36 Burst results for "Shen"

Fresh update on "shen" discussed on The Adam Carolla Show

The Adam Carolla Show

08:34 min | 18 hrs ago

Fresh update on "shen" discussed on The Adam Carolla Show

"Your dragline. It doesn't have to be told twice to crack your cold. Always cracked I the camera was so funny that I was just stand the wings and watch him do do do the bit while he was down below playing chariots of fire on the horn pipe he'll be upset everything was just concert contrast between sport fishing and funerals, and it just was such a funny ass bit. That is full blown Fred Willard conceptual that rights. Yeah that's out there in in Albert Brooks territory. That's so great. Yes gipper. Nadhim and he would go. was that loved one who died really loved one or maybe just a business partner died own your money. In that case, you may want to opt for a slick remembrance bringing up shark and Baker. got. The audience knew what to do with it. Seems so bizarre. So. How much is how much is do we know how much it is? Just say like, Oh, we're a third of the cost of a funeral or and then somewhere on read it they said Houston and cost a thousand dollars so they just pick you up. All. Right. Wait. What were you doing? Oh Brian. Yeah. Oh. What were we doing? Yeah. Let's do you. I. Will Do Chat. So Yeah Are we Jeff Casino Dark Week last week we all did various things. For the last. Seven years now, Christie and I've gone to Hawaii and that's obviously off the table this year why the other mandatory quarantine everything we just so up in the air wouldn't have made sense to make plans or go there. So Christie suggested something I would never have even thought of I, kind of was aware of these things but never really considered going to one. She goes happily go to a wellness retreat because you know you're you're going through your treatment you you'll have just finished. Everything's on her shoulders. Why don't we just go away for a week to one of these wellness retreats and? They're supposed to you know pick up spiritually and physically and emotionally and mentally and all that stuff and I'm like that's a fun idea. So. We found a place in Sedona Arizona of all places and that's where you'd find that. There are few in California, but we opted for this one. It feel it felt very remote. Chris has Pictures Prison Koa amongst the red rocks. In Arizona and it's it's very remote, very small. There is like eight rooms. So and of course, there are wellness retreat or whatever it is so like they're very dedicated to sanitizing everything and people. Like. This sounds perfect. Exactly what we need a little restaurant Alexei Shen off the grid. That's you're looking at picture crystal grotto for like meditation where the Sun comes innings the SUNBEAM's. skylight in the roof but. Though. That's the actual like red clay dirt that it's built upon. There's a flooring walk barefoot on the dirt and you meditate and do whatever. It's pretty woo I wasn't quite sure what to expect. We booked seven day. Stay obviously. Jeremy and it was pretty awesome I got my shock resigned. Had ever done before energy reading energy clearing Ricky Lynn I'd never done any of this stuff before and it was it was very it coincided with me finishing my medication and my lack of medication, and of course you're looking there at the spectacular pool that no one was at. Some of the people there most of the time. Mid Week imagine isn't quite as popular as the weekends. But yeah. It was very spiritually fulfilling thought very fulfilled. Coincidentally, I finished by medication a few days before we left. So I was feeling great by the middle of the week and I was getting all these treatments like I said, the shockers is and then the ricky and all this stuff i? Don't know if you guys Gina Maybe you've done that before. I here, let me say this all this stuff you make fun of. At we make fun of or one makes one of when you do. It's nice like. When the you know the guys or the girls burn that sage and running the fingers along the whatever and lining up whatever like as much smoking Hokum as it may sound like it's still nice to be on the sort of the person laying on the table in the towel when that Shit's going down your one hundred percent. Real to you know what I mean like I felt very at ease and so they did the smudging with the sage burning. It felt amazing. Of It was, it was real to me. I felt great. Right did you did you drive or fly? We drove it took six and a half hours out there eight hours back. There's a lot Sunday traffic coming back and That's awesome. All I ever think of like, what are you eating? Where's the bar like? How's that work? Well, it's funny. You mentioned that because it is all inclusive. So they have a, they had a crush showed you picture of the juice that a fresh juice bar you can just get Jews anytime you want more smoothies or cocktails. Cocktails you had to pay for everything else food snacks all just bring your stuff at the pool or whatever, and it was. It was pretty great. You really taken care of and the best part ended up being I. Mean All the Amenities are nice. The Room and the pool and the food and the drinks. I really got a lot of the healing stuff I I felt great and maybe it was coincidental with the fact that I was. Just, off my meds and I was starting to rebound anyway but couldn't accommodate better time well, and you can't. You can't not feel good in an environment. I mean that's why we literally just drove to Ventura for a day just being stuck in La amid all this stuff and all of a sudden you're transported to what feels like planet but it's also a resort. Of course you're just GonNa feel like that cloud is being lifted. That's awesome. Tonight just did peyote. Okay we're just as well social media and people realize how? Easy, it is to Sorta snap back by just getting a massage while something smells good is burning. and. There's some Mandolin music in the distance and the rescue to focus on your breathing. Right right things you want to release. It's spiritual so Back to the food. The food work food was much better than I anticipated when when I heard foods included I'm like a boy. And the restaurant there is called the cafe and Macau fucked up this out to go somewhere else. It was really really good I liked it. It was a very limited menu, but it was all good software fillet shrimp scallops chicken salad. So healthy. It's a health retreat is, is this a you know? Trying to think like there's a kind of a different levels of this stuff. There's like there's the no booze no animal protein, no TV version, and then there's the flat panel TV and you could get a cocktail version I guess with this one like was there TV in the room? There was never wanNA turned it on. Good. Yeah this isn't what over this wasn't like Super Granola unclog off the grid like. I guess, it's They take care of you for sure but the food was very. Is. Exactly. What you wanted a place like this which is weird. Tofu and like you know offering off the stuff, you would normally see Norman you. This was like really well done versions of stuff you see on a normal American restaurant menu did you have a chance to go to any of the Vortex? Their whole thing is there's vortex vortices. Tell Vortex vortices they're the to the trees grow and it's sort of a spiral. SHAPE, which is very weird. I. Didn't go outside of the RESORT CRISTIANO COUPLE OF HIKES BUT A is supposedly you know in Order to seize and so you. Could feel that energy and what direction? What direction does the toilet flush. The solve this work extra normal to me. Okay. Now look. I'm the atheist seems like I'd be dead set against this kind of stuff i. Completely into this stuff I mean I don't do it but I understand. The I understand the benefit of it. I understand especially in today's climate of just carving out a few days laying down, not turning the TV on staying off social media get in get in your shockers, align whatever your mind, whatever.

