinking about things. So as you described in twenty eleven. Larry took over as ceo made a bunch of changes. And he he turned us into business. Units like kinda crazy to imagine that like up to that point. We were like twenty thousand people and all of engineering. The products.

eric schmidt youtube Larry fifty miles twenty thousand people google twenty eleven today thousand operators ten thousand video editors boston larry Forty seven fifty Ceo
"shishir" Discussed on This Week in Startups

This Week in Startups

01:34 min | 5 months ago

"shishir" Discussed on This Week in Startups

"About things like we need to get. We need to make decision decisions. Let's all get on zoom and switch. We need to make this decision. Let's all get in dock. We need to know each other better. Let's let's go. We trust building exercise. We need to like learn a little bit more about each other. Now let's get on zoom. That's actually very remote before this. We were not not this level like we we had. We had three offices in about ten percent of the team spread all over the world and of course now we're are much more so i think we've had ten percent of the company move since we started. Whoa like to other places. My co founder. Now lives in a big ranch in idaho. My like everybody kind of so. They're never coming back on. No they're not coming back because this is this is. Where do you think happens to san francisco. You've been awhile right. Yeah i've been here for almost twenty years on and off the i would say i'm of the i the set of people you know saying that goodbyes on twitter. I think there are pretty small minority. I think i think. San francisco's getting continue to be a very special place. When we started my first companies in trotta. I was living in boston. It was started out. I went to mit. And we were starting it out of school. And i still remember the vinod funded the company but i'll khosla one of his requirements in the term sheet. Was you have to move from boston. Silicon valley you gotta be within fifty miles of his of santo road. It forget this was in the term sheets. There was the turkey and his case. It wasn't fifty miles. We literally moved into you. Know the space. Forty seven fifty sandhill. Where's dave a little office right underneath it. We office right. He's.

idaho boston ten percent san francisco twitter Silicon valley santo road three offices trotta about ten percent San francisco first companies almost twenty years fifty miles turkey Forty seven fifty sandhill one each
"shishir" Discussed on This Week in Startups

This Week in Startups

01:40 min | 5 months ago

"shishir" Discussed on This Week in Startups

"That question for youtube is because this formerly early thing the best ones leave right and so you know what what what are the best people that grew up on on youtube. Where do they actually make their money. I think youtube to take credit for justin bieber and that phenomenon would not exist for a lot of responsibility to be responsible for people's livelihoods and also not know them correct. Buddy mean oh you mean just like oh did in terms of running form like that. Yeah yeah people are dependent upon it. Yeah i mean. I think it's one of the things it's still the case. That youtube is the only truly open platform out there that pays people money at any reasonable level and will pay just about anybody. Money yet said it comes comes with a lot of responsibility. I think i think the team there are now. It's interesting. I i had an old boss told me. Once that every business goes through three phases. I hear a joke. Nobody believes in you. You're a threat. Everybody scared of you and your obvious and every presumes what you're gonna do is going to work and everything flips around and all you can do is wrong and i got to youtube when we were clearly. A joke like you said is big lawsuits. And so on. And i think i I was there and we got the lead it through that joke to threat period. I think i laughed right as it became obvious announced susan in neon scott. Not running running running youtube now. That team is now running through the obvious period. And the interesting thing about what you just said is like the responsibility that comes with with paint people's incomes you know in my face every article about it was like just so excited like can you believe kids.

justin bieber youtube susan things three phases one of Once neon scott
"shishir" Discussed on Juicy Scoop with Heather McDonald

Juicy Scoop with Heather McDonald

02:05 min | 6 months ago

"shishir" Discussed on Juicy Scoop with Heather McDonald

"I'm sorry. I don't think we're going to go there. No i i can't imagine we're talking about it but imagine what a crazy like false. You know life that was. it's almost like anything else. Like a shoot like a gypsy. Shishir school. I'm so sorry i don't have never talked about so i can't imagine what that's like because that wasn't my life but i find it fascinating and it. It's almost like you. Were you know in a little Family cameras almost right after compartmentalize that moment in my life because too heavy right you know going through that almost like you're in a bubble and yeah so when you're secluded in the midwest rain have neighbors right and you're living on you know all this huge farm. You don't have people that tell you what's right and what's wrong. Did you go to a regular school privacy. They ran the school to Lived on religious group. Commune kind of community. Yeah okay because some people would call it a cult. Anyone so what they did on that in that community was very intense. And it's wrong. And in fact i will for the rest of my life work towards shutting them all down because of happened to me okay and my brothers and sisters and all the other kids on the on the on the community and everything that happened there was just wrong so going being where i'm at today and going through what i went through. Was you know something that. I think that any young child should never have to endure and so for me to see them. Raise money and steal and manipulate that religion to me is a joke. And i don't want to say that to some people that believe in christ god because there are the churches out there but when i experienced was not okay so to.

Shishir school midwest
"shishir" Discussed on Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman

Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman

04:22 min | 10 months ago

"shishir" Discussed on Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman

"That good and lots of lots of bad behaviors can happen out of that. Means that that presence and physical locations on all all starts to dominate decision making, which exacerbates things like group think. and. So the behaviors that you're forced to put in with a distributed team are a lot better. Note that she shirt isn't saying that chatting with your co workers at the water cooler or the coffeemaker or in the corridor is a bad thing. Indeed I'd bet the countless great ideas or breakthroughs have been made during these informal chats. But to share is pointing out that we can put rituals on a pedestal and then use this to convince ourselves that making any change is too risky. So, how does CODA replace that water cooler ritual so as to maximize it good aspects and minimize the bad. Humans need a certain level of mutual trust before they can give everybody the benefit of the doubt you need to find ways to do that and getting them together is a good way to do it There's lots of other casualties you can do it to to just encourage people to get to know each other better company work closely with colds. Appier has this tool that we've mimicked where they do. This matchmaking process where you get mattress someone and you do a coffee chat with them and and just kind of find ways to make sure people form bonds. The other one is it really pushes on over communication and so as an example, one of the things I do I started doing it youtube and I still do every Sunday night I ride a a male to the whole team. It's my in my own words summary of what how I feel about what happened the previous week and what I think is happening the next week often full a little bit of you know personal take on things that you know this thing happened and I thought this was great and I really WanNa celebrate this thing didn't or re contextualisation of things. Hey, we just had this major event happen. Here's what you should take away from it. It's an example of how you can create rituals that reinforced company culture and identity. As you scale historical context has lost very quickly and you just presume we've been there for a long time. Everybody must know all these different things and then at the end plus first person that comes into the company has no idea about all those things and I think it's a good example of I think you should probably be doing even if you're not distributed but you are distributed, there's extra reason to do it. Our companies rituals are vital to our success. But they can also keep us locked in the past, which is why we need to constantly ask ourselves, what rituals are we following that are holding us back and what new rituals can we create together that will be inclusive empowering and keep was all accelerating forward. I'm reed. Offman. Thank you for listening. And now a final word from our sponsor capital one business. We always wanted to create something that didn't assume that you had to decouple kindness with success. In fact, we see those two things highly connected. That's now. You'll meet here by off she co-ceo of shine we were just hearing from her co founder Mara lie about how mental health APP has helped users impacted by the pandemic and social unrest for their employees that's meant taking care of each other as well. At weekly reflection, we share one pride, and that can be a shout to the team something that you did one learning to encourage always growing, and it's a way to essentially practice what we preach because you can sometimes forget to take care of yourself. Showings. Weekly reflections helped the remote employees connect with each other a need Chang, saw in their users as well. We saw that there was a massive spike three, hundred percent in community discussions, and that's where we came up with this idea of China together where people can come together specific prompster experiences to share advice around how to better take care of their mental health. We have therapists to help guide the conversation, which is almost emotional networking Jen Gorbachev Commands Naomi an Mara for supporting their community and their team through this challenging time. The work that Naomi and Mara doing shine just incredibly inspiring. The world is recognizing the need for not only these resources but these voices this perspective, the authenticity that they bring to the table and capital one businesses committed to supporting and highlighting black business owners during.

