21 Burst results for "Shipton"

"shipton" Discussed on BSP: Believer Skeptic Podcast

BSP: Believer Skeptic Podcast

05:47 min | Last month

"shipton" Discussed on BSP: Believer Skeptic Podcast

"The wind started blowing and it was picking up and kind of being annoying and one of the friends she liked holds her hand up and did something and she was like wind. Stop and at one point. The wind actually die down and and her friends who are with was like we always forget how powerful of which you are and i well. We'll get into all of that when we get to believer and skeptic curious yeah because i mean admittedly i feel like we'll win can naturally die down on its own but of course i'm not gonna shit on my friends and she's she's actually. They're very smart in two sitting off thinking of his win. 'cause all right so you're first one. Yeah for my first story. I am getting actually focusing on actually a really famous witch. And i'll talk about a little bit. Why she's so famous at the end. There's no witch trials here. I wanted to wait. Yeah how did you know no. I'm not kidding. That's her national. It's not a sea witch but now to say that that is actually her name also. Yes so i'm talking about mother. Shipton mother shipton was born ursula song deal in fourteen eighty eight so sued yes. Oh really could be. Eda's my my own witchy. That's come into fruition. Here i know right. I want to look it up and see if disney ursula ursula was named okay. Yeah because it really could be i never. I didn't even think about that so anyway. This is back in the fourteen hundreds. Now it's believed that. She was born during a violent thunderstorm in a cave on the banks of the river needed in narrow the sources report that ursula mother agatha was a poor and desolate fifteen year old orphan left with no means to support herself. They say that having fallen under the influences of the devil agatha engaged in an affair resulting in the birth of ursula. Can i say something here..

ursula song ursula ursula Shipton shipton Eda disney agatha ursula
"shipton" Discussed on Ross Patterson Revolution!

Ross Patterson Revolution!

01:36 min | 3 months ago

"shipton" Discussed on Ross Patterson Revolution!

"Eight o'clock on the remind me get offended. Oh actually grab a mic. I think he's over here camera. Y'all doing fucking awesome dude. Hell yes every time. I see you. I feel happy about it. Like you've always got huge smile and you're always fucking hilarious secret. It's the drugs. I knew it. I knew i love them so much. What do you today came to them. Just on a bunch of we'd we'd of all the different varieties. Why got some diamonds. Shipton and diamonds are a girl's best friend so there ninety seven point six percent. Thc oh shit freebasing we'd cool. I know it's hot outside because we're in texas. I love the hat. The story behind it. I found it found it. That's a nice hat story guys. Sit down buckle up. I found it. Yes wait what were you gonna ask them. Well what are you filming. Came into film and apology being eli. I ended our last episode by saying fuck palestine and it was just a joke because even a place so i was just playing. Make believe so. We came into film. Preamble apology before that episode. Drops on saturday. Because you know you're not.

Shipton texas eli palestine
"shipton" Discussed on You Really Shouldn't Have

You Really Shouldn't Have

05:58 min | 10 months ago

"shipton" Discussed on You Really Shouldn't Have

"Three revenue streams. One of them would be tv. Forbes's one of them would be live events on one of them would be the the tour concert whilst touring i debate. Shut down so many of these other things have gone online and say during the first pandemic we were lucky enough to work with ericsson. T take orders that kind of mobile. What congress stuff online in and give them new identity with that then gradually in a tv side of things starts to. Of course we're now able to create tv shows within they safe working practice away workings Kohl's and so when i came back as being great because all the tv phones is pop stars. Come back we were able to create. Continue making the makes the search for bbc. There's a t shirt that we did We've been able to continue bringing storytelling online for some of the brands that we were within and some of the other accusations that we're doing so whilst it's bean a massive game changer whilst it has destroyed a low of the as we had planned and we were planning for Off with big shows a year and advance the Widening on hold can actually forced us as creatives to reevaluate how we tell our stories. Anna's may as think about a distress bex more some is open forced us is kind of exxon medium as Extended reality forced are. We could have come up with those ideas if we'd have chosen in the old climate before covid but actually the appetite for them wouldn't be from clients in watching woods Style want to work in an extended rousey environment. Actually they work in a read environment unless forced to do that now. Because we've been forced the situation. Is this real hybrid between extended reality real reality and and what was interesting is people assigned to realize the actually with with extended reality in working essentially with your audience interacting with uvira camera lens. We can actually take those artists whether they be brando pasta on a much bigger crazy journey that we might have been able to before because before we are constrained by the realities of what it is to be reading fireman. You know gravity budget all that kind of stuff but now working in this hybrid of leila norio we suddenly put little makes 'em as performance in the middle of this kind of futuristic. Utopia wells at the top of the pyramid with his boss landed behind the and yes we might have had that as a concept originally. We voted through the cost genes seen in the screen content. Maybe lynch piece performance. We would never leave new three. When these kind of extended way we have been able to. Because they situations i think whilst as had its negatives there have been some really interesting challenges that we've had become an actually it's kinda creates a new generation of foments and storytelling which actually i think probably will continue into the future even when the covid said don we will now start thinking about things hybrid way know. We're seeing brands. That used to do a show at the youtube. For example that would allow them to reach an audience of twenty thousand people in the physical space but now they are taking online. They telling things in a much more innovative way and suddenly they're able to reach sixty thousand people and so for them. That's a real win actually end again. You've got a necessity of it now. You've got the audience of wanting to go on that journey with Site something different. So i think did you look for the positives.

youtube sixty thousand people leila norio twenty thousand people congress ericsson three one bbc Forbes uvira Anna Three revenue streams Kohl's One of them first pandemic year them lynch piece
"shipton" Discussed on You Really Shouldn't Have

