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"shipton" Discussed on Epicenter

Epicenter

04:16 min | 2 months ago

"shipton" Discussed on Epicenter

"Welcome to epicenter mine up today my guests are Harry Halpin and John Shipton. Harry is the CEO of nimh technologies. They're building privacy infrastructure. That's decentralized permission list and incentivize allows developers to build privacy pulls irving applications that protect people's data but also the Meta data and John Shipton. Is Julian Assange as father? Now you might be wondering why John Shipton is going to cripple conferences while he regularly attends crypto conferences hacker conferences and alike to build a base of support for the Legal Defense Fund that is fighting the extradition of Julian assange to the US. So as you know Julian assange was in the Ecuadorian embassy for the last seven or eight years and about a year ago was arrested in London and is now in a maximum security prison facing extradition to the US and one of the organizations that is leading this funding campaign. Is the Kurds Foundation? They are also defending other people who have been accused of various computer crimes hacking leaking information people like Edward Snowden Chelsea Manning. Jeremy Hammond and Barrett Brown and opinions about assange are divided. I recognize that but I think there's one thing we can all agree on and that is if he is convicted of violating the espionage. Act as is the case brought against him by the US. This sets a really dangerous precedent for freedom of speech and freedom of the press. You know one of the things which brought wikileaks. A lot of attention is the fact that they exposed war crimes committed by the US in Iraq. I think we can all agree that a world in which journalists are under constant fear of prosecution for exposing this kind of information is undesirable. And you know it's also important to recognize that. Wikileaks and Crypto have the same roots the cipher punk movement. You know we talked about the interview. Julian was in the cyberpunk mailing lists early on and perhaps even had exchanges with Sa- Toshi and I think you know the Crypto community really needs to step up here and support you know these these fundamental rights of free speech because it could be project next. Harry mentions that at the end the conversation and says you know it could be your project if you're building something that. Us government for example deems to be a threat. Will you could be facing prosecution for violating the extra two and you could be facing extradition to us. No matter where you are in the world you know they have very broad reach as we've seen here so I think this is a really relevant conversation for people that are in Crypto and for the types of technologies that. We're trying to build so yeah. This is really fun. Conversation really unique very different from what we usually do. It was great to sit down with Harry John. And we're going to have Harry on at some point to talk about. Nim everything that they're building. He was speaking at reset everything on the privacy panel and I really aligned and a lot of things here so love to have him on the podcast as well before we go the conversation. I've got a favorite ask you whatever you're doing right now whenever you have a minute. I'd like you to leave us an apple. Podcast REVIEW APPLE. Podcasts reviews are the fuel that power. Seo Rankings for PODCASTS. So when we have a steady flow of reviews coming in when people searched for Crypto podcast or blockchain. Podcast ON APPLE PODCASTS. Well we'll show up. We'll show up higher in the rankings. Which means we can reach more people. We get to have more of an impact and we get to attract sponsors which helps us keep the show running and I just love to read them like I actually have a slack notification whenever we get a new review it shows of my slack and like always excited when I read these reviews because I know that someone spent the time to show their love for epicenter. So that's the favorite. I'm asking if you want you to go to epicenter dot rocks slash apple. That will take you straight to our page apple podcasts. Or if you have the APP already you can just go straight in there and it would really help out a lot and really appreciate it and as a gift if you want one..

Julian Assange US Harry John Shipton Harry Halpin apple Wikileaks Harry John CEO of nimh technologies Edward Snowden Chelsea Manning Jeremy Hammond Legal Defense Fund Sa- Toshi London Barrett Brown Iraq
It's The End Of The World! (Again

Your Brain on Facts

09:21 min | 3 months ago

It's The End Of The World! (Again

"In the village of Giddy Shem Devon England in the eighteenth century lived a woman named Joanna. South caught southpaw became convinced that she had supernatural powers and began selling seals of the Lord essentially tickets to get into heaven which people bought. She declared that she was the woman of the apocalypse as foretold in the Bible and that she would give birth to the new Messiah on October nineteenth eighteen forty one despite the fact that she was sixty four years old. My Name's Moxy and this is your brain on facts. We are living through a more uncertain than usual time right now. I wouldn't say it's the end of the world but others might and half history is rife with people who claim to have been told or to worked out when the end of days is coming. The list on Wikipedia is twenty four page downs. And that's really only focusing on Judeo Christian. Prophecies everyone from peasant girls two months to the mathematician who popularized the use of the decimal point. How Theory Cotton Mather? The influential Puritan Minister who played a decisive role in the Salem witch trials proclaimed in sixteen ninety one that Doomsday would occur in sixteen ninety seven basing the date on events that were current to him that he interpreted as fulfillment of Biblical prophecy when sixteen. Ninety-seven passed uneventfully. Mother changed his forecast. First to seventeen o six than seventeen sixteen and finally seventeen seventeen. Mother didn't make any more between seventeen seventeen and his death in seventeen twenty eight but he was still certain that the end was near Jonas Wendell along with other adventist preachers predicted. The Second Coming of Christ would occur between eighteen. Seventy three and eighteen seventy four after the prediction didn't bear out Nelson Bar. You're of follower of Wendell reinterpreted prediction to mean that. Jesus had returned in eighteen. Seventy four but he was invisible that does make it harder to disprove all grant you then. There was mother. Shipton the witch of York a fascinating blend of historical figure and embellished character. Born Ursula South the older and a thunderstorm in a cave in fourteen eighty eight to a teenage mother who refused to name. The father mother Shipton looked every bit like the iconic which would he skin hunched posture. Hooked nose the works. She made a number of predictions all of them in verse like Shakespeare's Weird Sisters in Macbeth. She said to have predicted Henry. The eighths disillusion of the monasteries the great fire of London the reign of Elizabeth I and even possibly the invention of airplanes on the telephone but the first written version of her predictions didn't come out until eighty years after her death and some of the authors have admitted to adding to what she supposedly said. So we're not one hundred percent certain if mother Shipton really said the world to an end shall come in eighteen hundred and eighty one but we can be fairly certain that it didn't the cave in which she was born is now a tourist attraction along with the nearby petrifying well items placed in the well are said to turn to stone. And that's more of a loose interpretation than an outright fable. The water in the well has a very high mineral content and those minerals will attach themselves to anything in the water making. It look like the object is turning to stone. Bona snacked the witches in Macbeth referred to usually as the weird sisters but were originally called the wayward sisters meaning. Good women who lost their way and been seduced by the allure of Magic Doomsday Predictions. Could come from the highest offices in the land. But that didn't make them anymore. True Pope Sylvester the second game pope in nine ninety nine seat with the auspicious-sounding date of the year one thousand looming so Vesta in a number of other Christian leaders foretold the coming of Jesus at the turn of the Millennium and many people believed it like really believed there were riots in the streets. Thousands of Christians fled to the holy city of Jerusalem and many attended what was expected to be particularly interesting midnight. Mass at Saint Peter's Basilica on New Year's Eve when the morning of January first on and it was clear the world had not ended semester and the other Christian leaders revised their predictions. Have you picked up on that trend yet? If Judgment Day hadn't kicked off on the anniversary of Jesus's Birth. It must do on the anniversary of his death. So so Lester. The second declared the world would end in ten thirty three but he was already fifty four years old and sure enough. Didn't have to hear any gainsaying when the apocalypse didn't come the second time because he'd been dead for thirty years a century later pope innocent. The third had a less obvious and markedly less nice reason for his end. Time Prophecy innocent blamed the Muslims Christians and Muslims have had kind of assorted past and innocent viewed Muslims as agents of Satan to his mind. The apocalypse would occur six hundred and sixty six years after the founding of Islam. Which would put it in the year. Twelve eighty four. He too died well before he could see how wrong he was predicting. The end of the world requires perseverance. If at first you don't succeed try try again. You've got to stick with it. Like the founder of the Worldwide Church of God Herbert Armstrong along with his sons Richard and Garner Armstrong picked up quite a following even before claiming that the world would end in nineteen thirty. Six and only members of his church would be saved the Great Depression and the dust bowl probably made it easy for people to believe that our collective ticket was about to get punched Armstrong then turned his sights to nineteen forty-three where the second war to end all wars lent credence to his doomsday claims when life settled into the post war normal Armstrong amended his prediction to Nineteen seventy-two a significant margin of error. People sold all of their possessions to pay for travel to Petra in Jordan. Which most of us know as the Resting Place of the holy grail from the third and Final Indiana Jones. Movie where they would be safe from Roy Moore three which Armstrong said would be all of Europe led by Germany against the US and the UK. World War three did not in fact begin. Nineteen seventy-two or the next mandate of Nineteen seventy-five in December nineteen fifty four Chicago Tribune headline read Dr Warrens of disasters in World Tuesday worst to come in one thousand nine fifty five. He declares the doctor was just passing along the predictions made by Dorothy Martin a fifty four year old housewife from Oak Park Illinois. Martin believed that aliens from the Planet Clarion had beamed messages into her brain informing her that a. Masoud flood would soon destroy the planet. Her prophecies attracted a small group of followers including the doctor who called themselves seekers. Many of the seekers quit. Their jobs. Sold their belongings and removed any medal from their bodies which Martin said would be essential for boarding the alien ship. That would take them away. They gathered at Martin's home on Christmas. Eve Nineteen fifty five sing carols while they waited to be beamed to safety. This wasn't the first time the group had gathered for their exodus. The aliens were supposed to come on December seventeenth but didn't then the eighteenth twenty first and finally the twenty fourth. As the night of Christmas Eve wore on Martin's followers became understandably inpatient finally at four forty five in the morning on Christmas Day Martin announced that God had been so impressed by their actions. He was no longer going to destroy the earth. Nice recovery. Though Martin had few followers their experience has left a lasting legacy. The group had been infiltrated if you will by a small group of psychologists and students from the University of Minnesota led by social psychologist. Leon festinger festinger wrote about the whole experience in when prophecies fail a social and psychological study of a modern group that predicted the destruction of the world. Kind of a lengthy title. But we'll go with it. It was in this book that he began to explore something. You've probably heard of cognitive dissonance. That's when two disparate ideas exist in your head at the same time and you feel uncomfortable until you can find a way to make them fit somehow. Festinger observed cognitive dissonance in the seekers. Who had to repeatedly convince themselves that Martin was right even after seeing with their own is that she wasn't