Mara Naomi colds China Appier Jen Gorbachev Chang co-ceo co founder
"shishir" Discussed on Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman

Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman

09:02 min | 10 months ago

"shishir" Discussed on Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman

"Building. Your own rituals is as important as building your product. But if you aren't intentional about the rituals you create, you may find that rituals sprang up on their own like invasive weeds in a garden left unattended. And those unintended rituals can hold you back. I wanted to speak to she shirota about this because it's widely known in Silicon Valley that he helped Youtube scale to what it is today. When she should join Youtube in two thousand and eight, it had around three, hundred, fifty, million visits per month. By the time he left, they had more than a billion and she sheer helped to drive that growth with new rituals that kept the team focused on that audacious goal. Sure. Then brought his ideas about creating rituals to his new startup CODA. CODA lets users create a completely new kind of document with apply elements. It's a bit like up of a text occupant, a spreadsheet and your iphone. We'll get to Kota a bit later in the show. But first let's rewind a bit inches shears life. Straight out of MIT sheer co-founded Centrale a cloud computing startup. Then, he joined Microsoft in two thousand and two and work on office among other things in two thousand and eight sheer moved to Google taking on a role. That's a bit of a head scratcher. He was head of TV at Google. But very soon, she was working on Google's new acquisition. It was a deal that raised a lot of eyebrows. Youtube was not obvious at the time you to was in fact, many people looked at it as Google's first mistake now spent one point six, billion dollars on a company that was known for grainy videos, big lawsuits, copyright issues, cat videos it seems hard to believe now but at the time, the acquisition of you to was seen as Google's folly. Youtube had only just launched and shears moved to Youtube was also met with raised eyebrows. Multiple, thought is primary competition was a company called my space and a company called flicker, and so the idea of getting up and comparing youtube to. ESPN and Disney and so under sounded stupid and crazy. Sheer, sounded crazy to some. Right I ended up using this phrase that ended up being my calling card for the next few years was that online video would do to cable cable to broadcast. Broadcast was three channels cable was three hundred channels, and my view is that we're going from three to three hundred, three million channels. This is just history repeating itself. Tusha Shear. It was obvious that Youtube had the wind at its back, but that was not necessarily a good thing in his book when you have a tailwind, a couple of good things happen you get this amplification effect. So everything you do all of a sudden just seems genus and better than you would have expected. The other thing you get is a covers, tons of mistakes when the wind at your back you SORTA, don't have to hit the inside straight in order to make things work. There's a word for relying on your tailwind. Coasting. Coasting you just along doing things you doing because you seem to be winning. But meanwhile your competitors are experimenting with new ways to do things and before you know it though pull ahead. Sheer New Youtube had to stop relying on that tail when alone to keep ahead and once we realized that, hey, this tailwind, the tail one we have is on video is going to do to cable cable broadcast and here's this trend that were writing. Now, we had to take every philosophy and every system in lean into it tailwinds really matter and once you recognize it, you got to reshape your whole organization towards. However, some of Shears team wanted to follow the lead of Youtube is new parent. The simple framing of it was he come to Youtube at the time and you search for something we would return all the results could on youtube and that was that if we had it, we had it and we didn't. We didn't. There was a part of the team that was very focused on. Hey by Google, we should just give people the right results modern family is hosted on ABC dot com, which is tell people go ABC dot com the marketing and content partnerships team said look if you keep sending traffic off of youtube than going to come back and we're never gonna get that content on Youtube if we just drew people to it. Sheeran his team took an in depth look at the new rituals users creating not just around watching videos, but around searching general to work out how they should proceed. and. One. Of the observations we had google competitive property called Google product search started as a property called. Frugal and Amazon, was kicking. It's about. And every logical explanation said that should never have happened. Google products are should obviously have one because of the super set of Amazon indexed everything on Amazon and the rest of the web. If you ever searching for a product, why would you ever go Amazon when you come to Google products or at least that was the theory but clearly, and even at that time it was obviously, it was better. Amazon's approach evolved a centuries old ritual going to the store to buy goods. Sure it was an enhanced online twenty-first-century experience but at its heart, it was consistent with ritual everyone knew and practised. In contrast Google's approach was outta whack with a shopping ritual. It gave people too many choices. It was too comprehensive. Amazon focused on consistent over comprehensive and what does that mean in practice it meant that when I bought something from Amazon or just when I went to the site reviews roster structure the same way I understood how the return policy work I understand shipping work, and yet didn't have everything a lot of things it close enough to having everything, but I would rather have something that I trust trust in this sort of consistent or something comprehensive. Google was beholden to search ritual was after all the thing that had made the company wildly successful, but trying to enforce that same ritual at Frugal had held it back. And sheer believed it would do the same with you to. The Youtube team decided against the search ritual of showing comprehensive search results. And to say at work is an understatement youtube quickly cemented itself as the Go-to site for videos. and not just grainy cat videos in copyright infringements. Whole new type of user quickly emerged users who are making their own content and winning legions of subscribers. Sheer calls them makers. Everybody's presumption at the time was the only way that you can build. And make interesting content was to live in Hollywood pay for very large budget studios on, and that's how you may content and people really underestimated what this group of people would do. The makers help create a whole new set of rituals around how interesting creative content could be made distributed and discovered. SHEARN team made sure they supported these rituals. By. Two thousand eleven youtube already felt like they had one no other video platform at least in the Western world could touch them. They were in danger of hosting. We are still scaly. We just Kinda lost your out in front now and you don't quite remember what are we doing? Why do we push ourselves? To keep you out in front sheer started to imagine an entirely new way of defining success for the company. I have no idea if this is folklore not but I like it apparently, there's some board meeting at Coca Cola for somebody said, every single board meeting was, oh, we have x percent Shavers Pepsi and it's fifty to forty eight went back and forth back and forth like is this really the game we're in and somebody said, are we just competing for who can own the Brown water market? In this, telling the board members were locked into the ritual of obsessing over the Brown water market share and trying to get a few points up in the Brown water market. One of the board members said, what if we thought about this differently about we thought about our goal as something like percentage of stomach and they ended up broadening their view to whole lineup of drinks, and now they make water and they make all these other drinks and so on reshaped their market. Breaking out of this ritual opened a whole new range of opportunities for Coca Cola, and sometimes breaking out of an old ritual that is holding you back is as simple as asking yourself is this the game or really in? There's another question that she asked himself constantly, which he took from Britain's Olympic rowing team at the two thousand Olympics. Mantra, which was they would make every decision based on a single question, which is, will it make Boko faster and every decision? So is should this person sitting in front of the boat of the backup boat? Will it make book faster? Should we have Italian for dinner? Well, we'll make the BOKO faster Should we go to this? Well, we'll make the book of Esther. It. Seems like an obvious question ask will this make us go faster but sometimes we can focus on the wrong thing. Maybe you fixate on the shape of your sale and end up neglecting the direction of the current..

