35 Burst results for "Shirley"

Interview With Jane Badler Of V

Sci-Fi Talk Byte

02:07 min | Last week

Interview With Jane Badler Of V

"Jane battler talked about her return to be in the rebooted series. Their return for the new version, of V, playing the Queen deposed by her daughter Anna. Ten years. I it was kind of. then. We've been the last five years Before v I noticed there was this huge. Thing for me. So I went onto facebook and there was like thousands of people wanted to be my fan of this is crazy. What is this and that's what I I thought. Wow. I've got this amazing following and then when I heard that was coming back. No I kind of went into like palpitations. I had such an amazing reaction that I had to be on the show was bizarre thinking. Why am I feeling this way that it's like I hadn't finished what I'd. Started in some weird way. So I really fought to be back on i. met the first producer. Then he left and I met the I flew to La to sit. I was going to be in La met the second producer and because he met me when I auditioned addition is lots of other people he had met me and so he knew whose were excited about me and I think i. made it happen I think the fans made it happen because they bumped lorded them. So, you know I am so grateful I still keep my facebook happening I respond to people like it's really important. She described the differences between this Diana and the eighty s series until move. Absolutely. Extreme ambition and her extreme sense of power. I think this giant he's has much more calm as much more dignified and much more patience. She doesn't fly off the handle she just. Her stillness. His definitely a part of A. Little Bit. Little bit of a throwback to the eighties. I kinda like that a little bit like that you know that kind of sexy kind of sex given thing they got. Lots of bosom was. A good thing. It's a point of difference. Yeah exactly like we did in. Plano's Waltham so you can't stop. It was grander than the original series and Shirley the effects and make-up's were better. It just didn't seem to connect

Facebook Producer LA Jane Battler Anna Shirley Diana Plano Waltham
New Law Mandates California To Study The Issue Of Reparations For Slaves' Descendants

All Things Considered

04:28 min | 2 weeks ago

New Law Mandates California To Study The Issue Of Reparations For Slaves' Descendants

"This is all things considered from NPR news. I'm Mary Louise Kelly and I'm Elsa Chang in January. 18 65 As the Civil war staggered into its final months, the US made a promise. It would take for 100,000 acres of confiscated southern lands stretching from South Carolina to Florida and redistribute it to formerly enslaved black people in 40 acre parcels. Well, that order did not last long. Within the year, Lincoln's replacement president, Andrew Johnson, broke that promise and handed the land back to plantation owners. That was the nation's first systematic attempt to provide reparations for slavery. More recently, the late Michigan congressman John Conyers, tried and failed for nearly three decades. Yet Congress to consider the same issue. Now California has taken Conyers bill and used it as an inspiration for a new bill signed into law last week. It is the first state law of its kind. California Assemblywoman Shirley Weber is the author of that Bill, and she joins us Now. Welcome. Thank you. It's good to be here. Good to have you So what this new law does is basically set up a task force to study the issue of reparations for the descendants of enslaved people and To make further recommendations from there. Tell me what are you hoping to see? Come out of this task force. Well, I think they're a couple of things we hope will happen. Obviously, we hope there will be a number of recommendations on what the state needs to do in order to repair the damage that's been done. But hopefully in addition to that, we will have robust conversations about the really deep and long and pervasive impact of slavery and racism in California and across the nation. I talked to too many people who tell me I'm not a slave holder. I didn't I didn't own any slaves. What does that mean to me? Well, you may not have owned them, but the impact of your forefathers owning them. As what is the impact of the various laws and limitations placed upon African Americans That made it difficult, if not impossible, for them to compete educationally and economically and socially still has its lingering impact, and we see that in the streets today, we'll give us some concrete examples of what form Might these reparations take Well, you know, it could be like it is a Georgetown where those folks who was slaves that landed Georgetown, every descendant of those individuals now could have access and free education of Georgetown. We could look at the issue of loans and grants for people starting businesses, and we have businesses that are suffering and sometimes failing in this pandemic. Because of our let the lack of support and financing that made it almost difficult, if not impossible, for them to own land and only businesses. We need to look at housing patterns. California had some very, very racist housing patterns that existed. But they're they're number of things that need to exist and to indicate that is tremendous amount of damage was done and puts California on the hook as well, because he basically California was a free state, right. A lot of people don't think of California as a slave state, but exactly what role California did play when it came to slavery. Well, we had one of most racist governors who talked about removing all black people from state of California free or slaves. We created laws that prevented them from being able to testify in court against white person. We had lots of things embedded in our land ownership that prevents folks from buying or selling homes to African Americans. All of those things are important, as they began to say, is this wide African Americans continue to struggle have the least amount of wealth amassed have low homeownership, all those kinds of things that even after generations and generations of struggle. We still find that these things prevail. And even though a few sneak through the vast majority do not Now let me ask you dealing with the legacy of slavery is an issue that this entire country needs to reckon with. So there are a lot of people say, Let's look to a federal solution. How would you respond to that? Well, we have We lived for federal solution for 30 to 40 years. At this point, it's just not happening at the federal level. And so after waiting, we said, You know what California could do this? And I've governor said, You know what we can lead the way and that we think will motivate others to do. Likewise, California state Assemblywoman Shirley Weber was the author of a new state law to study reparations for slavery. Thank you very much, thank you for the opportunity.

California Assemblywoman Shirley Weber John Conyers NPR Mary Louise Kelly United States South Carolina Georgetown Congress Lincoln Andrew Johnson Michigan Florida President Trump Bill Elsa Chang
Helen Reddy: 'I Am Woman, Hear Me Roar' Singer Dies at 78

Morning Edition

02:38 min | 3 weeks ago

Helen Reddy: 'I Am Woman, Hear Me Roar' Singer Dies at 78

"Year before Helen Reddy was diagnosed with dementia, the singer explained in an interview with Houston Public media. Where I am woman came from, I guess Heaven, you know came to me and it wouldn't leave me was simply a phrase that over and over I am strong. I am invincible. I am woman. And I thought, Well, this is has to be a soul. I am woman. Hear me roar in numbers too big to ignore Helen Reddy this sport into a show business family in Australia. She came to the US after winning a singing competition in 1966. Her career was just beginning to take off when she decided she had to record I am woman, even though her label Capitol Records thought it was too strident to feminists ready, and her manager husband, more convinced the song would speak to a new generation of independent woman. Without any support from the label. They worked the phones trying to get radio stations to play it. It was so hard it was so hard, Helen Reddy and that 2014 interview. You know, so many radio stations would say, Well, we're we're already playing a female record. It took nearly a year for I'm women to work its way up the charts and become a number one hit. When ready, then won a Grammy for best female performance. She thanked her manager husband, I would like to thank Jeff wrong because he makes my success possible. And I would like to thank God because she makes everything possible, calling God she a national television was audacious. But remember, this was 1972. The same year, the Equal Rights Amendment passed the Senate and Shirley Chisholm ran for president. The Supreme Court made its decision in Roe vs Wade just a month after I am Woman reached number one on and I am women has legs over the years has been covered over and over with the cultural impact Illustrated in part by the gleeful karaoke version, sung by the main characters in the 2010 movie sex in the city, too. For recently Helen Reddy herself perform the song at the 2017 Women's March in Los Angeles. I wass but its ways. Yes, right. But look how much game Hindu and Helen Reddy's love memorialized in a movie that came out just this year, a biopic called, Of Course I Am Woman for Signature Song reflected optimism and joy in a time of challenge change difficulty. She leaves us joy and optimism in her music. It is

Helen Reddy Grammy Capitol Records Shirley Chisholm Houston United States Australia Jeff Wrong Supreme Court Los Angeles Senate President Trump ROE Wade
CDC reverses statement on airborne transmission of coronavirus, says draft accidentally published

The Daily 202's Big Idea

04:19 min | Last month

CDC reverses statement on airborne transmission of coronavirus, says draft accidentally published

"The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention removed language on Monday from its website that said, the coronavirus spreads via airborne transmission. It's the latest example, the agency backtracking from its own guidance. The agency says the guidance that went up on Friday and largely went without notice until Sunday should not have been posted because it was an early draft they hadn't been approved evidence that the virus floats in the air has. been mounting for months with an increasingly loud chorus of Aerosol Biologists pointing to super spreading events in choirs at churches on buses in bars, and another poorly ventilated spaces. They cheered when the CDC seem to join them in green the coronavirus airborne although CDC officials maintain Fridays post was a mistake Democratic lawmakers on Capitol Hill are incredulous and promised subpoenas an investigation to figure out what's really going on behind the scenes. This change on the website on Monday is the third time that trump's CDC has posted significant coronavirus guidance only to quickly reverse stance. It's also the latest disorienting turn in a significant scientific debate with enormous public consequences for how we returned to schools and offices the debate over whether the extreme infectiousness tenacity of the virus is due to its ability to spread well over six feet especially indoors and small particles that result from talking shouting singing you're just breathing many experts outside the agency say the pathogen can waft over considerably longer distances than six feet to be inhaled into our respiratory systems especially, if we're indoors and air flow conditions or stagnant. What's clear from such cases is that while the virus Shirley spreads slowly in households among family members, it also spreads rapidly at indoor events. The bring lots of folks together. Meanwhile against that backdrop, an NIH press staffer is being pushed out after being exposed as a secret anti. Mask Blogger, William crews, a public affairs specialist at the National Institute. Of Allergy, and Infectious Diseases told officials that he will retire after the daily beast revealed yesterday that he's the managing editor of the far right website red state were under the pseudonym strife. He is ridiculed the government's activity in response to the coronavirus outbreak a job that he does from the inside. It seems based on time that things were posted that he was doing a lot of this writing during work hours the daily beast reports that cruise under his pending called Tony, Ouchi, his boss, a quote mask Nazi and implied that quote government is responsible for the pandemic response should be. executed. Articles include one calling the Democratic governor of Nevada. A mask fetishists after trump finance would hold an indoor rally in defiance of that state's covid restrictions. And the White House has also again move to shake up the personnel office at the Department of Health and Human Services. After a series of IMBROGLIOS, the trump administration yesterday removed its top two liaisons between the White House and the Health Department Emily Newman and her deputy. Catherine GRANATO will be shifted work fulltime at the Voice of America. Newman already has spent more than three months detailed to the global media agency as its chief of staff which politico reports has meant that Grenada who was literally an undergraduate at the University of Michigan this Spring and is in her early twenties has been in charge of the entire health departments personnel policy amid pandemic that has killed more than two hundred thousand. Americans. In Reminder, the personnel is policy. There are new indications that America cannot fix. It's ninety five facemask shortage, and we have a story today that sites several experts agreeing that the trump administration's mismanagement and incompetence are the major reasons why? And the numbers themselves are still really bad a third of states or seeing new case numbers that are at least seventy, five percent of their peak infection numbers. The most recent ten thousand American deaths were added in just the last nine days three fewer days than the ten thousand deaths that preceded those. On a positive note, fewer of those infected with the virus or dying than earlier in the pandemic, and that's great news. But the ongoing addition of new cases means an ongoing edition of new deaths and cases keeping at it.