Dorothy Martin Shipton Jonas Wendell Leon Festinger Festinger Armstrong Macbeth Giddy Shem Devon England Jesus Pope Sylvester Salem Joanna Elizabeth I University Of Minnesota Herbert Armstrong Chicago Tribune Ursula South Nelson Bar
"shipton" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

10:05 min | 4 months ago

"shipton" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"Was Julian Assange's father John Shipton Chilean assigned just been imprisoned at London's Belmarsh prison since last September when he first served a fifty week jail sentence for breaching his bail conditions since two thousand twelve he taken refuge in Ecuador's London embassy to avoid extradition to Sweden over sexual assault allegations during his time in the Ecuadorian embassy is Sandra's reportedly spied on by Spanish security firm join the sign says a C. I. A. was behind the illegal twenty four seven surveillance for more we're joined by well one of the people who was spied on Jennifer Robinson the human rights attorney who's been advising Juliana Sanjan wikileaks since two thousand ten John Robinson welcome back to democracy now thanks for joining us from London can you describe the four days of hearings just physically I in the court room in London and what Julian Assange faces obviously we've just had a week of hearings join us on faces as you said a hundred and seventy five years in prison for publications back in two thousand and ten that were released we can expect all C. manning and I think it's important to remember what this case is really about the publication for which he's being prosecuted and sought for extradition that includes Iraq war logs the Afghan dire war diary showing a civilian casualties in abuse of detainees in in Iraq and Afghanistan war crimes human rights abuse the same with cable guy war crimes human rights abuse corruption the world over sorry for four days last week there was a packed out court room filled with the public gallery was packed the general section was packed to finally here after ten years of the U. S. preparing this case against wikileaks a grand jury investigation that was opened under the Obama administration an indictment the seed now by the trump administration we finally heard that the U. S. case and of course we had nothing new nothing new since Chelsea manning's prosecution back in twenty twelve what is important though is that what the court finally head is the defense case and a number of arguments put forth by a team including that yes the espionage act this is an unprecedented use of the espionage act against publisher which is of course a political offense and ought to be barred from under the terms of the U. S. U. K. expiration trading they should be exhibition should be Bob not basis we also heard evidence about the grave threat that this poses to press freedom not just for journalists inside the United States but the journalists everywhere around the world because of the precedent this case sets that the United States could seek to extradite and pop prosecute journalists and publishers from around the world for publishing truthful information about the United States we also heard evidence about how the United States indictment has misrepresented the facts including making a false allegation that join the signs had regularly and deliberately put lives at risk and we had evidence in the court this week about the technological security measures that we he likes imposed upon the media partners and the reduction processes that were undertaken to protect any one at risk in those publications it was a long week of hearings and I think it's important people start to see the the true facts of this of course Chelsea manning remains in prison in the United States right now but we heard evidence from her prosecution in these proceedings demonstrating that Chelsea manning had in fact provided this information to wikileaks based on her own conscience having seen war crimes the murder of civilians the matter of journalists by the by United States forces which is what drove her to release the material to wikileaks so it was it was a long week of hearings an important one for Julian so Jennifer Robinson can you describe the courtroom where I join the signage was held at the back of the courtroom as is the custom was he in the cage was able to hear the proceedings consult were you in the front with the other lawyers or his legal adviser that's correct sorry throughout the hearings Julian was sat at the back of the courtroom which is behind where we sit as his legal counsel in in effectively a glass box out in the dark now this creates significant amount of difficulties for us as his legal team in communicating with him during the course of the proceedings which was raised as a concern on on the final day of the hearing he sits behind us which means while we're paying attention to the judge and submissions in front we can't see when he's raising concern or seeking clarification or offering information to us about what he's hearing in court the entire court room including the public gallery and journalists related to the fact whenever he wants to raise a question with us and of course if he's whispering to us over trying to get our attention the court the U. S. prosecutors sitting right next to us in court can hear everything so we made an application at the end of the week in order to allow him to leave the talking of course feel U. S. view is it would seem strange that a defendant who does not pose any security risk would not be permitted to sit next to the defense counsel which is standard practice in the United States but the judge refused their application we also heard evidence of the mistreatment that Julian suffered not just the difficulties he has in court in communicating with us in a secure and confidential manner but also the treatment that he's been receiving from prison authorities just on the first day of the hearing he we heard that he was handcuffed eleven times strip searched twice and how these legal papers interfered with and taken away from him this is indicative of the kinds of treatment that he's been suffering and isn't of course the most recent in a long history of difficulties that we've been having in preparing his case with difficulties of access to him in the prison difficulties in getting him getting sufficient time with him to review and take instructions of the very complex evidence that needs to be presented in the court and it goes to show you the I think the obstacles and challenges that we face and that he faces improperly defending himself from these proceedings he said Wednesday I am as much a participant in these proceedings as I am watching Wimbledon a Dan complaining that he could not communicate with you with the lawyers overall now the U. S. attorney's argued that his case is not political explain what you think are the most significant war crimes that he provided evidence of and what it means if he came to this country how is that possible key an Australian citizen faces a hundred seventy five years for treason in the United States of course this case is inherently political whether you look at the times the offenses for which he's been charged including numerous offenses under the espionage act which encapsulate and capture a traditional journalistic activities the nation's espionage the espionage act itself as an offense is a political offense in substance but we also need to look at the political context in which this prosecution and extradition request comes this is of course in the context of the trump administration act a president who calls the the media the enemy of the people we've learnt since July and was arrested this extradition requests and superseding indictment came through to their bottom a bomber ministration had not gonna just taken a decision not to prosecute under the an espionage act because of what the so called New York times problem that is that you cannot distinguish between the actions we can explain you what times in receiving in publishing this information we also say that beyond the political nature of the offense in a political context in which he would be charged the U. S. prosecution seem to tried to argue this week this past week that what we can extend and joined in publishing this information was not a political act and of course we had evidence in the court about Julian's very well nine political views that we had with respect to what he likes and the names and and why would he likes was was created by him we had with respect to the Iraq war logs which he likes join saying with the release if lies can start a war that then the truth can stop them and we heard evidence about how the publication of evidence of war crimes in the context of the Iraq war both with respect to for example collateral murder which was evidence of a war crime and U. S. troops killing journalists and civilians but also more broadly about torture of detainees how evidence of that in fact led to the Iraqi government withdrawing the immunity if U. S. troops and the ultimate withdrawal of American forces from Iraq so of course what we're saying is that we can extend the published information of important human rights abuse it was certainly in the public interest and for which have one journalism awards the world over but that in fact resulted in a change in US policy and we say that that makes it and a political offense finally John Robinson how is Julian Assange's health we remain very concerned about his health of course he had more than seven years inside the Ecuadorean embassy without access to health care because the UK government refused to recognize his asylum and asylum that was granted to him by acquittal not to hide from Sweden as your introduction suggested but to protect him from U. S. extradition the very outcome that he's facing right now inside prison he's in difficult conditions is a high security prison he's been ineffective isolation for much of the time he's been inside the prison and you heard me earlier explain the treatment he's been suffering between the prison and the court each time for his hearing including being handcuffed numerous times strip searches and the like this is of course compounding our existing concerns about his health and we heard in court to psychiatric evidence is being put before the court about concerns about his ability to withstand the sorts of treatment he will suffer in U. S. prisons on the special administrative measures if he was returned to the United States so it is a very serious situation and one that is under constant monitoring at our end John Robinson I want to thank you for being with us human rights attorney she is legal adviser for Julian Assange and wikileaks since two thousand ten when we come back tomorrow super Tuesday we go to Texas to speak with a candidate who's running in a primary race that's Jessica Cisneros the twenty six year old immigration lawyer who's challenging Congress member can require stay with us all.