Youtube Google Amazon Frugal Silicon Valley Coca Cola ESPN Microsoft Kota Tusha Shear Disney Shears ABC Britain Olympics Hollywood
Human Computer Interaction and Online Privacy

Data Skeptic

05:38 min | 11 months ago

Human Computer Interaction and Online Privacy

"My Name is Moses Namara I am a PhD candidate in University Walk Online privacy career, investigating people with experiences on expectations of online privacy I am. Originally from Uganda was pointing, follow on came to the useful known I'm on my way to getting that beauty, and when it comes to online privacy. Can you be a bit more specific? Are you concerned with things like the SSL level or a user's relationship to their browsers? Where your interests lie, my interests fly A. Team, so I'm coming in not at the technical aspect of privacy, but I'd be used experience aspect of privacy, and so the key question being held. We hope uses money to privacy online as most our lives transition to use of nine technologies. Yeah, in particular, has the you know, covid nineteen in the stay at home orders, and all these sorts of things. How has that affected the privacy? World has a fictive privacy in terms of most people now being forced to interact connects through various forms of technology, really honest, various forms students having to download and use online technologies. Stay in touch with teachers to parents. Adults having to Donald Shishir, meet the I in terms of. With the news better so making sure that they can connect with other people that no money they would have meant Christopher's physically. So in terms of how effective privacy is that? We're seeing a lot of people now. Adopting new technologies, they haven't used all use mobile technologies higher rate than they would know. Maybe do, and so that definitely being what technology they end up using presents, different privacy, issues and challenges. Is Privacy I don't know the truth to this. I'm not an immunologist. Human being stayed home for two weeks. You know the virus would be effectively defeat, even though that's kind of impossible, if everyone used two factor authentication and some simple protocols, would that solve privacy? No different in you hoping tons of protecting people's access to their online accounts online logging online, they need to log into right, but that's the security level in terms of offering people the option to actually secure log into their accounts and making sure archaeology, the possums were trying to request or log into the account, so that help secure the data in one aspect, the other aspect in terms of privacy is that we biscuit looking at the data that they explicitly maybe give to the technology will looking I at the data that the technology that they're using requires for you to function. Function with looking at the data that is not explicitly given by the user, but implicitly in five by the technology right based on different, maybe algorithms that use, and so we are looking at all these different aspects in terms of holidays uses to come into play on. How do we ensure weather? That access is restricted to only people who the used as comfortable sharing with all having people here? This is a really interesting comparison. You guys have in the paper that that will talk I'm sure a lot about privacy at a glance, the user centric design of glance data exposure visualizations. To impact there, but if you start with, could you expand on the difference there between privacy in terms of settings and privacy of data what say user giving up in each case I guess. Privacy in terms of sittings are basically the control is that guide enable uses to set or let be known what level of privacy they're comfortable with, and this is usually enabled by technology that they're using so these technologies like a social media. Company will site like this because controls that enable people to sit with the one I share Nixon, that fitting that level, and so this is hoping that way then we have privacy in terms of the data, so the data is basically any use of using information beyond what the primary purpose was, and so I think that's where the issue comes in comes of using this data in other secondary Rewe's deviant of the primary ways that someone has. To be used what I like to think about when I think about did yeah, when I'm installing an APP I'm often being asked. Do you give it permissions for your camera or this or that? And often it'll say you know access to contact the Internet, which is such a weird Pandora's box to me. You know it a weather APP THAT'S GONNA! Talk to the weather server and get the weather for my zip code, or is it an APP that's going to? Be All of my private data and send it to the mothership. I've never felt like I really had a good I could be turned that on her off, but I never had a full control setting. Is that something you envision that? Maybe users would get more control of or do we trust that the user can manage those controls maybe too complicated I don't know what do you think so? That's a sexually good that you raised that because my research looks at what is the comfortable level at which uses able to engage and uses controls, but festival demo countries. You have the more less likely achieve all. All those controls because yesterday, a huge number of them on so that requires quick native, if looked to the ARCUS, fully seek out of control is unused them appropriately, but at the same time we need such was in place, because then uses a able to explicitly kind of make the edition non or set a liberal privacy comfortable. We've now the trick becomes the paradox becomes. We have these countries in place, but we have fewer people using them right, and so it becomes a question of. How do we meet these needs where they are on? How do we ensure that they are motivated enough to actually? Understand what this is due on. Be Able to actually go unused him comfortably. So

Uganda Donald Shishir Christopher Arcus Nixon Rewe
"shishir" Discussed on Invest Like the Best