CDC Managing Editor America White House Donald Trump Emily Newman William Crews Department Of Health And Human Nevada Shirley Catherine Granato NIH Politico Public Affairs Specialist University Of Michigan Health Department Grenada
Zendaya is the youngest Emmys lead drama actress winner

All of It

00:50 sec | Last month

Zendaya is the youngest Emmys lead drama actress winner

"Entertaining 2020 Emmys kicked off with a bang when the beloved comedy This is its title, Not a swear word s C H. I T. T S Creek broker record by winning seven Primetime Emmys in the comedy categories, including writing best comedy plus completely sweeping all the acting awards. Zendaya also made history a 20 for becoming the youngest winner of the best lead actress in a drama for her portrayal of ruin the HBO Siri's euphoria and the acclaimed limited Siri's watchman, also one big taking home. The award for best limited Siri's, as well as acting awards for Yaya Abdul Mateen, the second and Regina King. King wore a Briana Taylor T shirt, as did Yuzu Aduba, who won for playing Shirley Chisholm and Mrs America and all the favorite succession walked away with best drama. Okay, now that we've celebrated all that great

Siri Regina King Yaya Abdul Mateen T. T S Creek Shirley Chisholm Yuzu Aduba HBO Briana Taylor Zendaya Mrs America
A sweep for ‘Schitt’s Creek,’ ‘Succession’ tops Emmy Awards

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | Last month

A sweep for ‘Schitt’s Creek,’ ‘Succession’ tops Emmy Awards

"It was about TV to be sure but last night's Emmys will also about politics and social justice here's what blankets star Anthony Anderson got any host Jimmy Kimmel to echo the call for an end to police brutality others needed no prodding at all like Regina king of watchman who had a simple message for viewers got a vote I would be remiss not to mention that both king and lose I do both won supporting actress for playing Shirley Chisholm and Mrs America what T. shirts honoring Brianna Taylor the black woman in Louisville Kentucky shot to death by police in her home during a botched drug raid I'm Oscar wells Gabriel

Anthony Anderson Jimmy Kimmel Shirley Chisholm Mrs America Brianna Taylor Louisville Kentucky Oscar Wells Gabriel
How Chicago's Death Alley Got Its Name

Ghost Light

11:00 min | Last month

How Chicago's Death Alley Got Its Name

"By I decided to restart my day took a shower here. We are feeling good feeling in feel like I'm in the driver's seat. Good. Good. Yeah. That's a lesson forever and restart your day whenever you choose if you're not going the way, you want it. You get to restart it whenever you want and hydrate. And hydrate I'm going to a separate now. Everyone with us. Wasn't that refreshing. So before we get into the history of the Pittsburgh playhouse. Mercedes who again today script wrote us a little introduction. So without further ado, let's get into says. Introduction. She writes I love Pittsburgh. It's my home city, and in my humble opinion, it's one of the top two best cities on the planet. It's a place full of life and culture and history, but it's so small unleash that it tends to fly beneath the radar for most I grew up loving the city and knowing that it has a lot to offer when it comes artistic expression August Wilson, famously loved the city his home city so much that he created that connick Pittsburgh cycle it's an amazing city so to me, it just makes sense that if ghosts were real, they'd want to come back to hang out in the burgh I love for a little longer guests I love that you really heartfelt starts episode Mercedes. I think I need to go to Pittsburgh have you been now? Road trip I how far far could we drive from here? Yeah. I don't think it's far I think yeah I don't know. No I think. We'll take our stark reserves. Okay. So the history of the Pittsburgh playhouse. By Mercedes okay. The historic Pittsburgh playhouse originally on craft and was not so much a theater as it was a collection of buildings that were brought and then turned into theatrical spaces. The first of these was acquired in nineteen, thirty four and was formerly a German Social Club. This building was bought as a wedding present by Richard. Row for his wife Helen Wayne their stories actually very cute. So Richard. Fell in love with Helen when he first saw her perform in New York, his family was super rich and well-known Spanish factors in Pittsburgh. So he bought the location for Helen to give her a nice space to act in Pittsburgh. He basically did this so that they could live there together and she would feel fulfilled even though she wasn't a Big New York City Act trix actress. On that's so cute. Matching someone just give. The building. Just so that you can. Live in the and like feel like you're a big time. Yeah. I get jobs. Yes. Okay. So that their names are Helen and Richard Richard and So. With that, the Pittsburgh Civic playhouse was formed not just by Richard and Helen. It was a group of artists making up the company but like the rows. Oh but like the rows were moneybags. playhouses. Next purchase was an adjacent house to act as a lobby for what was then known as the Roth eater. The first performance in this theater and lobby space was in nineteen, thirty four. The playhouse was fairly popular in the thirties and forties staging productions of Noel Coward's private lives in Thornton wilders. Then new our town during his l.. Then new. Oh. I would like to, I. would like to live in a world where. Still felt new. During this, the playhouses signature leading lady was, of course, none other than Helen Wayne row, which seems like a pretty sweet deal and I'm jealous of her whole situation getting a sugar daddy to basically launch her acting career. Mercedes. SPEAK ON A. So the stage also housed musicals and featured a little known dancer choreographer just months before he would get his big break on Broadway you WanNa. Take a guess Fred Astaire. Close. Close. Oh Who Does skin I don't another dig her come on. It's obvious. Gene, Kelly. of. Yeah. Gosh. Okay. But I've heard he's like Not Nice well, did he like demand rehearsals like over and over again tell people bleeding? Yeah something wacko on in singing in the rain like I've brought up seeing in the rain on this podcast before which is funny. Okay. So that's NEAT I didn't know Gene Kelly was from. Pittsburgh neither that means Jim Kelly Okay Mall from the Burgh. What a gorgeous dancer what? Does little tap into. All right. Moving on. The third building that was additives Hodgepodge of theaters was formerly the tree of life synagogue the congregation moved to Squirrel Hill. I have to stop. I have to stop Squirrel Hill. Sounds like that sounds like a horrifying like like scary movie of chipmunks and squirrels like like. or or Blake dream. Yes my partner like squirrels. Okay. the congregation moved to Scroll Hill in nineteen fifty, one in this space was acquired by the playhouse making up their largest theater space. The Rock wealthier underneath the theater was a restaurant known as the playhouse restaurant. A former ballroom turned ice cream parlor. Cute. Wow. They're out here like setting up a small town. Lot of they got a restaurant. So there's three theaters. All connecting. So like spaces. Yeah. It was the playhouse restaurant, which is a ballroom to ice cream parlor. Got It. So you want got it another local Pittsburgh or to get their star at the playhouse before becoming a household name was one Shirley. Jones. I don't know that is. Listeners You do but I hope you do if you don't Google it we will. Profess, she performed in the playoffs. Many times Okay. Walmer says love that fact but. I feel like we're GONNA waking up in like feel stupid or something. Yeah. Well, another Pittsburgh native who has a history at the playhouse, oh? My Gosh is Jeff. Goldblum. We love chuckles literally Jeff. Goldblum pits. Pittsburgh playhouse butter boop. Out by I love. Jeff. Jacob Blue, that's the best I can I gotta wash him. Once when I go on benders watching Jeff Videos I can get that I can get that down pat? I can do really well that was impression to have like just in your back pocket it is it is when parties come back in twenty thirty I'll be sure to have perfected that party trick. Apparently, his first acting was done with the children's Cedar through playhouse junior an educational opportunities where children received professional training on a professional stage. Mercedes wrote feel free to have Goldblum here I would like to but I don't know why I love You love yes. We've why sorry I just I we did watch this show. But I'm just saying like outside of like that show on Disney plastic everyone by the way if you're busy plus stream Jeff. Goldblum show it's incredible but. I Love Jeff Goldblum I want his his interviews on Graham Norton also highly recommend every interview on. Yeah. True. True. Just pivoting entirely too grim noreen. My favorite episode did US maybe we are together. So don't get mad at me but did you watch that episode of Jeff. Goldblum the world according to Jeff Goldblum by the way is the full title did you watch the episode where he goes to Jeff Goldblum Day and gets like a tattoo like he'll give some tattoo people are getting Jeff. Goldblum. FLASH TATTOOS DID YOU. Know I didn't. But I've seen I've seen him Like. In an interview talking about people getting tattoos of him. And it's so funny. It's like I feel like we should be our next to you remember when we had just left London and somewhat some artists like installed this giant Jeff Goldblum statue on like Phil Lot on the lawn outside the the bridge theater setting somewhere around there and they had this like Gorgeous Gold Statue of Jeff Goldblum laying down like he doesn't Dross Park Oh. Yeah and he's like young his shirtless Yeah Walnut list but tank top or whatever no just a button down but it was like not buttoned half a Oh Anyway so you shouldn't. Superstar. He is he's got to love him. Okay. We're going to move on because this isn't his show but if he's listening it can be your show, Jeff. He's just sweet. Just send us an email. Go slight see the me calm your show. Can take over. So. The theater began to struggle financially and was acquired by point bark. Point Park University in nineteen sixty eight the playhouse continued to operate now mostly for students for many years this way this wasn't a perfect fit though the buildings of the playhouse were old and not originally intended for theater. They were also much farther from Point Park's main downtown campus making the playhouse more trouble for the school than it was worth in late two, thousand, eighteen, the old Pittsburgh playhouse buildings crafts avenue were demolished as the spirit of the playhouse was moved to a new home. Oh, that's a bummer. It's like cool history. The new Pittsburgh playhouse complex is located on Forbes and fourth, and while it may not have as many ghosts lingering as the old buildings had it is at the very least a space that was designed and intended to be used for theatre. Sad. Sad. Okay. Well, moving on things the hunting section of the Pittsburgh playhouse. We gotta get my my spooky vocal but We also Halloween town reference. Have you sir. Familiar. Halloween town. Longtime ago. I know. Collectively, Judge Lino, she was not raised on D. Calms and it shows in times like this. There's a wonderful line that Debbie Reynolds has when she corrects her grandson on how to make a ghost noise like make it like this out of a ghost sign it was one of the daughters anyway she's like she's like she says something about it being like like lower and more melancholic

Jeff Goldblum Pittsburgh Pittsburgh Playhouse Pittsburgh Civic Playhouse Pittsburgh Playhouse Complex Helen Wayne Mercedes Richard Richard Gene Kelly New York August Wilson Point Park University Noel Coward Fred Astaire Debbie Reynolds Google Squirrel Hill
Peaceful protests follow clashes with Rochester police

WBBM Morning News

01:03 min | Last month

Peaceful protests follow clashes with Rochester police

"Of of Daniel Daniel Prude Prude is is triggered triggered days days of of protests protests following following the the release release of of video video showing Rochester police putting what they call a spit hood over his head. He died several days later. CBS News correspondent Elise Preston says last night's demonstrations were peaceful. Protesters hit the streets of Rochester, New York, for the fifth straight night with truth members and community elders at the forefront to keep the peace. I don't want police to spray the young people I don't want the young people throw rocks, seven year old Shirley Thompson has a history of fighting for civil rights. Choose at the march on Washington in 1963. We're trying to appeal to the moral conscience of our authority figures in the city. Demonstrations erupted last week after a video was released showing Daniel Proves fatal encounter with police Back in Marty mayor of Rochester says Calls for mental health assistance will be handled by a city health agency. Is part of a Siri's of reforms designed to improve trust in the police.

Rochester Daniel Daniel Elise Preston Shirley Thompson CBS Siri Washington New York
The Limits of Filming Police Brutality

Slate's If Then

06:15 min | Last month

The Limits of Filming Police Brutality

"This summer Ethan wrote a new article in it. He looked back on the optimism he felt in two thousand sixteen his faith that cameras and social media could reform the relationship between communities and the police tasked with protecting them. But now, he says increasing awareness through video is not enough as I was wrong. It appears that it was George Floyd's. Killing. That may have led you to change your mind and. You describe watching that video. And being struck by the police officers face as he looked at himself being filmed can can you tell me what it was? You saw that struck you. He makes eye contact with someone who is filming him. And he doesn't even attempt to say put the camera away. He isn't embarrassed about what he's doing. That is the image of someone who is looking at someone filming them and felt like they were not be consequences for his actions. I wanted to read back something you wrote in your piece you said the hope that pervasive cameras by themselves would counterbalance the systemic racism that leads to the over policing of communities of color and the disproportionate use of force against black men was simply a techno utopian fantasy. I think we often look for technological shortcuts to deep societal problems. Systemic racism over policing fear of black men in particular these are giant thorny difficult problems. And I think I and many people hoped that police body cameras in particular but also mobile phone cameras would tilt the playing field. For me the most disturbing and maybe dispiriting piece of this was the fact that we're starting to see very good peer reviewed large scale studies that suggest that police weren't body cameras don't have any measurable effect on use of force on police misconduct compliance, and that seems really surprising for whatever reason. This is not shaping police behavior and I think the answer is that police officers know consciously or unconsciously that there a set of protections that are going to allow them in most cases to use extreme force and and not suffer consequences for it i. think that overrides whatever psychological effects we might have from that sense of being watched. And yet it was that video that lead to water. Now, possibly, the largest protests in American history is that not proof that the the video works. Unfortunately the less. No and I have bad news on that front my lab at Mit Center for Civic Media did a very large study of media coverage of. Police violence affecting unarmed people colored. So we looked at over three hundred instances of unarmed people of color who were killed in encounters with police between twenty thirteen in two, thousand sixteen. What we were able to show was that there was a huge wave of media attention to these stories for about twelve eighteen months after the death of Michael Brown. Before Mike, Brown. These were almost always a reported as an isolated incident after Mike Brown, we were eleven times more likely to link these stories into a larger pattern of systemic police abuse violence. So for that brief period of time for about twelve to eighteen months, we paid much better attention to these stories and we told these stories in a different way we told them as part of a larger pattern. But by the end of our study, media attention was back down to where it had been before. My prediction is that we will see some sort of six twelve, eighteen month window of attention to stories like that, George Floyd. But unless something else substantial changes, I would predict that wave attention will away in much the same way the wave of attention around Michael. Brown federal way. So in light of that, let me continue reading from where I read before. In your piece you say that Techno Utopian fantasy you spoke about was a hope that police violence could be an information problem like Uber Rides or Amazon recommendations solvable by increasing the flows of data. But after years of increasingly widespread gut body CAM use an even more pervasive social media. It's clear that information can work only when it's harnessed to power. What what do you mean here? How do you harness information to power? The hope for change coming out of George Floyd's murder is that this is a moment where communities really go after the structure police departments and the structure of our associated with them. Ferguson. Where Michael Brown was killed is one of the best examples of this that was a police department that had incredible influence within local government and was functioning almost as its own revenue generating and tax generating force. That was a police force that struck Shirley had grown out of control, and one of the things that we have to realize is that we can use things like video and imagery to call attention to this. But unless we harness it to changing those broken institutions, we're GONNA find ourselves back on again.