Julian Assange London John Shipton
Sanchita Balachandran Shifts the Framework for Conservation with Untold Stories

Museum Archipelago

08:36 min | 7 months ago

Sanchita Balachandran Shifts the Framework for Conservation with Untold Stories

"The field of conservation was created to fight change to prevent objects from becoming dusty broken or rusted but fighting to keep cultural objects preserved creates a certain mindset the mindset of protector a mindset. It's too easy to imagine objects and cultures. In the state of stasis. This is how it always was and will be forever. Often I mean just given the colonial oneal had an imperial histories of museums. It was because people were going to be gone forever. That culture was gone. And so this is the last trace but in fact. That's not how cultural heritage works it. It's transformed it's changed. It continues on in different forms and a lot of the way the Conservatives think about cultural heritage is is about out mitigating that change. which makes it a little bit fossilized but to me that changes where things are really vibrant exciting and people are so closely connected to cultural cultural heritage that it really feels alive? This is since Cheetah Bala Chandran Associate Director of the John Hopkins Archaeological Museum. Hello my name is Cinci Bala Alexander. I'm conservative and I'm trained in the conservation of archaeological materials in particular and my day job is the associate director of the Archaeological Theological Museum at Johns Hopkins University. Bala Chandran founded untold stories a project that pursues conservation profession that represents and preserves a full spectrum of human cultural heritage for the past few years. The project has been hosting public events at the annual meetings of the American Institute for Conservation Conservation Untold Stories emerged of bollocks hundreds frustration with how narrowly the field of conservation has been defined at felt that there were literally early too many untold stories in the field of conservation. I wanted to find ways to actually start to think about what else cultural heritage could mean other than say the things we typically think of as belonging in a museum or many of us cultural heritage means going to this important looking building that has paintings and sculpture and has labels labels next to it and I think we kind of decided in some ways at that's cultural heritage and preservation means taking care of those things and really I've become more and more aware error and curious about the fact that cultural heritage is much more complicated and diverse set of practices. It's often not necessarily about a single object or a thing but rather how that thing might function within a community or communities as as part of a series of practices and exchanges and storytelling and I just wanted to have a way to kind of work with people who are really doing that work outside the museum and doing it in ways that I think preserved Europe but also change cultural practices since untold stories takes place at the annual meetings of the American Institute for Conservation. A lot of professionals in the field Are already gathered there. The meetings attract over one thousand conservators blake many professional conferences. The meetings are often held in a nondescript hotel how setting but untold stories makes it a practice to conceptualize where attendees are sitting and the history that preceded them an example of this is the twentieth nineteen eighteen untold stories event titled Indigenous Futures and Collaborative Conservation. How many times have you been to a conference and you could be anywhere right? I mean you're in this big room and you never leave the hotel or the conference center and part of what I was interested in was trying to actually place a somewhere so twenty one thousand nine since we were actually meeting at the Mohegan Sun which is a Mohegan owned casino. We were on native land. It seemed like a really important opportunity. -tunities to talk about native sovereignty kind of history of genocide in our own country. The fact that anyone who's non-indigenous in this country is a settler settler colonialist but to really think about what this means in terms of how we take care of collections that have come to us as a result of historical happenstance stance but also a very violent past and to acknowledge the fact that museums which for most of us who work in museums are very safe. Welcoming and joyful places uses are evidence of this history of of pain and removal so the opportunity to work with the commod educational initiative was really exciting. Because because it's a partly native co-founded and they do a lot of educational work around questions of how even think about the history of this country story and to me. That was really important to be able to say in native space as opposed to you know in a place somewhere else. Part of of Bala. Hundreds point is that there isn't such a thing as a textualist cultural material. The intentionally nondescript conference ballroom has a lot in common with deliberately sterile museum environment episode. Sixty eight of this show features an interview with Ed Wanda's spears director of programming and outreach at the adamant educational initiative and one of the convenors of the twenty nineteen untold stories event in the episode. She discusses her presentation about how native native narratives are violently presented through White Lens in museums. It was in Donna spheres of Who suggested the title she had worked in museums? She's very familiar with these questions. And she's the one who suggested indigenous futures which forces you to recognize that this is not something of the past. We really wanted to do something. The thing that felt like we were going to push. This had to be uncomfortable but it also had to be aspirational. Where do we go now? And how can as conservatives servers we actually be part of this very kind of collaborative supportive mission to ensure futures. We can't make it happen by ourselves. It's it's not like we're saving anybody and that's another big concern of mine. There's a real sort of savior mentality that I think conservation has ask we save objects and I certainly came out of graduate school thinking that I was going to save everything and to me. That's a very problematic way to think about it because frankly if the objects still survives it didn't need me it made it thousands of years without me somehow. We've decided that we're the ones that making the that make these things live live forever which is pure arrogance so part of this event was really to think about how as conservatives can come up with action items and by action items. It was practices but more than anything of kind of Shipton in a mental framework for working much more equitably and more humbly to really have a sense of respect for this notion that there has already been a history before you and so when you enter into this hopefully collaborative relationship you need to acknowledge alleged. Things have survived for a long time without your intervention. And they don't need you but you could actually provide some sort of service some sort of benefit that could actually really help the untold stories team. True to their mission is careful not to present the workshop as a single solution or even a set of solutions. The team wants wants to counter the assumption within the profession. That all you need to do is go to one workshop and then you're all done you know. Unfortunately this doesn't change the working working practices it doesn't change the mindset. It doesn't change the way an organization functions and what happens is then marginalized people are called upon again and again to kind of keep performing this vulnerability and this discomfort for themselves in order to educate people who are unwilling to do the work that consistent like every single day for the rest of their lives work that will be required to make transformative change possible part of what in the twenty nineteen in conversation we. We felt very strongly we had to say is if if you really believe in equality if you really want to do something that is truly collaborative that does not assume some sort of hierarchy. It means being really uncomfortable the entire time and maybe at the end of it things will change but you you still have to kind of follow through on it when it gets really uncomfortable. And the fact is most marginalized communities. People have done this entire lives so it it just feels like it's time for you. Know I think in general the museum community to say we're willing to engage in these kinds of difficult ongoing perpetual natural

American Institute For Conserv Collaborative Conservation Cheetah Bala Chandran American Institute For Conserv Bala Chandran Bala Cinci Bala Alexander John Hopkins Archaeological Mu Archaeological Theological Mus Mohegan Sun Johns Hopkins University Associate Director Europe Blake Ed Wanda Shipton Director
"shipton" Discussed on What'sHerName