Invest Like the Best

09:54 min | 1 year ago

"shishir" Discussed on Invest Like the Best

"That's at one. Extreme of usage is very low. But your sense of utility is very high. So that's in one corner and the other corner tend to be. There's a lot of products where there's a lot of usage but not a lot of empty not a lot of anchor. Much of Youtube fit in this category people use it for hours and hours a day. But you push people on you had to pay for it. What would you a if we took it away? How would you feel and you get a wide spectrum? Of course it's a widely spread business but a lot of it would fall in this category of very high usage and low. Mcc if you draw diagonal through this chart but you'll find sort of above that diagonal our businesses that naturally lead towards casual fan or superfan business models and below the diagonal are ones that lead to what I call non end as models advertising being the most obvious of those. Where would something like insurance figure into this way of viewing the business world? Insurance is such an interesting example. So insurance is a bundle on many levels and in specified roles whom health insurance from health insurance added sort of basic offering. What is health insurance the bundle between sick people and healthy people and at the next level? What is insurance will tend to get bundled together with other forms of germs is bottled with dental and disability and so on at another level health insurance gets bundled with depending on your country in the US gets bundled with employment and many countries it gets bundled with citizenship. And you get it as part of that country at a core level if you think about usage versus anchor Value Health. Insurance is the perfect example. It's a thing that you pay one us. Yeah you never use it you pay for it and you hope you never get sick and when you do get sick you're up in the top. Left question gets asked a lie about. Why don't people just pay for what they need and health insurance like the perfect example? Because you can't the thing that I think people miss about it. I'm going to try to offer very little political and I don't think this Israeli have opinions on it but I'm gonNA ignore all lacks the reason health. Insurance works is the cost or the superfan is ridiculously exorbitantly. High and so the only way for that product to exist for the whole healthcare industry work to bundle healthy people with sick people. People need to contribute even though they're not using it or the whole system doesn't work when you have a catastrophic issue and you spend a few days in the hospital a few weeks in the hospital it's millions of dollars and no practical person can put away enough money to deal with xfinity. This is not about bad planning. This is about bundling. That's why that industry works and you can now ask the question of. Should it be bundled with employment or should it be bundled with citizenship totally reasonable but should you bundle healthy and sick people together go find any country where insurance is not prevalent and just look at all the rates of illness mortality of so on and it's order mind to health insurance works? That is a very good example of a product that sits in the top left of this quarter. It's interesting one because again. Since we first talked you start to see all of the world some sort of bundle and the notion of a business that you never wanna use but definitely want to pay for is strange at first and then insurance fixes that Strangeness Very Quickly Exactly Right Talk a little bit now from the consumer side. So that's sort of maybe the more proper way to compensate providers whether that's first party or third party is via deterred metric talk now about the consumer side of things in mid three. Okay Mithra so you already gave them the typical way this gets framed is. I've got this bundle. I only want to pay for these products and cable is uses an common example for this the myth maker in this case. Maybe they're following along so far you produce values casual fans maybe. I can buy this. Mcc thing that seems like inside baseball. I kinda cared but whatever. I overcome divides that money is up to them by come on good bundling is clearly bad because what it represents at its core is a lack of choice. That's the man. What is a Bundler doing the ripping off consumers by presenting a lack of choice in order to get product a half the byproduct be so just as a as sort of simple example to us is us McDonald's as an example and imagine you walk into McDonald's look up at the board? What goes everybody's head when you look at that board so I look at it and you say okay. I kind of want big Mac. I definitely want some fries and if I get those two things together than the drink is free and the person right behind them or do they say. I definitely want a big Mac. I really WANNA drink. I guess the fries are free and the person right behind them has a crying kid. Looks up at the board and says who has happy meal thing to come with the toy and then the whole damn meal is free. The interesting thing about that. Everybody's seen that happen looking up this board and everybody's looking at the same package and looking at different and to all of them. It looks like a deal. There's one fundamental reason why people think bundles are rip offs. When they're not and that reason is for consumer as the thesis in this in the section is for consumer to properly value bundle there must be transparent in reasonable albacore price for every product in the bundle. I get asked a lot of big media industry and so on. What's my opinion on? What's happening with capable industry tables going through unbundling and so on? I've you is. That's not actually what's happening through a variety of mostly non-intentional choices over the course of the last forty years the evolution of cable. What we've landed on is an incredibly non-transparent. Ala Carte pricing mechanism. Nobody has any idea what the cost of the individual offerings inside. The cable bundle would be and so they mis attributed and so they presume that if I were to rip out parts of the Bundle I get at the cheaper price so the reason I put these two in order to talk to three. You think were very disconnected in order for me to Papa understand the value of a bundle. I need to get all our pricing. Why does McDonalds work and comcast has trouble with this? Because Microsoft puts a price next the big Mac and next to the fries and next to the drink and you can their transparent the reasonable some people buy them but you now have an understanding of what that bundle feels like and when you say what you just said is if you survey people about what they like and dislike about cable it is easily the number one answer is I just WanNa pay for the channels. I want and then you'll ask them. You'll say okay. Let's take an example. I just want. Espn GREAT. What would you pay for? Espn you pay fifty bucks a month for Cable. What would you pay for? Espn and generally what they'll say is well. I read some article. That says that he has PM gets five bucks a month from comcast so about. I pay a little bit more than that. I'll pay like seven or eight bucks and I'll get just ESPN. Why can't I do that? That seems really clear. Okay so why? Do these two myths connect. And what's the problem with? What's happening here and by the punchline of this is. I think what we're seeing happening with cable is we're GonNa see unbundling and what we're going to see is transparency on all car racing and then we're going to see a massive re bundling as soon as people understand what the components of this bundle cost. We're GONNA see them all back together in the way and has lots of reason why I think the the bundled today is broken. I do think because we lost track of this. We'll get to this myth four to because we lost track of this. The cable industry has not been able to realign their bundled the right way. But I think what we're seeing transfer pricing okay. So you go through the scenario interviewing the consumer and you say hey what you want from cables that I would just want to pay for. Espn okay great. What would you pay for? Espn has had paid mark up over. What the five bucks that. I think they're getting I go back to miss too. So how is this working in Mathu? As well. The way I divide up money in a bundle is by martyring contribution and I take my fifty dollars bundle and I divide up the money by what percentage of people would turn if this Removed from the bundle and as an equation in there that I won't go into detail here but the net impact of it is that there's a relationship between the wholesale price of a product and the retail price of a product and it's proportional to the what we call the superfan percentage so the wholesale price of ESPN inside of the bundle five bucks a month. Let's say superfan percentage for it is ten percent. Let's say that it makes that Very Chris. Imagine that if you were to remove ESPN from a bundle and percent of people would turn what that implies the correct retail price free. Spn is fifty dollars per month. That's what the math implies. So now you go back to that consumer and say great. You're paying fifty bucks a month for comcast. What would you like to pay for? Well I guess I'd like to be free. You can pay fifty bucks for ESPN NOW. All of a sudden took an amazing deal. You Pay Fifty Bucks Pin and get two hundred ninety nine other channels for free. It's better the McDonald's and this is a really good deals but because we don't have transparency on each of these components were is that people think they're getting ripped off and so this myth is quite important. And when you think about it so that's cable if you think about it for people trying to apply this I get asked a lot about him going to produce this bundle should offer the product separately to in. My answer is definitely yes. Even if you don't think that's going to be a primary thing people by and you're GonNa make the bundle such a good deal because you think that that's really what you want people to buy people's ability to understand a bundle starts from their ability to understand two components the bumble. That's what Mitt three is all about. He's seen a little bit about how marginal cost or cost of goods figures into this whole framework so in examples of say Netflix. Or spotify or cable. Bundle doesn't cost them anything. Extra to distribute some of the product from the providers to the marginal user so enormously high gross margins. Obviously some things are physical bundles like McDonald's food. There's other bundles where there's more marginal costs as a percentage. How does that figure in to the thinking? Here for sure. There's a section of the paper in the end about that and basically you just adjust the equation to put a minimum on it. Your product is basically unviable if you're wholesale price gets below the marginal cost of delivery of that product and so if I have a five dollar value meal. Mcdonald's and immortal contribution of the Burger is less than what it costs to make the Burger. That should just not include it not gonNa work and it's at the floor effectively on what is tolerable. Mcc for the product in practical terms. I'll say sequoia use a lot of media examples at all. Have what you described as zero delivery costs or not zero near-zero delivery marginal delivery costs. When you look at other bundles. The interesting thing is I think. Many people don't perceive the amount of markup that goes into marketing a product superfan go back to the definition super fans are defined by number one willingness to a retail number two the activation energy to find it and the activation energy to find a product is.

Espn comcast McDonald ESPN US Mcc baseball Microsoft McDonalds Netflix spotify Mathu sequoia Papa
"shishir" Discussed on Invest Like the Best