You Really Shouldn't Have

21:25 min | 10 months ago

"shipton" Discussed on You Really Shouldn't Have

"The show and i suddenly that is kind of being near a me moment of where my career is being because i trained as a stage manager originally And felt like it was like a way of easing lovie stepping stones courses and things that are available tee me to get me into the industry but when i go to a certain point in my sage management career i realized that actually scratch more that crazy rich. I kinda thought backside might remember the actually directing something kinda cool now. I've had the experience of being stage manager. I can see more very into becoming a director. And so that's why did not doing today. I know a lot of your early work within tv. Is that where the journey started for. You well actually. I started off. Originally in phase trained as a in a guild scooby's can drama in stage management and technical data but the summer before i went drama school. I went often. I did work experience on the hundredth episode of t live and changed my entire outlook on life. Because suddenly i realized that it was his other exciting medium. That was much more any multiple short san. We didn't really rehearse that much it was much. Is cici my personality. A lot more. So because of that that really sparked my interest and made me realize that maybe the reputation of fates. It wasn't the thing for me. So i went off and i did my degree and i got a great. I had a great time doing that. All the time of day might Always doing In and i. I literally jumped ship of my degree and finished on the friday of the month. Best today abbott. Tv as an assistant manager and that naturally meant that my is a great grounding in oversee kind of inspired t be back in the day. The days came first. So we'll my education. Things never went waste because it would be grounded me in processes that she alot of people stumbling tv understand processes and kinda just muddle their way tree That ground being kind of allowed me. Everybody access sage madria. Tv a little besser and kind of navigate my way through the system a lot quicker and within all of that i also need. I had this crazy rich. And so i started to as obsessive music videos. I'm really sausage. Can how do that. And i wanted to write music videos inside. That became the It was because i had my knowledge of tv and cameras and all that kind of roots of caribbean crazy with cameras camera. Work that allowed parkway type thing as would stand led into doing live performances with pop stars and of the lovely things like that because they've met because i had that background on age from the Unconfirmed the tv night's performances to live way. Do you draw your inspiration from creatively. I mean everywhere essays. I'm just almost like a sponge the whole time and inspiration. I love to read. And that doesn't mean i'm reading books. Oh specifically there to inspire me. It just means that. I'm inspired by story structure. I'm inspired by characters. That like might be random but but sunday come back to may. I'm inspired by other people's work inspired by instagram. In the pictures. I see random videos and most technology alone. So because i've got that in-depth understanding of that kind of technical side states or not background seeing that technology in seeing a moving light for example it's been craig's in specifically for lighting designer. But i see in a how insperity can be applied lightens on away but how that could look behind an artist or how it could be used to interact with one. Another five dances that. We're working with or something along those lines. Just kind of seeing things reframing it with my mind and then putting eight. so yee's in an idea when it is right before we get onto blackstone. What you're doing more recently. I know you worked on the evening. Seventy the two thousand twelve olympics. I i wonder how you got involved in projects and what you remember. From that time. That was an amazing experience and actually dot kind of old at that period of time that base kind of tease really kind of kick started the process that is now black skull But essentially i was doing tv up until that time and it was about six most before two thousand twelve. Or i saw some twenty twelve on city before The actual ceremony was working. Tv and it was all kind of relatively small-scale but sauce working as age manager with abandoned. Kotite and i've always my start of. Phase management was always high british being good organizing doing everything sage module a day but then also having this great creativity. Because that's what. I am as an individual. I was quite For the right type of directed i was working with. They loved up. Because i really translate their ideas and make practical for them so i was doing this tv and i started. What can we take that on all of that. Tv shows every album knows. Did the stage managing kim gavin gracie director who lacy has become a bit of a mentos as he had all these big ideas and i was able to kind of re translate them and get him on stage for him alongside some of his other team and he asked me going toll with tate at the progress tool. Which is the biggest stadium toll with uk artist ever the dates in arrive at wembley or something like that and is huge and i'd gone from danish. Tv shows back on my street. They had a completely different scale stadium. Scale and i and i. It was quite addictive. Once you've done stadiums go Learn lot and so that really gave me my ticket into the world. Twenty twelve year Craig's soundings big technical understanding but then working stadium scale meant that when i applied for that job and kim gay came with right in the closing ceremonies. He gave me a good right up. on i kind of met the pays shepherd. He was the technical director of the time. They could see that this crazy. The understanding of crazy would be a real strong for my role was my official term was production manager which meant that out department in when i stopped. It was three of us in our department. We ended up doing a one hundred ninety two thousand Across four ceremonies under prop on stadiums gaucho as anything from the massive puppets the road onto the stage which alike in size of towerblocks Versus a little hemmed. Fox's someone carries in like a pocket watch and crazy all of these from scratch but not just that the the system of delivering around the stadium and making sure the ten thousand cost walking on stage with outright right moment. All of this kind of infrastructure was just is mind bogglingly amazing probably did it by it was something to be so proud of until back on but also kind of really inspired my crazy way of thinking and actually it kind of feels like now if we can do that kind of thing. There's no he's marie kondo anything else. That's incredible and you have one shot to get that right. Romania such a big event. Yeah i mean we see yes. We sessions a law Ultimately yeah it was one eight one two and you're also being watched by the beachie towards the people in the entire world so as a buzz. It's hard to replicate that. We also Work once you've done the olympics and he doesn't wanna they show us you find that you wanna do more and you won't and you'll say become quiet commodity because if you've had experience people wanna bide i experienced To create for them so only goes to go said russia we decided she olympics again was an amazing experience. Because farrah's it was leaving a different country different Winters today was different issues related to that but also why did find is that. There's nothing quite inspiring as crazy in amazing sharing. Noticed you hiding country but you'll have an mcse an sita's you save. She was amazing. Craze amazing shows but then lost the passionate debate. Because it's not telling a story that matters to my heritage. I didn't feel as invested in the emotional context of the show uses a. It was a weird one. It kind of forced me off the journey of wanting to do more than six. And i felt like a tick Summers and now will inspired me to come home. Made the change of going to be directed. Now properly gonna make go there and i'm going to create stuff eating all of the things that i've learned all these big experiences prominent creighton Now so really kind of and make sure that passionate staff all right dan. What is the worst gift you've been given so i was thinking about this. Obviously so grateful to anyone who wants to buy gifts harder kinda name. It i've realized is that i am thinking about. I'm the. I'm the kind of person i told all the time really hard to buy. Four means like eight is frustration. 'cause sometimes i ate presents on my god. What have you because probably day. So not being grateful when i go a french bulldog about five years ago. Suddenly everyone was like he was french. Bulldogs. let's game every gift. Under the sun related to fringe bulldogs fringe. Bulldogs tea towels. Are french bulldog like figurines. I've got french bulldog mugs. I've got every french. Poodle great things and most some of those things in is quite often ugly and not necessarily a one but the worst one of those things my dad and my step Bought me a lovely guesstimate. I have no admitted the they probably mortified. But there are these ornaments the can get which are white fringe bulldogs with gold wings on them and it only occurred some of a french bulldog and group. Facebook these are the gifts. You're supposed to get people when french bulldog dies and to remember you're dead fringe bulldog. My vote is running around. And he's happy. As larry and is not died but my parents still diagnosed that they actually bought us gift which is to signify the death of your beloved pack so we had on the show not realizing that any of this was a problem and it was just like an ornamental. We didn't really well but we shoved up his kind of date. Someone who didn't on goethe's bridge died. We know why are you. Olbermann explained to us. We almost died at that point. I do have a habit of knocking something shelf because he breaks. I just got to put it on a big say i m. i had a gossip one. I just know the chef expression go They've been here. Because the pandemic's they have noted that one minute is gone but if anything now they will know that story that i probably say just because of the context of the fact that there was another french gift which i probably won't anymore ambi dog that's the worst. You mentioned the olympics. They're being the starting point for what is now blackstone creative. So how'd it go comes to be well. Blasco actually started before in between the olympics. We finished The way the summer olympics london olympics in september twenty twelve paralympics. And i realize to actually going back into tv dot point would be a smart move because itv's wanted me to go back but they also understood the i'd kinda done other biggest gail things. So i can negotiate with the. I would be crazy. Director and were creatively on the shows with them. Well as doing some of the kind of more practical staging elements so. I went back there and i am winning. These is kinda like crazy design. Point view i ended up doing another say's dumped on ice which is done as a stage manager like ten years in a row i went back as a staging police and essentially driving crazy with christopher dean and then i met a guy will only moses but to show heating upgrades director but we as a show expected big extravaganza so i ended up staging not for him. That really was the first ration- of me being crazy director for pop star and a spot on banking spot relationships with record labels an old of a conurbation tumble out from each other. Bob off the in within all of that. I'm doing that. Duncan is period. I got the cold go to cheat and do the olympics which they didn't wanna turn down. Interestingly about point we needed to when we went to russia we ended up having to come power. We conduct didn't pay tax in the uk because we didn't need to for year and so my accountant said look if he sets accompany you'll still be able to see some kind of creative work. It comes up is no pressure but if you do that then you'll protected and you can still. You're still to do that if if need be so obvious. Company and i say within two days because i was about scout a place as lost many things go to russia and abusive unical the company and sat exhibition of mexican artifacts in the british museum. And they was a blast. Oh my desk. I'm recessive color. Black color black. I'm obsessed with skulls. now. I i killed viansa okay. A cooler blasco and that was where last originated from it became something that we assess up pretty quickly and started coming back from russia and doing these little one performances as like maybe once a month there was pressure but he's kind of a fun thing to do and they extract forms. Hey with pop star or it will be easy performance that or whatever it was now really cool But it meant actually without even thinking about crossing portfolio work as a direct hours crazy director at that. When i came out of doing the russian olympics eraser a had could fall back on that point the iconic came behind. Let's see what this could be whether it could grow i met. Jay is one of my business partners. He's a correct for the time he was in the same cut of head. Space me wanting to grow wanted more grades kind of move away from dancing and being fully focused on creating things my husband. Ross wasn't my husband at the time but he was. My partner is an amazing pretty soon director and he also is in the same head space so we kind of realized that we we. We stopped working together. Naturally because we saw some crazy together but it wasn't an confirmed thing we go through the first couple of months we will not allow actually taken it back because his christmas working together and crazy together. It's very inspiring less maintenance surveying that's when we says blasco crates if properly Three-way venture and only policy of kind of gone out and created is branded creativity. People seem to resonate way than we doing. Cool things with. I'm interested in the process of it in terms of tv. Show staff so they come to you and they say you know excesses. He's gonna play factor. Hit the song go nuts or is there more of an idea that he comes to you and say now bring nuts in life. It completely varies from briefed. Free us the interesting thing is exciting because there is no sat. Way of dealing with a zone uncooperative in that and that makes it kind of cool in a way. So sometimes they'll do exactly what he described his his how much you want to spend his song hayes. Maybe a logo. Or he's like the album cover of the single cover hayes the vdi could relate. Would you wanna do and we go back and a couple of days. Sometimes they come up with a very strong idea in the They want sliver. We taped ideas and she Shade in something that we know it was a camera or sometimes we say in a room with the artist. And that's our favorite thing is when we get to really collaborate kiss ultimately they on a journey without some before hits us. Maybe song has been around for year by castro. Can they be working on malaria. Saving working as being demos be living with them. They go through chrissy process to shape it whereas goatee six roster then come in when he's finally being released after x. amount of time and On that can sometimes what. Sometimes it feels aliens. What sony's about their understanding. The song should be so actually when we collaborate on ace as ideas from. That's where he comes. I know another project. The you guys worked on was drastic world life which i wanted to john quickly because that must have been different a lot of the other things you've worked on in the lot of moving pieces at some. What was that production process like and logistically. How that project manager jurassic was a a turn that we in the end the two and a half year project because it was so complex and so big and it has to be so right. The brand We approached by a company called fell then. Same out america Going to produce the show at the time that a skeleton idea for what they the story theme might be and we got rolled into work with the sea rises. It's going to bring that to life and really kind of flesh out what it was. And then we worked with He was designed to kind of bring that had a very specific process of how we wanted to bring that show to life. Because we didn't want it to be stock style was danger. They'd scott such big main pause. Dinosaurs were so huge. That actually could become quite clunky shelvin. We really wanted this kind of fluids. fluids would work while the narrative that we'd win so we had will these ideas. They wanted with amazing team. We'll bring them to life and of course once we'd settled and all of that stuff we then had to through the same process filmed all right to go st because we had to pay the the detailed ideas to universal a film rights than we had another prices to take all of that to ambulante same and a scene spielberg's company get to all of their levels of process and then eventually we ended up in a really stephen we got to sit there and spending Of hours with him taking through every detail of the shy getting all his input into his mind is so integrating sat brand that we really want to buy into every par with storytelling event. Show make sure that we were hitting the right. Performance beats everything and it was just the most incredible by for us to kind of sit in a room and presented these ideas to the mound that everyone looks up to is one of the best probably be best in the world was just insane and to have him nor any approve eight love and love it so much that we were. He told a story that he'd always wanted to make a full-scale t rex for fall the film but he'd never go to because they they didn't have the technology at the time when they dress park they may small little bit savannah. Actually when you live kudos film they re deal with like a hamster assigned footer. at time. they didn't deal with that kind of big scale and he never got round psyche because by the time you come back the brand. cj the next pace he just jumped meeting began short Cgi so we were him. The first people that brought this kind of theatrical experience to life for the brandon was just bowled by an loved when he came see the show. It's incredible stories absolutely fantastic. Not dan we can't really talk about events and live performance without touching uncovered. A little bit. Because you know it's been such a big thing for the whole world is last year. So i oversee assumed that it had a big impact on you guys and what you jay but what have you seen. What have you been doing over the last jedi. It's a sort of try and fill that void but it was a work around it. I can't talk about coby without commenting on the five day. It's been such a killer some for industry. If you're in the touring concert industry will is done to destroy the livelihood to so many of my contemporaries in the crease and the creates solely rely on that source of income is just devastating end with government in the situation recovering in a so difficult to see that is a continual process. That doesn't seem to have any resolve to it so Business obviously shutdown alongside. Everyone else works in that side but luckily out business has.

kim gavin gracie last year Facebook Jay kim gay Olbermann instagram ten thousand three ten years Ross today two and a half year Blasco olympics five dances Three-way one minute christmas one shot
"shipton" Discussed on You Really Shouldn't Have

You Really Shouldn't Have

07:32 min | 10 months ago

"shipton" Discussed on You Really Shouldn't Have

"Realized. I absolutely hate being on stage and just had no place me whatsoever so with that in mind i was i on my word i denotes the comes up but anyway i can follow these crates. Passion students agent a show capela. I was one of the way he says we're in the middle of hustle. And i looked off. The stage was to teaches in the audience. One of them with directing and then the other one was doing something else and afterwards i asked her what she's doing is stage managing the show and i suddenly that is kind of being near a me moment of where my career is being because i trained as a stage manager originally And felt like it was like a way of easing lovie stepping stones courses and things that are available tee me to get me into the industry but when i go to a certain point in my sage management career i realized that actually scratch more that crazy rich. I kinda thought backside might remember the actually directing something kinda cool now. I've had the experience of being stage manager. I can see more very into becoming a director. And so that's why did not doing today. I know a lot of your early work within tv. Is that where the journey started for. You well actually. I started off. Originally in phase trained as a in a guild scooby's can drama in stage management and technical data but the summer before i went drama school. I went often. I did work experience on the hundredth episode of t live and changed my entire outlook on life. Because suddenly i realized that it was his other exciting medium. That was much more any multiple short san. We didn't really rehearse that much it was much. Is cici my personality. A lot more. So because of that that really sparked my interest and made me realize that maybe the reputation of fates. It wasn't the thing for me. So i went off and i did my degree and i got a great. I had a great time doing that. All the time of day might Always doing In and i. I literally jumped ship of my degree and finished on the friday of the month. Best today abbott. Tv as an assistant manager and that naturally meant that my is a great grounding in oversee kind of inspired t be back in the day. The days came first. So we'll my education. Things never went waste because it would be grounded me in processes that she alot of people stumbling tv understand processes and kinda just muddle their way tree That ground being kind of allowed me. Everybody access sage madria. Tv a little besser and kind of navigate my way through the system a lot quicker and within all of that i also need. I had this crazy rich. And so i started to as obsessive music videos. I'm really sausage. Can how do that. And i wanted to write music videos inside. That became the It was because i had my knowledge of tv and cameras and all that kind of roots of caribbean crazy with cameras camera. Work that allowed parkway type thing as would stand led into doing live performances with pop stars and of the lovely things like that because they've met because i had that background on age from the Unconfirmed the tv night's performances to live way. Do you draw your inspiration from creatively. I mean everywhere essays. I'm just almost like a sponge the whole time and inspiration. I love to read. And that doesn't mean i'm reading books. Oh specifically there to inspire me. It just means that. I'm inspired by story structure. I'm inspired by characters. That like might be random but but sunday come back to may. I'm inspired by other people's work inspired by instagram. In the pictures. I see random videos and most technology alone. So because i've got that in-depth understanding of that kind of technical side states or not background seeing that technology in seeing a moving light for example it's been craig's in specifically for lighting designer. But i see in a how insperity can be applied lightens on away but how that could look behind an artist or how it could be used to interact with one. Another five dances that. We're working with or something along those lines. Just kind of seeing things reframing it with my mind and then putting eight. so yee's in an idea when it is right before we get onto blackstone. What you're doing more recently. I know you worked on the evening. Seventy the two thousand twelve olympics. I i wonder how you got involved in projects and what you remember. From that time. That was an amazing experience and actually dot kind of old at that period of time that base kind of tease really kind of kick started the process that is now black skull But essentially i was doing tv up until that time and it was about six most before two thousand twelve. Or i saw some twenty twelve on city before The actual ceremony was working. Tv and it was all kind of relatively small-scale but sauce working as age manager with abandoned. Kotite and i've always my start of. Phase management was always high british being good organizing doing everything sage module a day but then also having this great creativity. Because that's what. I am as an individual. I was quite For the right type of directed i was working with. They loved up. Because i really translate their ideas and make practical for them so i was doing this tv and i started. What can we take that on all of that. Tv shows every album knows. Did the stage managing kim gavin gracie director who lacy has become a bit of a mentos as he had all these big ideas and i was able to kind of re translate them and get him on stage for him alongside some of his other team and he asked me going toll with tate at the progress tool. Which is the biggest stadium toll with uk artist ever the dates in arrive at wembley or something like that and is huge and i'd gone from danish. Tv shows back on my street. They had a completely different scale stadium. Scale and i and i. It was quite addictive. Once you've done stadiums go Learn lot and so that really gave me my ticket into the world. Twenty twelve year Craig's soundings big technical understanding but then working stadium scale meant that when i applied for that job and kim gay came with right in the closing ceremonies. He gave me a good right up. on i kind of met the pays shepherd. He was the technical director of the time. They could see that this crazy. The understanding of crazy would be a real strong for my role was my official term was production manager which meant that out department in when i stopped. It was three of us in our department. We ended up doing a one hundred ninety two thousand Across four ceremonies under prop on stadiums gaucho as anything from the massive puppets the road onto the stage which alike in size of towerblocks Versus a little hemmed. Fox's someone carries in like a pocket watch and crazy all of these from scratch but not just that the the system of delivering around the stadium and making sure the ten thousand cost walking on stage with outright right moment. All of this kind of infrastructure.