George Floyd Michael Brown Mike Brown Mit Center For Civic Media Ethan Ferguson Murder Amazon Shirley Brown
Author Chat With Suzanne Park

Books and Boba

05:35 min | Last month

Author Chat With Suzanne Park

"So we're here, which is the park, the author of the perfect escape and low that first sight. Thank you Suzanne for joining us today. Thanks for having me. This is gonNA. Be Really Fun. I hope. Okay. Ask You all your deepest darkest secrets on this past summer. Little nervous. Person To make fun. So. A little bit about where you're from. Well. I was born and raised in. Tennessee. So in a town right outside of Nashville. At the time. Of the town didn't have that many non. Mostly, just white people at this in this town and I think slowly Shirley over the years they've increased it to about three percent. A pretty. Pretty. Big Waves are making their but Yeah. So I was born and raised in this town, but we did most of my schooling in Nashville. So. Yeah, eighteen years of my life spent. In the south. Are you also living in Tennessee right now or have you relocated. Yes. So after After high school I moved to New York for school, and then after that moved to Los Angeles for Grad School so I've moved. To those two cities in then found a position in Seattle and lived there for a number of years in the move to La. About. Eight years ago so I consider L. A. my home now but definitely have I still have a lot of friends. In Nashville and I do like to go visit. We kind of had the same trajectory because I'm from Georgia. And then I went to school in New York and then I moved to La and now I'm here. I totally understand when when people ask where are you from? I'm like I don't know I'm from like four different places so. And I've lived in a at least all of those places for a number of years. So New York, I was there for seven years for in La collectively I was there. Twice that I've moved here over ten if you combine everything and then Seattle also along time so up. So I consider all the my home to some degree but yet Nashville I do consider like my hometown. You had the opposite I was born in Toronto and then moved to L., A., and I've been here since. An immaterial house one psalm barely Canadian. About delay wondered about like like what does that feel that? Place. I. Mean. One is for your entire life living cities. I've lived in DC lived in San. Diego. But. I've spent at least twenty five years of my life in La specifically in San Gabriel. Surrounded by Asians all the sites. In Georgia and Tennessee. Is there anything about Tennessee that YOU MISS I'm this the food. Something I. It's true and even when in La, you really can't find good southern food I. Mean you fine food that is like southern adjacent, but it's not the meeting threes in it's not. Just. The just the type of food they have there's just hardier and it tastes how main I guess I just really appreciate that either foods and when I go back home we you know I love just eating southern food like shrimp and grits in. Whatever? Put it all on my plate biscuits gravy. If you can let you get a lot of fancy shops making southern food. Yes. That's right. I mean Collard Greens are not too fancy and yet somehow they add all these ingredients that make it almost too fancy and I'm like it's Turnip Greens like. It shouldn't have all these. It shouldn't have eighteen ingredients in it but but somehow the the the La way of doing it in it's also. Very, organic in. Raw when you eat it. So both of your books are set in Seattle. And you said that you're now in La do plan to write a book set in. La Anytime soon. One of my books, the one I'm riding for release next year the Young Adult Book Coming Out Ju I'm twenty, twenty one that one is partly in La. In. That book is about A. Social Media DICTA teenager who shipped off by your parents to go to digital detox camp in Iowa. So the beginning part is placed is end La, and you have a little bit of La. some some discussions about just the environment there when she shipped off, you can see the contrast of it though of so partly I guess the La based and that that's been a lot of fun to write because it really had the opportunity to write about both what I know about l.. A. In love about La but then also go with the stark contrast her being on this in this detox camp that's on a farm and Harketting through a fine. Yeah. the smaller town feels. So I've enjoyed that one a lot

Los Angeles Nashville Tennessee Seattle New York Suzanne Georgia Grad School Collard Greens A. Social Media Dicta SAN Shirley Toronto Diego San Gabriel Harketting Iowa L. LA.
Will Netflix Make A Sequel To Charlize Theron's Hit Movie The Old Guard

Direct from Hollywood

00:42 sec | 2 months ago

Will Netflix Make A Sequel To Charlize Theron's Hit Movie The Old Guard

"Shali Stare at scifi movie. The old guard debut two huge numbers last month already ranking Netflix's top ten most viewed movies seems pretty obvious. Right becoming especially given the teaser after the credit end. But according to deadline, it might be quite a while before cameras start rolling on the follow up mainly because Shirley's is in such high demand she currently developing another sequel with Netflix, the twenty-seven atomic blonde and other issues that given the extremely grueling demand preparing for an action movie. Shirley's typically likes it rotate between blockbusters and dramas to give her body arrest. So in all likelihood release a couple years before they could even begin thinking about the project and the script for the sequel hasn't even been written, but the screenwriters also the same mind, an entire series of graphic novels stories based on, we'll keep you posted.

Shirley Netflix Shali Stare
Freedom Summer: Barbara Lee

The Brown Girls Guide to Politics

07:06 min | 2 months ago

Freedom Summer: Barbara Lee

"In June nineteen sixty four freedom summer also known as the Mississippi Summer Project was a volunteer campaign across America to attempt to register as many black American voters as possible in Mississippi. News coverage of freedom summer shed a light on the white supremacy and police brutality that black Americans face. We. Don't Tuesday night the finding of three bodies in graves at the site of a damn near Philadelphia Mississippi where three civil rights workers disappeared six weeks ago. Over the past few weeks we have been experiencing another freedom summer. Minnesota are saying to people in New York two people in California to people in Memphis to people all across this nation enough is enough cell phone videos and social media are once again providing glaring spotlight on the inequities and injustice that are woven into the fabric of American society. In this special season of the browns to politics, we are diving into the past in how is impacting our present and future. For protests to political campaigns and youth involvement change is in the air and the fight for liberation continues. We'll be hearing from some of the Black Women at the forefront at today's movement who are fighting for change in making history to ensure that we have justice for all. Her name was even floated as a potential. VP. Pick for Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden's. It is no surprise that would ever congress is debating issues of equity and justice. Congress will lease voice is one of the strongest and most prominent today we talk about her work as a college student, a member of the Black Panther Party and what Congress is, do we to fight systems of oppression to reshape reimagined our political world? Congresswoman Barbara Lee thank you so much for joining us and happy belated birthday. Breaking very good happy with you. I'm really excited to talk to you today and for our listeners, the congresswoman is such a legend and all of her work that she has done in. Congress over the years especially for Black Brown and indigenous communities by I have to ask you this question because it's something that I just wanted to talk to you about for so long is. You were a part of the Black Panthers. What was it like being? Black Panther I actually was not a member of the Black Panther Party I was what they call the community worker community workers had a lot of responsibilities as the Black Panther. Party. Members and remember the Black Panther Party began as a result of police Gupta brutality and the African American community. I mean. They stood down the police because things, police, murders, police Retali- as we know now were occurring then and they were the first organization that really took the police on, and so it was out of that that the Black Panther party formed, there's the Bible programs because it was not only an organization that address police brutality, but it was an organization that addresses chemic-. Racism and poverty. and. So what I did, and which was really phenomenal work and I was a single mother on public assistance with two little boys. I helped sell newspapers like math a newspaper on street corners I actually participated in the breakfast program for children who didn't have whose parents didn't have enough money to buy food and that's actually the breakfast programs from the federal government. Actually. Started as a result of the of the models that the Black Panther party you. I also really worked with you. He knew then did the research on his book Revolutionary Suicide. It was really phenomenal project I got to know Huey Newton Bobby Seale, Elaine Brown, Erica Huggins Joan Kelly, who just passed away and many of the leadership of the black. Panther party because community worker and student I was very involved in a lot of the work with party members. I actually brought Shirley Chisholm got involved in politics through the first presidential the first. Time. A black woman ran for president and that was sure children who was the first African American woman elected to Congress and so the Black Student Union president I invited her to come to milk college where I was attending and I got involved in her campaign by herb insisting that I register the vote and I had a class go because I didn't WanNa work in any of those campaigns. Well, bottom line is working her campaign and got the Black Panther party really involved in voter registration efforts. I. Was the one that went and asked Huey Noonan Bobby Seale to consider becoming politically active around early Chisholm campaign and they did. So I worked on all phases of the black. Panther. Party and all the different divisions I actually bag groceries. You know the panthers had a whole ten point program which again, the Free Breakfast program for the kids They started the Community Health Center Movement by instituting the George Jackson free medical clinic they did sickle cell tests. In fact, there was the Black Panther party that raises awareness about sickle cell disease as a as a disproportionate impact African Americans Fast Board Twenty Twenty people in the African American community and Black and Brown news still struggling disproportionately as it related to food security food desert healthcare disparities, unequal education. I. Helped. Start. Actually I wrote the first proposals for the Black Panther Party community learning center. They establish a Black Panther party school and so I was very instrumental in working on that project. So I did a lot of work with the Black Panther Party and I can just speak to how phenomenal they were and how necessary they were and how we should as we move forward. You know there's this Symbol in a gun and Andy. In government in Ghana called and Copeland. If the bird beautiful bird looking back holding an egg in her mouth and like in order to move forward in order to blackboard and you have to look back, we have to know our history we know where we've been and we have to build upon that so that we can move forward it. Now a wonderful young people in the Movement for Black, flags, or dreamers all the movements that are taking place are a continuation of what I see as the civil rights movement of of today, as well as what Black Panther Party actually started as it relates to stand down and and thing that that policing in our community. chain stop disproportionate killing black, and Brown people

Black Panther Party Black Panther Party School Panther Party Congress Black Women African American Community Black Student Union Congresswoman Barbara Lee Mississippi Huey Noonan Bobby Seale Philadelphia Mississippi Joe Biden Minnesota Browns Shirley Chisholm Memphis Ghana Panthers New York
April Ryan Interview

Toure Show

05:04 min | 2 months ago

April Ryan Interview

"Another tactic trump used to galvanize his core supporters came to me in an awkward moment in the summer of twenty seventeen I took my kids to New York City to see Broadway musical wicked for the third time yet more importantly to see actress Shirley Ralph, who played madame miracle the headmistress of the school. My friend made theater history by being the first black woman to play Madame miracle on Broadway, it was art imitating life. When one of the characters began to reveal the plot of the play making the green, which the enemy of Oz character said the best way to unify people is to create a common enemy. Mind you wicked. The book was published in Nineteen Ninety, five and the play was a broadway musical in two, thousand and three. This thought pattern was laid well before Donald Trump decided to create a common enemy, but he understood what to do. And you could say that about a lot of things calling cabinet is the common enemy. April Ryan is the common in Barack Obama is the common and the media in general common. Enemy of the people isn't that something you and that was I swim. Are you afraid for your life right now? 'CAUSE you've gotten death threats. Now you're traveling with security. Are. You didn't say I'll challenge with security okay. Okay. Are you are you are you are you seriously afraid for your life? I'm seriously afraid. I'm seriously the mount over their freight for myself. I'm afraid for my fellow reporters. There are some crazy people out here. Today there are people out here who listen to this president and believe that he's doing God's work and think they're doing God's bidding by calling us and threatening us. A reporter, call my boss recently. And said, well, you know we hear April's getting these death threats and then. Okay well, I thought he was just going to verify verbally that I was getting the death threats. So my boss and I talked on the phone. So yeah I got a call from so and so from Sullen. So I said Oh I said, did you tell them? He said not only did I tell them I gave him the emails I gave them the voicemails I gave him I gave him everything I said what so it's cringe-worthy but I am not going to cower to fear. I. Do what I have to do to survive, but I'm not gonNA couch fear. Ones at back what does a credible death threat look like what have you gotten that really made you say I without going into without going into a lot of it when someone calls or emails or texts my company or me and says death from above and you know how? Some of these things are just belligerent and they talk about you know falsehoods about the black community. I'm a race Baiter I'm this I'm that and then death from it I don't WanNa get into it, but I had one the one of the early one came into the company website saying that I was like what in the person happened to be someone a retired military person Yes. So I don't want to go any further into this, but it's real Torah, it's real and. It's real, but I'm not going to stop because. I take my precautions I'm on I'm fully aware of it, but guess what a lot of it to they want to make you afraid. They want to make you afraid and I refuse. Has It changed the way you do your job in any way noticed that changed the way I do my job? No not at all not at all not at all. And I refuse to let it have you seen. This climate of media as the enemy and we must be violent toward media has it affected the way others are doing their jobs. I can't tell you what others I mean. I. Don't talk to them that much because. I just I don't WanNa. Give it life. But there's also this understanding that it's real. I mean. WanNa talk to you but I can't and I just don't want to get into it because. They're people who may WANNA copy. There are people who may want to do and I'm not going to give them that foothold. and I and I hear you sign because it's a sad day. No, it's it is heavy to see what we've already seen of. The newspaper gets attacked. This one gets attacked that when the television you hear Kim Volvo what they called they said to Kim is like what what, what did they say? They said some crazy stuff about you know they were talking about I don't even want to give you talking about the AK seventy, you use a pin but what about I have an AK seventy something along that line I'm like what it's ridiculous. C. Span of C. Span caller said something crazy about Brian. So I'm like what and I'm like it's not a joke. You don't use this tongue in cheek these words this is real this allies people don't see. There's collateral damage. When you do something like this and I am we have seen what happened in? Annapolis