Invest Like the Best

11:40 min | 1 year ago

"shishir" Discussed on Invest Like the Best

"Itunes and spotify offered was a way to pay for all the music. You Might WanNA listen to even if you're going to get access to some things that you might not have gone out and bought individuals and offering turned out to be incredibly Parker to use that terminology. What it allowed was it allowed for. Every consumer to all of a sudden get access to goods that they were casual fan up and turns out to be very powerful because the set of products for which any individual would pay retail and have the activation energy and find it. That's a product sentence to be very narrow but the set of that you might find utility in and you might find pleasure entertainment in or whatever it might be tend to be much wider than that so at one level spotify bundled together ninety nine cent purchases of music into a ten dollar offering another level. If you watch what it is doing now especially with odd casting is producing a bundle. That is really the Audio Bundle and Dana is a really good talk about the value of the eyes and ears and on a really good analogy for it but core idea being you can apply the same principle one step up and say not just about all the music you might listen to. It might be all the audio you might listen to. And then beyond that. What is built a set of bundling relationships across companies as well and one of the most popular ones is the spotify student. There comes with Hulu and showtime as well. There's a number of similar offerings. That have been made across the portfolio. But those sort of three different levels bundling up music only audio and then cross bundling across arts and services. Let's return now to the structure so introduced us to this first myth that you encountered and why almost the exact opposite is true. Yeah so reminder on the terminology math the way the papers written and I expect some of your listeners will wanna read the details. I'll try to cover it here but there's a lot of. There's a lot of fun in the details. This written as a conversation between me and what I call the myth maker and the midst maker. I think each reader could picture someone. Everybody knows someone who says online his bad. These are all the bad things that come out of it for the purpose of when I was reading the paper mostly just pictured myself so these are all things that I said ten years earlier. That's the way victory in the first one written in this paper is the most superficial and the highest align is the blanket statement bundling is bad for consumers as well as providers and the easiest way to understand this wine. Is You just start with the scenario described? Before I have three products I can sell them. Each Alencar can sell them in a bundle. What should I do? And what most people see in that. Sorta ran through the example. If I saw the car every product every provider only has access to super fans and every consumer on the flip side can only get access to products that they are a Superfan hops. If I have these products separate them out that's the value created if I put them in a bundle than I produce value in two ways for providers I give them access to casual fans and for consumers. I give them access to products that they might be a casual fan of us are music example earlier. What it spotify. Due to Itunes it allowed people to listen to music that they might not have gone out at ninety nine cents to buy and that value turns out to be really important and if you go look at the usage grass and so on what people spend their time listening to some of it is things that they might have gone out and bought and bought at nine cents or and record source on but a very large portion of what people spend time. Consuming are things that they value but they would not have met that super fantastic four so the first myth and then each of these has it of thesis that goes around with it is the way that bundling produces value is not by producing more super fans by producing casual fans one example. I like to use for. This is an example. People don't is. You'll see the ultimate fighting championship fan the OC. I'm not your description of its unaware of it but I'm not an active watcher Eh. Right right so interestingly. I sometimes talk in a room of one. Hundred people asked this question generally somewhere between two and five people raise their hand and Sam a fan of the FCC and generally those people raise your hand not a little bit in the air straight in the air. Because I'm sure you know someone like this or the people who are into ultimate fighting chip. It is a deep obsession some of it. There's lots of reasons why it's perhaps audience but I think one of the reasons is the Businessma you pay fifty bucks for a fight on Fridays. You invite your friends over and you watch if you ask the same question of people who are into the NFL Sarria fan of the NFL. A sustained group one hundred people and you'll get hands raised all different levels. Some people will say I guess. I watch super bowls. I'M A fan. So people say whenever my teams winning I watch all the way to the person at the end who says afforded Tv's I watch every game simultaneously every Sunday. My Fantasy League is my obsession and so on and one observation of that is the. Nfl vary widely distributed. And most of those fans can't really describe for you how they pay for the only. Actually no I come through my my Reisen bill myself. It seems to be free. I'm not really sure. Why and that reason is that that as a business focused heavily on casual fans they focused on distribution casual fans so backing all the way away up. The first myth is this sort of high level. One will get more practical in moment. Is I think that people will say bundling is cheating. Both consumers and providers the east are generally missing. Is that one done well. The way bundling produces value is by giving access to and revenue from casualties. I guess we're wind would go would be to say. I pay this however much per month for my cable. Bundle and only watch three channels. This is nonsense. I wish I could just pay those three channels directly. That sort of thing is sort of the reason. Why people don't like this concept but I think what you've made clear is I think the NFL example is perfect that if you take away all experience of the NFL from everyone except for the four screen fan that seems like an obvious negative right right exactly and the positive is because of the bundle. Yeah and by the way the example you just gave cable and why can't I just pay for three channels? You pause that one because that observation is very sharp on the consumer side and that's what made three is all about. We'll get to that in a second awesome awesome so the second myth is really about more than business model of this on the other side. Not The consumer side so much but will call the provider side so I I'd love a distinction between if relevant third party providers and first party providers and why there's this kind of weirdness around who should get what share of the Pie of the revenue that's generated from selling the bundle to consumers. Yeah so let's do deficient part. I so providers consumers bundlers. Most of this theory will divide the world and try to treat them neatly as divided between the provider the consumer and the bundler provider provides a good to consumer consumes it and the Bundler puts them together. It's not always that clean gave an example earlier sometimes the providers or bundlers themselves and to lots of different ways at that works. But let's pretend it's thing for moment. The third party versus First Party thing is interesting and one of the conjectures of this paper is all the examples given tend to be as you describe it. Third Party bundles. The bundler and a provider are different. Corporate ENTITIES. There many cases of what? You might call first party bundles where I have. Multiple product produced by the same company to Amazon Prime. To pretty good example Amazon has Prime Amazon music and so on New York Times of brick example they have not only the New York Times subscription but the offer subscription and food subscription. That goes along with the to they bundled together. There's also just one level deeper through this third party first party. There's also inside of a single product. You might call intro product bundles and from that perspective. I code as a pretty good example. Where the bundle is a bundle of products. It's a document a spreadsheet application all in one so multiple different ways it can be applied. I'll describe the terminology all in terms of third party. Bundles and thirty providers. Because it's easier to understand if two entities are separate but I think we should come back to that. I think a lot of listeners. That may not be the most practical application of this. It might actually be the inside a single company or inside a single product but okay so myth to so this one like you said to focus on providers. Three focuses on consumers in mid four will come back around the Bundler so myth to this one may seem odd to put as the second one as I've thought about the ordering understanding this one is the key to understanding the next set and the way has generally gets. That is a small sentence. What does the mythmakers say? The mythmakers says hey okay maybe I get your whole thing about casual fans creating value and the NFL examples are pretty good one but come on the bundlers clearly cheating everybody. They're paying everybody all these arbitrary rates they should just pay people fairly and bundling would work better and again. I'm putting the consumer side aside for a moment into focus. That's at all the time people look at it and say how does comcast get away with paying? Espn four dollars and fifty cents per month. History twenty cents per month doesn't seem fair now when people use the word fair they mean lots of different things but I find that most times what they mean by fair is by usage especially in Silicon Valley. That's the it's almost a direct proxy for that term the myth here to give the full sentences. The Myth is revenue from. Bundles should be allocated based on usage. How used to say this all the time or at Youtube building up these different products. And saying we're going to build this offering we're going to build a better bundling model and it's going to be more fair and what we meant by that was we're GONNA pay based on usage and as I spent more time thinking about it I realized not only is that incorrect. It's actually can lead to almost the opposite behaviors of what you really want to let me describe a little bit one way to think about it. So there's a little diagram in the paper that just lots out usage for some different properties. I'M GONNA use cables an example because it's very familiar but if you look back on paper written the first time post stats on this history channel on ESPN so uses to autism. An example history channel. Espn get about the same amount of usage if you look at it in terms of timespan rating points so it's very close and yet history channel makes about twenty cents per month per subscriber and espn make somewhere between four five bucks per subscriber per month. So what is the second access? What does that price access correlated to now? Usually you would buy go ask. People knew mistry. The term that generally gets handed back is anchor valley that axis corresponds to anchor anchor. Value is a word and a term that I use when the economic phenomenon is not yet clear as a kind of a made up her. It's not very descriptive. And so instead we started using this term marginal turn contribution. Mcc and it's pretty simple idea that access what anchor value represents marginal turn contribution is if I were to remove this one product from the bundle. What percentage of my audience would turn pretty easy to understand if I move? Espn from bundled. How many people turn and they've been a bunch of studies on this but the reason why. Espn is twenty times more than history channel is if you were to Spn for the Bundle Twenty Times as many people turn as if you were to move history channel. That core idea that bundles should divide up. Payment divide up the revenue based on M. C. C. As opposed to usage leads to a totally different way of thinking about the bundle. The paper actually even walked through some formulas for how to calculate this you can formulate arrived. At what a fair price would be a wholesale prices. How much you pay out to each provider and it is correlated mostly to this sermon. That marginal trunk. I think this concept is really interesting like this. To access. Chart for usage is on the x axis. Mcc is on the Y axis. It lets you plot all sorts of different businesses so what would be an example of say a very low usage but hi. Mcc business you could draw a diagonal through this chart. We owe back your very first question. Like what Superfan businesses casualty businesses? And so on so okay. Let's start where you start in the top left of this chart low usage hi. Mcc ANCHOR VALUE. WanNa use that term the typical example. I'll give it a sporting event you go to sporting event you bay hundreds of thousands of dollars or an hour or two of entertainment..

