35 Burst results for "Shin"

"shin" Discussed on CoinDesk Podcast Network

CoinDesk Podcast Network

03:57 min | Last week

"shin" Discussed on CoinDesk Podcast Network

"On today's show, we're talking about cryptocurrency, magic Internet money, and why women should be a part of the future of crypto. Laura shin is a crypto journalist and she was the first mainstream journalist to cover crypto full-time. She's hosted the unchained podcast and author of the crypto pians, idealism, greed, lies, and the making of the first big cryptocurrency craze, which just came out in February, Laura reveals the intense drama and story of the idealist, technologists, and opportunists fighting to bring cryptocurrency to the masses. She interviewed over 200 people to create the most accurate account of this incredible and unraveling piece of web three history which we are all invited to be a part of. Most notably, she recounts the tale of what's still one of the most egregious, most notorious events in crypto, the 2016 Dao attack on Ethereum. The Dow had raised more than a 150 million from more than 11,000 investors, the hackers stole 60 million worth of ether, while writing her book, Laura and her sources believe they uncovered who was actually behind the 2016 Dow attack on Ethereum. She actually names this person in her unchained podcast. Laura has spoken about cryptocurrency at places such as TEDx San Francisco, the International Monetary Fund, singularity university, the Oslo freedom forum, as you can imagine, there's many reasons we have right here today. But looking into the research, a representative survey conducted among 10,000 plus U.S. adults, ages 18 to 29 by the Pew Research Center, found that over twice as many men as women invest in cryptocurrency. Roughly 19% of women say they have invested, traded or used their cryptocurrency compared with 43% of men. But wait, there's more. There are also not as many women working in the blockchain and crypto industries. A 2019 report revealed the percentage of women in these sectors developers, investors, and casually interested in individuals, hovers between 4% and 6%, the Laura is the goat of crypto journalism, she used captured the history of crypto, especially the start of one of the most successful blockchains Ethereum. She's inspired women across the globe to pursue careers and crypto and to learn more about this exciting new technology. She's been celebrated by next adviser and partnership with time, yes, the time as a woman who is changing the face and future of crypto. Welcome Laura shin to our podcast. Thanks for having me. So good to have you here. Thank you so much for your time. You're such a busy woman so accomplished and I was just so inspired by your TEDx talk. You've accomplished so much and you're doing a lot you interviewed so many people. What gets you up in the morning? What does that fire that burns inside of you that gets you excited to just jump in? Well, well, a few things I would say probably the number one biggest driver is I really consider myself a writer at heart and I had so much fun writing my book. I just am having fun also seeing people read it and hearing their comments. There's just more that will probably happen with the book and all of those things are very exciting to me. So my drive is just really to write as many books as possible. And that's probably one of the main drivers that gets me up out of that every day. But another one would definitely be that crypto itself is so fascinating.

Laura shin Laura Oslo freedom forum singularity university International Monetary Fund Dow Pew Research Center San Francisco U.S.
Did the White House Make an Error in Shinzo Abe's Name?

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:27 min | 2 months ago

Did the White House Make an Error in Shinzo Abe's Name?

"Does anybody know if you're Japanese or you're fluent in Japanese affairs? Is it shenzhou Abe or Abe Shinzo? Did the Japanese have that tradition of kind of inverting the names? Because some cultures and languages do that. But Biden's statement calls him abbe Abe Shinzo. Everywhere I've always known him to be shin so Abe. Tell me The White House didn't make that kind of an error. Please tell me that they aren't so incompetent that they don't know the proper usage of the former Japanese prime minister's name. I mean, honest to goodness, you can't make this crap up. It's like that we're living through an episode of veep nonstop. It's on a loop. And if you don't believe me, warning language warning, lots of adult language, but it's one of the funniest TV shows in the history of TV. And it's called veep starting the brilliantly funny Julia Louis-Dreyfus on HBO. And that's what this is like. Kamala Harris babbling? Joe Biden's wife telling him say God bless America. Say God bless America. God bless America. It's like the scene from Christmas vacation.

Shenzhou Abe Abe Shinzo Abbe Abe Shinzo Biden ABE White House Julia Louis Dreyfus Kamala Harris HBO Joe Biden America
31 Patriot Front members arrested near pride event in Idaho

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 3 months ago

31 Patriot Front members arrested near pride event in Idaho

"Police arrested 31 members of the white supremacist group patriot front near an Idaho pride event Saturday saying they were there to riot Cordell lane police chiefly white says the 31 men were packed into the back of a U haul along with detailed plans and riot gear including at least one smoke grenade multiple shin guards and other shields the men who came from at least 11 different states were wearing khakis along with shirts and hats with the patriot front identification and covering their faces and heads with white balaclavas which is like a ski mask Police say they were not only going to riot at the pride parade but in several downtown areas The chief says they were tipped off by a concerned citizen who

Cordell Lane Police Idaho White
Author Deborah Cohen Describes the 'Big Get' Interviews of the 1930s

History Unplugged Podcast

01:55 min | 4 months ago

Author Deborah Cohen Describes the 'Big Get' Interviews of the 1930s

"The journalists in your book are interviewing the most important political figures of their day. Hitler Mussolini Franco Trotsky, Gandhi, Churchill, FDR. Could you describe some of these encounters and also, how important were these interviews? For example, would this be as high profile as if Anderson Cooper, Chris Wallace, were interviewing Vladimir Putin right now in the day of this recording his early April as that Russian Ukrainian war is still going on, or would it be more of a puff piece? Could you talk about these encounters with these world leaders? These are the analogy that you draw as exactly right. These are the big guts of their time. And in part, the reason why these interviews are so significant in this analogy with Putin brings this is that there's a sense that these are the figures who are determining history. So history is being made by them and also through them. So actually getting to sit down with them allows a reporter a kind of privileged access into the psychology and to the intellectual thought process, you know, it's not the same, you know, you could sit down with my career or Ramsay MacDonald or any number of kind of normal political leaders. And you've got, you know, some of their spend, you got maybe a little bit of a glimpse, but fundamentally you didn't think that their personality was making history. On the other hand, once you're dealing with a Trotsky or a Mussolini or a Hitler or Stalin or a Putin, it's certainly the case that they are outsized figures who is Jimmy shin puts in our managing to channel the tide of history, quite literally. So how important these are and what you get from them really does depend upon who you're talking

Hitler Mussolini Franco Trotsk Chris Wallace Anderson Cooper Vladimir Putin Gandhi Churchill Putin Ramsay Macdonald Jimmy Shin Stalin
Ukraine claims to destroy Russian tank in Moscow parade

AP News Radio

00:36 sec | 5 months ago

Ukraine claims to destroy Russian tank in Moscow parade

"The the the the T. T. T. T. ninety ninety ninety ninety is is is is a a a a third third third third generation generation generation generation Russian Russian Russian Russian battle battle battle battle tank tank tank tank that that that that involves involves involves involves the the the the shin shin shin shin of of of of the the the the T. T. T. T. series series series series designed designed designed designed in in in in the the the the Soviet Soviet Soviet Soviet Union Union Union Union the the the the victory victory victory victory parade parade parade parade in in in in Moscow Moscow Moscow Moscow includes includes includes includes the the the the T. T. T. T. ninety ninety ninety ninety and and and and some some some some of of of of the the the the weaponry weaponry weaponry weaponry now now now now used used used used on on on on the the the the battlefield battlefield battlefield battlefield against against against against Ukraine Ukraine Ukraine Ukraine meanwhile meanwhile meanwhile meanwhile satellite satellite satellite satellite images images images images analyzed analyzed analyzed analyzed by by by by the the the the Associated Associated Associated Associated Press Press Press Press confirm confirm confirm confirm that that that that a a a a school school school school in in in in eastern eastern eastern eastern Ukraine Ukraine Ukraine Ukraine where where where where some some some some sixty sixty sixty sixty people people people people are are are are feared feared feared feared killed killed killed killed in in in in a a a a Russian Russian Russian Russian striker striker striker striker has has has has been been been been destroyed destroyed destroyed destroyed the the the the photos photos photos photos taken taken taken taken by by by by planet planet planet planet labs labs labs labs at at at at P. P. P. P. B. B. B. B. C. C. C. C. show show show show the the the the school school school school standing standing standing standing on on on on Saturday Saturday Saturday Saturday well well well well an an an an image image image image taken taken taken taken on on on on Sunday Sunday Sunday Sunday shows shows shows shows the the the the building building building building flattened flattened flattened flattened I'm I'm I'm I'm Charles Charles Charles Charles the the the the last last last last month month month month

Ukraine Moscow T. T. T. T. Ninety Shin Shin Shin Shin T. T. T. T. Soviet Soviet Soviet Soviet Un T. T. T. T. Ninety Ninety Nine Associated Associated Associat Planet Planet Planet Planet La P. P. P. P. B. B. B. B. C. C. School School School School Charles Charles Charles Charle
 EXPLAINER: What's next for N. Ireland after Sinn Fein wins?

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 5 months ago

EXPLAINER: What's next for N. Ireland after Sinn Fein wins?