Donald Trump Kim Volvo Nineteen Ninety Wanna New York City OZ Barack Obama Shirley Ralph April Ryan C. Span Black Community Reporter President Trump Annapolis Brian
Shooting breaks out at music video filming

Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

00:53 sec | 2 months ago

Shooting breaks out at music video filming

"Two people have been hurt after violence breaks out at US at the shooting of a music video in Pontiac. Oakland County, Sheriff Michaels Chart says someone hiding in the trees began firing on those taking part in the music video at Shirley Park last night, striking one man in the arm. Another man was run over by a car, Bouchard says. When paramedics arrived. The situation gap tents, a lot of people that can have performed a circle has the deputies are trying to render aid. You know, they arrived and saw the individual laying our blood pooling around his head, and they're turned to render First emergency aid and group began to surround them and yell at them and telling them not to touch the individual and leave. I called in backups, Bouchard says they don't know if the man was run over on purpose that victims are not cooperating. Updating

Bouchard Oakland County Shirley Park Pontiac United States
Music Video Shoot in Michigan Ends With 1 Shot, 1 Run Over

Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

00:47 sec | 2 months ago

Music Video Shoot in Michigan Ends With 1 Shot, 1 Run Over

"Have been heard after violence breaks out at a shooting of a music video in Pontiac. Oakland County Sheriff Mike Bouchard says someone hiding in the trees began firing on those that were taking part of the music video at Shirley Park last night, hitting one man in the arm. Another man was run over by a car, Bouchard says. When paramedics arrived, the situation got a lot of people that can have performed a circle Has the deputies are trying to render aid. You know, they arrived and saw the individual ling of blood pooling around his head, and they were turned to render first emergency aid and group began to surround them and yell at them and Telling him not to touch the individual and leave. PMT is called him back up. Bouchard says that they don't know if the man was run over on purpose. The victims are not cooperating in that investigation.

Sheriff Mike Bouchard Oakland County Shirley Park Pontiac
"shirley" Discussed on The Jump with Shirley Manson

The Jump with Shirley Manson

03:08 min | 2 months ago

"shirley" Discussed on The Jump with Shirley Manson

"<Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> Are you aware <Speech_Music_Female> or are you <Speech_Music_Female> careful <Speech_Music_Female> to try always? <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> Mine defy <Speech_Male> notes defense <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> structures <Speech_Female> are or do <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> you not try not to pay attention <Speech_Female> to that and just see <Speech_Female> what <SpeakerChange> comes naturally <Speech_Male> as a writer? <Speech_Male> Now <Speech_Male> I think the first <Speech_Male> instinct if our spark <Speech_Male> is always really <Speech_Male> previous and. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Try To. <Silence> <Speech_Male> Like harness <Speech_Male> that somehow <Speech_Male> not play <Speech_Male> death and like <Speech_Male> over Paul something <Speech_Male> or. <Speech_Male> But. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Question. <Speech_Male> I sold <Speech_Male> out. <Speech_Male> Great. <Speech_Male> Just <Speech_Male> A. Yeah. Okay. So <Speech_Male> I think I'm to try. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> When he gets older. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> She, just funny. <Speech_Male> Make <SpeakerChange> Music <Speech_Male> for me personally <Speech_Female> laughing <Speech_Male> why. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> This love <Speech_Male> saying <Speech_Male> older she's funny. <Speech_Male> Why is it funny <Speech_Male> because live <Speech_Male> is funny <Speech_Male> quiet. All being old <Speech_Male> funny. <Speech_Male> because. He got like <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> Imo <Speech_Male> just older. <Speech_Male> <Silence> Like older. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> No No, it's just my mind <Speech_Male> is the same <Speech_Male> by the <Speech_Male> my body <SpeakerChange> is not to <Speech_Male> get all saw gear <Speech_Male> and like. <Speech_Male> Just <SpeakerChange> kinda like. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> This. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> As Fun <Speech_Male> as he uses. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> There's a <Speech_Male> euphemism in a half. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> But with writing <Speech_Male> music <Speech_Male> for me personally <Speech_Male> the more <Speech_Male> you do it begun over <Speech_Male> doing it for like <Speech_Male> thirty years <Speech_Male> or something but I just <Speech_Male> more it. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I want <Speech_Male> to be excited. <Speech_Music_Male> I want to be. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> I want to be <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> surprised. <Speech_Music_Male> So you just have <Speech_Music_Male> to experiment <Speech_Music_Male> with something <Speech_Music_Male> like trying <Speech_Music_Male> to pluck and <Speech_Music_Male> try. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Try. New Way <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> of doing <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> things or like just <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> keep you <Speech_Music_Male> motivated <Speech_Music_Male> and <SpeakerChange> excited. <Speech_Music_Male>

"shirley" Discussed on The Jump with Shirley Manson

The Jump with Shirley Manson

02:45 min | 2 months ago

"shirley" Discussed on The Jump with Shirley Manson

"<Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> A lot of <Speech_Male> kids in my school and <Speech_Male> especially in <Speech_Male> California in <Speech_Male> the early eighties hardcore <Speech_Male> black <Speech_Male> flag groups like <Speech_Male> that <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> But it just <Speech_Male> seemed. <Speech_Male> To <Speech_Male> me that <Speech_Male> hip hop <Speech_Male> was the <Speech_Male> future. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> seemed. Like does other things <Speech_Male> those were great <Speech_Male> but they didn't they <Speech_Male> weren't mine <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> for whatever reason I <Speech_Male> seized on hip hop as <Speech_Male> that and then <Speech_Male> As it <Speech_Male> grew <Speech_Male> in as it became <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <hes> you know <Speech_Male> I, sort <Speech_Male> of reached its glory <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> with groups like public <Speech_Male> enemy and you <Speech_Male> know I mean <Speech_Male> rebel without a pause. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> A lot of people <Speech_Male> my age in hip <Speech_Male> hop have that they <Speech_Male> remember that moment <Speech_Male> when they drop the needle <Speech_Male> on that record and <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> it was <Speech_Male> it was a feeling of always <Speech_Male> tried to get back ever <Speech_Male> since <Speech_Male> <hes> I call <Speech_Male> it my public enemy feeling. <Speech_Male> You know <Speech_Male> it's just it's. It's <Speech_Male> when <Speech_Male> nothing else <Speech_Male> to love that. <Speech_Male> Everything that was <Speech_Male> before and then that <Silence> moment on. <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> I I know <Speech_Male> some people have described <Speech_Male> that with <Speech_Male> Is Strange. <Speech_Male> I read a book <hes> <Speech_Male> with people are Gary <Speech_Male> Numan than they talked about <Speech_Male> the first time they heard <Speech_Male> I feel love by <Speech_Male> Donna summer <Speech_Male> because it was that ultra <Speech_Male> syncopated <Speech_Male> machine <Silence> made music. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> That just seemed more <Speech_Male> punk rock than punk. <Speech_Male> You know what? I mean <Speech_Male> in somehow it <Speech_Male> was like this <Speech_Male> incredible Pitney. <Speech_Male> Yeah. <Silence> And <Speech_Male> So <Speech_Male> any case <Speech_Male> that was mine, you <Speech_Male> know and and then <Speech_Male> later with other <Speech_Male> so many records <Speech_Male> and. <Speech_Male> <hes> and <Speech_Male> then NWEA <Speech_Male> and. <Speech_Male> Ghetto boys <Speech_Male> and I mean, just <Speech_Male> it goes on and on <Speech_Male> and on and day ally <Speech_Male> and. <Speech_Male> <hes> all these incredible <Speech_Male> moments <Speech_Male> and it also <Speech_Male> coincided <Speech_Male> of course with my <Speech_Male> high school life <Speech_Male> and. <Speech_Male> Growing <Speech_Male> up as a as a <Speech_Male> human. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> And it was the <Speech_Male> soundtrack of my life <Speech_Male> and for that <Speech_Male> will always be. <Speech_Male> That <Speech_Music_Male> bedrock. <Speech_Music_Male> That's <Speech_Music_Male> always <SpeakerChange> be my. <Music>

"shirley" Discussed on The Jump with Shirley Manson

The Jump with Shirley Manson

03:16 min | 2 months ago

"shirley" Discussed on The Jump with Shirley Manson

"<Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> Jimmy. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Male> <Music> West. <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> ME <Speech_Music_Female> AND <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> No <Speech_Music_Female> doubt about. <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> Your wonderful <Speech_Female> I wish you well in <Speech_Music_Female> finishing an <Laughter> idea. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> You can <Speech_Female> do oh my <Speech_Female> God. I didn't expect <Speech_Female> to get a psychic <Speech_Female> reading. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Well you're saying <Speech_Female> I. Thought I tricked <Speech_Female> you I was talking <Speech_Female> about myself as <Speech_Female> a songwriter, but you're saying <Speech_Female> there's <SpeakerChange> something I <Speech_Female> detect here <Speech_Female> I, detect <Speech_Female> and myself. So I detect <Speech_Female> in all <Speech_Female> all other artists <Speech_Female> in especially <Speech_Female> women I'm really tuned <Speech_Female> into other <Silence> female. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Creators because it's <Speech_Female> not often you get <Speech_Female> to talk and it's funny <Speech_Female> like because <Speech_Female> bands <Speech_Female> and your you were <Speech_Female> a bond girl <Speech_Female> we travel separately. <Speech_Female> But in these <Speech_Female> little microcosm, <Speech_Female> don't get to really <Speech_Female> talk <Speech_Female> about the <Speech_Female> challenges of being <Speech_Female> someone <Speech_Female> that puts <Speech_Female> out something creative <Speech_Female> basically under your <Speech_Female> own name and yes <Speech_Female> and you're responsible <Speech_Female> for your questions <Speech_Female> by on your criticized <Speech_Female> for Yeah <Speech_Female> Peop-. If. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> People who don't <Speech_Female> do. <Speech_Female> You know art for <Speech_Female> a living understands <Speech_Female> the power <Speech_Female> of criticism. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> It can give you wings <Speech_Female> or it can stick <Speech_Female> hugh and mud for <Speech_Female> years. Yes. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> But <SpeakerChange> let me ask <Speech_Female> you how you finish <Speech_Female> songs. <Silence> <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> With <Speech_Female> the. <Speech_Female> Finish <Speech_Female> it you got your versa. <Speech_Female> Okay. Now we need <Speech_Female> a bridge. <Speech_Female> Enough <Speech_Female> finish it finish <Speech_Female> the damn thing. <Speech_Female> Do you give yourself a limit <Speech_Female> in the studio <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> finish at <Speech_Female> home or <Speech_Female> is interesting because I worked <Speech_Female> with the band of producers? <Speech_Female> Yeah Right. So <Speech_Female> they <Speech_Female> they will <Speech_Female> work on something <Speech_Female> literally <Speech_Female> for all <Speech_Female> time. Yes. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Great. Ones <Speech_Female> Zoo thinker. <Speech_Female> I'm <Speech_Female> always the one who comes <Speech_Female> go nuts. It's an <Speech_Female> that's enough. You know <Speech_Female> because I start <Speech_Female> feeling something starting <Speech_Female> to get lost. <Speech_Female> You know <Speech_Female> I mean just starting to squeeze <Speech_Female> it <SpeakerChange> too much. <Speech_Female> Yeah. <Speech_Music_Female> I <Speech_Music_Female> know it's got to be <Speech_Music_Male> true. <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> Rain <SpeakerChange> God. <Speech_Music_Female>