Christie Ricky Lynn Fred Willard Albert Brooks Nadhim Partner Baker. Arizona Sedona Arizona Alexei Shen Pictures Prison Koa Houston Sunbeam Jeremy California Gina Chris Hawaii Super Granola
Why Corporate America Couldnt Change Carla Vernn at Her Core

Latina to Latina

05:05 min | 2 d ago

Why Corporate America Couldnt Change Carla Vernn at Her Core

"Carla I. Love that we were both up at midnight emailing and prepping for this. A says so much. Yes. The the the story behind the story. You just announced that you're leaving General Mills after twenty two years right now, the go-to practice buzzy thing in career advancement is zigzagging changing jobs every two to four years your career is sort of a case study in the opposite taking the long road to the. C. Suite. How were you compelled to stay for so long? I'm probably kind of an old fashioned person and I. Was Very Intentional in picking the first company that join out of business school. Before Business School, I was not very familiar with careers in corporate America. My parents were both educators and we didn't really have any business people in our family. Largely. Probably because my family is black and Latina Afro Latino for my dad and. Secretary Shen really prevented us from being able to have a path through corporate, America. So when I got to business school I had so much to learn about how does one even navigate and find a company in finding career path. When I realized that my skills were really well suited for marketing strategy then I went about making it my business to figure out what where are the best of the best marketers going where are the? Best of the best strategist going 'em back. Then the area we call consumer packaged goods, food companies, companies that make your household facial cleansers the things you wash your dishes with the product. See every day in the main part of the grocery store those companies where marketing was the absolute core most important skill of driving the success of the company. My intuition told me that if I could find a company that welcomed and embraced diverse styles. I was more likely to see leaders who blazed a successful trail that weren't cut from cookie cutter, and so when I found that in general mills, there was plenty of learning to do and plenty of career path runway for me. And so I really played the long game there. You said you partly went into to marketing because you felt it matched your natural skill set. So I both wonder what you were assessing your natural skill set. But then also how is you began to work inside of General Mills? You got really good at the thing you were already naturally good at. What I arrived on the doorstep of business school I didn't actually know what the career pads were inside of a company. I didn't even know what the job titles were. So all I could try to correlate when I went to business school was what am I passionate about 'em? What do I seem naturally skill that I have always been a creative person I've always been attracted to the arts and I also like associating new ideas in connecting. DOTS in reaching new conclusions over time in business school I got to learn that the people who love the creative work in business that's often called marketing and the people who love connecting disparate ideas in reaching a new conclusion is often called strategy. I've also never been a very shy flower I'm fairly direct may be a little bossy and so I also wanted to know what are the jobs that people go to when they like being in charge. I found now, where are the industries where people who do marketing strategy are in charge, and that led me to learn more about consumer products in that industry that's so dependent on those skills. What were you doing that began to open doors to bigger and better opportunities that the company? I have. I got great feedback from one of my best bosses in he said, one of my best skills which is an under appreciated skill is that I'm very coach of all. You want this weird kind of feedback yet because you want a boss to tell you oh, you're great at analytics or your so sharp your ideas are always the best I've ever heard for someone to say, wow, you seem to. Take Direction while didn't seem like the compliment what I think he was getting at was you I am a very malleable piece of clay I. Already know at the outset that I don't know everything. So I remain curious remain open to the knowledge that comes my way and I am willing to continue to grow my own skills and so I don't WanNa be the person that's too proud to ask a question. And, I've always been willing to be a learner.