"The the the the Irish Irish Irish Irish nationalist nationalist nationalist nationalist party party party party Sinn Sinn Sinn Sinn Fein Fein Fein Fein has has has has won won won won the the the the majority majority majority majority of of of of votes votes votes votes in in in in the the the the Northern Northern Northern Northern Ireland Ireland Ireland Ireland assembly assembly assembly assembly for for for for the the the the first first first first time time time time in in in in a a a a historic historic historic historic win win win win the the the the shin shin shin shin Fein Fein Fein Fein party party party party secured secured secured secured more more more more seats seats seats seats than than than than any any any any other other other other party party party party in in in in Northern Northern Northern Northern Ireland Ireland Ireland Ireland in in in in the the the the recent recent recent recent U. U. U. U. K. K. K. K. local local local local elections elections elections elections the the the the victory victory victory victory sees sees sees sees them them them them for for for for pasta pasta pasta pasta Democratic Democratic Democratic Democratic Unionist Unionist Unionist Unionist Party Party Party Party which which which which is is is is dominated dominated dominated dominated northern northern northern northern Ireland's Ireland's Ireland's Ireland's legislature legislature legislature legislature for for for for two two two two decades decades decades decades as as as as a a a a result result result result Sinn Sinn Sinn Sinn Fein Fein Fein Fein is is is is entitled entitled entitled entitled to to to to the the the the pace pace pace pace of of of of first first first first minister minister minister minister in in in in Belfast Belfast Belfast Belfast for for for for the the the the first first first first time time time time since since since since Northern Northern Northern Northern Ireland Ireland Ireland Ireland was was was was founded founded founded founded as as as as a a a a pasta pasta pasta pasta majority majority majority majority states states states states in in in in nineteen nineteen nineteen nineteen twenty twenty twenty twenty one one one one the the the the victory victory victory victory is is is is a a a a milestone milestone milestone milestone for for for for shin shin shin shin fain fain fain fain which which which which has has has has long long long long been been been been connected connected connected connected to to to to the the the the Irish Irish Irish Irish Republican Republican Republican Republican Army Army Army Army known known known known as as as as the the the the IRA IRA IRA IRA the the the the IRA IRA IRA IRA was was was was a a a a paramilitary paramilitary paramilitary paramilitary group group group group that that that that use use use use bombs bombs bombs bombs and and and and bullets bullets bullets bullets to to to to attempt attempt attempt attempt to to to to take take take take Northern Northern Northern Northern Ireland Ireland Ireland Ireland out out out out of of of of the the the the U. U. U. U. K. K. K. K. Karen Karen Karen Karen Thomas Thomas Thomas Thomas London London London London the the the the Irish Irish Irish Irish nationalist nationalist nationalist nationalist party party party party Sinn Sinn Sinn Sinn Fein Fein Fein Fein has has has has won won won won the the the the majority majority majority majority of of of of votes votes votes votes in in in in the the the the Northern Northern Northern Northern Ireland Ireland Ireland Ireland assembly assembly assembly assembly for for for for the the the the first first first first time time time time in in in in a a a a historic historic historic historic win win win win the the the the shin shin shin shin Fein Fein Fein Fein party party party party secured secured secured secured more more more more seats seats seats seats than than than than any any any any other other other other party party party party in in in in Northern Northern Northern Northern Ireland Ireland Ireland Ireland in in in in

Ireland Northern Northern Northern Northern Ireland Assembly Assembly Assembly Ass Belfast Irish Irish Irish Irish Nation Shin Shin Shin Shin Fein Fein Party Party Party Party U. U. U. U. K. K. K. K. Democratic Democratic Democrat Legislature Legislature Legisl Sinn Sinn Sinn Sinn Fein Fein IRA Shin Shin Shin Shin Fain Fain Republican Army Army Army Army London U. U. U. U. K. K. K. K. Karen Karen Karen Nationalist Party Party Party
"shin" Discussed on Epicenter

Epicenter

07:32 min | 6 months ago

"shin" Discussed on Epicenter

"Hi, welcome to epicenter. The show talks about the technology projects and people driving decentralization and the global blockchain revolution. I'm Sebastian guitar and I'm here with fede gay Ernst. Today we're speaking with Laura shin, she's a journalist. She's a podcast host and she's been around the space for a long time. And also the author of a new book called the crypto pians, which I just finished reading and Felix also read. Before we talk to Laura about her book and all the juicy gossip that's in there, I will first tell you about our sponsors this week. DEXs are great, but they're vulnerable to problems like any V, failed transactions and high cost costs. Cow swap tackles these issues head on and offers a new kind of trading experience. It's built by and cow swap is a meta Dex aggregator. It's kind of a Dex aggregator aggregator. And it fights ND by matching overlapping orders directly. And if no coincidence of wants are found, that's what the cow comes from. Trades are settled on a variety of underlying AMMs depending on which pool offers the best price. And I've been using cow swap quite a bit and I can tell you that the experience there is quite great. In fact, it's pretty cool that when you do a trade, there's a sound of a cow. So that's why I like it so much. Give Cal shop a try and enjoy perks like nose gas fees for field transactions, optimize transaction management for multi 6 and douse, as well as other fun and entertaining surprises, which you'll find out. Head over to the council of that exchange and start swapping today. Laura, it's a real pleasure to have you on. This is the first time you've been on the podcast surprisingly. But yeah, it's a good, I think it's a good time though. The book has come out. I'm excited to be here. So give us a little bit about your background and story and what's your pre crypto life like and what drew in and what got you to where you are now. So I have been a journalist pretty much for all my career, not literally 100% of it, but nearly all. And I was covering personal finance when I had been covering it maybe for four or 5 years and was feeling like kind of ready to move on and do something different because I didn't feel like I was learning a lot that was new. And so my Forbes editors said, hey, we have an idea to do a Forbes FinTech 50 list. Do you want to head that up with another reporter? And so she and I divided the list into subcategories and I took the category of digital currencies and became completely obsessed and fell down the rabbit hole as we all say. And so that was almost 7 years ago. And then a year after that, I launched my podcast, unchained, and that initially was a Forbes podcast and after the first season, they said, we're not going to continue with this. And so I found my own sponsor to keep it going. And that sponsor said that they would take out the exclusive ads on it for the year 2017. And that was the year that crypto totally blew up and then downloads my podcast blew up. And so they got this deal of a lifetime. And what happened was that, and then during 2017, I got hired full-time at Forbes to only cover crypto. Because previously, I'd been a freelancer for them. And finally, in January 2018, somebody who was helping me with the podcast said, hey, I have been doing research on a bunch of crypto podcasts and you could make X amount of money selling ads on this. And you have way more downloads than everybody else. So I was like, oh, that's an amount of money that's more than what I make at Forbes. So I had always had an idea to do a book and or rather had the desire and because we had just been through this massive mania and bubble, I felt like that topic would be a good subject for a book. And so when I basically I quit Forbes and I probably spent like, I don't know, maybe two days a week on the podcast and then the rest of the time on my book and the book aims to describe how the 2017 ICO craze happened. But since Ethereum was the main platform for that and you kind of need to understand the origins of Ethereum and understand the Dow and all that because that all really led up to the ICO craze and was kind of just without that context ICO craze doesn't make sense. So about three quarters of the book really is kind of like a history of Ethereum and how it got started. And then at the end is when you see how this all blossomed into the ICO craze. Very cool. Yeah, I remember when your podcast came out, like I think we started probably about a year or a year and a half before unchained. And I remember your podcast coming out and thinking like, oh, this is a person with a journalistic background coming into the podcast space. Myself, people would say, oh, you're a journalist. Like you need to be objective about stuff. And I'm like, no, I'm just a guy who's interested in crypto. I couldn't care less I would be an objective about stuff. And I was like, oh, this is a person who's actually going to bring some sense into this conversation. And I really also appreciate the fact that, you know, because you didn't have this technical background or you came at the subject of crypto from a much more higher level visionary and also perhaps with a financial background that it just framed conversations much differently than with epicenter. So I would sometimes listen to episodes that you had done prior to doing episodes on episode because it's kind of prep myself for those episodes or send people to the podcast where I thought interviews that we had done would be too technical. Laura shin's podcast is going to give you more of more of the business aspect of this or this sort of thing. So yeah, I've always really enjoyed your work. Yeah, and I was doing the opposite. I was listening to epicenter in preparation for my own interviews to understand the technical sides better. Yeah, so the book just came out and it's an interesting book because a lot of the other books I think that came out recently were much more like, you know, those like Bitcoin billionaires, for instance, which is more of like a fictional account of what happened. And then, you know, Camila's book, I think, also has a little bit more of that aspect, although it is more of like an investigative journalism type of piece. But your book is like a factual account of what happened. And I wonder if this is the book that you had always wanted to write, or if it just felt, was this the book that you felt needed to be written? Or is this more like your style? You're more journalistic style that shines through here. Oh, it's probably my style. I very much wanted this book to be a history book in the sense that I want people a hundred years from now to reference this book when they're trying to understand how to blockchain technology get started and how did crypto get started? And so I really was striving for accuracy on every level..