"shirley" Discussed on The Jump with Shirley Manson

The Jump with Shirley Manson

02:35 min | 2 months ago

"shirley" Discussed on The Jump with Shirley Manson

"<Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> When you talk <Speech_Female> about this, being <Speech_Female> a a moment <Speech_Female> in your career <Speech_Female> that changed <Speech_Music_Female> something for you <Speech_Music_Female> whether it's where you <Speech_Female> think can. <Speech_Female> You move forward <Speech_Female> with your career. <Speech_Female> Is. <SpeakerChange> there. <Speech_Female> Is there a threat <Speech_Male> between this song <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> a song <Silence> on the record? <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> Or do you just feel <Speech_Male> that was that <Speech_Female> a moment and then <Silence> you've moved through and? <Speech_Female> You're <Speech_Female> done with that. I <Speech_Female> don't know if I'm done <Speech_Female> with that. I think that there <Speech_Female> will be more songs. <Silence> <Speech_Female> There will <Speech_Female> probably be more rock <Speech_Female> and roll songs in the <Silence> future but. <Speech_Female> I feel <Speech_Female> like what happened <Speech_Female> in between <Speech_Female> that song <Speech_Female> just sort of pivoted <Speech_Female> me. <Speech_Female> Into this <Speech_Female> that record <Speech_Female> and that song <Speech_Female> made me realize <Speech_Female> that people really listening <Speech_Female> to me <Speech_Female> and so when <Speech_Female> I was finished on that <Speech_Female> finished doing that tour. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> And I had all this <Speech_Female> material that wasn't <Speech_Female> as exciting. <Speech_Female> Maybe as <Speech_Female> should've kissed me <Speech_Female> and in <Speech_Female> my mind I thought I, <Speech_Female> don't know who's going to relate <Speech_Female> to this material. So <Speech_Female> dark and it's <Speech_Female> weird and. <Speech_Female> You know if <Speech_Female> that's what they love <Speech_Female> and that's what people <Speech_Female> love. <Speech_Female> was. A little scary <Speech_Female> but I think I just got <Speech_Female> to this point where I <Speech_Female> realized <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> I have to make <Speech_Female> more music <Speech_Female> even <Speech_Female> if people don't love it. <Speech_Female> Even. <Speech_Female> If there are fans <Speech_Female> for that record that <Speech_Female> aren't for this one, you know <Speech_Female> and. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> I hope that <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> I can continue doing <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> it. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Yeah. I never know what's <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> next or what <Speech_Female> what something will <Speech_Female> sound like <Speech_Female> but. I <Speech_Female> think that there will definitely <Speech_Female> be an upswing <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> again at some point <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> you know. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> For for now, <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> <hes> I <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> don't think does this record <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> could have happened <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> if I hadn't made <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> that one. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> You <Speech_Male> have an embarrassment of talent. <Speech_Female> Really. <Speech_Female> And <hes> <Speech_Female> here's two more <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> dark nears to more <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> weird. Okay. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> You thank you so much. <Music>

"shirley" Discussed on The Jump with Shirley Manson

The Jump with Shirley Manson

04:27 min | 2 months ago

"shirley" Discussed on The Jump with Shirley Manson

"Six one was my I always see the beginning like the introductory paragraph teach you how do. A paper. I'm setting the table for where we're going to go and what's going to happen. So I knew that I was doing that I knew what song was corresponding with which I had charts and diagrams of how this related it had to be a big song. It had to be a rocker had to have a certain amount of who are just you know how'd written the words first or do they come to you commonly same time? Come at the same time only a couple times I've written music and or words separately both fruitful ways to go. You're playing on guitar playing on a guitar fire feeling by myself to keep into. I'm like, in fact. Yeah I'm in an apartment that is basically being renovated from beneath me. So it's like literally stuff like sticking out of the walls I painted in i. made it very homey but it was Definitely, not really a real apartment you know knows like falling apart. Exactly. How it was and there's like evidence of the night before is lying everywhere. There's like you know drinks, glasses and high heeled shoes on the table, and God knows what else and I'm writing probably faced with humiliation the night before where Nash came into the bar and he paid no attention to me with some glorious girl on his arm and I needed to say I'm here I'm watching. Notice me I think it was that kind of song this kind of, but I knew I was setting the table for much longer thing I had to say. and. This is an odd question, and again, if you don't feel comfortable answering it, you don't have. House. To it you love sex or do you just like writing it I freaking love sex but I don't like the misnomer about me is that I'm extremely monogamous. I'm a specialist not generalist so I only like having sex with someone that I actually really amend to. Well, I, just find it fascinating. You know. The people assume when you write something, express it the assume you are the person. A hundred percent like there's no room for maneuver, there's no room for, is that or artistic like licence? They just see you know she's this. She's the they took it to mean that I was a huge slot anything about sex I pretty much love it. Just I only like it with the person that I'm into and hard for people to understand although we don't know why men do not compute that and twenty five years later they still don't compute that they'll. Probably, like with me no. You can be a good girl and want sex with the people that you want it and you can describe it as audaciously as the men, and then that leaves the having to grapple with what they're. Of like a good girl or a bad girl is. PERMISSION TO BE HUMAN SIR So. Why did you pick broadwood to come and produce this very Personal. Female Perspective why did you pick him? Here's the thing about broad. He takes me seriously and so many producers don't they see my bad guitar playing and they say like well, I'll cover that up with what you mean to be playing and ends up sounding generic and you lose me in the shop owner and that explains a lot of the music that people don't like that I put out subsequently but. He lets me be. Who I am some other label flew me out to California and I had a cassette of like all the music and I think a couple people said, are you planning to rerecord this in tune and I'm like Oh my? It is what it is. I mean, this is my whole thing. Imperfect does not make me not worth hearing from I wasn't going to record because it was art it was it had been done. It had been done the way I wanted it done but now I had to live it. You know we can discuss at length. What makes my head that way that I would be willing to? Myself a couple times but I think it's just this deep respect and passion for art and understanding that artists who are long dead are still having an impact on our culture that hooked me right away. So that hooked me as.

Nash California
"shirley" Discussed on The Jump with Shirley Manson

The Jump with Shirley Manson

05:51 min | 2 months ago

"shirley" Discussed on The Jump with Shirley Manson

"Off. Think..

"shirley" Discussed on The Jump with Shirley Manson

The Jump with Shirley Manson

06:13 min | 2 months ago

"shirley" Discussed on The Jump with Shirley Manson

"shirley" Discussed on The Jump with Shirley Manson

The Jump with Shirley Manson

05:19 min | 2 months ago

"shirley" Discussed on The Jump with Shirley Manson

"shirley" Discussed on The Jump with Shirley Manson

The Jump with Shirley Manson

07:55 min | 2 months ago

"shirley" Discussed on The Jump with Shirley Manson

"S. Like the Title I was a teenage anarchist. Very much just like originally with the idea inspired by Michael Lanvin's I was a teenage Werewolf get. It was Kinda comical. One of the things I've really always liked most about punk rock and punk bands that they are self critical and will like be critical of the punk scene in particular I don't know if you ever got into Chambal Mamba, they had called give the anarchist cigarette they are anarchists, but they're being very critical of the anarchist punk scene and I always loved it when punk bands did that or even with like crafts being really critical of the clash or like the clash being readily critical of the sex pistols. I. Just I liked that about punk bands when they do would do that with other pump and so like this song had an element of that and with that president in the air. By saying this, like any of like the punk fans that we had first starting out are GonNa see this as such a fuck you that there's just no turning back and going back to our roots and away after the some. But what so what what was going on in your life at that particular type? Well. The song was written in two, thousand, nine, some point in two, thousand, nine. I had the idea for the title I and I was like that at at that phrase I, want to write a song around that. I could provocative phrase. Right, yeah Were you in Florida I was in Florida. We wrote most the record in Florida and then wrote a couple songs out here in. LA, when we came out for pre production, the other reason I chose the song specifically is because it's It's it's a shining of example of why sometimes too many cooks in the kitchen is actually a good thing and it's of any song that I have. It's the most collaborative. I've been most of the time people are very purist and we'll have this attitude of like look. Like original sparked for a song and you have to shelter that in like if you let too many people come in and have their opinion in like if the voices on height should change, it's GonNa, ruin it. You'RE GONNA, lose it and the songs going to be gone. Of any, Song. Like I've ever worked on. This is the most I've tried hardest to appease people again and been happy with the results of which is not really your style not well to some extent I'm really open minded when it comes down to it, I do take outside criticism. I have a thick skin like someone can be like that sucks and I'll work to change it but you're right Kurds were much more Puteh's to mean I were served known as she an an uncompromising. Punk Rock, right right. Well, and that's like I think with Punk Rock and with with myself in particular a Lotta, times that's just defensive if you don't guard yourself, then you're going to get steered into situations where after the fact they're gonNA look back and be like damn it. If I would have just like stood up for myself got railroaded into this and once you were in a more comfortable position sometimes it. Was Harder. To drop that outside Shell and Butch to his credit was was able to get through to me and and really like show me that you can let your guard down and you can work with other people and get a great result that you're happy with and you can learn you really knew who you were as an artist at this point. Is that fair to say because it was your second major label? Now I was having a complete identity. Let's get to know but you had done what two or three independent records three albums weeded three full links before we sign. Yes Warner and the new was our major label debut and then white process was the second record where we already knew were thought you know like our first record did not go gold it sold like for us. It was a success we sold like one hundred and fifty thousand records like doubled our sales of our previous Andy Really Shit. This is amazing but I knew writing on the wall like the major label is not happy with this and so I come from experience when I ask you this. What that must have been very difficult when you are signed to major label and you know that they have expectations and you find yourself in adverted comas feeling these expectations sure and I knew in reality to like the second records, fuck no matter what we do we're just. because. They're contractually obligated to put it out and they're going to put a little bit of marketing in it but if it doesn't hit like within the first week, you're just screwed and you know like in reality it's not gonna hit the first week because like that's just like one in a million shot you know but did so do you think that may have impacted your your approach to the production of this record? No way at the time we were being sued by a former manager and our like. Desperate I was like I am going to give this everything I. Have. I know we're fucked I know it's not going to be a hit. We've like a you know I know the realities of the situation we are in, but I am swinging for the fences I'm going to try everything I'm going to listen to everyone's input and I'm going to just approach it as diplomatically as possible and try when you said that you felt like you were having identity crisis was this as a result of this. Case that you were having against your former manager or a little bit of bag a little bit of dislike, the age. You know like I was twenty nine years old about to turn thirty. So there's the Cliche of like, Oh, my God, my twenties or ending of thirty thirty. I'm about to have a kid literally about having had a kid like my daughter Evelyn was born a week after we finish this record. So it was like working down to the wire but coming out of the PUNK scene like we've alienated ourselves from this punk scene that we grew up in, you can't turn back moving away from Gainesville Florida moving to La like I. You know I arrived here in l. a. and I just like I didn't know who I was and that was the hardest thing I had living in L. A. was. I'm a huge believer in this. The psychic subconscious you know and for me writing I'm very much location oriented I after know who I am in a place and be able to know how I reflect off other people off my environment and La has so much to it, and there's so many other creatives going on that I just couldn't grab anything. I didn't know who I was here and like in a psychic subconscious way like I. couldn't find the frequencies of where to tune into to just like. To to run with this as L. A. was crushing me I was like so scared of everything that was happening in my personal life like the ban wife was obviously so much stress with like all these with a lawsuit with the major label reality with just like inner band tensions I got arrested for an incident in Tallahassee where I got into an altercation in a cafe because someone was calling me. A SELLOUT NI- overreacted I had court charges hanging over me for like most of the period of time that we are touring on new wave we fell apart as a band while touring on new wave had a new drummer. So again, it was like identity crisis within the band of who are we with this new drummer who are we now like even you know at the time whereas psych. The decade was changing. We are going from two, thousand, nine into two, thousand ten, which doesn't seem like that big of a deal but it does like I tune into stuff like that. I'm a strong believer in the idea that you know you have a good song if it can be stripped down to his, you know Cousteau Guitar, you can add anything else to it. After the fact, a full fucking orchestra doesn't matter but as long as it works on an Acoustic Guitar, you have a solid structure. What influences are on I was a teenage on cast that you if any I mean are there are the artists that you reference are? Is it just purely you love I I'll tell you one influence that you may not ever or no one may ever pick up on but there's a Michael hutchence influence of their from inaccessible with at the being saunders the. So I was listening to a lot.