Business School General Mills America Carla Secretary Shen
Is It a Good Time to Start a Marketing Agency

Marketing School

06:22 min | Last month

Is It a Good Time to Start a Marketing Agency

"Welcome to another episode of Marketing School I'm Eric Su and I'm Neil Patel and today we're gonNA. Talk about if it's a good time to start a marketing agency so right now just to give context for everyone we're in the middle of covert, and we are in the middle of riots and protests right now the united. States at least so you have a lot going on, so neil I'll go to you I. Do you think it's a good time? Why or why not? So whether? It's a bad economy? Good economy, a recession, or there's things that you. You can't control. It's life i. do believe overtime things do go back to normal. You know specifically I'm talking about things I it. Where eventually go away so I believe anytime is a good time to start a business. As long as you think you can provide value critic product, critic, good service, you know even though there's a lot of people who aren't spending money. There always is other people who are spending money. Can you get to make an you generate sales to neal's point? There's people that are doing really well right now. There's people that have been. been absolutely crushed. The people that are doing well right now are spending while I'll give you an example. You know if you're running a of streaming business right now. You're probably doing better right now. If you're doing online education, you're probably doing better right now. Depending on what you sell, if you're P, you're probably doing better right now. So all that to say is at a time where the biggest agencies in the World Command, the largest budgets, big contracts, and all that a lot of people that are working with these large agencies they don't necessarily want to. To! Pay those dollars anymore. They want an opportunity to work with smaller shops. And this is your opportunity to to prove yourself, and if you're willing to craft a really good offer and get your foot in the door where you're not necessarily going to charge a lot of money up front, but you're GonNa get all these. You know smaller deals with larger companies. When you know, they can pay a lot later. You establish that relationship you take advantage of the Times right now, 'cause. They're also looking to shop for a deal. So you know, here's your chance. and. You Know Eric I know you deal with a lot of agencies in your agency accelerated permanent. Lot of them are starting up right now in trying to grow. What are you seeing? Are People doing well right now or they struggling right now and mentioned that there's always people spending money, but what of the results people are getting right now? Okay, so that's what I was amazed all these people. People that are willing to pay for the agency accelerator program right now looking. They're looking to grow because our businesses are thriving, so we had this one individual. He's based in the UK and they focused on smaller businesses side five clients last week. They just make a couple of tweaks. Another growing faster and then there's people that are looking to to that are looking to make a change in. In their business, because one person was focused on hospitality, and that's been totally decimated, but he's changing his business model right now and all of a sudden he's. He's getting more clients so I would say the people that were working with right now is it's maybe not the best apples is because these are people that are doing well. That are investing in this. So that's the caveat I say but. But they are looking to be aggressive, and they are looking to grow, and they do see a lot of people reaching out to them for different various services that that they have I. Think again. Going back to the point is during a downturn right now. I think it's a perfect time to start a business. It's a perfect time to learn and make mistakes where it's not going to be. A big issue. If you make these mistakes, put it that way so. Now for the people because they're probably are people that you've seen. I don't know as many agencies as you, but you've probably seen. People also drop in revenue due to Kobe I know we have and we lost clients lost a lot of stuff that wouldn't have happened if covid wasn't around, you know even though people are losing revenue right now. How are you seeing agency? Survive right now in. What are you seeing them due to grow right now this environment. Yeah, so they're changing up their offering, so for example anybody that has an events type of agency. They've switched over the virtual, and it's not the same original revenue that they had before because live events. You make a lot more because they cost a lot more, but at least they can recover some revenue and name of the game with businesses to survive. They need to survive and need to be able to hold through this and you know they'll be good to go other people I can tell you some are. Are pivoting into product services like a lower tier. Maybe it's not the original pricing been finding a lot of people are actually taking them up on it, so I think this really applies for business across the board I. Think if you are adaptable and you can make changes quickly. You don't just sit there I think you're going to be fine at the end of the day, but if you complain about it and you blame people I near. You're out there. Doing stupid things than you're GONNA be in trouble. And then, if you yourself were to credit agency right now, and you didn't have your brand your traffic. What would you do to get going and generate your first client if not your first three clients? Yeah. I mean I've done this before us. I'll go right back to that in a second, but I do want to say to everyone. There's a tool out there called startup runway dot io, so depending on what size your at right now if you have a couple employs a couple contractors I. I do think it's really important freedom map out a three scenarios, so if you are able to remain flat suit money revenue drops, or if you dropped twenty five percent, and if you draw fifty percent, it's GonNa. Show you how many months of runway you have left, and that runway is basically going to guide you and that's going to help. Spur you tack Shen or spirit you into action so to your question Neil. If I were starting out today and turn it back over to you. I know Brad. Nobody knows why I'm back in the day. When I first started, I was worthy attention was so I knew a lot of people were hanging on on asking Seo. Questions I think to saturated now, but now the question have to ask yourself is where all these people hanging out now. If I know my target market is hanging out on link, okay, can I make link did reach out to these people Lincoln. If they're hanging out on, you know in other areas like facebook groups. That I'M GONNA go over there, so I'm going to. To Go to where the attention is, I am going to be posting content at the same time. What happens is even right now with Lincoln. When people engage with me, I look at all the titles that engaged with me, and sometimes my team has access Wellington dill. Look at the titles as well and they'll be okay. This guy looks I might want to work with. I'm going to add him and I'm going to engage with him, and then that way you end up building relationship, and that's a really good way to build your client list so. Go any final words will turn over to you. What would you do I? Would go pick a niche I would then go and go to crunch base with for all the funded companies within the niche had a breakdown everything that they're doing wrong and tell them how they can fix it and breakdown step-by-step in hopes that some of them hire me because they could just in theory, they're venture funded. They needed to get results faster. So why wouldn't they pay me?