What'sHerName

03:05 min | 9 months ago

"shipton" Discussed on What'sHerName

"As she grew people were cruel here's an account from sixteen eighty six all the important men in town were gathered in a meeting and here's what the source says quote and she coming sitter on an occasional and some of them abused her calling her the devils bastard and hag face and the like this has grown men in a case men of town this child comes around Walker as the devils bastard and hank face and here's where we see sula start to emerge as somebody who's not going to put up with this crap source says quote one of the principal men that himself spruce and fine had in an instant his neck ruff which in those days they were pulled off and the seat of toilet clapped in its place he sat next to him bursting out into laughter at the site thereof was served therefore his hat was invisibly conveyed away and the Pan of a chamber pot which stood in the next room put on his head thereof instead yeah that's what Magic's for exactly rip off at dudes neck roughing give him a toilet yeah fantastic so this is the earliest account we have and after that the townspeople took her more seriously a neighbor came to her saying I've had a smoke and the petticoat stolen and she said I know exactly who it was and I'll get it back to you and she did the next day they went to the market cross her in the neighbor and the lady who had stolen the smoke was came up wearing it's holding the petticoats and said `I habits I stole it here's it back so it was that the power the Shipton saying I have these devilish powers I know it was you give it back or was it really a magic spell she got married and then she married at the age of twenty four in fifteen twelve to a local carpenter ankle toby shipton the shift was supposed to be in this glee hack it's all women and people thought that she had given him a little potion or cast a spell on him and then he died two years later of course again it was her fault she was never embraced in the town she was always terrifying to people and to escape the suspicion and the rejection of the town she would escape across the river like her mother and she found a piece in the cave and in the woods.

Walker toby shipton devils hank face principal two years
"shipton" Discussed on What'sHerName

What'sHerName

11:55 min | 9 months ago

"shipton" Discussed on What'sHerName

"I'm kidding Nelson and I'm a Levine Michael and this is what's her name fascinating women you've never heard of in the North Yorkshire town of Nares Bro I visited mothership dozens an amazing historic site that honestly I wish I could back to all the time and I spoke with Jay stelling my name is Jay Spelling and I am an officer at Mothership Tins I'm also an illustrator an author who has bee coolest job she's the most recent in a four centuries long line of people who've operated England's old list visitor attraction prop making a do everything yeah it's the way disturbing the world but I love it yes lovely and together Jay I walked through the ancient woods on the banks of the river knitted the River Lid Nid yes an eye view tipple oh yeah and people you can hire boats and go along on here the story begins as any Halloween special should it was a dark and stormy night and really it was it was fourteen seventy seven and the town of nurse borough huddled between the river Nid and castle towering above under roared and lightning ripped through the sky this was a night of evil portent no Christians Seoul would dare to be out on such a night but look on the river a small rowboat is struggling through the waves a girl is crying but wait she's not just crying she's she's rowing her cries hope despair are mixed with cries of pain as she leaves against the oars in this storm she stops to rest to scream as she holds her belly is you having a baby she is pregnant she's just fifteen no all she has refused to reveal the identity of the father baby is coming her name is Agatha and she very very brave not just because she's rowing across the river in a thunderstorm at night while she's in labor she's brave because of where she's headed to the deep dark woods on the other side to the forest where no one dares to go because this forest isn't just any forest and I mean pretty much all forests were deemed to be dangerous and wild and ski sorry in the Tudor era but this forest is widely rumored to have a supernatural pool of water that turns anything that touched visit to Stone and not only that but the wall of stone that hangs the pool was shaped like a giant screaming is goal surely the work of the devil sure years ago people who dared to venture they're even brought back leaves and sticks and even small creatures turned to stone that they found in the pool on the other side the river so steered well clear of that side of the river but Agatha wasn't orphan now she's pregnant she's desperate the people of the town have turned her out they refused to help her so long as she conceals the identity the true father so she's rowing across the river to seek shelter where no one else will ever go when she stumbled up the bank on the other side she spotted a small cave inside slightly sheltered from the storm she pushed back her wet hair to clear her is she looked out from the cave and then a flash of lightning she saw just a few steps up the riverbed gold-shaped rock with water cascading down to a pool of water underneath the baby was born in the cave while the storm raged around them and it said as the baby emerged into the world she didn't cry cackled she named the baby Sula and they say these massive this baby and not like a usual baby deformed and weird looking in a haunt back she was supposed to be really what you did inspector which to look like maybe that's been embellished in changed and I hope to didn't look quite like that but that's the accounts we've got that's what people always say about her mother and child lived there alone for two years oh the cave is still there the very spot oh cool you have to walk through this spooky woods to get there this here is beach avenue and these are some of the listen toll is trees in the country beech trees and the group really really told because if the ribbon needs being so close still here and hey we are at the cave but more than that right next to the cave there was indeed a pool that turn thing is to stone still there cool oh this part of the petrifying well was known as the giant scope so as well as the pitch while having all these magical properties and being terrifying it also looked like a giant skull in some images it looks really really quite scary you can stand right at the base of it and see the water cascading down and you can see it turning objects to sown before your very eyes it's awesome and I mean geology can explain it now but do we want it to no science ruining everything there's an underground lake and then the water creeps up through this what's the magnesium and that's what makes things tend to stone obviously now we deliberately hang things to turn to stone I put back in the fourteen hundreds things would naturally just turned to stone so dead animals and birds and twigs breath if you saw that you would be shops yeah this is so the underground lake is similar the way on the grounds and then the wool took comes all the way down here everything's site an over the top of the well and you can say people put in coins that's another lookie thing people do the spiders they are the witches and wizards event we had over summer yet creepy Harry to that's the gross bit we always hung cutting guys with two oldest things here are these two lumps so that's a ladies and mens top hat eighteen fifty three whoa but this is the Halloween special so it's supernatural and it's terrifying it's the devil it's physical evidence of the powers of evil and as she grew it became clear she was no ordinary child and then the Abbot of Beverly Intervenes the Abbott beverly intervened to help although we don't know who the father of the walls because the Abbot of beverly who is important guy we think that the father most of being influential or very wealthy to have Hatha intervention and then Agassi goes to a convent in we think Nottinghamshire then there's no record of her after that and baby doe's to live with a family in his breath but she was never really welcomed she was and then came back to find the door wide open so she calls on her neighbors to come and help you think she's been burgled and the go in only to find they wait links through the house they look in the cradle empty whereas Babyish Lagaan and they find her sat on I'm barb of the chimney naked and eagling the age of two is this a story she made up to cover the fact that she had left the child on its own all is it is like impossible but still we can make our best educated guesses by critically analysing the different sources that we do have which are actually quite a lot because she became a very famous witch in her name and she was famous for centuries afterwards I mean this bay in sixteen forty one this being fifty different books with her prophecies and parts of her history and life and the I think the earliest account was said to have been things that mother Shipton had said to supposed to be the first time that was written down with after she told it to this young girl on Waller and these are the stories that people told about her.

Nelson Levine Michael North Yorkshire Nares Bro four centuries two years
"shipton" Discussed on What'sHerName

What'sHerName

14:40 min | 9 months ago

"shipton" Discussed on What'sHerName

"Ah my favorite let's begin with fear that seems right for Halloween special thing Kalinic Kafia basically just lots of minerals and in the war a really high mineral content of calcium and sophie not my job is weird so it calms travertine and told us a tool for softer we were left on the way to your graces and then never come back for so two hundred and fifty years old days one and just kept on petrifying over the top has feared when she was taken in by the family and her foster mother went out to run an errand the with the devil ray so our sources are written after the fact and to separate fact from fiction Liam goes to Anwar when she was a young girl when Shipton was old and almost at horrendous life.