Laura shin Sebastian guitar Forbes Laura Ernst Felix Cal Camila
"shin" Discussed on Longform Podcast

Longform Podcast

06:01 min | 7 months ago

"shin" Discussed on Longform Podcast

"Buy additional ads while I'm still waiting to work out my deal with Forbes. So she did. And then this person who is helping me message me and was like, by the way, I've been doing research into ads on the shows. And with your downloads, you have way more than anybody else. You could charge this much and I was like, what? That is way more than I'm making it. My full-time job that I spent like 7 days a week on. And so yeah, so that's when I quit Forbes. But if I didn't own the copyright in the trademark, from the get go, it would have been a very different story. And so I just want to kind of give advice to anybody who's listening to this. If you are going to create something, you should own that intellectual property in that. Because I do know other journalists who have created great brands and shows with other publications in the publications owned them from the outright. And they had to walk away. They didn't own these hugely successful things. And so yeah, once you own it, it helps you tremendously and so I really would give that piece of advice to people. I mean, I just got lucky in that regard because I didn't even have my lawyer look at it. So the other piece of advice I went up, you'll do is have your lawyer check over every single contract. I do that now, but obviously at the time I didn't know what I was doing and but anyway, yeah, that ended up being such a godsend for me. Is there anything we didn't get a chance to talk about that you wanted to talk about on the show? Oh, yeah, yeah, yeah. So this goes back to so for people who want to work for themselves, I have this theory about how to succeed financially if you want to work for yourself. And I call it the three layer cake. Because I realized later what my first what my mistake was that first time around that I tried to freelance and I didn't succeed was that I didn't have a regular source of income, just any one kind of part time job that just had some base level of income that I could rely on every month. And actually, that's not true, because when I first started, I did, but then 9 11 happened, like three months later, and then a bunch of those gigs went away, like immediately. So that's not actually true. I did start with that. But then when they went away, I didn't get anything regular for a long time. But anyway, so that's your first layer. It's like the foundation. It's just like gives you something to kind of be able to make your budget on and cover your rent and whatever with. It's just sort of that base thing you can count on. You don't have to worry about it too much. And then what I call the second layer is kind of the things that you really want to do. Things that are getting you to your dream scenario, which is the third layer. And those things could either be a lot of money for a little bit of work. I used to do some corporate things where I would make it like a game. I would charge them a lot of money. I would be like, you know, you're going to pay me whatever. Some huge amount of money for this article. And then I would time myself and I would be like, awesome, I made $750 an hour. I'd be like, great. Done, I'm sending that in. And I would just, you know, try to try to make as much money as I could in a short of a time or so the second layer can be multiple things because it could also be that you want to do more long form stuff, but nobody's hiring you to do it. And then finally, this no name publication that nobody's ever heard of is going to let you do a thing where you can really go out and report and it's really fun and you can just kind of do this sort of reporting that you want. And you can write in that narrative fashion that you really want. And yeah, they're only going to pay you $200 for it, and you're going to spend two weeks of your life on this. But you'll have a good clip, and you'll have something that you're proud of, and you'll have fun. And so anything can be that second layer that kind of gets you to the third layer, which is where you're doing your dream stuff, but also making the money from it. And so I worked that second layer a lot during that period when, you know, I mean granted, I was lucky that the floor of this thing worked out well for me, so quickly that, you know, I was making 6 figures from it and I fully understand many, many people have worked for Forbes as a contributor, not made 6 figures, but it definitely at least during that time was possible. I don't know about now because they may have changed the pay scale. I really don't know what's going on with that. But even if you're making less than that, you can still make that third layer kind of like help you get to second layer gigs. And you use that extra time to, like I said, either get the clips you want, even if they're not paying, or you do other things where they're going to pay you a lot, and you just gamify it so that you're trying to earn as much as you can and as short of time as possible. And there's probably I'm sure other people can think of good second layer things. But you know, I'm really happy and I feel really lucky that now I'm basically at the third layer where I'm making good money from stuff I love doing. I have published a book that I actually really do feel proud of. Is it perfect maybe not, but it's my best first effort, you know? And I have a lot of really cool offers coming my way for really fun, creative things to do. And I'm just, I just love it. You know, it feels really good. So this is my theory about, yeah, how you can make it as a freelancer and move your way up to your own third layer of your cake. I feel like I rarely get to end this show on an upbeat note, so I'm gonna stop it there. Thank you so much for this interview. Thank you. It's been such a pleasure. Hey, thanks for listening to the long form podcast. I'm Erin lammer, my co hosts are Evan ratliff and max linsky, are editor on this episode, was Seth Kelly, our intern was Noel mater. We are brought to you in partnership with vox media who help us make the show, thanks to them, and all the sponsors will be back next week..

Forbes Erin lammer Evan ratliff max linsky Seth Kelly Noel mater vox media
"shin" Discussed on Longform Podcast

Longform Podcast

06:50 min | 7 months ago

"shin" Discussed on Longform Podcast

"I'm interested in something you actually just touched on a second ago, which is the relationship between crypto and journalism. And conversely, the relationship between journalists and the crypto world. It's not a particularly friendly relationship. So there's this kind of belief within crypto that generally journalists should be avoided and sharing things with journalists is not the way to go. And then there's this sort of parallel belief, I've perceived from people in the journalism industry that no one can cover crypto if they've ever participated in crypto. So there's a real discouragement of people who've held coins from covering the industry or really people who are sort of any way involved. What do you make of the fact that someone who invests in crypto can not cover it and how have you navigated those issues throughout your career? So before I answer the second part, I want to just push back a little bit on please do. So it is true and I am the one also who said that generally crypto people don't give compliments to journalists. However, what I will say is that I feel that this narrative around how crypto people and journalists aren't friendly. The truth is actually I have really good relationships with most of my sources. We are friendly and I respect them and they respect me and certainly there are people who yeah, they don't like me and maybe I would have a hard time getting them on my show or whatever. But generally by and large, my personal experience is not on an everyday basis, it's positive. Let me just push back about one idea there though. I think that you cover crypto sort of from within the crypto industry and have those people on your show. You might get a different response if you called and said, hey, I'm writing for this or that magazine. I have no track record and crypto at all. I want to talk to you about it. You're a known figure within crypto who sort of has your own reputation built in. Yeah. Yeah, in 2015, when I started as a different time, because at that time, people were still friendly and open, but you're right at that time this rhetoric with the hostility didn't exist. You know, I think, frankly, part of it is that the paradigms in crypto really change everything. You know, this concept around decentralization, so many people don't get it. And so it's true that a lot of journalists, they mess up when they write about crypto because they will call, they'll say things like, and I'm making up these examples, but that Ethereum is a startup, or they don't kind of understand what it, it's just such a new thing in history, frankly. So it's not surprising to me that a lot of journalists make mistakes in the beginning. I think crypto people, yeah, they can be a little bit intolerant and they're very quick to point out flaws. They're know it all. That's what I really mean to say. But frankly, journalists, you know, it's like that with any beat that you start and you don't really know a lot and maybe people on the inside think that you sound like an idiot, but you sort of figure it out after a while, or you don't, and you cover something else. And then in terms of the issues about whether or not you can cover this if you own it or don't own it, I have at times owned Bitcoin and Ethereum because when I worked at Forbes, the policy was a few disclose. You can cover what you own. And it's just different from some of the other news outlets. And then when I wrote my first freelance articles after Forbes, one of them, that they were for The New York Times, which of course wouldn't let you do that. So I actually either sold or gave away my bitcoins and ether, and I just never looked back because I was like, oh, well, if I want to write for a number of these other big publications, they're not going to let me own, and writing is so much more important to me than owning things. Yeah, I love them, that I can love them in this intellectual way. And so that's fine for me. But I personally don't feel that if you're going to cover these that you can't own them. That's just my personal opinion, because obviously I have in the past cover them and own them. You know, what I say that maybe there's like an amount that it should be capped at like maybe you can only put in 1% of your net worth or something or whatever because obviously if it's some crazy, crazy percentage of your net worth and maybe it's not a good idea. But also at the same time now the space is so big that no one journalist is ever going to write a story that's ever going to move the market in their favor. The idea that that's going to happen is kind of weird in my opinion. So that's another reason why I'm a little bit like, oh, I personally think the disclosure idea is totally fine and workable. Well, I think that that idea is evolved a little bit now as increasing number of journalists are covering what has come to be known as web three. Where originally in the early years that you were covering the question was, can you hold this or not? Is it okay to have this investment? And as cryptocurrency and sort of shifts into this web three gear, it becomes more experiential. And have you done these things? And it becomes stranger and stranger to expect someone to cover the web three industry without in any way interacting with web three, it would be somewhat akin to covering the early world of the Internet if you had never been on the Internet. So what do you think about that as it jumps out of the investment category and to whatever it's becoming? Well, I think in that case, a lot of those publications would say, well, you can use company money to do that. And then for any proceeds, we would donate that or the company would keep the money or whatever. In my case where I own my company, obviously, maybe people would have an issue. But at the moment, my company actually does own ether and Solana because I'm going to do NFTs for my book. And well, actually, the original reason I bought the ether was for my Ethereum domain names. So I have like Laura shin eth and unchained on eth and whatever, and I had to buy those. I get so many impostors. And they try to scam people out of money, like literally on Facebook..

Ethereum Forbes Bitcoin The New York Times Solana Laura shin Facebook
"shin" Discussed on Longform Podcast