LA Florida L. A. Chambal Mamba Michael Lanvin president Michael hutchence Cousteau Guitar Puteh Warner Andy Evelyn Shell saunders Gainesville Florida Tallahassee Butch
"shirley" Discussed on The Jump with Shirley Manson

The Jump with Shirley Manson

04:02 min | 2 months ago

"shirley" Discussed on The Jump with Shirley Manson

"All the. Girls. Shot. So. Saver..

"shirley" Discussed on The Jump with Shirley Manson

The Jump with Shirley Manson

03:08 min | 2 months ago

"shirley" Discussed on The Jump with Shirley Manson

"Thinking. Still. So. Still. Exist. Stand..

"shirley" Discussed on The Jump with Shirley Manson

The Jump with Shirley Manson

07:01 min | 2 months ago

"shirley" Discussed on The Jump with Shirley Manson

"So I've got story to tell you. I was working with a photographer here in Los Angeles working on a project and she went down to Alabama I'm pointing she came back after a weekend away. She said Shirley I have met the most extraordinary woman. And it was you and her name is ultimate wild. She came photographed you I think maybe you're like I big I shoot first-ever Britney's holding her hands to her heart. We became obsessed with you. When the first record came boys and girls came out the gate I was like well, I must be in one of the first people to buy an I tunes. You know it's like by. because all spoken you up Su said why It's so. Amazing the here I remember being Being a teenager and we didn't have a lot of money. So buying a CD was like very selective process and advocate I have sixteen dollars which see the American by this month and. I bought one of yours and I have a favorite song. I used to put it on repeat I love to much of the court changes and everything anyway. So you just made my day. Thank you. We're here to talk about you Britney. Ours don't deflect I know that trick I'm a libra. Let's talk about me. Hi Did you get access to music. Particularly I was wondering about, Pinault like how did you get hold of piano? My grandma had a piano. Her name is Ruby and she's Just the most dear to my heart. Is still around Oh. Yeah. Yeah. She's like I love her to death I. Smile every Thomas and We used to go over there more kids. That's still in my grandma whole lot and she had a record player and we listen to her old records, lot of Elvis, lot of crystals and do art music fifties, sixties, hits, and things like that, and then my sister we're going into play piano I remember this big Blue Velvet chair that would spin around and I would sit in that little chair and I would spin around around. My would be playing the piano and then she would try to show me something I was to spastics I wouldn't be able to like I was like what's God? We wrote like this little song together about a potato state's. Online is hilarious and those are like the best memories in my life. Every day was so exciting adventures so fun. So creative, what did you? What did you write the potato? The Common Potato it was called Carlotta, the potato, a blue song. And and lyrics Carlotta that potato Carlotta you're the only one. Knows it. Still perform that to this day. Don't bring it back I don't, but I could. You seem very young to me and still in like just the beginning part of your career which seems extraordinary because you have had this unbelievable ascension, you know but you're only on your third record. Yes. I'd like to take my time. I'm rush rush and you've got plenty of time I hope. So yeah, when you feel shift or your Abilities TQ somewhere unexpected. And you have chosen Simon Color was the lead single right on the first track of the second record. And I want to start investigating that choice by asking you first of all, like what was going on with you in your life. Just as you to bite to write that song. A lot of pressure a lot of fear. A lot of can, I. write another record can I do this again? AM. AM. Am I meant to do this or was this a one off? Was This a fluke I? Had All these other doubt. All of this out and I would Had A basement studio and it was just me. And about. A little bit that could never find his way out of my basement a bat bat. I was scared of him. I don't know if even noticed was there or not. But I would go down there all hours of the night. Are you what city Alabama Athens Alabama album grew up and Pretty, big studio at I built it up. So I could use it and I would usually start my nights around midnight noted go down there and I would always have an eye on this bat making sure he's not gonNA. Get me. I don't know what I thought was GonNa Happen All and then I would I would get to work and I was really pressuring myself like, okay this has to be. Great, this has to be great. This has to be great because if this isn't great, the no one's going to listen to anymore and you're going to live in a trailer park again, not that there's anything wrong with a trailer park it's just that was my particular hangup I. Didn't want to go back to where I came from even cherish came from and it made me the person I am. I just had a lot of anxiety around that. Of of screw it up. So that's kind of where I was at the beginning of doing the albums and Colored Alabama shakes and then I'll never forget the moment that I was working on a song and I was getting really frustrated and I was like, okay I need to take a break. I'm just gonNA screw around and then I wrote San Color. It was early days. It was the one that I was most afraid to bring to the band because it was so different. And in regard to do you think it was different. It opens with a Cold Xylophone, intro? And then the lyrics are very. Sparse and there's no real song structure. It's just a piece of music. With remnants of lyrical manning and odd harmonies. It was just so different and when I showed the guys I was actually really nervous. As I did this because I demo everything all the parts as I did this. And They're like coal. Okay. Yeah. Let's track that. And it was such a it was such a huge moment for me because I took a chance and I was a little afraid to be like criticized at the moment because like I told you I was already having so much anxiety about writing another record. And not wanting. To fail. But then once I liked let go. Everything showed up. That's why I chose the song in particular because not only was it like yeah. To great songs of popular on that record, and you know obviously records caught sign and color, and it was the one we got grammys for the went to number one right went to number one but also it was me beginning to realize. I can do this I should be confident in this. This is what I'm supposed to be doing I. Don't have to force anything out I should just be me and whatever that sounds like. That's why I chose sound and color..

Alabama Britney Carlotta Shirley I Alabama Athens Alabama Los Angeles Su Simon Color Ruby San Color Thomas Elvis manning
"shirley" Discussed on The Jump with Shirley Manson

The Jump with Shirley Manson

04:53 min | 2 months ago

"shirley" Discussed on The Jump with Shirley Manson

"Laura Jane Grace Known as the Front woman of against me is an immensely talented and strong willed musician facing the fire from her own fans she stayed to Tarawa signed does it evolve with her surroundings and her life from the days in Florida to her solar project Laura Jayne Grayson? The devoting mothers she is unapologetically. I have a mess respect for Laura and I was so grateful that she find time for me at rather holiday time in her broker schedule, I adore her and you will too. Large in Greece I can't believe you're sitting opposite me. It's been so long since I last saw you and it's so exciting to see you opposite me and sitting and Blue Velvet. Kite, are you an excellent? Thank you for having so. And I've been listening to you all week obviously because I'm doing my homework because I'm gail. and. So I'm I'm well in back into the fold because of course, as I said, you know. I've known about you for a long time through my drummer butch fake who? Was your producer for two of your. Record. Two records with butch are two major label records. I remember him playing you some of your music from your earlier records in his kitchen and saint to me I think the southbound is really special and I'm thinking of working with them. What do you think? and. He played your bands and I was like. You must do this. They've got great boys and a great vibe and they signed really vibrant and so then yes of course, he's nine madly in love with you that W. I appreciate but. It's A. Very deep respect for Butch missile and we're going to be discussing today is from the records you worked on the beach. It's from White Crosses, which was our second record working together and our second record for Sire Warner Brothers and so our final major label record with this whole like being asked to do this I realized like I. Don't have a hit song. You know like I don't have like number one hit singles or anything. So when asked about the concept for this podcast I was like this is interesting. So I got really like. Think about a song that like made a definitive switch for me in kind of less clear-cut obvious reasons like if you're abandon, you had one number one hit single like well, that's the song you're going to talk about. But so I chose talking about I was a teenage anarchist impart because I'm here in L. A. Now doing these full album shows one of the knights were doing white crosses in full and ten years ago exactly was when I was in la finishing the record, it could have been today that we finished the record ten years ago. was. So cool. Because I think it was interesting when I heard that they told me you know what song you picked. I had my own ideas of what you might have gone for, and in fact, when I spoke to my husband who as it turns out, was the engineer on this particular record said the same thing like interesting I. Hope you'll ask her you know why this is an important track. In the history of your discography, it is the most clear cut of any song I have that is like a dividing line of a before, and after in my life of alike, there's no going back from this. I've got the lettuce here July to beat them. I know I know the. Just set up at the pump I was a teenage anarchist. No I don't know. the I was fact the lyrics I was a teenage anarchist. HOW DOES THE BRIDGE GO? I was a teenager Jenna kissed. But then the same guts rich it. It was a mob mentality they set their I full sites on May. Narrow visions of autonomy you want me to surrender my identity I was a teenage anarchists. So every other verse just goes back and repeats the next part, right but the scene got too rigid or whatever. But the third verse, the bridge, the line is the revolution was ally we had recorded the whole entire song already finished the votes and then I was at bushes in his basement. Rewriting just that line for like a week straight every day coming up with like four or five different. The Revolution left me blind the. Just like seriously that was one of them at a point before landing on the Revolution was alive..

Laura gail. butch Laura Jayne Grayson White Crosses Jenna Laura Jane Grace Greece Blue Velvet Tarawa Sire Warner Brothers Florida producer la engineer
Pete Hamill, legendary New York columnist, has died

Bernie and Sid in the Morning

01:36 min | 2 months ago

Pete Hamill, legendary New York columnist, has died

"I have some sad news as well being informed that apparently legendary New York Post and Daily News columnist Pete Hammel has passed away. Unfortunately, at the age of 85 so he was a longtime editor. For the New York Post and a longtime columnist for the both The post and the News rush. You and I spoke with his brother, Dennis family, also a terrific columnist of mine. And, You know, people who know their history may remember this. But Pete Hamill was a pretty close friend of Robert Kennedy and Hammel helped persuade Robert Kennedy to run for president back in 1968. He worked on Kennedy's campaign. Then he covered it as a journalist, and he was one of four men who actually disarmed, sir. Hand, sir. Hand you know, removed his gun in the aftermath of that Kennedy assassination is a pretty good documentary series about that Kennedy assassination on Netflix. He's one of you know, when you talk about family you're talking about him and Jimmy Breslin. I mean those air, the legendary people. I'm saying Steve Dunleavy. I'm so sad about that, because he's really and you know, I gotta call Dennis the minute we get off the he Not only, though, would Bobby Kennedy, but he was quite The man on his earlier days dating Jackie Ah Onassis Onassis. Linda Ron's that Shirley Maclaine. I mean, he got around. I want you to know that. Well, see, we're even. We're mourning his death even more. If that's the case.