Kalinic Kafia Liam Anwar Shipton fifty years
"shipton" Discussed on What'sHerName

What'sHerName

02:54 min | 9 months ago

"shipton" Discussed on What'sHerName

"Happy Halloween Ghosts the dark scary animals mean people strange men hide Sir enclosed spaces tunnels underground spaces Scorpions spiders amazingly efficient they think about this a lot are you really afraid of the dark dark in places that I'm not familiar with and the there might be stuff out there that is alive or not alive or otherwise threatening yes and that seems to be a common strand among all of our greatest fears maybe everyone's greatest fears and I think since Halloween special HP lovecraft can spill um in this tiny little quote the oldest and strongest emotion of mankind is fear and the oldest Austin strongest fear is fear of the unknown well he definitely knew how to exploit that yes and that's what I think is the cheapest of all of our fears so Halloween is near and dear to our hearts here in America and it's getting bigger every year where we celebrate the Macab and we revel in the unknown and and it seems like what we're doing is conjuring fear and death so that we can face it but the roots wide-brimmed hat and she made potions and she casts spells five hundred years ago really it's a story about fear and how in tutoring land the unknown in the unexplainable was a very scary thing but for one woman known as Mother Shipton nothing was unknowable not even the future and so she was never afraid and that was her power.

America Macab HP Austin Mother Shipton five hundred years
"shipton" Discussed on What'sHerName

What'sHerName

02:13 min | 9 months ago

"shipton" Discussed on What'sHerName

"Oh yes what are you afraid of Oh man do you on a list all right the root of all of these fears like fear of the dark or fear of strange men who don't know what's going to happen fear of the unknown that is the Pallini go way way back so today I'd like to tell you the tale of a witch a real wit who had hooked nose.

"shipton" Discussed on Diet Starts Tomorrow

Diet Starts Tomorrow

04:34 min | 1 year ago

"shipton" Discussed on Diet Starts Tomorrow

"So yeah, it separately a bonding experience, and also it's sort of I have the feeling like when I use it of the way that I felt when I first started using dating apps before they like cumbersome and tedious and disappointing for sure I had that feeling back again. We're like this is fun is totally out. I same feeling isn't just about like finding date for myself or am I going to be a little forever? It's like, oh, this is like a fun activity in and of itself for sure. So anyway, that's enough of about ship enough about us enough about us. So now about you now about you, Tracy. Thanks again for also, thanks for shipping. Ship. Always I'm getting. Hip face. Yes. You wanna use that? So it's actually really good one. This is a great opportunity for puns, you guys. Everybody loves a fucking cheap picture someone who's ship face like the people in Burbach like there is crazy 'cause they've picture like someone who's just been using ship for so many hours. I can't stop I'm ship faced. I love it. Okay. So so you guys emailed us shit or like Shipton Shipton? You guys emailed us ship ton of questions and we prompted like one of those question airs on instant story. And so we got a lot of responses questions. See how to hear from the people get the people what they people. People what they want. All right. So I think the first one everyone has seen it everywhere. Let's talk about celery, choose celery juice, well back to the puns. This is definitely a trend worth stocking. Oh, but I'm sure I don't I don't get it very sauce. Your own funds to I didn't get it. I thought we were still putting ship. That's why I didn't understand like what does that have to do with the dating? I know that's really what was going through my head. Anyway, I say it's worth stocking. Because every time I'm seeing another headline about celery, I start laughing because it's ridiculous. It's the next. It's taking opponent was like, let's big celery common. They did some marketing campaign. Let me just say that. Okay. Tell us. Yeah. Is like a stunt simply the benefit of celery, juice, if it's where's your? Oh. Yeah. So what what do we know about celery? It's a low scratching, okay? Hey, gene. I'm like one of those people who like celery lawn tro, like jeans where they truly can't stand it like I can't have celery. Nothing happens. Growls? I hate the social experiment. We should have brought in it. Say around her. But celery, I really the cyber. The crunch if I accident, we have a tuna salad or something like I love I love celery, refreshing, so great it's refreshing because you don't have this natural water and yet, but some people have like, I know launchers, also great. I know I love launch. I just don't like celery. Yeah. Interest on. Okay. So justice. Well, which is what people do. I can't be. Yeah. But there is a gene of people who hate salon tro being. So they they will translate those taste buds into something that soapy tasting celery does not enjoy it's different because celery this on the celery, gene. So is the thing. No is trending now. Anti celery fail. Here's the thing. But cooked celery like if it's in a soup. It's not a problem. I think I would have an aversion to that. Because that texture to me is almost like. Sure to be the same as an cooked onion like dissolves in your mouth. But it still maintains those those fibers which is a off putting to me for The issue something. so much the consistency. As it is the smell smells Malas smell tampered with with cooking. But still that's why dot yeah. That's why I think with the cooking. We know what do we know about celery? So yes, it's vegetable it's non starchy. It's low calorie has potassium. It has fully has vitamin k, blah, blah, blah. But what we also know is that it helps people feel full if they eat it. Okay. If they juice it, maybe not so much. So we're we're taking this trend to the next level is juicing it. And what do you do during juicing waste, it waste it, basically? Yeah. A juicer strips the fiber, which is the most important part because that's what we know keeps you full..

Shipton Shipton Tracy Burbach
"shipton" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