Longform Podcast

08:57 min | 7 months ago

"shin" Discussed on Longform Podcast

"Lammer. Here with my co hosts, Evan ratliff, and max linsky. Hey Aaron, good day to you both. How are you? I am jazzed up about this week's episode. Someone I've wanted to have in the show for a long time, her name is Laura shin. She is the host of the podcast unchained, which is about the cryptocurrency industry. And hosts many major figures from within it. She also has a new book out called the crypto pians, which is about the early days of Ethereum and this gigantic hack that almost destroyed it. She was a reporter at Forbes, was doing this podcast, and then was sort of able to spin it out into her own business. And I was always curious about how that worked. And so we got to talk about that and a lot more things, mostly about cryptocurrencies. If you don't like cryptocurrencies, you might not want to listen to this episode. But if you are interested in the topic, there's going to be a lot to talk about in this. Layer and you yourself have covered crypto and are now a major figure within crypto. So I feel like you've got a lot of Venn diagrams here. This is a Venn diagram heavy episode. But also a lot of stuff about reporting. I should say, I had this book for a while, but had very strict instructions not to share something that's revealed in the last chapter of the book, so we got to talk about like when your book has a news breaking twist within it, how you handle that with regards to print galleys and things that are in circulation and you're trying to keep something from getting front run that is revealed in the book. So lots of interesting stuff like that in this. I'm going to say, even if you are not interested in cryptocurrency, you should listen to this episode. Thank you. Thank you, Evan. Our show is produced in partnership with the people at vox thanks to them. And now here's Aaron with Laura shin. Welcome to the long form podcast, Laura shin. Thanks for having me. You wrote a book that is like the catnip to the stack of books that I could potentially read in preparation for this interview. People listen to the show, probably know that I have something of a soft spot for the cryptocurrency world. But before we get into the cryptocurrency world, I realized that I started following you when you were already a cryptocurrency journalist. And I have no idea what you were doing before that. So what led you on that path and what were you doing before you started focusing on that? Well, so I'd actually covered so many things as a journalist before, but right before I was covering personal finance and it's just an area, it's not like a change is a lot. So after I'd been covering it for like four years, I really felt, okay, I kind of know this material. And so if I'm going to write yet another article on retirement, it's going to be just like something I wrote before, but with different words, which is completely not interesting to me. And not what I want to do. And I didn't feel like it was learning. So I got kind of antsy and I mentioned this to my Forbes editors. But just the way things are at publications, they were like, oh, we don't want Laura to go to a tech or something because we're going to lose the page views and so they said, hey, well, we have this idea to do a Forbes FinTech 50 list. Why don't you head it up with another reporter? And so she and I just divided the list and I took the category of digital currencies and then became completely obsessed. And that was what started me on this road. And that was almost 7 years ago now. Okay, so before those 7 years, how did you how did you get into journalism and what were your early experiences like trying to break in? It's so funny because probably my earliest experience was that basically I won a journalism contest when I was in junior high and I remember that not only did nobody in my grade expect me to win it, it was like the teachers had wanted to send another student but then she couldn't do it. So then they sent me and then I was one of the winners. But then also it was like 9th graders were included and so the fact that as a younger student I had also been one of the winners was kind of surprising. And then I just always did school newspaper in high school and college and basically after that, my first job out of college was teaching ESL in Indonesia, but I think I just kind of knew I was going to do journalism because I applied for a newsweek internship, but I didn't get it. I think it was something like this school year of the school where I was teaching didn't match up with the internship, but the woman was just like, just call me when you get to New York. And so I did. And then they gave me a job when I arrived. And that was how I got my start. What was the first point where you felt like you could make a living doing what you were doing? I don't mean to insult Forbes, but as I understand a lot of the Forbes sort of content farm nowadays is like part time or people like doing it on the periphery. What was your first full-time engagement in journalism? Well, so the newsweek gig, so now I guess it was like 24 years ago. And then I worked at The Wall Street Journal website briefly, and then I worked at The New York Times website briefly. All my full-time jobs are not I wasn't there very long because I kept quitting much to my parents consternation. What are you doing? Why do you keep putting these good jobs? But yeah, I mean, so when I had the full-time jobs, obviously, I was making money. But I'm glad actually you raised the money issue right away. I'm happy to talk about this because in my 20s, I did freelance, and it did not know how to manage my own personal finances very well. And so I ended up in a lot of debt, like 5 fit your debt and actually what's interesting is that it was a friend who finally kind of made an intervention. It was just like, Laura, this is ridiculous. And the timing of that was actually really good because I had gotten a part time job at the Los Angeles Times. And that kind of just helped my freelance work where I finally had a regular income, even if it was part time. And then I could supplement it with my one offs that I was pitching. And then I managed to pay down a big chunk of that debt. And then nasty little secret that I've been carrying is my parents then just finished it off because they realized like, okay, Laura, she paid off most of it. We'll just get her out of room as real a little bit faster. And then I went back to journalism school because basically I just realized, well, I don't have any expertise. And I thought climate change is going to be something with us until I die. And so I'll just cover that. People will be interested in that. However, I graduated in 2008, and no, at that point, people were not going to pay you to write about the environment. That was the year one of the statistics I saw was the journalism industry shrank 20 some percent, like 22% or I forget. So almost no, it was very, very hard to get a job out of if you even look on the Columbia journalism school website. For my year, the percentage of graduates who got a job was like in the 60s and then all the other years, it's like 80 90%. So then I had to do other work for a little while and then it wasn't until 2011 I got back into journalism. But for your other question about money, so I then started covering personal finance and when I quit the second time, I was absolutely terrified. I actually was just like sobbing, you know, thinking, oh my God, the second I tell my parents that I am going to freelance again, my mother's going to have a heart attack, and she's going to die, and it's going to be my responsibility. And I will have killed her. And I was just working myself into a tizzy. And yet at the same time, I had to do it. So when I quit this other full-time job, I had and I decided I was going to freelance again. I got the gig for Forbes. And frankly, actually, I mean, there were some freelancers that were making 6 figures from that. And I was one of them. Actually, I was just generating a ton of page views and since we were paid on page views, I just was making 6 figures. And it wasn't even my full-time thing. I was doing other freelancing. So I actually didn't have an issue. Money wise from the get go, which was great. And then yeah, I stayed doing that until finally, I went full time with them in 2017..

Laura shin Lammer Evan ratliff max linsky Aaron Laura Forbes Evan Indonesia The Wall Street Journal Columbia journalism school The New York Times Los Angeles Times New York heart attack
Man Gets 10 Years for Fatal Pawn Shop Fire During Minneapolis Riots

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:18 min | 8 months ago

Man Gets 10 Years for Fatal Pawn Shop Fire During Minneapolis Riots

"Knows all about social justice rioting and destruction. A man listen to this, a man who set a deadly fire in a Minneapolis pawn shop during the George Floyd riots was sentenced to just ten years after a federal after federal prosecutors invoked Martin Luther King Jr. and asked the judge to show leniency montez Terrell Lee 26 years old, pleaded guilty to a single count of arson, he admitted he burned down the max it pawn shop, the May 28th, 2020, the same night rioters shut the Minneapolis third precinct building on fire following Floyd's death at the hands of shins convicted police officer, Derek Chauvin. There was a guy was killed. In the pawn shop, two months after the fire, the charred remains of 30 year old Oscar Lee Stewart were found in the rubble.

George Floyd Martin Luther King Jr. Montez Terrell Lee Minneapolis Derek Chauvin Floyd Oscar Lee Stewart
Alec Baldwin Fatally Shoots Woman With Prop Gun on Movie Set

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:48 min | 1 year ago

Alec Baldwin Fatally Shoots Woman With Prop Gun on Movie Set

"Alec Baldwin kills a member of his crew with a prop gun. My friend Mark Davis reminds me that a prop gun, that ain't fire in anything. A prop gun is just that. It's a prop. It's a fake gun. It isn't capable of fire in anything. So they're using that term prop gun, probably inaccurately, but then again, all of this thing is weird. Every aspect of this is beyond bizarre. They are so careful on movie sets. There have been fatal accidents. Rural and Vic Morrow was decapitated? Making one of those I think Twilight Zone movies? Was it Brandon Lee Bruce Lee's kid who got killed on a movie set? So they're very, very careful. And yet somehow Alec Baldwin shot and killed the cinematographer on a movie that he was starring in and producing. Now, the investigation, of course, is underway. No charges have been filed, you know, you got to believe it's a horrible accident that will now follow Alec Baldwin for the rest of his life. He has to live with the death of this beautiful young woman who was his sin of photographer. I mean, again, none of this make it any sense. How does the shin of a photographer and his director get shot? And already, the family of Brandon Lee is tweeting out condolences saying no one should ever get killed on a movie set by a gun.

Alec Baldwin Vic Morrow Mark Davis Brandon Lee Bruce Lee Brandon Lee
London police officer gets life for abducting, killing woman

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 1 year ago

London police officer gets life for abducting, killing woman

"A serving London police officer has been sentenced to life in prison without the possibility of parole for the kidnapping rape and murder of a woman he tricked into his car using his police identification and covert nineteen laws when cousins forty eight was accused of falsely arresting thirty three year old Sarah Everard for violating it looked dumbstruck shins as she walked home from visiting a friend in south London on the third of March prosecutors said he handcuffed abroad drove her far outside the city and then raped and killed her cousins had pleaded guilty to the charges the judges said the seriousness of the case is so exceptionally high that it warrants a whole life sentence the sentence means that cousins will die in prison with no chance of parole Syria Shockley on them

Sarah Everard London South London Syria
US Steps Up Effort To Unite Families Separated Under Trump

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 1 year ago

US Steps Up Effort To Unite Families Separated Under Trump

"Hi Mike Ross you're reporting the bike did been astray shin is expanding efforts to unite families separated under the trump administration the bike that ministration is stepping up efforts to reunite migrant families that were separated under former president Donald trump's zero tolerance policy on illegal border crossings a federal task force initiated a new program Monday in an effort to locate parents most of whom are believed to be in Guatemala Honduras Mexico and Brazil under the program parents who are located will be helped to return to the United States and they will get at least three years of legal residency work permits and support services the American civil liberties union estimates more than fifty five hundred children were separated from their families Mike Crossey out Washington

Mike Ross Donald Trump Honduras Guatemala Brazil Mexico American Civil Liberties Union United States Mike Crossey Washington
Should the U.S. Maintain Its Presence in Afghanistan?

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:54 min | 1 year ago

Should the U.S. Maintain Its Presence in Afghanistan?