kim gay kim gavin gracie instagram ten thousand one hundred five dances friday Craig today twenty twelve One Fox Kotite hundredth episode wembley uk ninety two thousand first one Twenty twelve year
"shipton" Discussed on You Really Shouldn't Have

You Really Shouldn't Have

08:05 min | 10 months ago

"shipton" Discussed on You Really Shouldn't Have

"Show. Thanks so much for coming thanks. It's great to be now in terms of the creative industry. Was that something you were interested in working in from an early age. Yeah definitely. i'm i originally. When i was at school and i was in my first year of drama drama school my first year of normal school so i was like twelve fifteen. I assumed that you could need to in that kind of thing. If you're an actor. So i ended up stein School kids are in great drama teachers writing inspiring a buck. I seen realized. I absolutely hate being on stage and just had no place me whatsoever so with that in mind i was i on my word i denotes the comes up but anyway i can follow these crates. Passion students agent a show capela. I was one of the way he says we're in the middle of hustle. And i looked off. The stage was to teaches in the audience. One of them with directing and then the other one was doing something else and afterwards i asked her what she's doing is stage managing the show and i suddenly that is kind of being near a me moment of where my career is being because i trained as a stage manager originally And felt like it was like a way of easing lovie stepping stones courses and things that are available tee me to get me into the industry but when i go to a certain point in my sage management career i realized that actually scratch more that crazy rich. I kinda thought backside might remember the actually directing something kinda cool now. I've had the experience of being stage manager. I can see more very into becoming a director. And so that's why did not doing today. I know a lot of your early work within tv. Is that where the journey started for. You well actually. I started off. Originally in phase trained as a in a guild scooby's can drama in stage management and technical data but the summer before i went drama school. I went often. I did work experience on the hundredth episode of t live and changed my entire outlook on life. Because suddenly i realized that it was his other exciting medium. That was much more any multiple short san. We didn't really rehearse that much it was much. Is cici my personality. A lot more. So because of that that really sparked my interest and made me realize that maybe the reputation of fates. It wasn't the thing for me. So i went off and i did my degree and i got a great. I had a great time doing that. All the time of day might Always doing In and i. I literally jumped ship of my degree and finished on the friday of the month. Best today abbott. Tv as an assistant manager and that naturally meant that my is a great grounding in oversee kind of inspired t be back in the day. The days came first. So we'll my education. Things never went waste because it would be grounded me in processes that she alot of people stumbling tv understand processes and kinda just muddle their way tree That ground being kind of allowed me. Everybody access sage madria. Tv a little besser and kind of navigate my way through the system a lot quicker and within all of that i also need. I had this crazy rich. And so i started to as obsessive music videos. I'm really sausage. Can how do that. And i wanted to write music videos inside. That became the It was because i had my knowledge of tv and cameras and all that kind of roots of caribbean crazy with cameras camera. Work that allowed parkway type thing as would stand led into doing live performances with pop stars and of the lovely things like that because they've met because i had that background on age from the Unconfirmed the tv night's performances to live way. Do you draw your inspiration from creatively. I mean everywhere essays. I'm just almost like a sponge the whole time and inspiration. I love to read. And that doesn't mean i'm reading books. Oh specifically there to inspire me. It just means that. I'm inspired by story structure. I'm inspired by characters. That like might be random but but sunday come back to may. I'm inspired by other people's work inspired by instagram. In the pictures. I see random videos and most technology alone. So because i've got that in-depth understanding of that kind of technical side states or not background seeing that technology in seeing a moving light for example it's been craig's in specifically for lighting designer. But i see in a how insperity can be applied lightens on away but how that could look behind an artist or how it could be used to interact with one. Another five dances that. We're working with or something along those lines. Just kind of seeing things reframing it with my mind and then putting eight. so yee's in an idea when it is right before we get onto blackstone. What you're doing more recently. I know you worked on the evening. Seventy the two thousand twelve olympics. I i wonder how you got involved in projects and what you remember. From that time. That was an amazing experience and actually dot kind of old at that period of time that base kind of tease really kind of kick started the process that is now black skull But essentially i was doing tv up until that time and it was about six most before two thousand twelve. Or i saw some twenty twelve on city before The actual ceremony was working. Tv and it was all kind of relatively small-scale but sauce working as age manager with abandoned. Kotite and i've always my start of. Phase management was always high british being good organizing doing everything sage module a day but then also having this great creativity. Because that's what. I am as an individual. I was quite For the right type of directed i was working with. They loved up. Because i really translate their ideas and make practical for them so i was doing this tv and i started. What can we take that on all of that. Tv shows every album knows. Did the stage managing kim gavin gracie director who lacy has become a bit of a mentos as he had all these big ideas and i was able to kind of re translate them and get him on stage for him alongside some of his other team and he asked me going toll with tate at the progress tool. Which is the biggest stadium toll with uk artist ever the dates in arrive at wembley or something like that and is huge and i'd gone from danish. Tv shows back on my street. They had a completely different scale stadium. Scale and i and i. It was quite addictive. Once you've done stadiums go Learn lot and so that really gave me my ticket into the world. Twenty twelve year Craig's soundings big technical understanding but then working stadium scale meant that when i applied for that job and kim gay came with right in the closing ceremonies. He gave me a good right up. on i kind of met the pays shepherd. He was the technical director of the time. They could see that this crazy. The understanding of crazy would be a real strong for my role was my official term was production manager which meant that out department in when i stopped. It was three of us in our department. We ended up doing a one hundred ninety two thousand Across four ceremonies under prop on stadiums gaucho as anything from the massive puppets the road onto the stage which alike in size of towerblocks Versus a little hemmed. Fox's someone carries in like a pocket watch and crazy all of these from scratch but not just that the the system of delivering around the stadium and making sure the ten thousand cost walking on stage with outright right moment. All of this kind of infrastructure.

kim gavin gracie instagram three ten thousand first year five dances today twenty twelve t live Craig sunday twelve fifteen wembley first kim gay One one hundred ninety two thousan hundredth episode one thousand twelve
It's The End Of The World! (Again

Your Brain on Facts

09:21 min | 1 year ago

It's The End Of The World! (Again

"In the village of Giddy Shem Devon England in the eighteenth century lived a woman named Joanna. South caught southpaw became convinced that she had supernatural powers and began selling seals of the Lord essentially tickets to get into heaven which people bought. She declared that she was the woman of the apocalypse as foretold in the Bible and that she would give birth to the new Messiah on October nineteenth eighteen forty one despite the fact that she was sixty four years old. My Name's Moxy and this is your brain on facts. We are living through a more uncertain than usual time right now. I wouldn't say it's the end of the world but others might and half history is rife with people who claim to have been told or to worked out when the end of days is coming. The list on Wikipedia is twenty four page downs. And that's really only focusing on Judeo Christian. Prophecies everyone from peasant girls two months to the mathematician who popularized the use of the decimal point. How Theory Cotton Mather? The influential Puritan Minister who played a decisive role in the Salem witch trials proclaimed in sixteen ninety one that Doomsday would occur in sixteen ninety seven basing the date on events that were current to him that he interpreted as fulfillment of Biblical prophecy when sixteen. Ninety-seven passed uneventfully. Mother changed his forecast. First to seventeen o six than seventeen sixteen and finally seventeen seventeen. Mother didn't make any more between seventeen seventeen and his death in seventeen twenty eight but he was still certain that the end was near Jonas Wendell along with other adventist preachers predicted. The Second Coming of Christ would occur between eighteen. Seventy three and eighteen seventy four after the prediction didn't bear out Nelson Bar. You're of follower of Wendell reinterpreted prediction to mean that. Jesus had returned in eighteen. Seventy four but he was invisible that does make it harder to disprove all grant you then. There was mother. Shipton the witch of York a fascinating blend of historical figure and embellished character. Born Ursula South the older and a thunderstorm in a cave in fourteen eighty eight to a teenage mother who refused to name. The father mother Shipton looked every bit like the iconic which would he skin hunched posture. Hooked nose the works. She made a number of predictions all of them in verse like Shakespeare's Weird Sisters in Macbeth. She said to have predicted Henry. The eighths disillusion of the monasteries the great fire of London the reign of Elizabeth I and even possibly the invention of airplanes on the telephone but the first written version of her predictions didn't come out until eighty years after her death and some of the authors have admitted to adding to what she supposedly said. So we're not one hundred percent certain if mother Shipton really said the world to an end shall come in eighteen hundred and eighty one but we can be fairly certain that it didn't the cave in which she was born is now a tourist attraction along with the nearby petrifying well items placed in the well are said to turn to stone. And that's more of a loose interpretation than an outright fable. The water in the well has a very high mineral content and those minerals will attach themselves to anything in the water making. It look like the object is turning to stone. Bona snacked the witches in Macbeth referred to usually as the weird sisters but were originally called the wayward sisters meaning. Good women who lost their way and been seduced by the allure of Magic Doomsday Predictions. Could come from the highest offices in the land. But that didn't make them anymore. True Pope Sylvester the second game pope in nine ninety nine seat with the auspicious-sounding date of the year one thousand looming so Vesta in a number of other Christian leaders foretold the coming of Jesus at the turn of the Millennium and many people believed it like really believed there were riots in the streets. Thousands of Christians fled to the holy city of Jerusalem and many attended what was expected to be particularly interesting midnight. Mass at Saint Peter's Basilica on New Year's Eve when the morning of January first on and it was clear the world had not ended semester and the other Christian leaders revised their predictions. Have you picked up on that trend yet? If Judgment Day hadn't kicked off on the anniversary of Jesus's Birth. It must do on the anniversary of his death. So so Lester. The second declared the world would end in ten thirty three but he was already fifty four years old and sure enough. Didn't have to hear any gainsaying when the apocalypse didn't come the second time because he'd been dead for thirty years a century later pope innocent. The third had a less obvious and markedly less nice reason for his end. Time Prophecy innocent blamed the Muslims Christians and Muslims have had kind of assorted past and innocent viewed Muslims as agents of Satan to his mind. The apocalypse would occur six hundred and sixty six years after the founding of Islam. Which would put it in the year. Twelve eighty four. He too died well before he could see how wrong he was predicting. The end of the world requires perseverance. If at first you don't succeed try try again. You've got to stick with it. Like the founder of the Worldwide Church of God Herbert Armstrong along with his sons Richard and Garner Armstrong picked up quite a following even before claiming that the world would end in nineteen thirty. Six and only members of his church would be saved the Great Depression and the dust bowl probably made it easy for people to believe that our collective ticket was about to get punched Armstrong then turned his sights to nineteen forty-three where the second war to end all wars lent credence to his doomsday claims when life settled into the post war normal Armstrong amended his prediction to Nineteen seventy-two a significant margin of error. People sold all of their possessions to pay for travel to Petra in Jordan. Which most of us know as the Resting Place of the holy grail from the third and Final Indiana Jones. Movie where they would be safe from Roy Moore three which Armstrong said would be all of Europe led by Germany against the US and the UK. World War three did not in fact begin. Nineteen seventy-two or the next mandate of Nineteen seventy-five in December nineteen fifty four Chicago Tribune headline read Dr Warrens of disasters in World Tuesday worst to come in one thousand nine fifty five. He declares the doctor was just passing along the predictions made by Dorothy Martin a fifty four year old housewife from Oak Park Illinois. Martin believed that aliens from the Planet Clarion had beamed messages into her brain informing her that a. Masoud flood would soon destroy the planet. Her prophecies attracted a small group of followers including the doctor who called themselves seekers. Many of the seekers quit. Their jobs. Sold their belongings and removed any medal from their bodies which Martin said would be essential for boarding the alien ship. That would take them away. They gathered at Martin's home on Christmas. Eve Nineteen fifty five sing carols while they waited to be beamed to safety. This wasn't the first time the group had gathered for their exodus. The aliens were supposed to come on December seventeenth but didn't then the eighteenth twenty first and finally the twenty fourth. As the night of Christmas Eve wore on Martin's followers became understandably inpatient finally at four forty five in the morning on Christmas Day Martin announced that God had been so impressed by their actions. He was no longer going to destroy the earth. Nice recovery. Though Martin had few followers their experience has left a lasting legacy. The group had been infiltrated if you will by a small group of psychologists and students from the University of Minnesota led by social psychologist. Leon festinger festinger wrote about the whole experience in when prophecies fail a social and psychological study of a modern group that predicted the destruction of the world. Kind of a lengthy title. But we'll go with it. It was in this book that he began to explore something. You've probably heard of cognitive dissonance. That's when two disparate ideas exist in your head at the same time and you feel uncomfortable until you can find a way to make them fit somehow. Festinger observed cognitive dissonance in the seekers. Who had to repeatedly convince themselves that Martin was right even after seeing with their own is that she wasn't