Neil Patel Eric Su UK Facebook Neal Wellington Dill Lincoln Kobe Covid Brad Shen
"shen" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

04:57 min | Last month

"shen" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"To the way that he had of conduct himself over the past year, and I, just I don't know found that I found that really interesting is that speaking could be violent act and I think to what we spoke about earlier in how we should be conscious of the sounds that we make conscious of the words that form the sentences that we form thoughts that we form. And I think that words if not, if not honoring the space around it right and not thoughtfully composed. Could could be violent. Right could have a violent effect on people certainly could have a discomforting effect on people, and it can certainly serve to just sort of add more noise and chatter to the world. anyways made me think about that, but yeah, it was a really interesting story to follow. And not knowing ahead of time what your movie was really going to do, and when you introduced Greg in the beginning of the familiar. Oh, this documentary, this guy in the whole the whole film. Yeah, right and that okay that that'll be interesting, and then it just kept opening. Right and he was just more kind of an example. Of someone who is pursuing? I had this Patrick like. What if we did a four thirty-three and invite you to be on? Pike S and we just sit here for an hour. I would have done that. Might? My dream has been to be invited to do Tedtalk and just stand up on the stage and say nothing for the entire time. I don't know how listeners. While I'm about halfway through that episode that. There is a place. There is a place I think. Get a chance to hear you talk us your voice, in non guttural sounds. To to. Help us a appreciate. This subject and how it's drawn, you in continues to draw you I think that has value to. So appreciate. I'm glad we actually. Had A conversation. If People WanNA follow you on social media. How did they do that? They can find me on instagram. Twitter at Shin. S. H. E. N., in my website is Patrick Dot com can find all my information there. Okay, yeah. Well congratulations. I think you've accomplished something pretty life defining. That's all in this movie. Yeah, thanks! Yeah, it's an honor to be on this podcast. Is this is what number two hundred something like an? It's an honor to be. Yeah well. You know I'm glad we ran into each other again, yeah! I just i. think that artists like yourself. In a in a can of big way is artists are the ones who step away from that injury from the canvas Right and inspire others hopefully same right right but I. Think this project stepping so far back. In our noisy busy caffeine cacophonous yeah often is. I think it's so vital. I'm already thinking like. How can I get the our new church? How can they get us to screen this film? Right as a conversation starter started right missing the those kind of things and other other religious organizations I. Mean because you cover quite a bandwidth of different spiritual approaches, and how silence L. plays vital roles in this, and yet it kind of gets lost in the midst of being religious. So. I may be in touch. You know at least. Yeah love to come by, and if it's helpful, conversation afterwards and yeah the Great Okay Well Yeah I act on things like that those impulse. Well congratulations I definitely give you an open invitation. As some of these new projects release start to form and are ready for consumption and experience I love to bring you back. I think you're a thoughtful fascinating. Dina's type. TYPE TYPE gave myself a little space. But yeah I it folks if if you get an opportunity through whatever platform. To rent it by. I just this is such a worth while experience to make us all step back into realize the the hunger that we have for our health mentally physically right for the well being of those around us. To have kind of noise canceling. Efforts so that the silence can speak to us and and. Yeah, I again coming as an extrovert.