"Dr michael oren joins me from israel. Doctorine this stuff. Should the united states maintain its troop presence until all american citizens green card holders and sl and permits are out. Yeah of course. I i listen. I'm looking at this. From the distance of israel. We hear commit understand. Why is it. When the taliban flagrantly violated every principle every article of agreement why the united states has to maintain its deadline of. Obviously i i agree. And president biden says it's because president trump agreed to may one deadline but the taliban violated that with an attack on forward operating base chapman in march. We were not obliged to go along with this agreement they they committed themselves to a negotiated resolution. You know from our perspective. We don't understand why the united states is not blowing up the military equipment left behind. It's gonna fall in the hands of the telephone since it's not creating carter save quarter to the airport Look several thousand roofs and special forces. There's a lot of things are striking messes as rather. How should i say. Anomalous amateurish confused a debacle. Let me ask you about michael. You've done a lot of rescue missions. Over the years in israel the ethiopian jews with the soviet union back in the days of the soviet union resettlement is complicated. Who runs resettlement for the israeli government especially the ministry of absorption of the interior ministry. There have been cases. You may remember way long ago Back in the late nineteen seventies Menachem betty begging admitted several loads of vietnamese boat. People yes so yes manatee jae-shin they're still still running the asian restaurants here

Dr Michael Oren President Biden President Trump Israel Taliban United States Chapman Soviet Union Israeli Government Carter Ministry Of Absorption Of The Michael Menachem Betty
How to get the Mind of a Navy Seal

Untangle

02:02 min | 1 year ago

How to get the Mind of a Navy Seal

"You give us some insights into what it's like to learn mental toughness navy seal from very very beginning of the training when a person shows up seal shows up to our doorstep. It's about a two and a half year process to get him to his first appointment but the first six months in it's the famous training bugs basic underwater demolition. Steel training is bubby. What most people recognize just seal training. The first six months is nothing. Glamorous or laborat- it's cold water long days sand and some heavy logs right so it's all mental toughness and it's all we twist the body to mold divine. That's how we refer to it too and we teach them those days how to breathe simple things how to focus. And i'm sure we'll get into a lot of focus in here but we train from the very beginning because if you can't the person the mind of the person if you will we call it the naked warrior she came build that then you can put lasers and technology all over the place but you won't have what we need. We won't have someone that could be a problem solver in any situation no matter that so the first thing we do is mind training. And that's about six months long and teach them how to change their beliefs in their values how to change their beliefs about which pain for instance we use a student. I comes in we use an. It's kind of funny thing when he go to medical. When i get hurt or something like that and dr will point to scale. What is your pain level. And maybe they have shin-splints or something like oh. It's six or seven now. Three months later. That same student goes in. He has broken leg and the doctor which pain level because too so what they've learned to do is to have a different relationship with that discomfort if you will and they've separated them from just a little bit in his bike cozy can focus. That can stay in the moment. One of the key things you'll see about a seal that successful makes it through the training. Everyone has the exact same skill. And that's the be able to stay in the moment. Be present to be focused on what you're doing.

Navy
How to Improve Hip Extension and Delay Knee Extension for Sprinting

Just Fly Performance Podcast

02:53 min | 1 year ago

How to Improve Hip Extension and Delay Knee Extension for Sprinting

"How'd you get someone to delay knee extension in regards to both acceleration and top end speed sprinting. So there's a few things i i like. I was like these questions. Because i think about the guests on the podcast and the mentors. I've had and i think about some of the things that they've given me that. I will put together so i would say the first big figure for me in terms of really thinking about delayed knee extension was a dairy bar before i get to some of the drills and the ideas that i've taken from him that i tend to utilize with helping people to not overextend. Extend their needs to quickly. I like to go to more of the base. Like base human functioning. And for that one. I like dave o'sullivan who is on the show. He had an exercise. He's called a slouch. I call it a j. curl for some reason. I don't think going to help her first to it. Is that but if you go to the of sullivan episode. I'll try remember to put it in the show and it's this one. There's a video there but it's a movement the where you'll be taking a split stance so like a half lunch. Think and then the front. Like i'm going to take the knee over the telephone instead of the shin perpendicular to the ground. I'm in this split half lens and taking the front new well over the toe. And from there i'm going to kind of do like a jefferson curl almost with my upper body. I'm just gonna slouch forward over that knee. And then i'm going to retract myself back up without straightening the knee and hopefully explained that pretty well but really in reality. I find the athletes who have a tendency to straighten the knee out early in sprinting. Acceleration and sprinting. They're gonna if you put them in. That slouch move position. They will invariably straighten the knee on the way back up early. So they're going to get them in that half lunge position there needs kinda forward they go down and then they're getting ready to go back up and they're either like grip on their toes like crazy at this point already which is kind of a thing that happens for people who tend to rely on quads but as soon as they start to reverse the movement. Out of the slouch the bottom. They will straighten there early. And so if you put them in a three point two point start three point start. You very often will see the same thing happening. it's just like it's a a movement. That's kind of wired in the system so i am a big fan of slowing things down before we take them fast. And i like Ed were you was on the show. I think episode two nine. His book is slowing down to run faster as a feldon christ practitioner and does a lot of work on the ground crawling even that's crawling and groundwork is the slowest you can get. But i think it's hard to do that work. You can do some crawling. Work with delayed knee extension actually in fact. It's hard to crawl in a way where you don't want your extension especially if your hips are low to the ground. So that's there's another thing. Maybe you could utilize that too. But that just creates a good like a starting place for athletes with that.

Dave O'sullivan Sullivan Jefferson ED
"shin" Discussed on Song Exploder

Song Exploder

04:09 min | 1 year ago

"shin" Discussed on Song Exploder

"My understanding of its importance in my life and now here's new slang by the schenn's in its entirety. Dry dry bits ride.

"shin" Discussed on Song Exploder

Song Exploder

04:53 min | 1 year ago

"shin" Discussed on Song Exploder

"Came out twenty years ago in two thousand one after garden state came out. That album went gold and the soundtrack to the movie won a grammy nowadays. James mercer lives in portland. I spoke to him from his home studio and he told me how the shins actually. I started as a recording project aside project while he was in another band called flake music and this episode james breaks down new slang and looks back at how his songwriting and his early home. Recording skills came together to make this iconic song..

Jim Ryun Was the First High Schooler to Break the 4-Minute Mile

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:58 min | 1 year ago

Jim Ryun Was the First High Schooler to Break the 4-Minute Mile

"Take us through those two years. How did you know that you would because again. I want the headline from for my listeners. Understand that you broke the four minute mile in high school. This is an unbelievable thing. It wasn't until roger bannister in the fifties broke the four minute mile. He was views after college. I guess he was already a surgeon or something doctor. But you did. This is a high schooler and two years before you'd never run. So what were those two years like suddenly discovering this talent well to begin with it was very very painful Whether if your listeners you may have had them to shin-splints. I had shin-splints the first six weeks that iran which is basically very painful for every step you take somehow a god gave me the perseverance to go through their And then i finally made see the last place on the c team. We had three levels across country is go. Abmc was the last person on the c team and then this phenomenal thing happened here within the next six weeks by the time we get to the state meet. I ended up being on the varsity team and finished sixth in the state meeting cross country and i was elated. I thought this is grand It was grand is because one of my goals was to make the team When away other goals was to get a girlfriend. And i got a letter. Jack and girlfriend in jack went together but it didn't so that was kind of the beginning for me very infants steps and then this phenomenal thing happened in the next six months where i went from a five thirty eight mile to a four zero seven mile which i still find it hard to believe i see your eyes opping well because i think i could have run a five thirty eight mile when i was younger now. I'm not kidding but that's it you know. Maybe maybe if i had trained i could've gone it down to five twenty years. I don't know but the idea that you had the ability to become one of the greatest milers in the history of

Roger Bannister Abmc Iran Jack
Why a Chinese Billionaire Is Jailed for 18 Years

BBC Newshour

02:00 min | 1 year ago

Why a Chinese Billionaire Is Jailed for 18 Years

"You might think that picking quarrels and provoking trouble is a bad character trait. But in China, it's a charge often used against activists and has been again to devastating effect. Shindo, who is a prominent billionaire, and he has been found guilty of the aforementioned behavior for which he has been sentenced to 18 years in prison. This is the latest in a string of punishments against outspoken corporate bosses. Let's talk about this brand of authoritarian capitalism with Professor Steve Sang, who is director of the China Institute at the University of London. Welcome to the program. Let's hear a little bit more about this man first, who who started out with 50 pigs in 1000 chickens and went on to employ many thousands of people is an agricultural entrepreneur. You're absolutely right. He is one of those really impressive Chinese entrepreneurs. And unusually, he is an entrepreneur with a big heart. So, yes, he made a fortune in agri business. He, in effect created a small tongue of his business, where he generally advertised that he is treating his people very well, indeed. And none of that seemed to upset the Chinese authorities for some time, Indeed, they were quite pleased with him. What was it was it his big heart that led him to fall foul of the authorities? Well, his big heart certainly can be a bit of a problem. And of course, Mr Son is also a Communist Party member. Now what has change is not so much how Mr Son is behaving. But how the Communist Party itself is changed. Before she Jinping. They even at different stages, put him as put Mr Shin out assets as an example of how Chinese capitalists are behaving.

Shindo Professor Steve Sang China Institute University Of London Mr Son China Communist Party Mr Shin
Talks on North Korea Nuclear Make Progress; Difficulties Remain

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 1 year ago

Talks on North Korea Nuclear Make Progress; Difficulties Remain

"Trilateral talks have made progress on the North Korea issue but tensions remain the US Japan and South Korea have reaffirmed their commitment to work together on north Korea's denuclearize shin and other regional threats but little progress was made in bringing closer together the two U. S. allies deputy secretary of state Wendy Sherman has reaffirmed that there were lines remains a linchpin of peace security and prosperity in the region a key area is that the US and Japan or what about China's claims to contested areas in the south and east China seas the south Koreans stayed away from the China issue at a joint news conference while stressing the importance of maintaining dialogue with North Korea I'm Charles Taylor this month

North Korea U. S. Allies Deputy Secretary Japan South Korea United States China East China Charles Taylor
Interview with Pilot Julia: Aerobatic and Corporate Pilot

Pilot to Pilot - Aviation Podcast

02:12 min | 1 year ago

Interview with Pilot Julia: Aerobatic and Corporate Pilot

"Julia. What's going on. Welcome to the pilot pilot. Podcast thank you so much for having me. I'm really excited to be here today. Excited to have you on like i said before We talked a little while ago. Now isn't it. When we have those a feels like it's forever ago that goes by so fast but we got you here now. We're going to have you on the podcast. Show your story. The first question i always ask everyone is why. Va shin. Why did you want to become a pilot. Yeah for me. It goes back quite awhile so my dad started taking me to oshkosh airshow when i was about eight years old and that was really the spark for me just being at the air show around the airplanes watching the air show performances at knitting so many pilots. And having that just be the dorm that you know you're just everyone you interact with as a pilot. I knew i wanted to be a part of this community. I knew that. I wanted to fly in some capacity and i was so attracted to aerobatic side of things and just generally And like really tight community there so yet it was definitely be airshow. Seen that drew me. When i was young to why did i bring you. There was a dislike. You look to the paper and on the oshkosh. Let's bring my daughter there. And maybe she'll like aviation or aviation already and those kind of like a constant thing your family would go up to oshkosh. My dad had been going for quite a few years before he brought me. He wanted me to be old enough. That i could like make it through an airshow day without you know having a breakdown so eight years old was he. When he decided i was good they. He has always loved airplanes. He's not a pilot himself but he has always been a big aviation enthusiasts and lover of airplanes. When he was young he was told he couldn't be a pilot because he had eyesight. Which in the sixties was kind of true but But yeah so he has really stayed connected to the community has a lot of friends who are pilots so it was very natural for him to introduce it to both me and my younger brother adds Bring us with two airshows and we'll go flying with his buddies who had smaller planes around chicago at. It was just a blast.