Dorothy Martin Shipton Jonas Wendell Leon Festinger Festinger Armstrong Macbeth Giddy Shem Devon England Jesus Pope Sylvester Salem Joanna Elizabeth I University Of Minnesota Herbert Armstrong Chicago Tribune Ursula South Nelson Bar
"shipton" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

10:35 min | 1 year ago

"shipton" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Hey chri Hey how you doing good I don't post on your screen you put a mother ship in haven't you aha yeah other symptoms great problem to look around lasted almost time remember the shift she took her shoes always bringing up the comet in the top comment still compliant by the man would fall in line in the comments still confined by so I was curious as to why throughout history we've you know in in not just mother Shipton and not just those predominance or anyone else just always seems like whatever common passes overhead there's always something big happens the plague it black death all those things go down and and and it just seems to be that it either is because of the cycles or it's just some strange coincidence that when comments Rome in the sky something happens down here it's like as above so below the chaos of the heavens reflects the chaos here on the planet you know and that's where we're at right now maybe the mother ships following along with something like hell Bob yeah hell Bob was kind of creepy in that regard because you could see something following it and then when that happens get cold said with bass said about how they were going to shed their skins and go on to be on the planet adds yeah you know it's really odd about that you know they're looking at it yeah well the Hale Bopp comet is really interesting is when you when you talk about hell Bobby talk about heaven's gate called I remember I remember Marshall Applewhite he was on the video and he said we are part of the evolutionary level above human he said the evolutionary level above human and and if you reverse that if you if you invert if you make it an acronym and you reverse it evolutionary level above human it's easy L. L. D. H. U. it reverse that's hail like hill bought through into the evolutionary level above human in the you just reverse the acronym it's hail which I thought was weird because it was in some sort of strange I'm going to be full of all the people and all people in Phoenix was looking at Hale Bopp and that's when they seen the Phoenix lights Phoenix lights images of Big Bird well yeah the rising from the ashes again something that signifies a rise in the apple and from what I understand and I don't know if anybody who's listings live shows C. needs but apparently there have been sightings all around lately of UFOs there these red lights we are forming a big going to formation they disappeared now they could be drones wherever what happened in Colorado in their time of the drugs the drugs ever existed but yet they were very concerned about them but now people are seeing red light formation us all over the southern half of the country so what's going on there what did these drones and what a what what are these UFOs people are seeing and once again it's like the Phoenix lights people who look up they see things that would normally see and so you know something like the Phoenix lights is so compelling the people wonder is that something that give me that that was that was one of the major UFO sightings that happened in the country back in nineteen ninety seven he was riding went with it whats app he what what it was right they want listed you think Marshall Applewhite was with high I I wondered too I mean I I remember after it happened I thought to myself what if he was right what because he said you know the world's gonna end is the world's gonna end we're gonna see all kinds of anomalies in the sky and so so the Phoenix lights we saw the comet Hale Bopp they went off they want to do that place I just always wanted relative to help up I said I thought to myself that he really did they really go and I know that sounds crazy but you know the back your mind you ask yourself is it are these the end times we see these things happen it's just too peculiar I think they have a new Yorker on ground zero just amazing all the things that are coming together I was hoping to talk with doctors going to the science guy the real science guy but I guess he had to leave early something he mentioned was the police had to use on that flash me back to what you were talking about several months ago the Blackstone B. twelve spokes okay the symbol of the pool the real what if there's a connection there all I wonder if that was all prophetic back then a few months ago well yeah the blacks on the tool society and remember they they call that that one wasn't common but astro they call it they call it cool and they changed the name by the way if I let you know that they change the name because NASA got a lot of ribbing about it because of the **** background but then he had me at hello widely called madam I can't remember I can't remember event horizon was going to go look at it it was called that they've called the fool something fool and then so I I think they just change the name of it because they want to have all the the people talking about the **** connections about the role and and and that is secret underground ultra terrestrials of they were conjuring during the times of World War two once again remember what atlas said atlas in a war from underground beings from underground Alice in the rabbit hole and all that stuff coming together in a in a very strange way I mean we got a lot to think about discuss here because I think that you know atlas yes the name atlas sticks out in my in my mind of of what was you know what was it trying to talk to us about in October back in October and of course saying stay out of major cities health problems for the president we thought it would be if he was going to have a health problem and he did get sick but then again the health problems for the president could've been covert nineteen for all we know well right now he seems to be defying the people that are in his news conference right now he says things are going to get back to normal by Easter the spirit of the day for each dollar of who commanded the that aid store the police had to use that hidden star I don't know crazy connections just boggles the mind and California here I come home I don't hope California can you believe that I can get out of my head California was the wife of Caesar who warn Caesar about the bankers do not die in times of comments or in times of comments you know it beggars die in times of comments but that's the thing is nobody cares only win big when only one comments come do we see people like Caesar and other presidents and rulers and kings and queens leave their thrones and we're seeing C. E. O.'s leaving their throne so who's next Tuesday next on the list of those in power leaving their their lofty perches and and hiding out because they know what's coming that's the that's the that's a terrifying part event while I was at my dad's house because it was information overload with what with all the new rules and divorce healed the mayor of New York City was on the air he said something very bizarre he said that people will feel comforted when they see the military in the streets and like what what about with a guy in Texas city said older people are willing to die for the economy he added something to that effect something is saying that the I'm sure a lot of older people would be willing to die for a better economy that's why they want to open up so soon but you know I really believe though that even though trump's putting a good spin on all this which is you know can be debatable as being irresponsible but the truth of the matter is you know if there are and I'm and I'm and I'm gonna say this again if there are sixty nine drugs available to treat this we need to demand that they try them because you know putting us in this position of lockdown without any exit strategy in my opinion is draconian and and they won't give us an exit strategy all there give us with the death tolls and who are infected we need to start telling us what to prepare for because what we are now is which stock in hearing about the deaths were stuck in hearing about the hopelessness the lack of masks the lack of ventilators we need to start hearing some positivity because people are going to start killing themselves we're gonna start writing there is start fighting unless this is the plan yeah that's the plan it's gone from pandemic the plan to make and I think people need to understand that we need leadership we don't need platitudes we need leadership we don't mean doom and gloom stories and sure we know what's going to get worse we know that it's making it's getting worse but it's going to get better and if it if anybody says it now they're thrown out all kinds of derision for saying it's going to get better well I got so angry listening to the radio I think it was on Saturday governor Cuomo that is one of his first news conferences and he's talking about how this is going to happen over and over and over again because harkening back to nine eleven things will never be the same we'll still be another problem then we'll get over it we'll get over it together government will do what government does best but we can't do it alone here in New York state we need the federal government everything was government and it's going to be over and over and over again yeah while because you give you give them power and they don't want they don't want to let go of it in the minute you start talking about hope that means oh my god my my ability to be a little Hitler isn't gonna work anymore my ability to be a little Stalin in may be a little you know Mussolini is not going to work anymore it's called the back to the big Mussolini the orange man there is a freedom in angry at I mean it's it's just nuts this this power grabbing power struggle and at me between trump and everybody else I mean we need to just say look let's clean house and start over again with others I die I'm getting to that point where if it's gonna be like this for another four years I don't think it's worth the trouble I really don't where she wanted to throw all the ports you could possibly throw into the recipe but are they still arguing about that or did they passed their aid package I do not know I haven't even noticed that you know I get so sick and tired of hearing Schumer sounding like a critical parent too and I am saying to myself you know both here now both both very here Nancy Pelosi both you don't need to get a clue they too are are another example of of what the bad things are in government it's it's it's yeah it's just it it eight we need an exit strategy we need somebody to tell us when it's going to end trump's attempted to do this immediately gets.

Shipton
"shipton" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

10:05 min | 1 year ago

"shipton" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"Was Julian Assange's father John Shipton Chilean assigned just been imprisoned at London's Belmarsh prison since last September when he first served a fifty week jail sentence for breaching his bail conditions since two thousand twelve he taken refuge in Ecuador's London embassy to avoid extradition to Sweden over sexual assault allegations during his time in the Ecuadorian embassy is Sandra's reportedly spied on by Spanish security firm join the sign says a C. I. A. was behind the illegal twenty four seven surveillance for more we're joined by well one of the people who was spied on Jennifer Robinson the human rights attorney who's been advising Juliana Sanjan wikileaks since two thousand ten John Robinson welcome back to democracy now thanks for joining us from London can you describe the four days of hearings just physically I in the court room in London and what Julian Assange faces obviously we've just had a week of hearings join us on faces as you said a hundred and seventy five years in prison for publications back in two thousand and ten that were released we can expect all C. manning and I think it's important to remember what this case is really about the publication for which he's being prosecuted and sought for extradition that includes Iraq war logs the Afghan dire war diary showing a civilian casualties in abuse of detainees in in Iraq and Afghanistan war crimes human rights abuse the same with cable guy war crimes human rights abuse corruption the world over sorry for four days last week there was a packed out court room filled with the public gallery was packed the general section was packed to finally here after ten years of the U. S. preparing this case against wikileaks a grand jury investigation that was opened under the Obama administration an indictment the seed now by the trump administration we finally heard that the U. S. case and of course we had nothing new nothing new since Chelsea manning's prosecution back in twenty twelve what is important though is that what the court finally head is the defense case and a number of arguments put forth by a team including that yes the espionage act this is an unprecedented use of the espionage act against publisher which is of course a political offense and ought to be barred from under the terms of the U. S. U. K. expiration trading they should be exhibition should be Bob not basis we also heard evidence about the grave threat that this poses to press freedom not just for journalists inside the United States but the journalists everywhere around the world because of the precedent this case sets that the United States could seek to extradite and pop prosecute journalists and publishers from around the world for publishing truthful information about the United States we also heard evidence about how the United States indictment has misrepresented the facts including making a false allegation that join the signs had regularly and deliberately put lives at risk and we had evidence in the court this week about the technological security measures that we he likes imposed upon the media partners and the reduction processes that were undertaken to protect any one at risk in those publications it was a long week of hearings and I think it's important people start to see the the true facts of this of course Chelsea manning remains in prison in the United States right now but we heard evidence from her prosecution in these proceedings demonstrating that Chelsea manning had in fact provided this information to wikileaks based on her own conscience having seen war crimes the murder of civilians the matter of journalists by the by United States forces which is what drove her to release the material to wikileaks so it was it was a long week of hearings an important one for Julian so Jennifer Robinson can you describe the courtroom where I join the signage was held at the back of the courtroom as is the custom was he in the cage was able to hear the proceedings consult were you in the front with the other lawyers or his legal adviser that's correct sorry throughout the hearings Julian was sat at the back of the courtroom which is behind where we sit as his legal counsel in in effectively a glass box out in the dark now this creates significant amount of difficulties for us as his legal team in communicating with him during the course of the proceedings which was raised as a concern on on the final day of the hearing he sits behind us which means while we're paying attention to the judge and submissions in front we can't see when he's raising concern or seeking clarification or offering information to us about what he's hearing in court the entire court room including the public gallery and journalists related to the fact whenever he wants to raise a question with us and of course if he's whispering to us over trying to get our attention the court the U. S. prosecutors sitting right next to us in court can hear everything so we made an application at the end of the week in order to allow him to leave the talking of course feel U. S. view is it would seem strange that a defendant who does not pose any security risk would not be permitted to sit next to the defense counsel which is standard practice in the United States but the judge refused their application we also heard evidence of the mistreatment that Julian suffered not just the difficulties he has in court in communicating with us in a secure and confidential manner but also the treatment that he's been receiving from prison authorities just on the first day of the hearing he we heard that he was handcuffed eleven times strip searched twice and how these legal papers interfered with and taken away from him this is indicative of the kinds of treatment that he's been suffering and isn't of course the most recent in a long history of difficulties that we've been having in preparing his case with difficulties of access to him in the prison difficulties in getting him getting sufficient time with him to review and take instructions of the very complex evidence that needs to be presented in the court and it goes to show you the I think the obstacles and challenges that we face and that he faces improperly defending himself from these proceedings he said Wednesday I am as much a participant in these proceedings as I am watching Wimbledon a Dan complaining that he could not communicate with you with the lawyers overall now the U. S. attorney's argued that his case is not political explain what you think are the most significant war crimes that he provided evidence of and what it means if he came to this country how is that possible key an Australian citizen faces a hundred seventy five years for treason in the United States of course this case is inherently political whether you look at the times the offenses for which he's been charged including numerous offenses under the espionage act which encapsulate and capture a traditional journalistic activities the nation's espionage the espionage act itself as an offense is a political offense in substance but we also need to look at the political context in which this prosecution and extradition request comes this is of course in the context of the trump administration act a president who calls the the media the enemy of the people we've learnt since July and was arrested this extradition requests and superseding indictment came through to their bottom a bomber ministration had not gonna just taken a decision not to prosecute under the an espionage act because of what the so called New York times problem that is that you cannot distinguish between the actions we can explain you what times in receiving in publishing this information we also say that beyond the political nature of the offense in a political context in which he would be charged the U. S. prosecution seem to tried to argue this week this past week that what we can extend and joined in publishing this information was not a political act and of course we had evidence in the court about Julian's very well nine political views that we had with respect to what he likes and the names and and why would he likes was was created by him we had with respect to the Iraq war logs which he likes join saying with the release if lies can start a war that then the truth can stop them and we heard evidence about how the publication of evidence of war crimes in the context of the Iraq war both with respect to for example collateral murder which was evidence of a war crime and U. S. troops killing journalists and civilians but also more broadly about torture of detainees how evidence of that in fact led to the Iraqi government withdrawing the immunity if U. S. troops and the ultimate withdrawal of American forces from Iraq so of course what we're saying is that we can extend the published information of important human rights abuse it was certainly in the public interest and for which have one journalism awards the world over but that in fact resulted in a change in US policy and we say that that makes it and a political offense finally John Robinson how is Julian Assange's health we remain very concerned about his health of course he had more than seven years inside the Ecuadorean embassy without access to health care because the UK government refused to recognize his asylum and asylum that was granted to him by acquittal not to hide from Sweden as your introduction suggested but to protect him from U. S. extradition the very outcome that he's facing right now inside prison he's in difficult conditions is a high security prison he's been ineffective isolation for much of the time he's been inside the prison and you heard me earlier explain the treatment he's been suffering between the prison and the court each time for his hearing including being handcuffed numerous times strip searches and the like this is of course compounding our existing concerns about his health and we heard in court to psychiatric evidence is being put before the court about concerns about his ability to withstand the sorts of treatment he will suffer in U. S. prisons on the special administrative measures if he was returned to the United States so it is a very serious situation and one that is under constant monitoring at our end John Robinson I want to thank you for being with us human rights attorney she is legal adviser for Julian Assange and wikileaks since two thousand ten when we come back tomorrow super Tuesday we go to Texas to speak with a candidate who's running in a primary race that's Jessica Cisneros the twenty six year old immigration lawyer who's challenging Congress member can require stay with us all.