Patrick Dot S. H. E. N. Dina Twitter Greg Tedtalk caffeine
"shen" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

06:57 min | Last month

"shen" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"Yes, it's educational. But it's experiential. Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, and so an I started with this, but I'll say it again me. Make your head just explode. In terms of being big I mean it's so beautifully. Painted the like every frame everything is just beautiful. Thank you, thank you so much. That's awesome. Yeah, so so the aesthetics of your of that I don't know if you carry that forward in everything that you do or just you know this particular. Yeah, I'm much very very interested in in cinematic language again being about something of something rather than about something. Again, this idea fusing everything together The work being experience and expression of the thing rather than have the work be a reproduction of the thing that's kind of what I'm after. Yeah, and so yeah, I feel imprecise was a glimpse of that, and I'm trying to do more of that as a as I go forward. I. WanNa make sure you tell the story of this young man that took a vow of silence walked across America Veer I think it's fascinating. After you found out about him. Yeah, what you went through detract coming down. As a lot of fun. The Tel the television that story, yes, Greg Hindi had recently graduated. I believe it was Yale and rather than you know. Run off and go get some high paying gigs somewhere. He decided to take a year off. And Walk from New Hampshire, where he lives to Los, Angeles or the span of a year. In silence. And he wanted to do it. As As as art project. I think he was interested in sort of Art Sorry silence as a as expression. is a performance. And so it was partly that I think was also partly away. cleanse his Palette. You know after years and years of schooling, Yale and killing himself to. To to. These, great good grades and I think he just needs for cleanses palate. go back kind of blank slate before he. Continued on with his life. And so I heard about this journey that he was on. When he was more than halfway through the journey I can't remember where he was exactly some in the Midwest. Maybe I don't know. And I just immediately knew that I wanted to find him. Some speak with him. But of course that proved to be very difficult because he had no technology on any soft technology, in was unreachable unreachable. I had found online an old kickstarter project he'd started at the before his journey had begun to raise some money for the journey to pay for some expenses and food and whatnot, and there was some contact info for his father. Somewhere in in in that page so I reached out to his father, and said Hey I really want to reach out to your son Greg. I know he's on this. You know cross country trek in silence with no technology. How how can I find him? And he says to me well. I've I've been checking into his bank statements in logging to his bank account, and I see where he swiping his credit card to purchase food, and by water and such and so I kind of know the trajectory that he's on kind of know where he where he's headed. And so okay well when I'm ready to go, I will call you, and you tell me where he lasts wiped in I will just head in that direction ads, so the day comes I'm. I fly up to. The the Bay Area San Francisco and. That he's kind of headed that way I call his dad and he says that he slapped swiped. Is Credit Card I? Think it was like a dollar, ninety nine cent store, or something like that for for some items, and so we just drive from the airport to this ninety nine cents store about an hour and a half away from the San Francisco Airport. We interrogate the The the staff there and we can find out kind of whether or not. He was there to begin with, and they said Yeah. There's this bearded guy that came through and bought some water. We think he headed that direction. In so we followed along. This path was bike path. That would naturally make sense that he would walk along. Safe from the roads and whatnot, and there is like you know we. We come around this bend and the there's this guy, this disheveled guy pushing around. Looks like a homeless bird. And I run up to him and I'm like you know I instinctively I get out a piece of paper and I'm like a my name is Patrick I'm writing this. The and I handed to him and he says. Back on his. He's rains piece of paper and he's. He ends back to me, says you can, you can speak. It's okay you can say you don't have to be. Like Oh yeah, that makes sense that will speed things up a lot. So I started speaking, he would respond with in written form. And that's how we conducted interviews, and that's how I got to know him. And I started following his journey. That way spent a couple of days with them on that particular leg of the trip when he was going from I, think Nevado, which is just north of San Francisco into the area, and then I met up with him again again same way. Maybe a couple of weeks later comes. DADS drove up pch and just found him. And spent a day with him that way. Was a lot of fun. Now have using I, mean I I imagine you guys like well head in that direction that he may not be they're. Like, wow, but have you had a chance to debrief with him? After he finished his journey, yeah, so we I spoke with him, so he the moment that he finished his vow silence in spoke, again was a very private moment, and he didn't want cameras around, and so we let him have that obviously but we spoke with him a couple days later, maybe a week after in an on camera interview, which we ultimately didn't use in the film. but the couple things he said I thought were were quite profound. In fact, let me back up, so he actually recorded himself saying his first few words. In House able to see that at some point, and so he relayed the experience of what that what that was like in? You know. When he got his voice back, it took a moment and it kind of. guttural sounds at first came out of his mouth. And then he started relay the random story about the kindness of this one truck driver that was passing by. He was really particularly thirsty that day I. Think didn't have any. Water is on a long stretch of road between cities, no water and the truck driver just pulls over in handsome like a bunch of water like a six case of six pack of the water bottles, just something. and. That was the first thing that he felt he needed to say A. Which I thought was really interesting. But I I think what was more interesting than that was like this guttural sounds that I came out and I think he had to sort of reacquaint himself with speaking with sound and relating to his identity to has speaking person you know He said later in my interview with him. That? Like using his voice almost.