09:50 min | 1 year ago

"shipton" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"Chris Shipton. He's the president of messing Matz. Welcome. Chris X Michelle much much-appreciated. Even though he's saying messy, Matz and cats are much too. But we don't really call them much. You have high quality dog and cat products. That's correct. Yeah. We started with dog specific, but we found out very quickly that the cat lovers didn't want to be discriminated against. So we started working hard on some key cap products as well. We're gonna talk about three of your products here that I think they're ingenious I that. This one's for are. You cat lovers out. There you have a two and one Cutler cat house. And what I love about it. I'm gonna let you describe it. But I love that. It's multi. So how for everybody listening? How would you describe it? Well, yeah, you you basically nailed it there. That's a Cutler, and then it actually transforms into cat cave. So the cat can hideouts and keep its privacy or you can leave it down and flat and the cat can curl up and be with one in the world. But the really cool thing about it that most people kind of overlook is the patented probiotic enzymes called ever fresh that we embed in the fabrics. That's the kind of at the next level stuff as we like to call it. And what that is is really probiotic enzymes that wake up when a food source comes in contact and that is actually odor. So when these cap is start to smell probiotics wake up, basically, they eat the older, they turn it into CO two and water vapor. Then they go back to sleep and they last for the life of the bed. It's all natural odor elimination. I love it. I thought it was great that was, you know, a cat cave and cut. Laura, which is where they said, the cat can go on top of it, and you know, just curl up. But the fact that it has this added bonus of their probiotics. Yeah. They're probiotic enzyme. So we talked about that in diets all the time, and this is just taking it to another level where we can actually incorporated into our lifestyle. Most of the competitive products that we would come across in this space would would usually use potentially low level toxins like antimicrobial that kind of thing that that actually wear out over time where we come up with an all natural solution that just keeps on ticking. As we like to say, that's a great point that it's an all natural solution because you have to be so careful what you put around your cats and your dogs. I mean, even just using something like a different type of air freshener or any kind of carpet cleaner can cause respiratory problems on some cats. I just. That way. Right. And I think the goal of most people is defined a home in a lifestyle trend that is safe. You know, we've got kids in the house pets in the house, and I don't just in general wanna stay healthier. Well, I loved the product. I think it's fabulous. Now, you have another product which I think this is really cool because it's I love multi-purpose products that just flipped something becomes something else. You have a travel water bottle and bowl. And this is I just think it's great. Isn't it? It's so cool. So cool. You know, you slip something and becomes. Well. Let me let you describe it. Because. Really, the Genesis of this was hydration. There's lots of parts of the country where you're always walking dogs need to stay hydrated. So we really wanted to find a solution that was suitable for the owner to walk with ease. And and have it kind of all in one piece. So we developed a stainless steel bottle. So it wouldn't break. And then we have a patented whip up silicone sleeve, basically that when the dog needs to drink you pull it up the water drains into this large open silicone ball. And then the water is not finished. It actually will go back into the bottle. So you can keep going on with your journey and not waste your water. I love that idea because people have come up I've seen other things where you can some dogs. Well, drink from something poured. But a lot of them won't and I've seen people on hikes or a dog parks where they'll try to cut their hands. So that the dog will get some water or put it in on the little cap that came with the bottle. And that doesn't fly. It just does not work. Yeah. My dog was one of the perfect examples of that. We we you know, my dog diesel wouldn't drink out of a regular bowl while walking. But as soon as we started using this for whatever reason, he just found it easy. And then, you know, if there was any leftover just went in the ball or back into the bottle, and you know, we just kept on going, and it is quite wide. So you know, he's a he's a lab cross. So you know, it was easy for him to get us. Big snowed in there. And then it's great for walking. Okay. This next product I love, and I think it is. I don't have. I can't decide I think I like I'll three I don't have a favorite. But this is what I think is called. Okay. Brings out the cooking me, which doesn't come out very often, the your flexible silicone, treat maker, what I love is that it goes in the oven goes in the freezer. It goes in the microwave. I know it's only up to certain temperatures in the oven. He could hold it. Because a lot of us like to pet parents like. To make tweets for our pooches, especially if they're on special diets, and you have regular tweets during the maybe the most of the year, and then you can make ice tweets during the warmer times of the year. So how do you describe it? Yeah. Let's give you a history goes back a little bit on us, a kitchen company. So that's how we really got started all these silicone items we were doing silicone bakeware so kitchen tool so when we got into the pet world but five years ago, I was like no I've been making like ice cube trays and baking moulds for the house. Why don't we take that and move it into the pet world in little bone shapes? So it was we kind of fell into it in a good way as the market has grown. We we found little niches so bone broth, for example is a big trend and people want to freeze that and give it to their to their dog. So it's a, you know from a raw diet perspective. Which is I'm sure you've spoke. Into that. Now, that's growing in popularity. We can accommodate that user from a bone. Broth, we've also had people obviously big things, which is kinda cool. It's not something. I would do every day. But I've done it many times with like chickening kale little treats for for my job and more of a simplistic way, we'd be taking maybe a dehydrated food packing. It out like you make it, and then you put it in to the mould and bake it that way, so you actually are repurposing your your food. It's it's kind of neat. And the dog's love it, obviously, you know, they get to in the in the summer have frozen treats in the baking, it's fun for everybody. The kids want to get involved to making treats for for Fido or whoever were the pup is bringing everybody together. Do you think cats would like baked treats if you were ever to make a cat tweet holder our cat tree trae holder, you might have stumped me on that one. I've never been approached on it. So that's worth. Probably a little bit of investigation because I'm thinking, well, I wanna cut. No, I'm just kidding. 'cause I'm thinking that you have two sizes one is similar bones enlarge abundance, right? Yep. So little fish patterns. Yeah. Maybe little fish because if it was small enough, and you know, cat tweets are so tiny compared to even the small dog treats that it. They have much smaller mouths, of course. So it have to be a lot smaller. And I know that some cats like ice, I have one that place with it. But she probably would eat it. If it tasted good, maybe fish flavored water or fish Baath or something froze. Andrea that's what it's worth looking into thanks for the product development idea. Yeah. Hey, being put me on staff anytime knows. That's all these things come about in our office. Actually, it's like, you know, what if we did this, you know, my dog or cat might like this idea. And no one's actually approached us on the cat treats. We'll put it at the at the table next time. We're talking product-development. Yeah. Well, it comes from my other Sheri's cata tuten even on best bets for pets. I've gotten lots of comments on you have so many dog things what about cats what about cats and counter, actually, there's more cats that are owned at least in the US than dogs because generally when people own cats they have to most households have one dog hadn't put the two and two together about having multiple cats. I knew the new the stat that there are more cats than dogs and for me, not being a cat person for probably about fifteen years, I became allergic to them. Unfortunately, I used to have cats as a kid growing up. I haven't had the product development side there because I'm I typically catering to my dogs. That's where this all started. So I. I keep thinking about what's best for our household and how I build around them, and what we can bring to market and in offer others that are like minded dust knows it might be something that's untapped because I've never heard of a cat treats trae or whether no silicone or regular or anything. So I don't know if there exists at all or who knows? But I'm going to be going on the web and taking the peach. Yeah. There may be something out there, but you have weighed products, and I know you have more than the ones that we listed working people by the messy, Matz products..

"shipton" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

02:24 min | 1 year ago

"shipton" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"Welcome back everyone. Okay. Well, Pat levers, and they're messy. And well, what do you mean? Do I have some great products that not only will solve the messy problem? But they're multi-purpose which I love I'd like to introduce Chris Shipton. He's the president of messing Matz. Welcome. Chris X Michelle much. Appreciate it. Even though he's saying messing, Matz and cats are much too. But we don't really call them much. You have high quality dog and cat products. That's correct. Yeah. We started with dogs specific. But we we found out very quickly that the cat lovers didn't want to be discriminated against. So we started working hard on some key cap products as well. We're gonna talk about three of your products here that I think they're ingenious I this Hans for our cat lovers out. There you have a two and one Cutler cat house. And what I love about it. I'm gonna let you describe it. But I love that. It's multi-purpose. So how for everybody listening? How would you describe it? Well, yeah, you basically nailed it there. That's a Cutler, and then it actually transforms into a cat cave from. So the cat can hideouts and keep its privacy or you can leave it down in flat and the cat. Concur up in with one in the world. But the really cool thing about it that most people kind of overlook is the patented probiotic enzymes ever fresh that we embed in the fabrics. That's the kind of at the next level stuff as we like to call it. And what that is is really probiotic enzymes that wake up when a food source comes in contact and that is actually odor. So when these cap is. Start to smell probiotics. Wake up basically, the older they turn it into CO two and water vapor. Then they go back to sleep, and they lost the life of the bed. It's all natural odor limitation. I love it. I thought it was great that it was a cat cave and Cutler, which is where they said, the cat can go on top of it, and you know, just curl up. But the fact that it has this added bonus of their probiotics. Yeah. They're probiotic enzyme. So we talked about that in diets all the time, and this is just taking it to another level where we can actually incorporated into our lifestyle..