NFL ESPN spotify Mcc Amazon Prime Itunes Bundle Twenty Times Hulu Parker Dana New York Times Alencar comcast Youtube Sam Silicon Valley FCC M. C. C.
"shishir" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

01:36 min | 1 year ago

"shishir" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"The Joe pags show coming your way on the other two on the Thursday the first at the Thursday edition of what I'm saying Shishir Mehta said Tuesday a Canadian since Friday lying around I've no idea you can choose yes indeed nothing new there this issue is with the Joe Cocker street arrangements of feeling all right today it has more akhir didn't have horns that's why I like this one it is Joe coverage not what we do is we like to say well I do I'm not loading what here's no that was perfect really check it okay there's a lot going on lots to get to I would the.

Joe pags Shishir Mehta Joe Cocker Joe
"shishir" Discussed on The Box Of Oddities

The Box Of Oddities

03:10 min | 1 year ago

"shishir" Discussed on The Box Of Oddities

"S- like an insurance claims. Men just comes around well let me see the the corpse please K.. In some wax no it's incorruptible. That'd be a cool job. Water responsibility though. Oh for sure. Yeah Imagine Imagine Accident Guy but imagine you're called in into to determine whether or not one of these bodies is incorruptible and hands a saint and that saint is up in heaven watching it and the guy screws the call he says No. This isn't a saint and the saints up their son of a in my mind. That's how I would share Shishir. Well a lot of the incorruptibility nece has to do with how pliable the bodies are. So you know you really you may just have to go in there and give them a little jiggle and and see see what happens there. Simple apple simpler process than have envisioning. I mean I. I don't know you know it could be. I think it would depend on. How seriously you take your incorruptible claims? ADJUSTER job uh-huh. Yeah anyway so there you go The incorruptibles saints who are Pliable and smell good and are covered hurt in scary wax.

Shishir
How Coda Is Making Docs as Powerful As Apps

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast - Inspired Tech Startup Stories

09:21 min | 2 years ago

How Coda Is Making Docs as Powerful As Apps

"Of apps Stokes and spreadsheets that still run. Absolutely everything. Do you ever wonder if things could possibly change? Well about a year ago, a company called coda came out of stealth with the promise that anyone could make a document as powerful as an app, and now they're making good on that promise. And since the beta phase tens of thousands of people across thousands of teams are using coda every month and we've got some big companies involved here to such as cheddar, Spotify, an Uber as well as small businesses just the Hudson baking company of all being building coda docs, to create solutions to that. Very real problems. If you go by the coda website, whilst you listening to this podcast, check out that gallery to say some of those coda documents. So a couple of weeks ago coded and then new type of dog released code at one dollars. Zero and with it. That was a new mobile experience available on both mobile web and oil s so the concept of a dog being as powerful as an app, captured my attention. But when I also learned the as a rich tech history working at Google, and Microsoft, I had to get him on the show to learn more. So book elope, and hold until it, so I can be me is all the way to California, so we can speak with Shishir have Roger CEO and co founder of coda. So massive warm, welcome to the show. Can you tell the listeners Labatt who you are, and what you do or thanks for having me Neil? Notre, I run a startup called Kuda that I've been working on for the past four, five years before that I spent about six years at Google, I most of that working on YouTube. I ran the tech side of YouTube, and before, though, it's been about six years. Microsoft, worked on office windows and sequel server and before that I started a another startup colts and Trotta. I quite a while ago. Now. On the tech podcast. I love hearing about how techies transforming every industry, but also often, more importantly, the story behind the solutions slowly changing the world. So can I ask that you share your journey that began with an observation the world still runs on documents and spreadsheets for us four years? Okay. Tell me about that and the inspiration behind what you're doing. Yeah. Sure. So KOTA where we're building. A new type of document it blends the best of documents spreadsheets presentations, applications into one new surface. And we like to say that it allows anyone to make a doctor's, powerful an app and the, the idea for the company came out of two primary observations of the world. The first is that we think that docks not apps around the world. And so we look around and look at our teammates or collie or you know, what people do at home or school, and you ask people, what they used to keep themselves productive or or management system. And so on, they'll often name some packaged applications that they've that they've bought or things they built in the across all sorts of different examples. But the if you actually observe them and you walked what they're doing. You'll see them in documents and spreadsheets all day long. And this is something when I worked on the office team it was something we used to talk about as we saw in our user base. But when I got to Google particular when I got to YouTube, it, this is became very start for me. This is right, when Google doc. She's coming out, and we basically ran the entire company on, on Google docs and sheets. And, you know, things like the way we did go planning or the way we did performance management. Or you know, one of the fun stories was at when I joined YouTube back in two thousand eight if you hit flag on a YouTube video on the website, it would show up as a row in a spreadsheet on an ops person's desk. And that's how that's how he managed thing. So, you know, so there's a sort of first division, that, that even though there's all these applications out there. Everything still seems to Ronin documents. Spreadsheets. And then the second observation is if you look at those documents and spreadsheets, they haven't really fundamentally changed in over forty years. And we have this running joke at the company that if Austin powers to pop out of his freezing chamber, he wouldn't know close to where or what musical listen to, but he would absolutely know how to work document spreadsheet and a presentation. And it's a pretty simple reason all the metaphor for those tools for set in the nineteen seventies Wordstar and Harvard graphics and visit Cal, you know, gave us all the metaphors that were still using today. How pages are laid out in the document house. Lives related presentation spreadsheet everything, like how you do a one b to see three that we've all gotten used to we like to pull up battleship all those metaphors have state, exactly the same forty years and you put these two observations together, and it sort of interesting. You know the the this surface that what are the use cases fundamentally changed. And we're, we're now using this not just for digitizing, you know, paper documents and slide decks, and so on. But we're actually using it to run our teams and our families and our. Businesses we we use it all day long. We stare at it at all of our productivity done out of it. And yet, we're using metaphors that are forty years old every other piece of software in the world has has changed in that time period, you know. So what about what about documents? And so that's how we started. We said what, what if we were what if you were to backup ignore history and start from scratch, what would we build that, and that's what we've been building? A new type of document fun. Fantastic, especially because if you'll buy ground being at YouTube, and Mike self and seeing firsthand, the heart of the tech industry. But you tell me well about how that moment that you realized that if you're going to build a new type of dog, you really were going to have to start right from scratch. I mean, it must be quite daunting. Yeah. I think it's one of those ideas that, you know, I always like to say the, you know, the sort of two questions, I ask people when they come to me and say, should I start this company and always ask them? Do you have an idea? You can't imagine not working on and do have a person, you can't imagine not working with and is rarely the case that the answer to both those questions are. Yes. But when they are, it's, it's sort of inevitable. You can just you can see the gleam in and entrepreneurs is they, they can't help it started and, and it almost becomes an obsession. So, so when we were getting started myself, my co founder, Alex tonight, you know, he was actually working on another startup at the time that, you know, thankfully wasn't going that while, and so I was helping them brainstorm other ideas, and, you know, one of us one of us wrote the sentence on the board and said, you know what, if what if you can make apps easily as you can, as, as you can make dogs and once that showed up on the board. All of a sudden, we had this whole list of ideas, it just kind of snapped into place and we. You know, we could just sort of picture the product, we could picture all little elements what we need to get done. And it was it quickly became clear that none of those elements are things where you could just slightly twist, one of the existing surfaces and, and have it just worked that you had to sort of fundamentally we start with a different type of information model and you know, everything from very fundamental concepts. Like, for example, we don't we don't differentiate between documents spreadsheets presentations, all in one surface down to like very specific. Details of the ways that, you know, the way our tables were presented as a lot closer to a database into a spreadsheet, and we have an interaction model people. Call buttons or week all buttons. And people, people really like that people use to setup actions in workflows, and so on that are all these, you know. New types of building blocks reframed in a way that, that have to have to fit together perfectly and that point, we can picture the product. It was really clear that no, we weren't going