Va Shin Julia Oshkosh Drew Chicago
Chella Man: Trans, Deaf, Goofy, Hungry, and Tired

LGBTQ&A

02:04 min | 1 year ago

Chella Man: Trans, Deaf, Goofy, Hungry, and Tired

"So before reading the book my some shin was that since you have coke clear implants that you would have perfect one hundred percent hearing and never need to think about it ever again. And so obviously. That's not the case. You say you can hear some. What can you describe a bit more about what that somewhat is. Yeah exactly i mean. It's a huge misconception. I always kind of compare it to. Have you ever taken a video outside when it's windy. You know how like when you play back later. How that win sounds. That's just how i hear win in general so everything is very mechanical. I always used to say i don't have any moisture human hearing necessarily and it's just bury like mechanical is just like asking you at what is it like to see you know. How do you describe that to someone. That's the best comparison. I think i can give you since you do rely on reading lips like our video calls like this challenging. Yes oh it's a lot of energy typically and how have live captioning so if you have a hard of hearing person next time having live captioning super helpful in google hangouts actually has that imbedded in in it holding on those platforms is typically what i usually do but right now i actually feel pretty comfortable because i'm in a quiet environment at your lips are clear you have that fancy mark so i'm pretty good. Okay let me know if that changes to and that's great to know for next time also so thank you with the cochlear implants. I know that not every person has them. Was that a choice that you made or were you too young. That was made for you. That's a great question. A lot of kids. Don't get the choice but my parents intentionally did a lot of research about the controversy within the deaf community about cochlear implants and they wanted me to have the decision myself. So for longtime up i would be. I think they asked me like once every single year. At least you know do you. How do you feel about getting coakley. Implants now and i would always be deeply opposed to it

Coke Google Coakley
"shin" Discussed on Odd Lots

Odd Lots

03:28 min | 1 year ago

"shin" Discussed on Odd Lots

"And i'm joe weisenthal joe. I feel like it's an interesting time to be central bank. I mean yeah it always is. But i think particularly interesting right now because the the scope of new challenges new economic conditions new forces on sort of like how banking and money and markets work. Lots of new stuff right now. Lots of a new territory. Yes so not. Only are central banks responding to an exceptionally unusual economic crisis in the form of a global pandemic which basically led to the shutdown of the entire economy last year. But they're not now Reacting sort of differently to the recovery. So for instance. We saw the fed coming in more hawkish than expected last week. But it's still on hold for the foreseeable future. You have brazil delivering successive rate hikes to deal with inflation. China's sort of winding down. Some of its easy monetary policies. The ecb hasn't even started tapering or even talking about tapering at this moment. In time so you have all these central banks sort of off and doing their own thing trying to respond to this very new environment. And in the meantime you also have some very interesting ideas floating around on the nature of money so sort of like the very fundamentals of being a central bank. Yeah that's true. I hadn't really thought about it Sort of those kind of crosswinds. You're absolutely right like Sort of like unprecedented. You know. i guess there's a sense in which the cova crisis hit everyone the same way at the same time basically like a kind of had this big shutout effect but the recovery is very different with different conditions. So it's like okay. Everyone turns off everything for a few months in our trying to turn it back on again. And some countries different fiscal policies. Some countries have had different trajectories of the virus itself. Some countries have like different underlying economic conditions that changed the nature of the recovery. So there's that and then you get the splintering of policy outcomes as you talk about plus again you know the the rise over the last year of differed thoughts about money particularly crypto currencies. We have The chinese digital currency which is like people talk about for a long time but does actually out. That's raising all kinds of new questions. So yes just numerous things all hitting at the same time. Yeah it's a lot for central bankers to wrap their heads around but We are going to try to do exactly that today. And we have the perfect person to discuss These broad themes with the for central banks and also how central banks are dealing with new approaches towards money including crypto currencies. We're going to be speaking with hyun song shin. He's the economic adviser and head of research at the bank for international settlements and also a previous thoughts guests. So y- thank you so much for coming on. It's really great to be back. So i guess just to begin with a wanted to zero in on the central bank digital currencies idea because it does feel like over the past year. This is an idea that is gaining a lot of momentum. We've seen a lot of banks Issue papers about it including the. Is one of the things i.

last year last week hyun song shin today one brazil ecb chinese past year China things bank
How Exiting the Pandemic Is Affecting Central Banks

Odd Lots

01:26 min | 1 year ago

How Exiting the Pandemic Is Affecting Central Banks

"Joe. I feel like it's an interesting time to be central bank. I mean yeah it always is. But i think particularly interesting right now because the the scope of new challenges new economic conditions new forces on sort of like how banking and money and markets work. Lots of new stuff right now. Lots of a new territory. Yes so not. Only are central banks responding to an exceptionally unusual economic crisis in the form of a global pandemic which basically led to the shutdown of the entire economy last year. But they're not now Reacting sort of differently to the recovery. So for instance. We saw the fed coming in more hawkish than expected last week. But it's still on hold for the foreseeable future. You have brazil delivering successive rate hikes to deal with inflation. China's sort of winding down. Some of its easy monetary policies. The ecb hasn't even started tapering or even talking about tapering at this moment. In time so you have all these central banks sort of off and doing their own thing trying to respond to this very new environment. And in the meantime you also have some very interesting ideas floating around on the nature of money so sort of like the very fundamentals of being a central

JOE FED Brazil ECB China
"shin" Discussed on Zero Credit(s)

Zero Credit(s)

05:53 min | 1 year ago

"shin" Discussed on Zero Credit(s)

"We just watched ends to that end. We then have to thank legendary. Pictures warner brothers studios for putting that clause end there and the deal to make their monster verse. Because without it we would have gotten shinned godzilla too. I really was not anticipating thanking them for keeping shinned godzilla to from us. But i think you're right. I think this is the only case in which i'm going to thank the existence of the legendary monster verse contract array for those of you. Who are confused by emotional whiplash welcomed to zero welcome. Enjoy your stay now after this conversation. I think there's really only one thing left for us to do right. It is time for the final ranking of the legendary pictures. godzilla. Verse monster verse. Cluding shin guards. Look for some reason it yes absolutely to best from worst to best This is oh. I don't actually remember hold on. This list is called. John's godzilla list. Okay i remember my order. I haven't been writing it down. Bad co host. I don't remember my worst. But i'm gonna go off the top of my head and i actually might okay. I think my order is as follows. Here we go drum rolls police at number five we have godzilla king of the monsters really. Okay i think. Godzilla king of the monsters undercuts severely a lot of the hold on. No it's godzilla vs kong movies real dog shit. That sounds. they're now. We're on track again that that movie is actually pretty awful. Israel dog shit tied were place with godzilla king of the monsters which is a better movie but actually walks back and does serious damage to the moral underpinnings of godzilla as it exists. Military monster verse. Fuck that movie and guns versus called. Wow sixty six percent of the gods ella movies. I rank as the worst yup Followed of course by the other one Godzilla is coming in at number three That movie's fine. I could certainly think of worse adaptations and reboots of godzilla. And in fact they've made them And then i'm gonna say kong skull island to it's a fun movie at number two. I really enjoy however it is officially been dethroned. I think everyone saw this coming by shin. Godzilla you know me. You know me as a person. I'm a pretentious man who loves neon genesis evangelical. And i've talked about how much i love shin godzilla for like three years. I think this movie rules. I think it's really interesting. I think it has a lot of very pertinent not just for citizens of japan but for citizens of the world I think it's gorgeous. I love the music. There's very little. I dislike about this movie. Shin zillah is the king of the monsters of hot godzilla. Summer i'm god you're buzzfeed..