Julian Assange London John Shipton
Sanchita Balachandran Shifts the Framework for Conservation with Untold Stories

Museum Archipelago

08:36 min | 2 years ago

Sanchita Balachandran Shifts the Framework for Conservation with Untold Stories

"The field of conservation was created to fight change to prevent objects from becoming dusty broken or rusted but fighting to keep cultural objects preserved creates a certain mindset the mindset of protector a mindset. It's too easy to imagine objects and cultures. In the state of stasis. This is how it always was and will be forever. Often I mean just given the colonial oneal had an imperial histories of museums. It was because people were going to be gone forever. That culture was gone. And so this is the last trace but in fact. That's not how cultural heritage works it. It's transformed it's changed. It continues on in different forms and a lot of the way the Conservatives think about cultural heritage is is about out mitigating that change. which makes it a little bit fossilized but to me that changes where things are really vibrant exciting and people are so closely connected to cultural cultural heritage that it really feels alive? This is since Cheetah Bala Chandran Associate Director of the John Hopkins Archaeological Museum. Hello my name is Cinci Bala Alexander. I'm conservative and I'm trained in the conservation of archaeological materials in particular and my day job is the associate director of the Archaeological Theological Museum at Johns Hopkins University. Bala Chandran founded untold stories a project that pursues conservation profession that represents and preserves a full spectrum of human cultural heritage for the past few years. The project has been hosting public events at the annual meetings of the American Institute for Conservation Conservation Untold Stories emerged of bollocks hundreds frustration with how narrowly the field of conservation has been defined at felt that there were literally early too many untold stories in the field of conservation. I wanted to find ways to actually start to think about what else cultural heritage could mean other than say the things we typically think of as belonging in a museum or many of us cultural heritage means going to this important looking building that has paintings and sculpture and has labels labels next to it and I think we kind of decided in some ways at that's cultural heritage and preservation means taking care of those things and really I've become more and more aware error and curious about the fact that cultural heritage is much more complicated and diverse set of practices. It's often not necessarily about a single object or a thing but rather how that thing might function within a community or communities as as part of a series of practices and exchanges and storytelling and I just wanted to have a way to kind of work with people who are really doing that work outside the museum and doing it in ways that I think preserved Europe but also change cultural practices since untold stories takes place at the annual meetings of the American Institute for Conservation. A lot of professionals in the field Are already gathered there. The meetings attract over one thousand conservators blake many professional conferences. The meetings are often held in a nondescript hotel how setting but untold stories makes it a practice to conceptualize where attendees are sitting and the history that preceded them an example of this is the twentieth nineteen eighteen untold stories event titled Indigenous Futures and Collaborative Conservation. How many times have you been to a conference and you could be anywhere right? I mean you're in this big room and you never leave the hotel or the conference center and part of what I was interested in was trying to actually place a somewhere so twenty one thousand nine since we were actually meeting at the Mohegan Sun which is a Mohegan owned casino. We were on native land. It seemed like a really important opportunity. -tunities to talk about native sovereignty kind of history of genocide in our own country. The fact that anyone who's non-indigenous in this country is a settler settler colonialist but to really think about what this means in terms of how we take care of collections that have come to us as a result of historical happenstance stance but also a very violent past and to acknowledge the fact that museums which for most of us who work in museums are very safe. Welcoming and joyful places uses are evidence of this history of of pain and removal so the opportunity to work with the commod educational initiative was really exciting. Because because it's a partly native co-founded and they do a lot of educational work around questions of how even think about the history of this country story and to me. That was really important to be able to say in native space as opposed to you know in a place somewhere else. Part of of Bala. Hundreds point is that there isn't such a thing as a textualist cultural material. The intentionally nondescript conference ballroom has a lot in common with deliberately sterile museum environment episode. Sixty eight of this show features an interview with Ed Wanda's spears director of programming and outreach at the adamant educational initiative and one of the convenors of the twenty nineteen untold stories event in the episode. She discusses her presentation about how native native narratives are violently presented through White Lens in museums. It was in Donna spheres of Who suggested the title she had worked in museums? She's very familiar with these questions. And she's the one who suggested indigenous futures which forces you to recognize that this is not something of the past. We really wanted to do something. The thing that felt like we were going to push. This had to be uncomfortable but it also had to be aspirational. Where do we go now? And how can as conservatives servers we actually be part of this very kind of collaborative supportive mission to ensure futures. We can't make it happen by ourselves. It's it's not like we're saving anybody and that's another big concern of mine. There's a real sort of savior mentality that I think conservation has ask we save objects and I certainly came out of graduate school thinking that I was going to save everything and to me. That's a very problematic way to think about it because frankly if the objects still survives it didn't need me it made it thousands of years without me somehow. We've decided that we're the ones that making the that make these things live live forever which is pure arrogance so part of this event was really to think about how as conservatives can come up with action items and by action items. It was practices but more than anything of kind of Shipton in a mental framework for working much more equitably and more humbly to really have a sense of respect for this notion that there has already been a history before you and so when you enter into this hopefully collaborative relationship you need to acknowledge alleged. Things have survived for a long time without your intervention. And they don't need you but you could actually provide some sort of service some sort of benefit that could actually really help the untold stories team. True to their mission is careful not to present the workshop as a single solution or even a set of solutions. The team wants wants to counter the assumption within the profession. That all you need to do is go to one workshop and then you're all done you know. Unfortunately this doesn't change the working working practices it doesn't change the mindset. It doesn't change the way an organization functions and what happens is then marginalized people are called upon again and again to kind of keep performing this vulnerability and this discomfort for themselves in order to educate people who are unwilling to do the work that consistent like every single day for the rest of their lives work that will be required to make transformative change possible part of what in the twenty nineteen in conversation we. We felt very strongly we had to say is if if you really believe in equality if you really want to do something that is truly collaborative that does not assume some sort of hierarchy. It means being really uncomfortable the entire time and maybe at the end of it things will change but you you still have to kind of follow through on it when it gets really uncomfortable. And the fact is most marginalized communities. People have done this entire lives so it it just feels like it's time for you. Know I think in general the museum community to say we're willing to engage in these kinds of difficult ongoing perpetual natural

American Institute For Conserv Collaborative Conservation Cheetah Bala Chandran American Institute For Conserv Bala Chandran Bala Cinci Bala Alexander John Hopkins Archaeological Mu Archaeological Theological Mus Mohegan Sun Johns Hopkins University Associate Director Europe Blake Ed Wanda Shipton Director
"shipton" Discussed on What'sHerName

What'sHerName

03:05 min | 2 years ago

"shipton" Discussed on What'sHerName

"As she grew people were cruel here's an account from sixteen eighty six all the important men in town were gathered in a meeting and here's what the source says quote and she coming sitter on an occasional and some of them abused her calling her the devils bastard and hag face and the like this has grown men in a case men of town this child comes around Walker as the devils bastard and hank face and here's where we see sula start to emerge as somebody who's not going to put up with this crap source says quote one of the principal men that himself spruce and fine had in an instant his neck ruff which in those days they were pulled off and the seat of toilet clapped in its place he sat next to him bursting out into laughter at the site thereof was served therefore his hat was invisibly conveyed away and the Pan of a chamber pot which stood in the next room put on his head thereof instead yeah that's what Magic's for exactly rip off at dudes neck roughing give him a toilet yeah fantastic so this is the earliest account we have and after that the townspeople took her more seriously a neighbor came to her saying I've had a smoke and the petticoat stolen and she said I know exactly who it was and I'll get it back to you and she did the next day they went to the market cross her in the neighbor and the lady who had stolen the smoke was came up wearing it's holding the petticoats and said `I habits I stole it here's it back so it was that the power the Shipton saying I have these devilish powers I know it was you give it back or was it really a magic spell she got married and then she married at the age of twenty four in fifteen twelve to a local carpenter ankle toby shipton the shift was supposed to be in this glee hack it's all women and people thought that she had given him a little potion or cast a spell on him and then he died two years later of course again it was her fault she was never embraced in the town she was always terrifying to people and to escape the suspicion and the rejection of the town she would escape across the river like her mother and she found a piece in the cave and in the woods.