Robert Kennedy Pete Hammel New York Post Jackie Ah Onassis Onassis Dennis Family Pete Hamill Steve Dunleavy Daily News Jimmy Breslin Shirley Maclaine Netflix Linda Ron Dennis President Trump
Ben's Red Carpet Ban

Nightly Pop

05:16 min | 2 months ago

Ben's Red Carpet Ban

"Welcome to pop your source for nightmare weddings and Yoga. Ball sits. Big Round of applause I like get. Nina's often that you guys but hunters here has always and so is actress producer and. Legend. Viviana. A. Welcome. Back. Welcome where we are so excited to have you hundred GonNa Flirt with you. The entire show get prepared for them. Time Vivica just walked taping. That works for me baby just a little. Just a little took us. Describe my style of flirting. So this is. My God I'll. Little tickle we can get started now. All Right Ben Affleck was just banned from arm his upcoming James Bond Premiere at least that's what the tabloids are claiming. It's probably total but supposedly bond producers are afraid the couples pedia will overshadow the movie and Daniel Craig's okay. They have like a you've obviously you're a lot more famous than both hundred and I combined you too many movie premieres yet we like it. It's a big win for us tonight on nightly pop. If you going to an event and for movie you were in and producers said, listen you're man can't come how do you handle that challenge? Cry. Let's start right there. We've never look here. Work showed up gave as our how I not shining I. If this is true is totally unfair. Why does the girl not have to shot because she's in a grid we? Away from. She has died. He has done for them hunter. What do you think about if you could not bring me to a movie premiere as a standing date for you because your girl canceled? Would you be asset? That's okay with me and I think if they really don't want Ben Affleck showing up, put it in a city that doesn't have Dunkin donuts. I guarantee you. Not Going. There for some reason I mean honestly I have to say I don't know why I'm leaning towards this being true but I sort of believe it. I kind of feel like this sort of makes sense I mean I don't know if Ben Affleck is going to overshadow Daniel Craig's something about them always walking those. Dogs which I Got? Every day. Why it's always just so staged feeling for some reason I I do believe. I kind of believe that they're like listen just leave your boyfriend at home or moving on. While Shirley's there and knows what she wants when it comes to a relationship and the first rule is she's not going to live with anybody you guys. She recently told the mirror that she's not sure that she could live with somebody again and that he may have to buy the house next to her. She's just too old for this. Like it okay. I just want a new. And nobody's coming up here running thing but me so I'm all with their Charlie's let them know when it's happening to come over and do the deed. With after other than that stale ass next door right you. My God. First of all, my type of woman this is Great Vivica. I'm happy to buy any house near Your House I'm going GonNa have to save up a little bit but I can do it and then seconds I see where they're coming from but it also feels like Charlie's is coming from a place of she hasn't had healthy relationships lately maybe or she hasn't found that person you do want to live with I. Think we all kind of think that after we go to break, we're like no more of the opposite sex ever again taking that much of my personal mind and then raging you find someone. And you can grow with and maybe they start outside the house maybe eventually you're like, Hey, let's have toothbrushes in the same room. Let's try that out for a little while. Yeah, I feel like with Charlene I think that also when you are single for such a long time, you kind of get set in your ways and just having the idea of someone come in and just rearranging things becomes really daunting and just quite frankly really annoying and to be honest Shirley's does not need to settle. She doesn't need to do anything that is inconvenient for her at all. So like I. Totally under understand her mindset of like I don't. Yeah. Come over when you need to do the deed otherwise I don't need to be moving my cashmere sweaters for you to put your jeans and the next door take your time says the girl that got engaged in seven months. I was like, all right give it to me okay Brian. Austin. Green is getting defensive about dating multiple women after his split for Meghan Box Ryan was on the Hollywood raw podcast you listened to that a lot right with DAX holt an atom. Glenn where he said he isn't playing anybody but the whole point of dating is to talk to several people at once. What people normally do when they get out of something is they date they they talked to multiple people at once I'm not playing anybody like this is. My life is just is much more under a microscope. Let me ask you. So should he have to tell the woman? He's dating that he's seeing other people I'm GONNA ask Hunter Africa's I can't wait to hear the assay. I appreciate honesty to be very honest with you in their plans. Call dating onto someone says it's meeting. You is called dating I. Think the biggest problem is when it's rubbed in other people's faces

Shirley Ben Affleck Daniel Craig Charlie Vivica Viviana Ball Nina Producer Hunter Africa James Bond Glenn Charlene Brian Austin Meghan Box Ryan Dax Holt Green Hollywood
SpaceX Capsule, NASA Crew Make 1st Splashdown In 45 Years, Crew Heads Home To Houston

World News Tonight with David Muir

02:06 min | 2 months ago

SpaceX Capsule, NASA Crew Make 1st Splashdown In 45 Years, Crew Heads Home To Houston

"Mission accomplished NASA and spacex completing historic feat this afternoon when to use astronauts in the SPACEX dragon capsule splashed onto the Gulf of Mexico here's ABC's Gio Benitez. Tonight that historic splashdown. SPLASHDOWN Dragging Endeavour has returned home astronauts Bob in Doug, Hurley inside the spacex Dragon Endeavor for this nineteen, our journey to Earth orbiting the planet at a mind blowing seventeen thousand miles per hour before entering the atmosphere at two, thirty, six, pm eastern the extreme heat cutting off all communications between the dragon and earth for four tenths minutes hoping and praying. That everything is going well, look we just made history. The United States of America once again has a human spaceflight program at two forty, the astronauts signal there. Okay. I F four minutes later, those chutes deploy dragon ultimately slowing down to just fifteen miles per hour splashing down in the Gulf of Mexico welcome back to planet Earth and thanks for flying space x the Dragon Avoiding Tropical Storm Isa else in the Atlantic Astronaut Doug Hurley with the first words from inside the Dragon Shirley are honored purpose a recovery boat loading up the dragon the heat shield underneath that chart by that re entry thirty, five, hundred degrees Fahrenheit locals racing in their own. Boats to get view maybe next time, we shouldn't announce our landing zone, the recovery team wearing masks and has met suits, Bob, and doug emerging on stretchers feeling gravity for the first time in sixty four days. The first American splashdown in forty five years since the. Apollo an incredible day for SPACEX and NASA Gio Benitez joins us now live from the Johnson Space Center in Houston and Geo. Tonight the big question how are the Space Dad's as they call them, Bob and Doug doing. Well Tom I, were told they are doing very well in fact, they're already on their way back home to Houston

Doug Hurley Spacex Gio Benitez BOB Splashdown Nasa Mexico Johnson Space Center ABC Houston United States Tom I America
"shirley" Discussed on The Next Picture Show

The Next Picture Show

08:10 min | 4 months ago

"shirley" Discussed on The Next Picture Show

"In this. Often thought about. Participating In the native American ritual the Sweat Lodge. Often where you steer, but then I learned. To crawl through a dirt tunnel under the. Naked buttocks to naked buttocks with a dozen other men while some Shaman Stoke. Fire maintaining the hundred degree heat and pedal some. Noxious route t that inspires, hallucination. Now time for connections when we bring these two films together and talk about all they have in common, but I I've been informed during this break that Percy Jackson is not actually the lightning thief, some other characters, lightning thief, and my ignorance of this important way series has been exposed for all the world to see I am sorry, so let's talk about the things. These films have in common most obviously. Let's just talk about the madness of both of them. The haunting has very fragile character who teaches over the edge and eventually so does surely it's that's that's a starting point. Right what it is a strong connection between these two. Yeah. Yeah, but I also like I said before I think there is. You can't talk about their psychological fragility without also talking about the fact that it's tied into the kind of roles and expectations assigned to them. You know like for surely especially. She clearly at a certain point has a lack of interest in playing the right role, right, she prefers to be this disruptive presence, sitting on the couch at the Faculty party, and then spilling the wine all over it. And then getting into a fight with the Dean's wife, but like I think there's a certain point in which you're like actually fitting in and playing that role is its own kind of madness. Right like the very last thing we see rose when she's being told Oh you just need to kind of rest, and things will go back to normal and she's like going back to being the wifey like. That that was madness. and. You're like you're right. You're totally right like there's a lot about what you're expected to kind of put up with Indu. And keep quiet about that doesn't actually seem that same? There's also a bit of a Theodore to her characterization here to where she just by her willingness to be cutting in social situations, but also the fact that she knows Rosa's pregnant or just that kind of an echo of that character as well right. She's a witch, right? She, says it yourself, and she definitely has like very almost magical way of just like cutting people to the quick when she she wants to. Kinda gone a little deeper into that because I found that element really interesting maybe. I should read back on a few years ago about Shirley Jackson seems like a pretty fascinating life. Have you read it Alison? I haven't? It was one the again? It's been on like like. Has Been One that I've been meaning to read, and this has certainly made me more interested in reading it I just she seems like such a kind of interestingly fraught percent in terms of the life, she she lived, and in terms of kind of. What she struggled with You know in terms of domestic life professionally, and then just like physically as well with her health is interesting that one of the last the books she was working on a win, she died quite young. Her forty was a book about a woman. Who Tax it all. Comic novel about a woman who kind of packs it all in and starts over sorts of new leaves. Her husband starts a new life which I thought was. Curious I would love to. Play out. So, we should talk about the style that film there's. A mixture before there's really a couple of moments that reminded me of the haunting, and there's kind of a close up of of a wall where the sound design kind of takes over. That was felt like a conscious mosh to Houghton. Shirley, but other than that there's there's just not not a whole lot here are. Of One hundred house as well though, isn't it well? The the reason why I had put style here is because I think in both films there's not necessarily connection other than the both films are are pushing things to extremes in terms of style. We talked to be in the first episode about the haunting, and about the use of space and light and black and white, and the way kind of enforces claustrophobia you use was using lenses, or whatever the hadn't really been approved of yet or fully developed, and so there's there is some distortion effects that he was comfortable. Putting the movie at that work quite well, and it does have again to to go to my absolute favorite Noel. Mary quoted has has more Dutch. Till's than a poorly hung vermeer exhibit. Become I. think that was one of those things where it's like all right I'm gonNA. Stop writing now, because no one's this but I think that you have with Shirley Ann also unconventional and aggressive style, whether I certainly saw madeline madeline, and presumably her other films. I mean we're just. She's just in love with Telephoto Lens. There's a of like there's no deep focus at all You're right up in. You know if she could like borough hall and her character's heads in the camera and there she would. And so you have your. You're forced into these this perspective. That's very different of course from the honey, the haunting you getting a lot of wide shots, and you're getting all of these every single character in sharp focus in the frame, and that's just not the way here. It's like let's just show you this whole scene from the side of Michael. Steele Berg's face You know so so again. Both kind of work to similar ends, but they're not. Obviously they're not the same. Yeah she really. She has like that much looser like almost like disorienting camerawork right but I, do think it does create a similar effect of feeling like you feel very on board like your point of view is even like a one that you have to constantly kind of reassess and I think there's something in that that even though they I think the style is very different like in spirit. I feel like they match up. In some ways, there is in both these foams to use a unavoidable cliche in talking about the Hollywood also this one as well. The house kind of becomes a character. In both these films. Is Another direct ECHO? That may not be intentional may just be because drawing from the same source of Shirley Jackson but these this is. Cramped, cluttered, but very rich and character. New England House that that Shirley Jackson lives in that. It's just a couple of degrees away from feeling like a haunted house. Outside covered plants, it definitely looks a little forbidding. It gets a little bit their ways. When when you see it from the outside that it's mental. Look I think a little spooky a little you know it does feel like the fairytale straight like of dark fairy tale castle, but you know these young ingenue as pershing, but I think there's like an kind of very basic sense you know. The hunting is a movie about eleanor who comes to this? This House and then refuses to leave. He doesn't WanNa leave and Andrew. Jackson his kind of Agoraphobia in this movie, right. She also doesn't want to leave the house. She hasn't left the house for a long time. You hear multiple times and other characters alike especially her husband are like you know like you haven't left the house for like two months or something like that they are both just rattling around in these places that are their chosen homes. US these days in a way, right? It's so funny. Every wants to. BE CORTINA'S This feels phil gets it. Like it side. Omit the shining cut lauren. How did how did I not see this whole that Kubrick saw this whole Gordon coming in. How how crazy we'd all go yeah, so it has that, and of course the notion of.