Chris Shipton Cutler Michelle Matz Pat Hans
Yemen on the brink

FT News

11:24 min | 1 year ago

Yemen on the brink

"We're looking at the humanitarian crisis in Yemen. The US this week called for peace talks to begin within a month to end hostilities depicted a Saudi led coalition against who rebels a Middle East correspondent spoke to lease grandba- the UN's humanitarian coordinator in Yemen about how bad the crisis is. I want needs to be done to stave off a catastrophic famine. We know the UN has already warned that there is a risk of a big famine in Yemen, like half of Yemen is are at risk of big famine. How bad is the situation right now out of the entire population? In Gaiman more than fifty percent, close to sixty percent of all the people in the country are food insecure. That means that they're struggling to support their families out of the eighteen million. Who we classify as being food insecure? There are eight and a half million people right now who when they wake up in the morning, they have no idea where they will find their next meal, or if they will have won a we have warned that he's conditions. Do not improve improve very quickly. We think another five and a half. Maybe even five point six million more people will be in those pre-famine conditions. And this is why the United Nations last week invoke secured. The council resolution twenty four seventeen which obliges the UN to warn the members of the Security Council when we think that there is a conflict related famine. And we took that step last week that demonstrates how seriously the UN regards this crisis as the UN conjugate futon if free single month, the United Nations World Food program, his distributing food to eight million people the work that they are doing with the frontline NGOs is absolutely heroin. Now, we know that because conditions are deteriorating. So quickly that we have to do even more. Now, I'll admit to you that the operation in Yemen. It's the largest in the world. That's also one of the most difficult operations were working under dangerous, very complex conditions. It's going to be hard for us to continue to scale up. We are committed to doing. So we know that literally millions of lives are at stake and millions of people depend on the United Nations to. Do what is necessary is there enough food in the country? But people don't have access to it or there's just no food. We characterize this as an income famine. And what that means is that what is driving the famine our economic conditions, many destitute families, simply do not have the money that they need to buy the things that they acquire in the market. There's also the problem of the importers ninety percent of all food in Yemen is actually brought into the country. It's imported well for importers to do what they have to do they require foreign currency. And there is a severe shortage of that in Yemen. And that's one of the factors that is driving the depreciation of the currency. And that is limiting the ability of importers to bring in the foodstuffs that will keep people alive. One of the reasons the UN came out last week and said, we are facing pre-famine conditions in Yemen is because the value of the real has depreciated so quickly and to such an extent. That tens of thousands of families. Just can't afford any more what they need and the real depreciates heave him by just a few times, literally tens of thousands of families are thrown out of the market, and they have no option for food except us do militias grab the food. Or once the food is out there. You're able to distribute the food operation that we're running in Yemen is being done under extremely difficult conditions. Now, we bring in hundreds of thousands of metric tons of food, and then it is transported to the areas of the country where people are most at risk. We then use partners on the ground in order to distribute that food now, it's the responsibility of the UN to do everything we can to make sure that the food reaches the people who need it when we know the food isn't getting to the right place. It's our top to take steps, and we do recently in a very hard hit area. We halt. The operation until we were able to get in place the parameters that were necessary to get the food where it had to go. So a militia was not allowing this food to reach people will he was thirties on the ground who wanted the U N to use a certain partner, and that partner just didn't have the track record and didn't have the capacity to do the job the way it needed to be done. And so we insisted that the partner, which we knew could do that work was the one that was chosen you'll this is something that the UN does everywhere we have an obligation to the donors were accountable to the people to do things the right way. And that's why we will sometimes take steps to say, no, we can't go forward with his operation until the right conditions are in place. What is the situation with sports because presumably the food is Shipton what's happening in holiday, then other ports. So the port of data, and that's just north of there solid. These are crucial ports that we described them as the lifeline for. Northern naming eighty to ninety percent of everything northern game and needs comes through these two ports. And because most of the population in Yemen is in the northern part of the country. The ports are just disproportionately important announce why it's been so important throughout the entire conflict that those ports stay open their functioning now, even as fighting escalated in who data starting in June, all in the last three months, those ports of remained open in the UN is continuing to bring food and we've made the point in. We've made it a strongly as we can that. If those ports close even for just a few days the impact will be immediate. And it will be catastrophic. They are the lifeline for millions of people and the coalition were blockading the port is that no longer the case. Now, the ports are open, and we have received commitments from all of the parties to the conflict that they will stay open if they closed millions of lives are at the line. Obviously, it would be great. If a political solution could be reached that would solve problems. But in the short term to avert this famine, what are the steps because the famine is being driven by economic factors. The key to stopping the spread pre-famine conditions is to stop the depreciation of the currency. Stop inflation, make sure that shippers half the foreign currency that they need. So they can bring in the food that people depend on. We also have to make sure that families have income that they're part of public works program. So that they're earning income that they can spend on the market, and those really are the constellation of factors that have to be in place. So this situation doesn't deteriorate further. The how can you stop the depreciation of the real in practical terms, it's very clear that the government of Yemen, and the central Bank of Gaiman really they played the decisive role here if the government of Yemen is able to inject liquidity. Into the economy. So that importers have the money that they need to bring in the shipments. This is gonna make a huge difference. We've also made the point the impetus need the lines of credit, and this is something the central Bank knish you right now these are two steps which would make a huge difference. We know that the government of game and is deeply committed to looking at these issues to solving them. The point that the UN is making is the time to solve them as now that's why we went to the Security Council last week and said Yaman is facing up famine that Khun Gulf the country and be one of the largest in recent memory. We've made that alert and we're hoping that everyone steps forward and find solutions so that the people of aim and have a chance for the future. So this is the government and the central Bank in Aden. That are protected by the coalition. Well, certainly the government of Yemen and the central Bank based in Aden. They're the ones that play the. Sisa fall. They're the ones that are responsible for monetary policy. And because this is an income famine everything depends upon the handling of the currency the handling of monetary policy. That's why they're role is so crucial. Just now the food that you are able to distribute is that enough to sustain people the United Nations provides a supplemental ration, so it will keep you alive, but not over the medium to long term. It's a supplemental emergency food ration. That means that if you're destitute, and you have absolutely no way of surviving except on you in food. You cannot do that for the medium-term. And this is one of the things we're most worried about in Yemen. There have been literally millions of people who have had no other source of food men the UN for several years now, and these people will they are in terrible trouble. Their immune cycles are breaking. Down. These are the people that we worry the most about right now. Our children already dying of starvation. It's very clear that there are millions of children that are malnourished across the country seven million people are malnourished and three million of those are children. If you go to many of the hospitals in the therapeutic feeding centers on the mound nutrition centres, which you see breaks, your heart. It absolutely is devastating to see young boys and young girls that don't have a chance. They're starving to death. We see it every day. You get the impression that the world is not paying enough attention to Yemen. His very clear that the crisis in Yemen is one of the most dramatic and deeply warring crisis in the world, the UN characterizes what's happening in Yemen has the worst crisis globally. Seventy five percent of the entire population needs some form of assistance, and there's no other country in the world who are higher percentage of the population needs help. If this crisis is not resolved will the consequences be bad. Just full the people of Yemen humanitarian crisis or are there? Other reasons why the words should take notice humanitarian crises are rarely self contained. They have consequences that extend far beyond. I think in the case of game. And what's absolutely clear is that the magnitude of the crisis risked, so many things that we care about you know, when countries breath. Down when they fall apart. But we see our mass migration human trafficking, transboundary, epidemics, the breakdown of law and order creates conditions that allow for the spread of insurgency it can allow for the spread of terrorist groups that have international aspirations and intent it's so important that he Ayman is stable. It's important for the people came in first and foremost, it's important for the region. And it's important for all of us.

Yemen United Nations UN Partner Security Council United States Middle East Aden Coordinator Heroin Ayman Khun Gulf Gaiman
"shipton" Discussed on Drink Champs

Drink Champs

02:03 min | 1 year ago

"shipton" Discussed on Drink Champs

"Someone. NPR actually come. Still, homey. Don't touch. Just. Tim. Okay. L the peace. You look even acts as gone PR. They'd just get this grazing. Yes. Wanted to hit the good for my kill. Stitches. Got here. Job rows. Have long stairway. Twenty. Was it might. Rages man on the ring. Roy Ray who rage inch road Android road ranges awful. Awful. His brothers doing push. Roy spoken, dick. If you. He's young again. His his gets most of those Joan. I mean, it's you on the special. I don't think session if you start this. She can't stop because then you'll Shipton into water Lambis as normal. It'd be natural. Are you the one?.

Roy Ray NPR Shipton Tim Joan
"shipton" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

KYW Newsradio 1060

01:52 min | 1 year ago

"shipton" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

"A fifty to forty eight vote. The Senate has confirmed Brad Kavanagh to the United States Supreme court and the president weighing in. We have several reports where you tonight, we begin our coverage with correspondent Bob Costantini from Air Force One. The president tweeting. I applaud and congratulate the US Senate for confirming our great nominee judge Brett Kavanagh later today. I'll sign this commission of appointment, and he will be officially sworn in very exciting capital will be sworn in this evening. The court says, but the White House plan to ceremony next week. And the president went on to say the struggle to confirm cavenaugh in his words turned our base on fire. So how did our local senators vote on the issue in Pennsylvania, Republican Senator Pat Toomey voted to confirm and democratic Senator Bob Casey voted against any New Jersey? Both democratic senators for Booker Bob Menendez voted against the confirmation in Delaware, the two democratic senators there, Tom Carper and Chris coons both voted against Kavanagh's confirmation here in Philadelphia. There was a bit of outrage and also a bit of celebration in the news broke of cavenaugh being confirmed for that part of the story. Here's KYW's. John mcdevitt, make America great again. Some people are in favor of capital confirmation. Despite Ford's accusations think he. He didn't do what he was accused of doing. Why? Prove that it happened when he's just being like, no it didn't happen. It's fine. I don't understand that as a woman as a therapist is a person on this planet. Seventeen. Gifts. Hobbit record for the past ten years of being a decent man shouldn't have even been nominated. They should have done background. Check shouldn't be a big news story Shipton background checks, and then nominated someone with a clean record. And there are some who think Kavanagh's.