Greg Hindi Yale DADS San Francisco Airport Midwest Patrick I New Hampshire Bay Area San Francisco San Francisco Nevado Angeles Los
"shen" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

07:08 min | Last month

"shen" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"React to the noise, so I think ultimately what noise does is it puts us in this reactive mode where we have to respond to it because we don't have ear Lids, so it was whether we like it or not. When noises around us when we're surrounded by noise, we have to respond to it, so every aspect of our being is responding to that Even when we're sleeping, so if you live under a flight path, and you're sleeping your body and all this sort of activity of your body. is reaching that of the waking awake state in the wake state And so because we don't have ear lids were constantly responding to that noise, and we're using energy that we could otherwise be using to do something more interesting more important ourselves more meaningful. And so yeah, that's where I think noise becomes dangerous. Yeah! D- Did you come across any reading any research on. This little thing I mean I. I find especially when I was in graduate school yeah. Even undergraduate. If I went to the quietest part of the library, I couldn't concentrate. It was quiet much. I would do better in a coffee shop right right and that's what the science bears out to. That people. Often, do better when there's kind of a minimum of sound in the background Dah. Not Ninety DB but night, maybe maybe thirty. Or something me. It's that white noise. It's kind of this fuzzy thing, and but then you know from what you said earlier I'm like it might just that insecure with. Getting in touch with. You know what's really happening when I'm looking at this material, but but yeah for for for Mo-, most of my academic pursuits I just learned that it. It would probably be less than an hour unless I really had to use the library to now we have the Internet. To be there to look up and use resource materials and that kind of stuff I would just eventually just pack up my stuff and then just moved to a coffee shop. That's funny. Yeah, I back to the NFL. Story If you think about it. Zero decibels is not. It's not a normal environment for human to be immersed in its. We are constantly using our ears to navigate spaces to understand kind of how we where we are in relation to the space that we're in our voice, can bouncing off the walls of the space that were in give us a sense of how far away we are from the wall in how big the spaces and so that's gives us some comfort right to have some level of sound in the room when it's zero decibels, there is no sound bouncing back is completely foreign to your body, and it's just. It's more distracting than anything. And, so I! Do I do think that our bodies need some degree of sound to feel normal to feel like it's functioning properly to allow our minds to then be set free, so I mentioned earlier that noise whether we're conscious of it or not. We're responding to write on some level I think it's the same thing with zero like dead silence bases. We have to respond to that because it's just so foreign to our bodies, so I think it's there's a middle ground somewhere thirty to forty range where our bodies feel like okay, we can breathe normally now. We can be proactive in the space. Now. Generation only my my daughter is Jin's E. I mean it's almost like she was born with ear buds. Inter Inter ears. I don't always know what's playing. You know and I would like to think that there are people that I see with the listening to my podcast. Yes I'm totally not against people kind of multitasking in that sense. Yeah, but I. I know when she was younger and. We would challenge her. Like how can you focus on you? Can You do your homework? You have all this music playing and and she would say no. It's you know is that. I would think. Is that a? Version! We haven't go to the coffee shop. Yeah, and they're touch like I spent hours in my office here at home editing photos right, and sometimes they do with no extra noise, but then sometimes put on smooth jazz or whatever, but it's not blasting. The DB's are not deadening, but I find that. Yeah. I find I can't listen to a podcast and it photos. Yeah, yeah, Oh yeah, right right because the words have to. You have to engage words and I found over the years to where we're married almost. Eighty one like it is true Li. It's been for us like if we have to have a serious conversation we have turn off TV. You know we have to. Because when you have some especially when other people talking where you can understand what they're saying that coffee shop yeah. I have the hardest time actually focusing on the person I should be listening to in I in that isn't that what's happening in every single restaurant coffee shop? Yeah, across the. Globe. Ninety DB's in above, and you're like a foot away and you're shouting at each other. And using all that energy. Right, to just sort of make sense of what they're saying. You're doing a little bit of leap lip reading. Maybe you're trying to fill the gaps of the words that were eaten up by the sound around you using the energy. Just hear what the person's saying. Just trying to grasp what they're trying to say when in fact he should use energy to sort of engage and be proactive with this person got us from you and think about classrooms to seem things happening in classrooms. And all the studies show that the students sitting front do better than kids sitting in the back because they have to work harder to hear what the teachers are saying because the acoustics in the room and whatnot. So you reminded me of the story of an author wants told me where he did a ride along. With a cop as like fourth of July, weekend or something, and he thought he'd get all this action stuff for his book. His, mostly domestic violence disputes, and that sort of thing but nine times out of ten they would step into this like domestic violence or disturb dispute between partners screaming at each other nine times out of ten. The police officer would say. Turn off the radio. Turn off the TV. And then just have a conversation nine hundred attend. The police officer would say there'd be no more dispute. They forget. They forget what they were fighting about right and it was just so much noise adding to the frustration and the aggression in the room and it's. So, yeah. You told me that story in your in your film to me. The most stark example of what you just described was those clips from the Cable News. and that's another tall, my gosh, and and so. I was I was getting so agitated. Because everyone's talking over at each other. Everyone's shouting right and and and whether it's from the progressive side of the conservative side and then you contrast that.