Youtube Google Microsoft Co Founder Spotify Stokes Labatt California Colts Notre Wordstar Ronin Neil Austin Shishir Mike Self Roger Ceo Alex
"shishir" Discussed on Call Her Daddy

Call Her Daddy

04:07 min | 2 years ago

"shishir" Discussed on Call Her Daddy

"I think another really really good point that I want people to start doing if you're trying to avoid feelings posttax is hit up an old body someone that you are familiar with that you've had sex with a hit. One that you're comfortable with and just literally go through your old bodies and randomly hit one up catch up with them. You don't even need to fuck it hang out with that. I literally will just you could start sexting, and like talking a little bit more and just keep your mind off shit because I think a lot of times, especially with girls if you're not trying to be fucking more than one person at a time just texting an old body. That's like, easy your mind off Shishir. You know what I mean? Yeah. That's a good one a basic one is don't sleep over. Okay. God. Cuddling up snugly up to him. Like, don't don't let yourself get in those fields here, and there you can fuck and sleep over. I get it. We had twelve to kill us. I'm not trying to get an nor. No, I grew up. I think. Yeah. I think that's especially girls. I think at a little of fuck emotional or there are some fucking bitch boys that they try to act so cool. And then all of a sudden you end up being the fucking big spoon. And they're trying to be little home with you bitch. What the phone of? So I. I mean, I guess like a really good one too is just puck and increase your masturbation that is rely on them for low. Anything you're warning that can some have ramp the funky like someone when you don't. Okay starts to look real fucked right around here when you're really Horning. Okay. May jump anyone. Don't fuck around with like pet names. Don't be doing babe. Bb Honey bun looney bunny leggy. No, no, no, no. And do not let them call you babe or baby ought is don't ever. Her for engaging in this discussion. Side, you told me babe. Try to get cute with it. Knock it the fuck up as far as you're concerned. I'm your hor you're what you're captive and God. No, I agree with you. Yeah. Fuck off with the penny. I think I think this is one of my best and lasts would be for how devoid feelings post sack is do not be the one who acts different okay after sex. You do not initiate any fucking change keep the same pace the same energy. Basically, you're not you cannot let this out the sex clout your judgment. There are too many people that all of a sudden, I feel girls who this all the fucking time. And it's it's pathetic. It's like all of a sudden you guys fucked and then it's Friday night. He hasn't hit you up. He made it clear. He's not hanging out with you that night. He's ghosted you. And at two AM your fucking calling him and texting him trying to get your phone call. It's like if you don't have plans yet, you are not texting him if it is your hookup, and they oh you nothing. And then you are pushing that boundary you look fucking way to clearing if your if your behavior. Changes especially if you're starting to act more needy. He is going to be terrified, especially and girls the same. When a guy does it to me after we fuck, and he's like, all of a sudden blowing me up you've had it. This guy wants up fucking calling. You and say, dude, I get it the sexist fucking bomb chill the fuck out. Just kill. I ain't play. I've I've had a guy do that too. In it freaked me out. Now, you go I'm like running away. But then also keep in mind guys. That's also the side of when you do start doing that it immediately gives the person the upper hand they immediately have the power in the hookup because you're the one that's con constantly straying from what the initial plan was. And now you're getting a little bit more mushy with guys play the game am telling Dan suck outta here with that shit. All right. You mentioned someone you don't want him calling you baby while I'm calling you a whore..

Shishir Dan
"shishir" Discussed on 1150 AM KKNW

1150 AM KKNW

03:10 min | 2 years ago

"shishir" Discussed on 1150 AM KKNW

"Food because. Gotcha. Shishir? Kushal chunks go in by leaders in country. Home. Long. Home. She. Bishop. Don't..

"shishir" Discussed on SOFREP Radio

SOFREP Radio

02:19 min | 2 years ago

"shishir" Discussed on SOFREP Radio

"I mean, I guess if you fucking kick back and smokes, create them or pop creidim pills for a week straight. And did nothing else. I maybe kill you. Who knows marijuana? Can't can't physically kill you. So he was actually brought that up and he said for marijuana to kill you'd have to smoke your own weight and marijuana. Physically possible. No one's ever overdose. It's not it's not going to kill you. Yeah. So I'm just glad to bring awareness. You know about this issue speaking, Joe Rogan can't wait here. Mike Tyson on the Joe Rogan podcast is that he's having him on. He's been teasing that out. And I'm I'm excited here. Mike Tyson on his podcast and I'm excited to hear Konya west. There's five Tyson has fucking crazy stories. I read his book it was it was an experience. Even remember when I think maybe he went on Howard Stern and he was talking about prison sex. Yes. He did talk about. And then there was true there that he was like banging. And when they have that when the guests visitors come, and they don't check you for Chris what's Pani up as on. Holy fuck and Mike Tyson was treated like a celebrity in jail. So he got away with Shishir. But if you're if you watched that documentary, and it's on Netflix as well Tyson, really good documentary. I would I would definitely recommend it. But crazier stuff happened. To him after that documentary. I mean, the guys just had a string of some bad walk in and a lot of poor decision making. But remember his his young daughter and think who was probably maybe four years old getting choked by extinction cord on a treadmill and dying. Oh shit. I was shortly after that documentary. So it's just like one thing after the other price. Yeah. And he seems like of you know, for a guy who was so violent, and so aggressive and people have their opinion on on whether he is a rapist or not. I mean, that's what he went to jail was convicted. But he was certainly without a doubt like a sexually aggressive guy. He would say that himself in his book an inappropriate, he's he he doesn't he he proclaimed Venison's, but he's definitely a very overly aggressive guy in that manner. If you see them now in interviews, he seems to have gone like the completely other direction. Really like, very peaceful guy doesn't if it's actually why I suggest all you watch the. Documentary..

Mike Tyson Joe Rogan marijuana Howard Stern Konya Netflix Shishir Chris Venison four years
"shishir" Discussed on 1150 AM KKNW

1150 AM KKNW

03:36 min | 2 years ago

"shishir" Discussed on 1150 AM KKNW

"See you're interested in Yemen. Shoulda polio. New merger. And. Shishir? Listen to the coin guys in Egypt. Vision about anyway. Washer y'all go. You won't be home show. Kushtia shish is you up in then Pasha those social issues. Yoshimoto wrong with usual Cova million challenge. As we ain't you Fritz at Don, Gordon Joan into the Joey. Hydro Hannaford trauma Kimba now hard. Not nats. Shearwater Pasha the Conan Doyle. Or you may be young tag allies with on our show, the data invasion. I go does your whole economic consuming your Hano pull now is here. The. Fisher hall to pull nausea and Pam withhold nice century. Don't wait. Tumbled toil upon job yet. How woman twelve in Indonesia Delpont, Georgia? Issue Honduras Johan push Delilah. Not now. You mean? Male tourism social will push Honey Jane Commissioner Joe Guangya quarters with the tie-up. We young woman would tension model homes Jewish woman. Number which judiciary. During the shirt share a horror show. She is. You may be all kinds of issues. Estrogens report how. On now, also. Hammond Russia on the. Treasure twenty one hundred dollars rebate. Horridness Yengo Shueisha twenty nine. No. On them. Hey sanjay. The you always hear point your dealer. Shin. Call the irony total. Madani N Dow porno show her how should they are young. Ah? Hip usual, our she's yeah. To wash it during your user group that resentment. Sure. Sure. Sure. I sure wish dry hole where the route. So young. Richard cantu. How they took. Now. Hijau teeny disease. You might I be going door. Telephone shoulda gentleman's. I always going going through homes real change. Tell us. Washington me. Beijing. For real idea. Jomie who? Choose UP. She you may go Ghana. Chico. Ho for John and yet..