Walker toby shipton devils hank face principal two years
"shipton" Discussed on What'sHerName

What'sHerName

11:55 min | 2 years ago

"shipton" Discussed on What'sHerName

"I'm kidding Nelson and I'm a Levine Michael and this is what's her name fascinating women you've never heard of in the North Yorkshire town of Nares Bro I visited mothership dozens an amazing historic site that honestly I wish I could back to all the time and I spoke with Jay stelling my name is Jay Spelling and I am an officer at Mothership Tins I'm also an illustrator an author who has bee coolest job she's the most recent in a four centuries long line of people who've operated England's old list visitor attraction prop making a do everything yeah it's the way disturbing the world but I love it yes lovely and together Jay I walked through the ancient woods on the banks of the river knitted the River Lid Nid yes an eye view tipple oh yeah and people you can hire boats and go along on here the story begins as any Halloween special should it was a dark and stormy night and really it was it was fourteen seventy seven and the town of nurse borough huddled between the river Nid and castle towering above under roared and lightning ripped through the sky this was a night of evil portent no Christians Seoul would dare to be out on such a night but look on the river a small rowboat is struggling through the waves a girl is crying but wait she's not just crying she's she's rowing her cries hope despair are mixed with cries of pain as she leaves against the oars in this storm she stops to rest to scream as she holds her belly is you having a baby she is pregnant she's just fifteen no all she has refused to reveal the identity of the father baby is coming her name is Agatha and she very very brave not just because she's rowing across the river in a thunderstorm at night while she's in labor she's brave because of where she's headed to the deep dark woods on the other side to the forest where no one dares to go because this forest isn't just any forest and I mean pretty much all forests were deemed to be dangerous and wild and ski sorry in the Tudor era but this forest is widely rumored to have a supernatural pool of water that turns anything that touched visit to Stone and not only that but the wall of stone that hangs the pool was shaped like a giant screaming is goal surely the work of the devil sure years ago people who dared to venture they're even brought back leaves and sticks and even small creatures turned to stone that they found in the pool on the other side the river so steered well clear of that side of the river but Agatha wasn't orphan now she's pregnant she's desperate the people of the town have turned her out they refused to help her so long as she conceals the identity the true father so she's rowing across the river to seek shelter where no one else will ever go when she stumbled up the bank on the other side she spotted a small cave inside slightly sheltered from the storm she pushed back her wet hair to clear her is she looked out from the cave and then a flash of lightning she saw just a few steps up the riverbed gold-shaped rock with water cascading down to a pool of water underneath the baby was born in the cave while the storm raged around them and it said as the baby emerged into the world she didn't cry cackled she named the baby Sula and they say these massive this baby and not like a usual baby deformed and weird looking in a haunt back she was supposed to be really what you did inspector which to look like maybe that's been embellished in changed and I hope to didn't look quite like that but that's the accounts we've got that's what people always say about her mother and child lived there alone for two years oh the cave is still there the very spot oh cool you have to walk through this spooky woods to get there this here is beach avenue and these are some of the listen toll is trees in the country beech trees and the group really really told because if the ribbon needs being so close still here and hey we are at the cave but more than that right next to the cave there was indeed a pool that turn thing is to stone still there cool oh this part of the petrifying well was known as the giant scope so as well as the pitch while having all these magical properties and being terrifying it also looked like a giant skull in some images it looks really really quite scary you can stand right at the base of it and see the water cascading down and you can see it turning objects to sown before your very eyes it's awesome and I mean geology can explain it now but do we want it to no science ruining everything there's an underground lake and then the water creeps up through this what's the magnesium and that's what makes things tend to stone obviously now we deliberately hang things to turn to stone I put back in the fourteen hundreds things would naturally just turned to stone so dead animals and birds and twigs breath if you saw that you would be shops yeah this is so the underground lake is similar the way on the grounds and then the wool took comes all the way down here everything's site an over the top of the well and you can say people put in coins that's another lookie thing people do the spiders they are the witches and wizards event we had over summer yet creepy Harry to that's the gross bit we always hung cutting guys with two oldest things here are these two lumps so that's a ladies and mens top hat eighteen fifty three whoa but this is the Halloween special so it's supernatural and it's terrifying it's the devil it's physical evidence of the powers of evil and as she grew it became clear she was no ordinary child and then the Abbot of Beverly Intervenes the Abbott beverly intervened to help although we don't know who the father of the walls because the Abbot of beverly who is important guy we think that the father most of being influential or very wealthy to have Hatha intervention and then Agassi goes to a convent in we think Nottinghamshire then there's no record of her after that and baby doe's to live with a family in his breath but she was never really welcomed she was and then came back to find the door wide open so she calls on her neighbors to come and help you think she's been burgled and the go in only to find they wait links through the house they look in the cradle empty whereas Babyish Lagaan and they find her sat on I'm barb of the chimney naked and eagling the age of two is this a story she made up to cover the fact that she had left the child on its own all is it is like impossible but still we can make our best educated guesses by critically analysing the different sources that we do have which are actually quite a lot because she became a very famous witch in her name and she was famous for centuries afterwards I mean this bay in sixteen forty one this being fifty different books with her prophecies and parts of her history and life and the I think the earliest account was said to have been things that mother Shipton had said to supposed to be the first time that was written down with after she told it to this young girl on Waller and these are the stories that people told about her.

Nelson Levine Michael North Yorkshire Nares Bro four centuries two years
"shipton" Discussed on What'sHerName

What'sHerName

14:40 min | 2 years ago

"shipton" Discussed on What'sHerName

"Ah my favorite let's begin with fear that seems right for Halloween special thing Kalinic Kafia basically just lots of minerals and in the war a really high mineral content of calcium and sophie not my job is weird so it calms travertine and told us a tool for softer we were left on the way to your graces and then never come back for so two hundred and fifty years old days one and just kept on petrifying over the top has feared when she was taken in by the family and her foster mother went out to run an errand the with the devil ray so our sources are written after the fact and to separate fact from fiction Liam goes to Anwar when she was a young girl when Shipton was old and almost at horrendous life.

Kalinic Kafia Liam Anwar Shipton fifty years
"shipton" Discussed on What'sHerName

What'sHerName

02:54 min | 2 years ago

"shipton" Discussed on What'sHerName

"Happy Halloween Ghosts the dark scary animals mean people strange men hide Sir enclosed spaces tunnels underground spaces Scorpions spiders amazingly efficient they think about this a lot are you really afraid of the dark dark in places that I'm not familiar with and the there might be stuff out there that is alive or not alive or otherwise threatening yes and that seems to be a common strand among all of our greatest fears maybe everyone's greatest fears and I think since Halloween special HP lovecraft can spill um in this tiny little quote the oldest and strongest emotion of mankind is fear and the oldest Austin strongest fear is fear of the unknown well he definitely knew how to exploit that yes and that's what I think is the cheapest of all of our fears so Halloween is near and dear to our hearts here in America and it's getting bigger every year where we celebrate the Macab and we revel in the unknown and and it seems like what we're doing is conjuring fear and death so that we can face it but the roots wide-brimmed hat and she made potions and she casts spells five hundred years ago really it's a story about fear and how in tutoring land the unknown in the unexplainable was a very scary thing but for one woman known as Mother Shipton nothing was unknowable not even the future and so she was never afraid and that was her power.

America Macab HP Austin Mother Shipton five hundred years
"shipton" Discussed on What'sHerName

What'sHerName

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"shipton" Discussed on What'sHerName

"Oh yes what are you afraid of Oh man do you on a list all right the root of all of these fears like fear of the dark or fear of strange men who don't know what's going to happen fear of the unknown that is the Pallini go way way back so today I'd like to tell you the tale of a witch a real wit who had hooked nose.

"shipton" Discussed on Burn the Haystack

Burn the Haystack

21:29 min | 2 years ago

"shipton" Discussed on Burn the Haystack

"I mean but when people when people realize that they kind of girl she's just a human lack may rather than aussies really grand rats small without raising if I could create that into different things having are encouraged without raising will be kind without raising any kind of dual off because we don't have to have there's different key words into the pinchers search bar that you will stop is coming also obviously you can monetize it through ads and stuff which is kind of what I do for a lot of my clients is when you're uncertain kind of consuming a lot of stuff yeah so is that sweat Pea interesting help drive traffic to people who literally such in full that a church alighted poster or something sometimes I'll dislike have no inspiration and also I'll just literally just scroll through Pinterest and if I see something spies me I'll be like Oh yeah let's you know listen change that and then wham Bam he go citing that looks kind of original but it's actually stolen contract it's great it's great that's cool yeah honestly I barely ever use pinterest I mean I only end up on there because I'll be searching something on Google and then end up finding like an image and then click on and it takes me to pinterest and then I'll see images and then also end up in pinterest but not really because I plan to be the and then when you go down that spiral you just scrolling is like oh you might like these pants like a damn staging stuff gets me every time yeah anyway all right well that brings us pretty nicely okay to your bread and butter so as you like to tell us a little bit about how you got into a digital marketing and Yeah where did that all start sorry I graduated you well actually Batra I went to uni I was studying I wanted to actually do journalism because yeah I love writing things like that but then I realized it was Super Investigative I was just like Nah not really my style plus afford so that was kind of the main reason and I was there at the argumentation day I went to Utsa in Sydney and don't when I was there at the Oregon social media as if you can actually study a digital leaders didn't make sense to me but I was having a look at it in Ashley is Pretty Interesting assigned up the not did that coastal three years but in the second year they actually said do you WanNa do a double major ooh that sounds release Martin Fancy show so I had log in I could do public communications which was basically advertising pr so I chose advertising and the last of the three of course I did digital social media and advertising together and graduated on the end of that end towards the end of that a year I one of my good friends at Uni that I'd made had dad worked at a AD agency and basically she said look on day looking for somebody and they don't want they make so would you became and it was like Shaw okay so I went for the interview I got the job after about ten months on but to the end up against the buses unfortunately it didn't work out May I- by that stage I had actually the guy that was that was managing me he had really pushed me to sink outside the box and he really was a pivotal point in May actually being where I am right now because at the time I was working a grocery store down the road from my house and a had heard I'm studying social media on ends they asked me all could stop doing some stuff on facebook for us and I'd spoken to my manager at work about it and he was absolutely you do it do it but creative proposal strategy for them jewelry Mike Walsh I why would I have to go to oldest F it anyway in search years I just do it like you blow them away with what you are like okay sorry he helped him kind of that together and I took it to them and they were amazed by knows like sweet and they were kind of my client and I had to yeah to get an A. B. N. and I was like wow I'm actually adults ahead it was kind of freelancing a little bit at the beginning and that that kind of just math a lot of self employed people dot like that and yet your family friends finding out and all that stuff I was telling people that are doing it on the side in what was that essentially I was thinking what this could actually be a full-time thing it's hot time now but I could actually make this into a proper proper business it's any mate property the answer I was contemplating what do I do next conscious Do I freelance just shift in time to create a business name will do I do this ah blaster long story short I create a J solution marketing end in August I think was not last year before I basically labeled I set up my website I said on my social media accounts and all that kind of stuff and basically as soon as I started exposing snoozing kind of putting it out there and just showing up being present capable of finding me like left right and center I hardly had I hardly had to market myself and it was just happening like what the heck people people actually interested in all of this and they're wanting to get wanting me wanting to work with me this kind of stuff so it really just kind of snowballed into this thing where I saw potential in it and not really excited that's kind of where ended up on in how I ended up he off and now I'm working fulltime I went from hiring in my in my parents office from two so to be cute in my sisters folkston harm so it just is what our family really lovely but yes I love it it's amazing I never would have thought what I'd be doing but it's just insane when you kind of backtracking Gardner if that connection with my friend at union had never happened I would never got nutjob would I've met my manager would have actually pushed me to the end like Sarney things may not have lined up to actually lead me to where I am now in I'm just thanking God for the opportunity instead of kind of opened up new doors and led me to where I am and what I'm doing now because I'm he now and I've got your steady clients some in the US moist for early on in all around Australia installed in I'm just being able to make connections with these people learn about their brand in business in kind of just leverage that online sir search engine marketing social media marketing content creation copywriting with people It's just been the best because I get two people on and that's what I love doing yeah amazing honestly sounds like the dream like it's it's sounds like literally it sounds like everybody it sounds like one of those you know like tyler Pez videos as we're like this is what we can do and you can have a mansion gatty Ron and olive is massive for my rimmed office on the other end hoping best fought back in rollout in just you know the flexibility is awesome but there's a lot of present conflicting with foyer self I made it stressful it's overwhelming and you put a lot of pressure on yourself because much very much a people pleaser I feel Wack I put my clients before me which is good thing but because of that often I stress myself out a lot I realize the I can actually say no to people show car I yeah It's a lot of learning in a lot of growing really quickly sorry it's amazing but yeah it's been really challenging for the person who is listen to this and thinking I wonder if I could do that. What could you take us through maybe like a typical work day for you and then like maybe big pitcher Ed workweek or work month whatever if you divide your work into blocks what are those what are the the small blocks the lodge big blocks as far as working with clients ating contents what does that actually look like a year because I know it sounds rights and you've already alluded to it's probably a hell of a lot of work and there's a lot more pressure than going to shift at McDonalds I think Yes I gushing head right but yes I find my work kind of goes in cycles in like monthly cycles onerous because I usually see iced default massively I've got some clients who are I've got a lot of clients now some that appear technicians so they voiced off which is Celek violent company which is a bunch of different in class and they all have different needs sorry that is itself kind of working at your some clients need a lot more attention than others and will stop by it generally works in cycles on at the beginning of the end of the month I'll be scheduling content for the following months first week of a knee months I'll be reporting on the previous and then in the middle it's kind of where I Kboi news clients or I on stock creating content contain calendars for the following so kind of disguising a cycle of creating content? eh scheduling malcontent reporting on the content that's very high level basically what it is it's obviously complicated than that at times desist continuing this year optimization and monitoring campaigns making sure I'm not wasting my money essentially because you know some of my clients spend five dollars a day but I've got other clients spending upwards of one hundred or two hundred dollars a day it's a lot of pressure in that sense where you're trying to get that return and spent particularly yet for people who have a big budget as well so it can be high stress at some points on but I think realizing that all of my clients is movies themselves Surveyed Charlie get what I'm going through as well Sir I think when I realized that I just took the pressure off a little bit humans show I got six emails in a row from them but they totally understand it might take me a couple of hours to get back to them about it I think when I realized that it just made it a lot more easy to deal with all that stress and stuff like that but yeah one of the biggest challenges working for myself has just been the inconsistency when you starting out particularly the inconsistency in income inner going from a job where you get paid as soon as you walk in the door from nine am to five pm responding to emails aren't billable time you will not getting am to five pm and I think that's what's driving Mars to WanNa pursue lunar things like possibly doing digital courses or creating some sort of stream of passive income where I can have that reliability this in Incan I mean now that I'm choosing to a on getting more consistent income now but still it's a struggle because some clients as I said before a demanding than others others I might not do work with for a couple of weeks when invoice it's very it can be quiet you know because you just by yourself in your office working or you know just by yourself work you on your blog how do you stay motivated. Yeah I think I've gotten onto the podcast bandwagon lightly guys so you'll be happy about listen I listened to yes and stuff while.