Shin zillah three years John japan shin sixty six percent godzilla Israel shin godzilla one number three buzzfeed one thing five number two zero welcome ella skull island kong Godzilla
"shin" Discussed on Zero Credit(s)

Zero Credit(s)

03:27 min | 1 year ago

"shin" Discussed on Zero Credit(s)

"Have no idea Well in two thousand eighteen or in between two thousand sixteen in two thousand eighteen dojo studios made a deal with legendary pictures and warner brothers studios to make godzilla films in america. A part of that deal was that toho studios could not make a live action. Godzilla film during the link up the contract. Are you fucking kidding me. Thereby cancelling the plantation godzillas sequel until after twenty twani. Are you fucking kidding. Me yes i. I'm not kidding you this. This is absolutely true. Considering we just watched a movie about how american superpower can bully japan and to not being the greatest nation it can be. This is disgusting. This is ultra disgusting Gusting this is stupid so now that the contract is up. There were discussions. Hey are we gonna finally do the sequel to shouldn't godzilla but the studio decided. Now we're going to create sort of a monster verse of our own was leading to the shin. Alterman the schenn kamen rider movies. Ever gonna make they're going to be set in the same universe but they're not going to feature godzilla. I will be totally frank with you. I couldn't be more pumped about shin. Kamen rider and by extension shin alterman. Considering what hedy aquino yano did godzilla and how much. I enjoyed this movie. I could not be more pumped. That's i think that's much more interesting than ashamed. Gut zola to. Yeah i feel like schenn godzilla to if it got like if the sequel were to be made. I don't know where you go. Leave the obvious answers. You introduced another monster. And maybe you explore this new godzilla a savior. But i don't think this godzilla can be a savior. It is a mindless or malice. Vengeful kind of creature. I don't wanna see it redeemed. I wanna see it as a statue. Because it represents humanities coming together and finding a solution that doesn't resolve holy violence and like reinforcing all of the themes in the first movie. So i if you have. A second movie were then godzillas. Our only hope. I feel like you're than deconstructing all the work you did. Yeah i feel like you can't turn the godse lotion godzilla into a savior. Which by the way. That's a point that i hadn't That i hadn't thought about it's incredible that this movie hinges on a non-violent solution to godzilla. Yeah interesting what. What an interesting choice. I i really appreciate that. But i agree with you. I i can't really see shin godzilla to the difficulty of course with the original godzilla. Film is that it was a a horrifying movie about the horrors of war particularly nuclear weapons. but then For the sake of success and you can only make so many horrifying movies about a lizard that put other lizards in there for him to fight right. So maybe additional ship godzilla movies Would undercut the things we enjoyed about the movie..

america two thousand first movie Godzilla second movie Gusting hedy aquino yano shin godzilla Gut zola toho two thousand eighteen two thousand sixteen schenn kamen rider american twenty twani Alterman so many horrifying movies rider schenn godzilla Kamen
"shin" Discussed on The Insider

The Insider

04:03 min | 2 years ago

"shin" Discussed on The Insider

"Out for those that might be listening to this podcast. Who got into magic because of you What vice you gives them. Yeah. I mean if well, actually Yeah. I. Mean. The advice I would keep keep doing magic first of all because. It's it's if you guys stopped that's the end of it. You know you guys have to keep doing. You have to keep spreading it. You have to keep showing people magic you have to keep. Thinking of new ideas There's there's so much. So many things to talk about I mean just talking about the whole thing about purists sleight of hand impure, Gimmick. If you are pure S- out there a highly recommend try learning Gimmick gimmicks try learning sleight of hand you gotta mix together because. You're almost kinda handicapping yourself. You know when when you're only choosing to do just curious slight of hand you're it's almost like I don't know driving a car without a turbo. Do something like that. You know you gotta gotTa just you have to experiment and. Don't be afraid to fail. That's that's another big tend to tell people because you gotta just. You GotTa always just take risks and just try try try try now onto a very exciting online live event experts at the called tasteful happening on October the twenty fifth it features Jason England Element. Josh and Andy and you. What can people expect you learn from at the events? Adam. Are we going to need cutting and exact? Moment Although I would love I would love to teach that. But I decided to just go with some sleight of hand and it's very focused on the long the to pop. So I'm focusing on tricks that require a knowledge on that and teach a control and change along to. It'd be people haven't seen. You said be requires knowledge. If that, you're going to be teaching the pommel people going to need to come in. I mean, it'll. It'll help if you. It'll help if you know along student pump and I will be going over it. But I, I know it is. It's quite A. Strange to kind of get comfortable with so so they can. They can stop brushing up on that now and then get the my lectures. Visits. Looks like that. See sneaky peak. I'm looking forward to about the event. Just, sharing the ideas I think no one's no one's seen these before. So hope people like people like it. I've never taught it to anyone. Forever. So this'll be the first time that the became. Exclusives. Performing in Vegas been the dream and if so, what's what's next? Working. While I'm I've been working it's been tough. It's been. It's especially during the virus has been tough to kind of wrap your head around everything even trying to be created this kind of tough at time to however that is the ultimate goal is to changing the show we want to change your showing WanNa, make it better. And 'cause before I was actually performing in someone else's theater it was terry failures theater so we actually couldn't really do anything creatively you are very restricted it was almost it was almost like we're doing tour show right and he's lateen rig and exactly all his lighting everything even his screw. So but now Terry Terry's is contracts over with the Mirage and so. Now. I'm able to to make changes and so I'm very excited to. See. we was in the House with full quick fire questions Shimmy your favorite movie. To be inception but I think. Excite now. Oh. Okay. Pizza topping..

Terry Terry Jason England Element Adam WanNa Vegas Josh Andy
"shin" Discussed on The Insider

The Insider

02:33 min | 2 years ago

"shin" Discussed on The Insider

"It was some magicians you rate that people might not be too familiar with, and then we can put some instagram shantytowns in the nets. Sure. Yeah. while Yon Free share remember when I. saw him as at two thousand, twelve blackpool out to me I thought that boasts for the first time ever because I had known a lot of magic it's obviously. I thought I witnessed real magic when I saw his when when he was making the cubs in the balls vanished I was like what what is going on because I I don't know if I want to stay here I won't set by didn't know that. The technique of. Interested candidates into this is fun. Okay. Yeah. So I didn't know that I didn't know the I was very familiar with lapping she'll end and so for me I was like, Hokey the cards are the the cubs involve actually music mixed mixed with his personality and character it was just it took it to the next level. So his I remember his phys AMAC was one of the most impactful like visually I'll probably remember for the rest of my life you know. That that moment in Blackpool. couple of other magicians that that. are very influential of jean-pierre Ballerina sides act on Youtube when. He was younger and close up magic but all all silent, not speaking at all making amazing things appear and disappear and. He he was. He was also very influential to look at. Tommy wonder I really really like watching stuff to and then some of the newer guys you know David Sousa. Stage manipulator I really you know his his magic really great bills more of his character and persona and use very slow and I? Think that was what really. I really like that. You know because. At the time we see a lot of the Special Jeff McBride and he's amazing fast producing cards fast. But when I saw David Susan that was like the first time I saw a stage manipulator that was going very slowly elegantly and I said, wow, I wanna be like that and so I got a lot of actually in terms of movement in terms of style even color like what I wear was actually influenced from David Sousa..

David Sousa cubs Jeff McBride David Susan Youtube Tommy Blackpool.
"shin" Discussed on The Insider

The Insider

05:16 min | 2 years ago

"shin" Discussed on The Insider

"So I have a holistic music that I like and just say it's on my phone and then so what I do is whenever I have a new idea for trick I have these range of music and I know like kind of around like what type of atmosphere what type of rhythm it has and so then I kind of like combined. Together see if it works, it doesn't throw back Liz I grab another song ends. That's usually how it works. But the in order for the song to be in that little list is very tough because I'm very picky with what songs I like and It tends to the songs as well need to be to have a certain type of flow they tend to need to crescendo upwards throughout all throughout and Because I feel like magic in general kind of needs to have the earliest might my magic needs to have this type of? Gradual increase in terms of either magical nece or Intensity. Actual show I'm. During your clear magic is there something that you wish that you? Done differently. Had not done at all. Yeah Probably not released so much tricks when I was younger. I. Wish I wish I had held that off. But. I got I, got so into like releasing products. That that I just. I don't know. I. I really. I. Really enjoyed like like putting my name out there but. At the same time, I just I wasn't mature enough. So I think that's the one thing I wish I could change especially when I was younger. other than that. Not. Not Too much. Not Not not too much outside I. Think everything else. I'm pretty happy with what I did. Plenty. You use a mixture of kind of crazy hard move monkey slights and pretty heavy gimmicks and a lot of additions either in the slang camp or the Gimmick camp right what why did you decide to embrace both of those? I'm so glad you asked that question. Because it's such an important I think that is kind of. That because I think like I think it was like ten years ago or something especially when and Dave came out. So many people got into just pure sleight of hand and I'm one of them I used to be a purist. I used to hate gimmicks anything to do with non irregular that even just using a duplicate card I was like Nah it's gotta be. Pure fifty two playing cards and I started using gimmicks when my carpal tunnel actually came in CARPAL tunnel both both of my hands and then And so started started being very difficult for me to practice obviously sleight of hand because it takes practice like eight to ten hours a day on a certain slight I wanna get it down really well and so..