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"shishir" Discussed on Chrisley Confessions

Chrisley Confessions

02:43 min | 2 years ago

"shishir" Discussed on Chrisley Confessions

"Been bothering me years. Leave or. Me working on getting a permanent asset. But I just wanted to own Hugh, Hugh, what would be the thing Shishir do keep which impermanent put him out. I would have to be for you put him out. Let me just share something with you. If my child put their hands on me, I would put them out. I would lay them out. Oh, Jesus, please. Keep me close to the cross. Because if one of my kids come at me with an say staff does she? Yeah. That her daughter stabbed her in the leg. Choked her that she can't sleep. This chicks gotta go after the mother has reinforced in her child who the mother is. Because they you know, how that would go down in our house. I'm from South Carolina. I believe is smack in the shit out of somebody puts their hands on you. I come at you. I put my hands on you. But you put your hands on me. And you don't let these clothes. I got on food you because I'm I like to fight you know, that will never is going to be fighting. This is combat in her Ohio. Yeah. This is your home you have to lay those ground rules. You have to have those that boundary, and if your child cannot respect your boundaries, then they must have a better plan. And they do they gotta go because. Yeah, they are putting their hands on you. If they're putting their hands on other. Children in the home. No that can't work that just can't work. Can you imagine if chase came at me and said I'm on Joe as daddy. Yeah. Wouldn't be good. I with throat less. End up. We are praying for your family because obviously you need it. I am praying for her family. But I'm praying that she smacks shit out of her daughter. That's what I'm praying far. I'm praying that you remind her who her mom is. And I got also know what you've been doing as a mother that your child feels it's okay to disrespect you to this level. Nephew in church. You run into jobs. You've always kept a roof. Over ahead. You kept McLean. Cafe in this. She still trying to cut you. Nah. Nah. Come South Carolina. Let me let me teach you how we would handle that end South Carolina back in the day today. It's kinda hard for you to kind of choke choke a child out when I do something like that. Because then you going to jail because the DSS is going to get involved because they can handle it better than you can even though they lose in kids in the system every day and don't even know where the hell they play some. But thing Hanley better than you..

South Carolina Shishir McLean Hugh Hanley Ohio Joe
"shishir" Discussed on MMA Junkie Radio

MMA Junkie Radio

03:38 min | 3 years ago

"shishir" Discussed on MMA Junkie Radio

"I wish should remember, man, get Frank MIR on that show was fun. Really? Yeah. What was he laughing about too stupid questions that we would ask them, but then he'd start laughing, but his laugh would make us laugh. And then we all start up. Okay. Well, see, you can get them laugh or see if you can get them to remember that incident. Okay. Have you brought it up to him since now pushing ten years, something like that. Right. Because we weren't even here yet than studio. Right. So past ten years because this is war on our nine nine and a half year nine and a half. How would you say your year? Why they were on nine and a half years. You can't do anything a nine and a half, then call it nine and a half years. But because he would say ninth year, but yeah, Chris let is one of those guys that kind of tie in with a lot of things though. I mean, you know you guys mentioned your interviews, which I've heard on this show him someone was mentioned. You mentioned in the day, George, the pay per views, and you use, you meant you through in the Shane carwin, verse Brock, listening and wasn't that one of those really stat cards where I think they had Matt Brown versus Chris Lytle, and that was one of the first cards that's Nelson memory. That was also one of the first cards. I remember because one of the first cards I called in, I think I called in broke down the main card as Christopher, walk in the show. I don't know if I told you guys at the time I told you as later I fest up to it, but yeah, and then you know, like I said, this weekend was doing the top five welterweight wars. So I felt like I went through almost all Chris levels career because he has authorised career from beginning to end. Like, really, you know you, you forget about, you know, of course, let over Tiago Alvarez and he's. He's early on fights, but at that one. Really? Yeah, that was that's the one that I've always said. The loudest strike strikes. I've ever heard in a fight. We're in that fight your way at mossy forty-seven or something. It was in knows in the eight. It was New Jersey, and it was when Lytle and Alvis were throwing late kicks back and forth. Remember the buds and the smacks when we were just like Jesus Christ out, are they still doing setting? Stop that one of the doctors around? Yeah. So here we go. Here's the card Lessner Carwyn. Okay. LeBron archea about that? It was leaving. He hadn't. He just fought two weeks before it was either that or he was fighting next after that. But yeah, yeah. Turnaround rate run. Then you had Lytle in Brown house was mentioned by Dan, Tom, Stephan Bonner, and Chris Christopherson ski. I think they finished up one in one right. George bliss and Kurt Pellegrino. Brendan Shaab. Chris took Shishir Shishir. She Pellegrino by the way, underrated lightweight, but on some some scraps, that guy was scrapped the whole in his face atman. He's tough. Yeah, but he's the one that got triangle by flipping birds thrown thirteen Denver Colorado, Ricardo Romero versus south patches l. e. y. just I can click on any of these is a whole bunch of things come. Then Romero get. I mean, absolutely destroyed by Kyle Kingsbury here mental debate. Yeah, I'll click them and just the second Brock is doing wrestling, obviously, Stephan bonders doing pro wrestling Brendan shabas the podcast guy now. Wow. A lot of these guys are just chef. Chris Lytle doing bare knuckle boxing to grow Gama's in his underwear. Again, KENDALL grove and Gorn relic Jerrell Harris versus David branch? Well, yes. PIN. Thousands slam. Yeah. Wow. Daniel Roberts versus forced pets and John Madsen versus Carlos Imola injure Albert's..

Chris Lytle Chris Tiago Alvarez LeBron archea Kurt Pellegrino Frank MIR George bliss Brock Ricardo Romero Shishir Shishir Kyle Kingsbury Christopher Shane carwin Brendan Shaab Chris Christopherson Matt Brown Lessner Carwyn Jerrell Harris KENDALL grove New Jersey
"shishir" Discussed on The Document

The Document

01:47 min | 4 years ago

"shishir" Discussed on The Document

"Death march they finally reached the first base camp and dug in for the night wiped out by the days track and then they collapsed in their sleeping bags for the chilly night the following day there was another eight hours of hiking the goal this time though was the abc the advanced base camp it was located on a beautiful plateau right below the glaciers of shishir parma the green moss that covered the rocky ground was dotted with tiny purple flowers this was a a little area that had a little lake and it was a place where the climbing team sixteen years ago had built a little memorial for dave and alex and carve their names and stones which were still there and this is where we were gonna set out even at sixteen thousand feet the abc was still a ways away from where the bodies their friends rested so the cancer a couple of nights and got accustomed to the altitude and some very raw emotions and they agreed on a plan they'd hiked to a ridge near the glacier then split into two groups conrad anchors group would actually venture out onto the glacier were the danger was greatest the other would not and then they carry the bodies back down to base camp but the plan started to fall apart right from the start it was a night a restless sleep at the abc the altitude had started to take its toll especially on david bridges brother dan who is basically incapacitated jobs group wanted to give him a little extra time to recover so he could go along in the final ascent that konrad decided to stick to the original plan and left with his group in the early morning darkness it was somewhere around four a m.

dave konrad alex conrad david bridges sixteen thousand feet sixteen years eight hours