"shipton" Discussed on Burn the Haystack

Burn the Haystack

29:49 min | 2 years ago

"shipton" Discussed on Burn the Haystack

"Come back to the haystack with Josh and Jessie I'm Jesse and today we have a great interview coming at your Heart Jess Shipton now I just want that I feel could touch somebody rather than missing out on that will continue to be altogether oh well just go you can print me at the time I could've used that help at the time Nine people only getting contact with the favorite content creators if they have a problem it's never normally if they like something and if something's good which is frustrating seems almost always the the haters that they jump on the bandwagon a lot more quickly than the people that are finding like actual value in how you doing maybe exhibit a YouTube comments but anyway that's awesome I want to know I've got so many questions okay I think the best one to go run out is what what positive feedback have you had on the blog like have you had any like what what are some of the messages that people have sent you oh my Gosh I can't believe that came from a blow yeah I have I've made a lot of friends I think that's the amazing part about it and like anyone friends people I've never before but people that particularly from the US I have quite a big following from that and even now that I think I was taught just kind of like not engage will yeah kind of like an engagement surprise where we kinda just lift each other's things often just really like yet to Kinda share it this content and there was a lot of people that yet they just genuine people from all different walks of life and because of that we were able to connect such a deep level we pray for each other we your dual of these amazing things we show last jennings you know like one guy he's just had a kid and they were sharing about that on any of these people have never met before it was just it arvind up such an amazing opportunity for that and then I mean I've had people email me or whatever on an Oscar on thanks through something at school on that was this one guy and he was in year eleven twelve quite remember and he was going he must have been any twelve when he was going to school captain I'm just confused just like why on getting I feel God is calling me to speak school captain so that I can really be a leader an share you know all of this on all of his goodness and stuff and I just said him I'm like dude you don't need a badge to be able to do that like you don't need acting you don't need that label Austin we try to put labels on ourselves it's like wear the ones I feel getting the credit because I mean as humans we always want to be appreciated in south by I kind just reminded him that he has he made right now he he's got Jesus Hakin Shaggy's right now he doesn't need school captain badge and stuff sir just to be on his life the good feedback about when people send me stuff on our thank you so much this was this message was may like that means so much to me but the fact that people come to me and just asked me to pray for them even like that's incredible sorry I mean all of it in an art show has displayed amazing I mean yeah some comments really get any high at all I've been really busted that I mean I get some people going on I don't really agree with what you said or something like that I have a compensation in DMZ something about it and I'll just get that story and I'll be like yeah I totally relate to that yet whatever and stuff so I think just taking off taking religion of the pedestal and putting relationships there instead that's what I've really come to realize is so important with online platforms because yeah I mean we grow we say a curated fate of really pretty images but there's real life pests behind that going through possibly some really messy stuff when we actually take the time to get to nor those people in what they're going through and how we can offer anything whether that's just encouragement whether that's a Bible verse whether that's actually froehlich I literally sometimes ask People Hey Sydney on your voice memoir Oh send me a message or something and I'll prior view and start I'll send them a voice memo org video back of me praying for them and that's where Davis connections with people on that I've never met that has really been amazing opportunity just all send kind of connections that I've been able to make on how has blogging change the way that you think about your own faith and spirituality walk with God and that sorta stuff yeah that's an awesome question I think I think just being real with people I appreciate authenticity I appreciate people being genuine and not kind of just beating around the Bush and start somme I really ah I really have realized that if if I didn't have it altogether or if I didn't have the answers people appreciate when I actually argument about that guy you know what actually started yet to that or I'm on a really rough part of my journey right now God was something like that and I actually say yet the Christian by myself on this pedestal and just pretend like as soon as you become a Christian or as soon as you have Jesus in your life that everything is good you can still wrestle with God and he can still wrestle with questions and not have things all sorted out when you are a Christian and I think when people realized that particularly from when I say that outside just passing or whatever I think that has really on like blogging in that way has opened my eyes just to the fact that there are many different people with so many different perspectives so when you look at the end of that you just have to be real and be human with them because that's how we will connect and dumb yeah putting that relationship above the religions the things I think that's really good I love that was there wha- I'm curious why is there like a particular because I can really I mean even through the over the Internet like a really failure passion for connecting people to Jesus So has that been in particular experience view that has driven to do all of all of this what what drives you to do this awesome question on honestly the biggest thing for me was I had conversations with some of my family members and it wasn't like religion-based or anything but religion brought up and start east Allow my family members on Christian oil vague might be but they aren't really I'm very vocal about it kind of you know like I mean run on a blog and I do this I'm unashamed battle with that kind of stuff a lot of my family members you know they might believe but I actually haven't had that the station with that and I was quickly realizing that I felt very comfortable talking to strangers or people that I kind of didn't really nor very L. acquaintances whatever about my faith and would be really open about it but as soon as it got to my family whether that was extended family of course family Dolphin I didn't really want to talk about it that much because I felt they will possibly given judge me and I think at that point I realized it's so much easier to talk others about my faith was my family and I didn't realize why soy that to be honest was the pivotal point I was like how do I talk to my family is about how can I make this easy out because the whole evangelism saying whatever spreading Jesus it can be really daunting and inside I think when we do it in a way it's more comfortable to us it takes pressure off and serve me that's I'm very extra betted I don't know if you've got that the I love people i WanNa know this story what lights me off is hearing people's passions and stuff start if I can get to know someone as a friend end or just as a president general in kind of share with them my passions in a way that's through writing or through just chatting and stuff to me that's the most comfortable way of doing it rather than just think I would ever go hiking with can I view and just out of the blue because that still I norge yeah with my family I would almost feel even we'd saying that asks what that just changed everything when I realized that the people that are closest to me with the hottest to talk to about something I was so passionate about that just of yet I was just like wow okay I need to need to change up how how I think I need to be doing this you yes we should be a reflection Jesus I won't people to chat to Maine after conversation with main guy there's something different about her like that's that's what I want to be that person obey someone where people will I don't know what it was I just I feel something different about it and I wanna get to know a better because latched at bat an eye what that looks like but if I can just be more and more reflection of Jesus for my actions my words all of that kind of stuff inside the box that curiosity within some family members and stuff like that that's to me is the most comfortable way of doing it and so yeah I think that's kind of what drove me at the beginning to do it all on and now I just realized that yet we've got this online platform we've got this way where we need to have a using where we come to every Saturday Sunday or whenever you type thing you can literally have church any day anytime of the wake and you can be connected Caprio anyway I think that's amazing on about leveraging Chech- online in just having this connection with people from all over the world it's pretty amazing and I'm I'm blessed to be in kind of a surprise a generation where we have these gifts right in front of my house to us now that is amazing and Yeah thank you so much for sharing that I want to talk about digital marketing and social media minute before we do that I did have just this is just a curiosity so tell me tell me if this is just totally off base but is there money in blogging like I don't know is a bunny and blogging can you make money from it absolutely in multiple different ways like the biggest one if you starting out or would be advertising on this or lack allowing add sense and stuff you can apply to get on Google ad sense and actually have ads however sometimes as you might have some pretty risque ads someone probably a line with what you're trying to share so that can sometimes be yet touching guard but in a unlinked so when you're driving traffic to your side or your Bogota Affiliate links are a great way which is kind of way referring content you kind of acting as a bit of it influence our I suppose in terms of recommending different brands will book so products or whatever that might look lacking in getting a little bit of commission off that I suppose if people use your links a lot of people do that you're the shed the equipment they used Amazon get a couple of dollars off that every time one of the audience on purchases at at another way and then yeah I mean obviously monetize it through things like ECOMMERCE sorry I mean that's a dream I would love to have the small that reason at the moment it's a huge Hobie of mine and I love that if you can be a thing in life is as far as if you can make your dream in your passion job or something the you can completely do leave off that would be amazing it's it's not a priority of mine right now I'd love to keep working on that in the background united I can create power or if I can create something that has that we can be walking billboards for Jesus installing kind of like I my hope arisen to do that stuff I feel like we always needs to be a cause and I think that needs to be the case was being genuine decent human being because there's not many of those in the world unfortunately like it's it's not hard and so I just wanted to kind of put that goodness out there and start getting people to ask questions and yeah so I mean yeah plenty of ways to monetize your blog on but obviously the biggest thing is just being consistent with content in driving that traffic there best racial made it well it's not really social media platform it's more of a search engine platform is pinterest in that to really good way of driving traffic to two blocks to different websites and things ought to so again that's just that's one of the he's one of the ways you could do that explain to us how that works with Pinterest because I've actually never at that before how does impinge wrestling with your blog is is it just in creating boards and stuff like that different content pieces that you have on your blog sir uh-huh yet let's just take a blog pace for example and then you would create pinchers graphic was something about that way you kind of have used the five ways to evangelize or something like that that and you'd be driving traffic to not specific blog pace the back end of all of that is where it gets a little bit tricky sometimes because it comes into things like such engine optimization in how you would actually be optimizing pins so that when people attacked oh ombudsman the organic way of doing that is what I said basically optimizing star that you've got ut when it's popping up in different things like that so the same Dr With Google Ads this section ten is high in such engines which is why I kinda cold pinchers tomorrow social media platform because official on pinterest bought people generally are that to get ideas tips on inspiration Sir the reason why they going there is to search for different things type of content I suppose a little bit more intrusive in the sense that you placing it in front of people that fit your target market Oh that's cool I'm not afraid to admit I use pinterest like the only time lot not to plan my second dream thing it's it's when I'm like doing like a graphic art work for the haystack or something like that or like a logo or like.

"shipton" Discussed on Burn the Haystack

Burn the Haystack

14:38 min | 2 years ago

"shipton" Discussed on Burn the Haystack

"Backup and you'll see this in the episode but I want to set the stage for Jess because she seems like an ordinary girl really happy bubbly go when you first ah but she's actually accomplished Quaden life and that copy overstated when she was just a teenager in high school she started this blog called smiler raisin and she has used that blog for many many years since to encourage people to write about travels and her experiences and really to minister to people all around the world not only that but just a little while ago just started her own digital social Oh media marketing company which now has dozens of clients all around the world and she is helping those clients to sell their products and emphasis even better and even greater than they would before she's a real success story and in this episode we talked to.