Brett Kavanagh president US Senate United States Supreme court Senator Bob Casey Booker Bob Menendez Ford Senator Pat Toomey Bob Costantini Air Force Tom Carper Shipton John mcdevitt KYW White House Pennsylvania Philadelphia New Jersey Delaware Chris coons
"shipton" Discussed on RobinLynne

RobinLynne

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"shipton" Discussed on RobinLynne

"Is heading lettuce kirk we don't care fall in pain relief stage two skinny let's back that will catch acquittal skittles chasing rainfall data before grammy challenge the thick cal flop we'd call sal pathway trouble i now killing knicks ticket cal like a man keep you'll miss hit with shipton hunting self feature coming out your mouth fame pc disappear southeast awesome shooter dig a one wake your hewlett hyun will be tread now you just that's right that's don't just saturday please here just why world and where he's we don't i'm good.

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"shipton" Discussed on The Librocube

The Librocube

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"shipton" Discussed on The Librocube

"Shipton like a freakish amount over the show i don't remember which is to me the perfect time to rewatch show is when you have forgotten everything about it and it's so close to being never seen this before with just enough dashes of shit ya i remember that to make it that much more enjoyable so for that reason i can easily give it a five to five the first season and it's not as sort of famously slow as i remember it's being reported to be or even i remember it being lots of shit happens i feel like in this first season i'd almost go the mrs nyerere now a little bit into the second season and that feels a little slower if you're familiar with the wire the titular wire is police pudding a wiretap hence the name on phones in order to try to catch a band of mary drug slingers in shit what's the city baltimore baltimore which is sort of famously city in which lots of murders and crimes and drugs happen i r l that is a strange thing is like is it still like that today like i feel like when i hear the name baltimore i don't necessarily think of of crime and death and such like a have almost baltimore and philadelphia some for some reason and i don't really know why have them sort of interchanged in my brain a little bit doesn't make sense of what i say doesn't make sense okay so let's talk a boats the cast of kind sorta kinda sort of stars jimmy mcnulty played by dominic west who you know what i'm surprised about him is a feel like almost all the other actors on this you see and other things but the don't really know what he went on to do like i i feel like he's great in the show he sort of a a lovable of blues earlier sort of bastard a little bit ship my timer just went often siri just went on.

Shipton baltimore jimmy mcnulty dominic west mrs nyerere philadelphia
China, Bryan Curtis and Hong Kong discussed on

02:14 min | 2 years ago

China, Bryan Curtis and Hong Kong discussed on

"To the enke's four two one win over baltimore glacier taurus shipton with two hits in an rbi for the yankees who have won three straight and are now a season high nineteen games over five hundred gray even says record at four and four allowing one run on four hits with six strikeouts it was the first time in his eleven starts that gray did not issue a walk aroldis chapman struck out the side in the ninth for his thirteen save manny machado hit seventeen home run for the orioles who have now dropped six in a row the nineteen year old julian walking neiman baking justice v start has a shares the lead at muirfield village at the memorial golf tournament with kyle stanley after a four under sixty eight tiger woods got off to a strong start to the memorial the second round but struggled mightily after a ninety minute weather delay missing four punts under seven feet in the final six holes to finish six john's back with nearly two dozen players in front of him at the french open novak djokovic and second seed alexander's veira advance to the fourth round will on the women's side us open runnerup madison keys overcame some late match shakiness to reach the fourth round with a straightset win over naomi osaka of japan will the bloomberg sports update i'm tom rogers this is bloomberg daybreak weekend our global look at the top stories in the coming week from our daybreak anchors all around the world straight ahead on the program i'm bob moon and new york tesla holds a shareholder meeting and apple as its annual developers conference i'll have those stories i'm nathan hager in washington where trade could trump just about everything from the g seven summit to north korean negotiations and i'm markus karlsson in london where we're asking whether more emergency action is on the cards when turkey's central bank meats and in asia we take a look at growth with a special look at china japan and india i'm bryan curtis in hong kong that story coming up i'm danielle boko in toronto where we're looking at how labor strikes in the transport sector have exposed and kelly's he'll for commodities markets that's all straight ahead on bloomberg daybreak on bloomberg eleven three oh new york bloomberg ninety nine one washington dc bloomberg one zero six one boston bloomberg nine sixty san francisco siriusxm channel one nineteen and around the world on bloom radio dot com and via the.

China Bryan Curtis Hong Kong Danielle Boko Kelly Bloomberg Baltimore Glacier Gray Asia London India Toronto Boston San Francisco Siriusxm Japan Manny Machado Orioles
"shipton" Discussed on Selfie with Kristen Howerton and Sarah James

Selfie with Kristen Howerton and Sarah James

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"shipton" Discussed on Selfie with Kristen Howerton and Sarah James

"Title i've always thought against it in some way shape more or always thought to to fix it so what if i work with it as an ally what if that was my archenemy what if i you know wasn't today enemy but was really a champion and ended physically i think there's something else that happens that obviously with shifter transformation is incredible energy and strength and in my life has grown proportionately massed ranks because it's interesting when i'm choosing to not choosy have mindset panel things differently are not doing negative behavior over sunny that's happening and i'm doing something different like your life reaction response differently to that and so my work is growing my friendships have grown or deepen unfolding myself more vailable different way i think that's all part and parcel interesting just shipton a behavior can change relationships and i thought people were going to be upset or leave me or not be you know not me happy received something when i may be have they have in there heads but extra i think i've gotten more connection validation at support because i also think it was not a vanity play in it wasn't surface issue it was like a real i'm gonna gonna go on this journey and i think she were all on that so we are different places for people absolutely absolutely what's up next for you what are you excited about so i'm working on really cool getting re write another book also i have ever two bucks and my last book i published two thousand eight so i haven't.

shipton
"shipton" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"shipton" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"Only essential personnel lead to report i'm sure there are people who say well hey count me lucky are not deemed the central personnel though therefore i don't have to worry about it have you ever thought of what that means you'd have i had a job and which i was not deemed essential personnel i'd have to think hard about looking for another job or at least having by resume uptodate because if if they can do without you gurria snowstorm how else can they do without you decided to keep in mind anyway uh it's a it's a problem that of course uh they they seem to space themselves out on that proverbial beltway we've all heard about an amount which i've spent many many long and painful hours but uh it's almost like i think that they actually have an organization which i call the anti destination league and though they they they whatever of a snowstorm or a threat of us those storm washington closes at schools while the threat of a snowstorm there may not be a flake goods followed the sky in fact there may not be one that ever falls but the kids will get out of school but they space themselves out of the streets to provide maximum disruption and then of course was the gay used to snow and they're no longer snow virgins that you've got an election and florida or at coup in nigeria and you've got the the latest crop of slow burgeoned shipton and we go right back to the same circumstance neiger of and southern missouri which is not wisconsin but uh it gets it gets pretty cold i remember as a kid one time jumping off my back porch into snow i was again i guess of us but.

nigeria burgeoned shipton missouri washington florida wisconsin
"shipton" Discussed on FinTech Insider

FinTech Insider

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"shipton" Discussed on FinTech Insider

"Shipton mindset within finland and the nordic so i think we had talked about you told me in the nineties that there was a financial crash that took place i think when the soviet union collapsed so this idea of i don't work for one company for forty years get my pension retire retired the idea of entrepeneurship multiple jobs right now so you talked a little bit about the uk if i'm not mistaken you guys i think thinking expansion you're talking going outside of just finland but maybe the uk and other countries is at on your plate right now while i mean we are now in foreign markets in europe and our market is is is europe by may phnom basic regulation covers all of the european economic area and we are continually adding new markets including exterior sell marcus coming up at say this is a very u s terms so apologies drink your beer and go with it that's a very ball z move to do that because what second you go beyond your border right i mean it's easy to or it's not easy but understanding regulation within finland for example well then the second you step over to go to sweden then he step outside of that in fact what germany uk how'd you work with regulators for that had you eased their concerns when you're saying all right now we're ready to move yeah i made of course europe these days it's the best place at the world to be able to paint the company i made the regulation is actually good it's proportional it's it's something reasonable like the services that we do basically a koranic alanon and the transactional banking services before payment he seduces you really did and it's a gray area you didn't know what is allowed to do what is what is not allowed to do whereas now with sensible regulation he actually have the clarity that okay get it regulates reasonably straightforward and he no all of europe is is is open for for you to tackle on may on an under a single regulation so we're in that sense were big fan saw all of europe european union ah.

finland soviet union uk europe sweden germany forty years