Liz Dave
"shin" Discussed on The Insider

The Insider

04:03 min | 2 years ago

"shin" Discussed on The Insider

"Something that. Changes Magic but for the better still waiting on the I don't know what it is But I just want to take it to the next level. You know I want to be kind of even more. So why widely? Accepted by the world So I'm not too sure what it is. I've recently especially been thinking about this. I don't know it's just a weird thought in my head. When you're. Out with. Friends. What kind of tricks do you do because? Obviously, you can't sit there and Music, and get some devices and. Thing. What? To dinner in different says Oh show you. What what do you do? Yeah I usually just so so I have I have like obviously have a group of friends are all magicians. Recently majority of them are all magician. So I'm always just either jamming on ideas like, okay. How does this look that I flashed? Before when I, you know when I was in high school and stuff like that I would just do regular dislike handcart tricks. I had a phase where I would you know do know Monica and stuff like that. Have a really bad memory. So On Monica already like it's it's terrible. It's it's like I wish I could do no Monica be honest I just keep forgetting Memorize it, and if I don't remember, is it within the next week? I forget it. A very bad memory. That's the only downside. Music. Really. Important. Partner Metric What did you think it's important and how do you select the music that you use? Music's really important for me. I. Mean I guess it obviously because I come from a music background I studied classical. I I was majoring in Canada performance as well. So I think. You know when I first started magic. It was kind of thing. It was a funny reason I said I was like I was like, okay. I'm going to have music in my ex because I don't want to waste. The amount of practice and knowledge of music that. Since I started resolving all the way to eighteen. I don't WanNa waste that opportunity my parents that so much money on it I just WanNa. Make use of. So that was that was actually initial idea. But then I think. Let time. Went on I realized music was such an important piece of everything. It really affected the the whole overall I really believe fifty percent of my axe because without the music it just it's not very good. I I use the music for Misdirection, use the music for obviously atmosphere. I use the music for to play with people's emotions throughout the act and and I also use it for justification. You know, let's say I need to specifically. A move my hand this way. Or. I. Need to do this gesture in order to have to take people's attention away so that I can think he got here. So it's it's. It's stuff like that but usually it would take talking misdirection for hey, look over here since instead I use music for for that and also like it helps covers, you know loud noises. Let's say I, have gimmick that makes a loud noise music great that just less than that. Hence, why you notice is really loud music. So that's that's actually one of the. But But yeah, and also you know timing to synchronizing is also very cool. It's fun to do is not is not easy it's quite difficult, but it's totally worth it. and. I kind of view. So when I what I'm being close up magic I I'm almost seeing myself like a stage magician, a lot of influence from stage magicians in that sense where you know when you see stage magic, it's usually done all to music. So it's Kind of just mixing. Those two John Together the unhappy select. Had you respect? Hello. Yeah..

Monica WanNa Partner Canada
"shin" Discussed on The Insider

The Insider

03:29 min | 2 years ago

"shin" Discussed on The Insider

"Laugh you're communicating directly with them your brain on up on stage and it's it's it's it's such A. A random type of performance, there's just so many things to it. You're acting you're doing sleight of hand. You're you're juggling juggling with your hands and your you have to you have to have powder. You have to have atmosphere you have everything, and so it's actually. It's really difficult. It's difficult to be good at magic. I think anyone can be a magician right? You can buy invisible decade districts do the trick, but in order to. To, do it well into good it's actually really difficult because there's so many parts to magic. There's. There's music there's acting there's Had Her and stage presence everything also props knowing how to design your own props. And then at the end of the day You have your own style, each magician. Know I their shows likely illusionist. illusionist like that And a Lotta, the tight end don't get me wrong. A Great Dinner Party wishes to the their company but sometimes it Kinda of some, some of the because they have so many different types of. Shows and some of them do fall flat and the only reason why is because the director? Feels like they they know the magician, right? They're treating the magicians almost like dancers or jugglers and they're like, okay, you all your all do this type of style. You're all going to wear these clothes or whatever, and and so the problem with that is that because magicians are so unique, each magician is unique to their own style. Dancing Juggling acrobats it's different you. They can accommodate like like circus lay they can accommodate two to whatever style the director wants to do it. You know but with magicians it's totally different or or for example, if I were to try to fill a magician's act I actually wouldn't know exactly which angle to get unless I actually studied his act whereas like a Ballerina for example, she was filming another Ballerinas Act Shannon she was doing no because the belly all I'm GonNa do this this this Okay I immediately know where's the magician? There's so many nuances. Oh, my my top. It's here. It's to my left instead of right or actually leaving instead of doing this. There's so many nuances that. That that magicians tend to just make because we all just make this ourselves and we tweak it to our personality and I think that's what makes it so unique and that's why I love it so much it's because it's just so different. Very Long Answer. Has has your opinion on the magic community changed in recent years since he became more kind of public housing. Now it's it's actually been sank. Hasn't changed. I think it's I've always been A. I feel like I. Love I love. The community community is obviously there's a lot of drama that kind kinda goes on everywhere but it's still. So with any art for I think magicians though do you tend? To focus a lot on the drunk But but that you know that all side. I think it's it's. It's. It's still it's still it's still the same I. Hope it I. Hope There's A..

director
"shin" Discussed on The Insider

The Insider

02:49 min | 2 years ago

"shin" Discussed on The Insider

"It's pretty close I would always just change the performance and handling. Do. You think creativity can be studied can be learned and if so how does somebody listening to this wants to be more creative stall that? I definitely. Think that creativity is something that you can train your mind to think in a different way. However, there is a fine line of of. A training your mind to be creative. The like doing what I did, which is tweaking trick or I know a lot of people do Eric Johns, stuff they what they do is they would read the effect. Of like in a booklet say they wouldn't look at the methods and they would try to guess the method then they end up coming with the different way of accomplishing that same effect. So I know magicians do that. I. Don't I don't do that at all I, go the opposite way I I see the method I tried to change the effect but So there's a fine line between doing that type of practice because that is a brain muscle that. You kind of practice and then also realizing that creativity sometimes just has to let it come naturally can always force it and the best idea usually just come out of nowhere and so it's it's it's. So it's you got to kind of figure out how to juggle the two because I've noticed the times when I come up with the worst ideas is when I'm like, okay, guys, let's all sit together and then let's all just try to create a new. What's you get a bunch of your friends to sit down onto unlike a little. Meeting Table For example have little drawing board like okay. Let's just plan this are GONNA do. Yeah because that's it's not an okay. So from two o'clock to three, we're going to try to create by it just doesn't it doesn't look like that. At least from my experience. I in part of the research for this Os watching some interviews with you because I don't like asking the same questions that you always get asked but. You set the really care about magic. Why do you cast a much? Because I love. It. I love everything about magic and it's it's it's the for me because I have studied. Piano might also studied film I. I do I do a lot of different Types of artsy things and magic is that only type of art form when it comes to theater It's it's a rare art form where you get to communicate with the audience, you the fourth wall. But at the same time, there are moments where you can also make it look like play look like a ballet dance and have the these musical moments are like have David Copperfield moment where it's also music and it's very grand but then you can immediately get out of that and go into a moment where you're making the audience..

Eric Johns David Copperfield
"shin" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

05:48 min | 3 years ago

"shin" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"Informed shin and more can you share some of the incredible headlines on curcumin and tell us why you use this patented B. C. M. ninety five formula of curcumin with seven times greater absorption okay well first of all I think while people might not know the term Cuman they may well no tumor wreck route which is a yellow spice and it shows up in curry's and it's part of the five thousand year old Indian hired that X. system of medicine I've been studying tumor act and its derivative curcumin since the nineteen seventies and I'll say this right off the bat that there are almost no plant materials in the world as extensively studied is there's a couple of thousand studies can be found in the scientific and medical literature we know that Kerr Cuman is powerfully anti oxidants we know that it has a remarkable capacity to protect the liver and the liver is our primary detoxifying organ it greatly enhances joint health so if people are experiencing joint discomfort due to over use this really helps to relieve that and it's also what we call cardio protective it helps to protect the heart it helps to maintain normal healthy cholesterol and one last thing that is really kind of astounding is that cook human actually causes your body to produce what are called neuro protective factors in the brain so it causes your body to produce these agents in the brain that protect the actual tissue of the nerves in the brain itself there's almost nothing else that we know of that does that and specifically the PCM ninety five that you mentioned offers about seven times the absorption of any other Kerr Cuman extract so when you take two hundred fifty milligrams of the stuff you get about seven times the activity that you would if you took say a comparable amount of another curcumin extracts of this in my opinion is one of the most life enhancing protective totally beneficial substances on earth and it has just decades of scientific and medical studies to back it up yeah Chris I know that we talked already about the green tea in the Kerr Cuman in your new green tea see our liquid soft gel formula which purities given away for free today but tell me about the third nutrient on the list the wrist Vera troll which is super hot right now share with us some of the headlines and the science behind resveratrol I notes from red wine in French love it but why is it on your short list well Rivera trol is one of those remarkable compounds they I just had to shake my head at how many different things it does it is found in wine grapes it also shows up in cranberries what we know about raise their trolleys that like green tea and also like curcumin extract it's profoundly anti Occident but more than that it shows significant properties when you look at some of the things in the body that happened during aging as a result of fat accumulation in tissue and insulin sensitivity rest Vera twelve helps to protect against those things it's a powerful immune regulator and you know our means system is responsible for keeping us healthy it is remarkably beneficial for the heart and this is why it's considered one of the keys to the so called French paradox in of the French drink a lot of red wine they eat a lot of cheese they smoke cigarettes and they stay slim and they have good cardiovascular health but Rivera trawl appears to be key in that and additionally there is a brain benefit like there is with the Kerr Cuman with blood flow to the brain so when you take Rosemary trawl you get brain blood hello this means you get more oxygen to the tissues of the brain your brain cells stay healthier longer your mind is clear sharp and focused so this is on my short list for all those reasons and for about a dozen more that would just plain take too long to explain right again we're talking with Chris killing also known as the Indiana Jones of natural medicine sometimes called the medicine hunter as well Chris let's laser in on this wonderful formulas you created in conjunction with purity products I know that purities been in business now for what is over twenty years they've got a top rating from the better business bureau and people can get a complimentary bottle of this green tea C. R. today we'll give that number out a few minutes but first what does this C. R. stand for and second you designed this formula in a liquid soft gel why do you like the liquid soft gel technology so much okay first questions first it's called green tea C. R. which is short for green tea curcumin and resume our trol the big three ingredients that are in this product in meaningful protective amount the reason that it's in a liquid soft gel is that that allows for rapid and very complete absorption when you have a fluid soft gel you just get more quick break down of the capsule more rapid absorption and to some extent more complete absorption into the intestines that means that your body utilizes more of the ingredients in the supplement yeah Chris before tell our listeners how they can get their very own complimentary bottle of green tea C. R. tell me this if you wanted to buy this green tea plus the patented B. C. M. ninety five Kerr Cuman plus the wrists Vera troll I mean you spent close to.

shin