officer Mo NFL Jin
"shen" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

07:09 min | Last month

"shen" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"Expect during the making the film I. We had to visit some Aniko at chambers. I was just thinking of that and these are rooms that are built to be ninety nine point nine percent silent. Go to all the sound panels every wall around, even though you and so you walking on like this almost like chicken wire, and there's like more soundproofing materials underneath, and it's a room built was in a room the. The ones that are done right and the one that I was in. We're had this really profound experience was in MINNEAPOLIS MINNESOTA. It's called or fueled labs. At the time it was the quietest place on record on the entire planet. Now why building these places for testing test product? They need to test the the sort of noise footprint of a of a particular device, dishwasher or something, and so they need an absolutely silent room and the Acoustic Acoustic Studies in the research, and that sort of thing as well so I'm in this room. It's negative thirteen decibels. which is thirteen decibels below possible? It's. But you know it's. It's thirteen decibels below the threshold of hearing. Okay, you know sophisticated recording equipment and some animals can detect sounds below zero. DB, but we can. And so it's negative thirteen decibels, and it's just like it's suffocating. Right in this room and I told these people. That ran northfield. Let's turn off the lights close the door. I'm GONNA lay on the floor in in. Have this be as depriving of all sensory information as possible. And I told him to lock me in it for forty minutes just to see what would happen because the rumor was the story. The story that's often told about aniko chambers is that at the forty minute mark is when you begin to start hallucinate game. Start to go a little crazy. I wanted to feel what that was like so the second I step into this The first thing I noticed and this was awful. was my Tinnitus, I didn't know that I had tinnitus which is ringing in your ears that many many people suffer from some people temporarily many people permanently. If you've ever been a very loud concert, and you step into quiet room right after when you get home that evening or something, you'll know what I'm talking about them. Ringing ears that just kind of persist for a little while so I have a permanent case of from what I understand. From having played in rock, bands and stuff growing up, not wearing earplugs, it's totally makes sense, but anyway step in his Oh chamber, and they're just ringing in my ears, constant ringing in my ears. That's there all the time, but you don't notice I. Don't notice it because I'm rarely in such a quiet environment. I've noticed that It's gotTa be around thirty five to forty decibels in quieter for me to detect my tinnitus in most environments. The your house at the moment is probably this is thirty five ish, probably maybe forty So the chances of me actually hearing are pretty slim, the most environments so after kind of sort of deal with the Tinnitus and calm myself down kind of immerse myself in in the space. That I'm dealing with this inner dialogue. That's going. It's just constant running running running this dialogue. That's happening. What am I supposed to be feeling? What am I gonNA say when I get out of this room. Making a film about this space about silence like what am I supposed to feel right now? Tell the story I must be profound, I have to have an instagram. and. It's like it was just constant constant Inner Chatter and it probably took another thirty minutes from me to quiet that voice. Dan In just focus on the breathing focus on the space that was in in that last ten minutes was awesome. You know it was beautiful and I think that's what happens in silent spaces in silence for a lot of people. At first, it's really scary when we step into it because that inner dialogue comes in, there's this lack of definition lack of direction. And we don't know what to do with ourselves, but if we sit with a long enough, I think the other face of silence. The other face of that kind of space shows itself in sort of welcoming warm kind of embracing kind of silence that. I think that I think we don't often have the patience to to get to know anyway. Yeah, I the. That section of your film was was quite remarkable. Just for all the reasons you said, and then I would dovetail that with the performance of John Cage's. Four thirty three yeah, like I've never heard of this guy right? And and he kind of had this epiphany five following the story writing, and so he's there in front of his piano. If you're reading and is just sister for four minutes and thirty three seconds, and he doesn't play anything and I'm thinking okay now I find paid for ticket, you know. And then near the end of the film I hope I'm not giving anything we and now you have these orchestras performing his piece right a- unlike okay, so everyone knows I mean whether it's a small hall or Big Hall. They now know what this is highly regarded. Yeah, right and and it's just like. The the sitting there it just to see the musicians. These world class musicians sitting they're. Not playing anything the conductor with his arms down. Here a little cough over here, right? But people and I kind of visually saw the way he depicted it I saw that evolution. Apparently happen to the audience to. And at the end they're like giving standing ovation, and and it's always always feel like. If I didn't watch this film I would feel like. This is the emperor's new clothes. You don't want to be the one do in the audience that we've had a lot of those. Because we would start off. Many of the film screenings with performance of four thirty three. Oh Lord has poets in the area to align performed a piece of their own, and then followed by four thirty three, and on many occasion people will just. Maybe two minutes in the what's going on. Where's the film with what's? Just like? It's it's remarkable you like. How much we expect all those spaces to be even two minutes have expect all the spaces to be filled constantly, and it was something. Yeah, so I think the. The getting through it and I've gone on per walks FBI. Trees Roy Okay we're GONNA. Take the afternoon as just you and Jesus you know and I. I know that it takes a while. To declutter your mind right and and yet I feel like. Even being in touch with the clutter and your fight with it is part of the process. Yeah, right instead of feel like. Oh, I'm so defeated. I just can't do this like. No. You have to kind of go with it. Yeah, that's the first lesson of meditation writing. In Easter tradition is like those thoughts are going to bubble up right all negative thoughts. Going to bubble up, you let yourself feel defeated like you have to sort of invite those things into your mind, and then let them leave your mind, and then you go back to sort of the silence. You go back to the reading But yeah, it's it is part of the process it's. In Zen particularly there's no delineation between. Meditation in Activity Right It's all one of the same..