Shirley Jackson Percy Jackson Shaman Stoke Sweat Lodge Shirley US Shirley Ann Indu Faculty party New England House Dean madeline madeline rose Alison Theodore Agoraphobia Houghton phil
"shirley" Discussed on The Next Picture Show

The Next Picture Show

07:55 min | 4 months ago

"shirley" Discussed on The Next Picture Show

"Do. You know what it's like. So also kick things off with a what we always ask. What everyone think of Shirley? I really liked Shirley, but not not as much as Madeleine's madeline, which was just. Last film which really just like knocked me off my feet. Just you know was one of my favorite films of two thousand eighteen, and just felt like this incredible, incredibly electric. Film that did some similar things here in terms of like artists and news in that relationship, which could become kind of imperious and this blurring of process, in which reality is untrustworthy, all of those things she definitely brings to Shirley, but it's in a somewhat more conventional container I. Guess I would say and I think it was a little less exciting as movie to me while still having a lot of things that I enjoyed. Of kind of the opposite reaction because I'd never seen a Josephine decker film, so I decided to finally check out Madeleine's madeline, and then surely and I had the opposite reaction, which is I was really. Grateful for the convention -Ality of Shirley the relative convention Allie of Shirley because her style is really hard for me to. It's tough style for me to kind of embrace. It's uncut in Madeleine's madeline in a way that it is not here. Even though this is certainly not by any, means a conventional bio-pic. It's going kind of conventional by her standards. It would seem but. But overall, I think I like Shirley quite a bit. It's another Great Elisabeth Moss performance it's it's one where decker style I think does serve of the material well and serves as kind of mind meld again that sort of happens in the other film to just sort of transformation that's taking place within these characters and then kind of coming to each other at least. In the way that rose sort of becomes surely at a certain point It's not I mean it's not the most subtle thing in the world when it happens, but I, but I appreciate that I appreciate it like kind of of academic environment of it th reminiscent. Keith his meant to put it here in the notes, but there's a lot of the film of the reminded me WHO's afraid of Virginia Woolf terms of fraught relationships among intellectual types. All that seem pretty real to me. Overall is a film. I did With some reservations. To? And actually I haven't seen Madeleine's mental and yet and I've been meaning to you for a couple of years now currently, but okay. So I. Don't have a point of comparison there. But I thought it was very strongly and become kind of dilute toward the very end of the movie, really kind of drew together in a tight, not I really appreciate it, which is a bit of a spoiler how I guess it's not A. Spoiler, not spoiler, but but things. Are you know I? It further complicates very complicated relationships when when you, the final scene between Shirley and Stanley but I mean I i. felt did a lot at work here, I thought. The performances were great. I mean to say Moss's good in the movie is not exactly a shocking thing, but I I thought she kind of captured this sort of weird mix of aggressive misanthrope. He and That seems true to the character I understand of Shirley Shirley Jackson herself and I knew very little about Stanley Edgar Hyman, and I thought was great greatest this sort of this. Charming sleazy, deeply eccentric professor catchers academic thing where it's like. If you have a certain amount of respect and and tenure, you can get away with stuff that. You really shouldn't otherwise you know so. That is campus business to. The, way he handles Logan Lerman's character as as as a mentor and arrival it just bitterness at the core of that, particularly with regard to certain professional threat I guess I thought that was dead on me. I think that type of relationship you know is exists in academia everywhere. Yeah, and I think you also have them as these kind of lake. Constance walk on campus. Right like the main relationship. Between Shirley, and Stanley is one that is like ten of an unwillingly open relationship on her part. They have an arrangement that's mentioned. That clearly is not one that she seems to be thrilled about, but also there's some of that that leads through into Stanley's. Men T as well I mean the film is sat in this kind of ambiguous period. It plays a little little loose with Shirley Jackson's timeline, but I would say probably like between the two works. It's between the lottery, which is published to believe in nineteen, forty, eight or forty nine, and then hangs a man which is published in the early fifties, so it's like right in that period, and they're certainly like it's very based on that period's gender, dynamics and expectations. But also a little advanced to right I. mean like the idea of any kind of an open relationship, and that seems like a northeast Liberal Arts college idea that would become mainstream until later, right? The idea of a very modern marriage. It's an open relationship image. He knows he's cheating and he's told her he's going to do it. Does it does not cut both ways. And Yeah they're no in there, no key parties or whatever in this movie, but. I did appreciate about it, too. Is that it resolved a lot of e going to buy picks with a certain amount of skepticism, and it does the thing that I like bio-pics to do which is really focus on. One set period of time rather than trying to do too much i. mean you know in the fact that the novel that she's working on is kind of not the novel. You want to expect the film about her to cover you think Oh. Let's see what happened during when she wrote the lottery. Like what kind of what was she experienced at that point? House right? This is hangs a man, but it's pertinent in of course the story that she's working on. She's developing for the novel bleeds the relationship that she's having with this new young woman in her. Life is feeding into it at all. It's well done i. mean that that's a good choice and I guess it's based on the. Intel, Keith mentioned that it was based on a novel. I assume the novel kind of covers that terrain as well. Yeah. I guess one thing worked against me a little bit. It was bound expectations where I thought that there would be a little more plot driven by this this investigation to the missing woman so when that didn't really quite go where I thought it was I guess I was a little. Thrown off, but but yeah. No, it's good. It's I. Think it's definitely worth seeking out I. I will check out Allen's Mandoline to finally at some point I kept. Thinking is as you mentioned. Before have to give other films could appeared this with it might have been have been even better than the haunting lake launch and Kafka, but also. There's some really strong references to persona in this film. Kind of weird sort of flying blind on this one a little bit. We just like Shirley Jackson's the haunting, which is fine, there are connections there. We'll get into later. I think there's only a couple of moments that remind me of the haunting in this film and we'll get into connections stupid. There's but stylistically it's quite different as well. Do you think that there's something you know? We can discuss this later, but I think there isn't there as well. That is a theme that's haunting becomes much more explicit here, which is idea of someone who is treated as an hysteric. And degree to which you are a hysteric, because of your own mental health issues, zero hysteric, because of the just deep unfairness of the gender roles and expectations that are placed on you, you know, and I think that that becomes like that's really brought to the forefront here in terms of this idea in both of these. The female leads of of the idea being the good campus life, the good faculty spouse how you're supposed to behave, and then you know Shirley is in.

Shirley Shirley Jackson Madeleine Stanley Edgar Hyman Elisabeth Moss madeline Keith Logan Lerman Virginia Woolf Intel professor decker Liberal Arts Constance Allie Kafka Allen
"shirley" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

Encyclopedia Womannica

07:25 min | 5 months ago

"shirley" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

"Hi this is jenny pressing pause on our regularly scheduled programing. Because what's happening right now is new, and not because we want to participate in a moment, we want to participate in the movement. We WanNA. Use whatever platform we have to drive change. This company was founded with the mission of amplifying underrepresented voices in my first interviews for Wfan I heard many women running for office. Talk about how the moral arc of the universe bends towards justice, but only if we make it. We each have responsibility to step up today, I wanNA pass along some of the resources and reflections I've been working on that I. Hope might be helpful for you to. If you're in a position to donate, please consider giving money to one of the following organizations or to an organization. That's meaningful for you. All include links to all of these in our episode notes the official George. Floyd, Memorial. Fund campaign zero, which is working to end police violence in America. The Ella Baker Center for Human Rights, which organizes funds in black and brown communities to go towards social programs rather than policing or other punitive activities and the black. Black lives matter movement I'd also encourage you to find a local political candidate. You believe in and give money to them to. There's a lot to read and watch and listen to I. Highly Recommend Black Feminist thought by Patricia, Hill, Collins and white fragility by Robin de Ngelo. I also recommend NPR's code switch and intersects. Analogy matters hosted by Kimberly Crenshaw who've previously highlighted on Encyclopedia Manteca I also recommend you watch thirteenth the Eva Devante, Film on Net flicks. I think it's incredibly important. We remember that the events of the last few weeks are not new. It's particularly important for those of us. Who are white? Americans to educate ourselves on these issues, not just this week. Will it's at the top of our news feeds, but every week I hope that you'll join me reflecting on how we can value black lives every day. Here are some questions I've been asking myself and my loved ones. WHAT BLACK STORYTELLERS DO I? Read or listen to do their works reflect. Reflect a diverse set of black life experiences. How many black podcasters filmmakers influencers too I regularly follow? How many black owned businesses do I regularly support? Are there close people in my life who do not support or understand? The black lives matter movement. How can I talk to them about it? As a registered voter am I. Supporting Candidates and platforms emphasize social justice. If you haven't registered to vote, why not? This week we're focusing in amplifying the stories of African American women who changed the course of history now and moving forward were also offering free ad space on wonder media network shows to organizations working towards social justice. If you want more information on any of what I've said, please email me at Jenny, at Wonder Media Network Dot Com now, let's look to Shirley Chisholm a trailblazer who continues to inspire political action today. Thank you for listening. I spend before you today as a candidate for the Democratic nomination for the presidency of the United States of America. From Wonder Media Network I'm Jenny. Kaplan and this is Encyclopedia Annika. St Years Ago, a woman who was determinedly unbought, an unbiased was elected to Congress. Today! We're talking about that. Audacious leader, the first. African American US Congresswoman Shirley Chisholm. I am not the candidate of black America although I am black and proud. I am not a candidate of the women's movement of country. Although I am a woman and I'm equally proud of that. Surely was born in Nineteen, twenty, four to to immigrant parents living in Brooklyn New York. Love of education began in elementary school on her parents sent Shirley and her brother to Betas to live with their grandmother. Shirley credited the strict British style schooling there and her grandmother for teaching her that she was valuable. She started her career as an elementary school teacher. In nineteen fifty one, she earned her masters degree in Early Childhood Education from Columbia University. She then consulted for the New York City Division of Daycare. From an early age, Shirley was aware of racial and gender inequalities, and as an adult, she became involved in the New York City chapters of the NWC p., the League of Women Voters, the Urban League and the Democratic Party. In nineteen, sixty four. She decided she wanted to do more than volunteer, so she threw her hat in the ring and became the first African. American, woman elected to the New York state assembly. Surely, just kept on making history in nineteen, sixty eight, she ran and won a seat in the US. House of Representatives becoming the first African American woman in Congress. I'm concerned, actually overdue. Get terribly excited about. She was outspoken and her advocacy soon gained her the nickname fighting Shirley. She spent seven terms in Congress where she fought for women and minorities introducing over fifty pieces of legislation on their behalf. Americans all fellow countrymen. One day confronting the judgement of history in our country. All God's children. And each of us is is precious, is the wheel of the most powerful, general or corporate millionaire? Shirley was the first black woman and the second women. Serve on the powerful House Rules Committee. And then again, she looked higher. In Nineteen seventy-two surely sought the Democratic nomination for president. Xi faced intense discrimination and was blocked from participating in televised primary debates after taking legal action, she was permitted to make just once. Attempts to stifle Shirley's power didn't stop her from earning sport of thousands of students, women and minorities. They joined her efforts on the Chisholm trail, and despite having an under-financed campaign Shirley was able to enter twelve primaries. She secured the votes of one hundred fifty two delegates. She didn't win, but she ran. An impressive campaign inspired many. In nineteen, eighty, three, surely retired from Congress, but she wasn't finished having an impact. She became a professor at Mount. Holyoke college and their CO founded the National Political Congress of black women. She passed away in two thousand and five. Surely Chisholm left an indelible mark on our nation. Own Tune in tomorrow when we head across the Atlantic for the story of another incredible pioneer. Special shout out to the one and only lizzy Caplan. My sister and the research fanatic behind this amazing collection of women. You Tomorrow..

Shirley Chisholm Congress United States America jenny Ella Baker Center for Human Ri lizzy Caplan New York state assembly National Political Congress Wonder Media Network Dot Com Atlantic New York City Division of Dayc Floyd Kimberly Crenshaw Chisholm trail Columbia University House of Representatives NPR official
"shirley" Discussed on The Two Shot Podcast

The Two Shot Podcast

03:38 min | 8 months ago

"shirley" Discussed on The Two Shot Podcast

"She did. Bring me some chocolate biscuits. This is episode one hundred sixteen with the brilliant Kelly Shirley and joy. You'll see you at the end. Kelly Shirley I want to tell me why already now. You're one of my favorite guests so far. You know why because I'm not because you'RE ORANGE. That will be three things only two things. To tell you your fiber won- he turned up two minutes before the ten thirty slot. So you're already had vivere already. I pray and you brought a packet of chocolate hobnobs with you. The only the only other person it's a to bring presents I believe was Vicky McClure and episode one. She she she gave his biscuits and things that are out and check back. Thanks a cake as well to cake. Every my Li- joy I did the weekend because passing down one and it was a horrible. My little boy. I'm we wanted to go swimming. So we went to the baths and obviously everybody the same idea. The Queue was coming out of the door and he just turns anyone. She'll not on my song. Let's not do this so I said why. Don't we go and bake chocolate chip cookies? Now I am not. I like to cook. I'm no Baker at all. We did a huge success. I doubt replaced. I'm not getting into Bacon thing now though as not not. I haven't liked opened a door and I'm going to start biking to more. I liked just played by what I'm cocaine instead of measuring things. I'M GONNA time for all the patients die. Do it. Then don't do Mary Berry pickup. That fine not out to be honest. Is that not going sooner? The kids because the so-called afterwards you know you're going to have a swim and five minutes is good and then you freeze in your low key. Together there's little classes or over the floor and Senate. She tells them because disgusting. We know I mean it's the only big gripe isn't it is a bit murky. You're always the last one to get dry. Obviously after after. Put your children before yourself. Apparently so people just shivering. Got Two kids twin. Oh my God tell me does four. They are amazing that the best thing if funny they love my giants. I think I'm most really are. They are my number one fans and I just said honestly I I love him so much we work of course but they're just starting to play together a bit more and can leave him for forty five minutes can have a and then come back and the fall you know you. Laughing at says is not work. I've only got one and I find that out. You Find The Times that would be a good parent. Isn't it because they need so much attention all the time and I need so much? Yeah thank thank God. I've got them seriously. Did you find it hard at the beginning? Being a working mom my God of course I have inter.

Vicky McClure Kelly Shirley cocaine Li Mary Berry Senate Baker