"shipton" Discussed on Diet Starts Tomorrow

Diet Starts Tomorrow

04:34 min | 3 years ago

"shipton" Discussed on Diet Starts Tomorrow

"So yeah, it separately a bonding experience, and also it's sort of I have the feeling like when I use it of the way that I felt when I first started using dating apps before they like cumbersome and tedious and disappointing for sure I had that feeling back again. We're like this is fun is totally out. I same feeling isn't just about like finding date for myself or am I going to be a little forever? It's like, oh, this is like a fun activity in and of itself for sure. So anyway, that's enough of about ship enough about us enough about us. So now about you now about you, Tracy. Thanks again for also, thanks for shipping. Ship. Always I'm getting. Hip face. Yes. You wanna use that? So it's actually really good one. This is a great opportunity for puns, you guys. Everybody loves a fucking cheap picture someone who's ship face like the people in Burbach like there is crazy 'cause they've picture like someone who's just been using ship for so many hours. I can't stop I'm ship faced. I love it. Okay. So so you guys emailed us shit or like Shipton Shipton? You guys emailed us ship ton of questions and we prompted like one of those question airs on instant story. And so we got a lot of responses questions. See how to hear from the people get the people what they people. People what they want. All right. So I think the first one everyone has seen it everywhere. Let's talk about celery, choose celery juice, well back to the puns. This is definitely a trend worth stocking. Oh, but I'm sure I don't I don't get it very sauce. Your own funds to I didn't get it. I thought we were still putting ship. That's why I didn't understand like what does that have to do with the dating? I know that's really what was going through my head. Anyway, I say it's worth stocking. Because every time I'm seeing another headline about celery, I start laughing because it's ridiculous. It's the next. It's taking opponent was like, let's big celery common. They did some marketing campaign. Let me just say that. Okay. Tell us. Yeah. Is like a stunt simply the benefit of celery, juice, if it's where's your? Oh. Yeah. So what what do we know about celery? It's a low scratching, okay? Hey, gene. I'm like one of those people who like celery lawn tro, like jeans where they truly can't stand it like I can't have celery. Nothing happens. Growls? I hate the social experiment. We should have brought in it. Say around her. But celery, I really the cyber. The crunch if I accident, we have a tuna salad or something like I love I love celery, refreshing, so great it's refreshing because you don't have this natural water and yet, but some people have like, I know launchers, also great. I know I love launch. I just don't like celery. Yeah. Interest on. Okay. So justice. Well, which is what people do. I can't be. Yeah. But there is a gene of people who hate salon tro being. So they they will translate those taste buds into something that soapy tasting celery does not enjoy it's different because celery this on the celery, gene. So is the thing. No is trending now. Anti celery fail. Here's the thing. But cooked celery like if it's in a soup. It's not a problem. I think I would have an aversion to that. Because that texture to me is almost like. Sure to be the same as an cooked onion like dissolves in your mouth. But it still maintains those those fibers which is a off putting to me for The issue something. so much the consistency. As it is the smell smells Malas smell tampered with with cooking. But still that's why dot yeah. That's why I think with the cooking. We know what do we know about celery? So yes, it's vegetable it's non starchy. It's low calorie has potassium. It has fully has vitamin k, blah, blah, blah. But what we also know is that it helps people feel full if they eat it. Okay. If they juice it, maybe not so much. So we're we're taking this trend to the next level is juicing it. And what do you do during juicing waste, it waste it, basically? Yeah. A juicer strips the fiber, which is the most important part because that's what we know keeps you full..

Shipton Shipton Tracy Burbach
Yemen on the brink

FT News

11:24 min | 3 years ago

Yemen on the brink

"We're looking at the humanitarian crisis in Yemen. The US this week called for peace talks to begin within a month to end hostilities depicted a Saudi led coalition against who rebels a Middle East correspondent spoke to lease grandba- the UN's humanitarian coordinator in Yemen about how bad the crisis is. I want needs to be done to stave off a catastrophic famine. We know the UN has already warned that there is a risk of a big famine in Yemen, like half of Yemen is are at risk of big famine. How bad is the situation right now out of the entire population? In Gaiman more than fifty percent, close to sixty percent of all the people in the country are food insecure. That means that they're struggling to support their families out of the eighteen million. Who we classify as being food insecure? There are eight and a half million people right now who when they wake up in the morning, they have no idea where they will find their next meal, or if they will have won a we have warned that he's conditions. Do not improve improve very quickly. We think another five and a half. Maybe even five point six million more people will be in those pre-famine conditions. And this is why the United Nations last week invoke secured. The council resolution twenty four seventeen which obliges the UN to warn the members of the Security Council when we think that there is a conflict related famine. And we took that step last week that demonstrates how seriously the UN regards this crisis as the UN conjugate futon if free single month, the United Nations World Food program, his distributing food to eight million people the work that they are doing with the frontline NGOs is absolutely heroin. Now, we know that because conditions are deteriorating. So quickly that we have to do even more. Now, I'll admit to you that the operation in Yemen. It's the largest in the world. That's also one of the most difficult operations were working under dangerous, very complex conditions. It's going to be hard for us to continue to scale up. We are committed to doing. So we know that literally millions of lives are at stake and millions of people depend on the United Nations to. Do what is necessary is there enough food in the country? But people don't have access to it or there's just no food. We characterize this as an income famine. And what that means is that what is driving the famine our economic conditions, many destitute families, simply do not have the money that they need to buy the things that they acquire in the market. There's also the problem of the importers ninety percent of all food in Yemen is actually brought into the country. It's imported well for importers to do what they have to do they require foreign currency. And there is a severe shortage of that in Yemen. And that's one of the factors that is driving the depreciation of the currency. And that is limiting the ability of importers to bring in the foodstuffs that will keep people alive. One of the reasons the UN came out last week and said, we are facing pre-famine conditions in Yemen is because the value of the real has depreciated so quickly and to such an extent. That tens of thousands of families. Just can't afford any more what they need and the real depreciates heave him by just a few times, literally tens of thousands of families are thrown out of the market, and they have no option for food except us do militias grab the food. Or once the food is out there. You're able to distribute the food operation that we're running in Yemen is being done under extremely difficult conditions. Now, we bring in hundreds of thousands of metric tons of food, and then it is transported to the areas of the country where people are most at risk. We then use partners on the ground in order to distribute that food now, it's the responsibility of the UN to do everything we can to make sure that the food reaches the people who need it when we know the food isn't getting to the right place. It's our top to take steps, and we do recently in a very hard hit area. We halt. The operation until we were able to get in place the parameters that were necessary to get the food where it had to go. So a militia was not allowing this food to reach people will he was thirties on the ground who wanted the U N to use a certain partner, and that partner just didn't have the track record and didn't have the capacity to do the job the way it needed to be done. And so we insisted that the partner, which we knew could do that work was the one that was chosen you'll this is something that the UN does everywhere we have an obligation to the donors were accountable to the people to do things the right way. And that's why we will sometimes take steps to say, no, we can't go forward with his operation until the right conditions are in place. What is the situation with sports because presumably the food is Shipton what's happening in holiday, then other ports. So the port of data, and that's just north of there solid. These are crucial ports that we described them as the lifeline for. Northern naming eighty to ninety percent of everything northern game and needs comes through these two ports. And because most of the population in Yemen is in the northern part of the country. The ports are just disproportionately important announce why it's been so important throughout the entire conflict that those ports stay open their functioning now, even as fighting escalated in who data starting in June, all in the last three months, those ports of remained open in the UN is continuing to bring food and we've made the point in. We've made it a strongly as we can that. If those ports close even for just a few days the impact will be immediate. And it will be catastrophic. They are the lifeline for millions of people and the coalition were blockading the port is that no longer the case. Now, the ports are open, and we have received commitments from all of the parties to the conflict that they will stay open if they closed millions of lives are at the line. Obviously, it would be great. If a political solution could be reached that would solve problems. But in the short term to avert this famine, what are the steps because the famine is being driven by economic factors. The key to stopping the spread pre-famine conditions is to stop the depreciation of the currency. Stop inflation, make sure that shippers half the foreign currency that they need. So they can bring in the food that people depend on. We also have to make sure that families have income that they're part of public works program. So that they're earning income that they can spend on the market, and those really are the constellation of factors that have to be in place. So this situation doesn't deteriorate further. The how can you stop the depreciation of the real in practical terms, it's very clear that the government of Yemen, and the central Bank of Gaiman really they played the decisive role here if the government of Yemen is able to inject liquidity. Into the economy. So that importers have the money that they need to bring in the shipments. This is gonna make a huge difference. We've also made the point the impetus need the lines of credit, and this is something the central Bank knish you right now these are two steps which would make a huge difference. We know that the government of game and is deeply committed to looking at these issues to solving them. The point that the UN is making is the time to solve them as now that's why we went to the Security Council last week and said Yaman is facing up famine that Khun Gulf the country and be one of the largest in recent memory. We've made that alert and we're hoping that everyone steps forward and find solutions so that the people of aim and have a chance for the future. So this is the government and the central Bank in Aden. That are protected by the coalition. Well, certainly the government of Yemen and the central Bank based in Aden. They're the ones that play the. Sisa fall. They're the ones that are responsible for monetary policy. And because this is an income famine everything depends upon the handling of the currency the handling of monetary policy. That's why they're role is so crucial. Just now the food that you are able to distribute is that enough to sustain people the United Nations provides a supplemental ration, so it will keep you alive, but not over the medium to long term. It's a supplemental emergency food ration. That means that if you're destitute, and you have absolutely no way of surviving except on you in food. You cannot do that for the medium-term. And this is one of the things we're most worried about in Yemen. There have been literally millions of people who have had no other source of food men the UN for several years now, and these people will they are in terrible trouble. Their immune cycles are breaking. Down. These are the people that we worry the most about right now. Our children already dying of starvation. It's very clear that there are millions of children that are malnourished across the country seven million people are malnourished and three million of those are children. If you go to many of the hospitals in the therapeutic feeding centers on the mound nutrition centres, which you see breaks, your heart. It absolutely is devastating to see young boys and young girls that don't have a chance. They're starving to death. We see it every day. You get the impression that the world is not paying enough attention to Yemen. His very clear that the crisis in Yemen is one of the most dramatic and deeply warring crisis in the world, the UN characterizes what's happening in Yemen has the worst crisis globally. Seventy five percent of the entire population needs some form of assistance, and there's no other country in the world who are higher percentage of the population needs help. If this crisis is not resolved will the consequences be bad. Just full the people of Yemen humanitarian crisis or are there? Other reasons why the words should take notice humanitarian crises are rarely self contained. They have consequences that extend far beyond. I think in the case of game. And what's absolutely clear is that the magnitude of the crisis risked, so many things that we care about you know, when countries breath. Down when they fall apart. But we see our mass migration human trafficking, transboundary, epidemics, the breakdown of law and order creates conditions that allow for the spread of insurgency it can allow for the spread of terrorist groups that have international aspirations and intent it's so important that he Ayman is stable. It's important for the people came in first and foremost, it's important for the region. And it's important for all of us.

Yemen United Nations UN Partner Security Council United States Middle East Aden Coordinator Heroin Ayman Khun Gulf Gaiman
China, Bryan Curtis and Hong Kong discussed on

02:14 min | 3 years ago

China, Bryan Curtis and Hong Kong discussed on

"To the enke's four two one win over baltimore glacier taurus shipton with two hits in an rbi for the yankees who have won three straight and are now a season high nineteen games over five hundred gray even says record at four and four allowing one run on four hits with six strikeouts it was the first time in his eleven starts that gray did not issue a walk aroldis chapman struck out the side in the ninth for his thirteen save manny machado hit seventeen home run for the orioles who have now dropped six in a row the nineteen year old julian walking neiman baking justice v start has a shares the lead at muirfield village at the memorial golf tournament with kyle stanley after a four under sixty eight tiger woods got off to a strong start to the memorial the second round but struggled mightily after a ninety minute weather delay missing four punts under seven feet in the final six holes to finish six john's back with nearly two dozen players in front of him at the french open novak djokovic and second seed alexander's veira advance to the fourth round will on the women's side us open runnerup madison keys overcame some late match shakiness to reach the fourth round with a straightset win over naomi osaka of japan will the bloomberg sports update i'm tom rogers this is bloomberg daybreak weekend our global look at the top stories in the coming week from our daybreak anchors all around the world straight ahead on the program i'm bob moon and new york tesla holds a shareholder meeting and apple as its annual developers conference i'll have those stories i'm nathan hager in washington where trade could trump just about everything from the g seven summit to north korean negotiations and i'm markus karlsson in london where we're asking whether more emergency action is on the cards when turkey's central bank meats and in asia we take a look at growth with a special look at china japan and india i'm bryan curtis in hong kong that story coming up i'm danielle boko in toronto where we're looking at how labor strikes in the transport sector have exposed and kelly's he'll for commodities markets that's all straight ahead on bloomberg daybreak on bloomberg eleven three oh new york bloomberg ninety nine one washington dc bloomberg one zero six one boston bloomberg nine sixty san francisco siriusxm channel one nineteen and around the world on bloom radio dot com and via the.

China Bryan Curtis Hong Kong Danielle Boko Kelly Bloomberg Baltimore Glacier Gray Asia London India Toronto Boston San Francisco Siriusxm Japan Manny Machado Orioles