Tinnitus aniko chambers Acoustic Acoustic Studies MINNEAPOLIS MINNESOTA northfield John Cage FBI cough Big Hall Dan
"shen" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

09:41 min | Last month

"shen" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"It can be approached two thousand different ways. And we didn't want to come at people and prescribe a particular path, but we want to just kind of. People to experience of silence. So that they could sort then find their own path towards it. But yeah, what's the genesis of this film for You? Where did this come from? Yeah, that's a good question. I've always struggled to answer this. 'cause, it's always an you know this with your projects. It's always a compilation of a bunch of different things and finally converge in a light bulb. Goes off in your your mind, and you're like. Wow, that's okay. It's time to do that because all it all make sense. Everything's lined up to make that to make that project. You know I could go back to high school. You know when I sort of had these existential yearnings in I would read Freud and. Native American spirituality was really really seeking as as a teenager. And if continued that search. Wasn't until. I came upon a film called integrate silence. Think two thousand seven I wanNA. Say It was released. About the crust Susan monks in the French ops. The three and a half hour, meditative film, barely any dialogue in it. And it's just a really beautiful meditation purely of him the life in the rhythms of being a monk at this particular monastery. And that's what I'm beginning to think about. Silence is something. Other than auditory thing, and that's when I really really became intrigued with silence as This mode of. This metaphysical kind of element And that's when I began researching in thinking about it a lot more. Nathaniel door skis work along introduced to that that Kinda give me a cinematic language to kind of understand silence was introduced to the works of John, cage another artist who found really pure I think expressions of silence in art, not representations, but something that's again of of silence, and I just really found that intriguing and. Thought, it would be fun and interesting and powerful to use that kind of language and apply that to a film. That invites people in to experience the silence, so it's. It's I think it's an extension of the journey that I've been on. My first film was about death, anxiety and how we're all facing our mortality in various ways, but at the end of the day our behaviors are all kind of rooted in response to our mortality. my you know I've made films about wisdom found among the janitorial staff universities throughout the country and so one on the search about about how to be in the world. How To do it right? There is such a thing, yeah, and writer Yeah Yeah exactly. And silence just seemed to be like the next chapter of that. That story I guess so one of the. Things I'm still chewing on from the film. Is that silence contrary to how many of us would initially think about? It is not the absence of all sound. Right and it's like. like a lot of the very beautiful contemporary of settings out in the forest and. The first opening shop that solitary trees like where did you find like? But you have the rustling in round of the wind moving the grass. Right that I. Think for for some folks. Let's start with myself. I'm an extrovert Mary to an introvert, okay and so. When we've early on our marriage my wife would. Now married to a pastor. This is too much noise around her. All the time and inches a hey, let's go on a silent retreat. But the euro at this monastery for a weekend and I'm like what am I being punished? And and so I'm married disown as completely different need, right. At the same time, She is dealing with the return of her cancer. And it's a slow. Growing cancer started off in the lining of uterus. Now it's inter- lungs, but she's been just devouring all kinds of metabolic in formation about cancer, not just the medical. You'll sort of thing and so when I came to that section with the Japanese professor in the foreign. Film yet. I go hey. I know that. I want to tell you about thirty years. I know that when and she and she would add this. When I was telling your on and on about your film, she says things caused noise and right, and so she goes is not just auditory noise. It's clutter. Yeah, right that table on the way to your garage it's it's what used to be our backyard, and so she goes. It actually is a tangibly. Attend Jabbour improvement to my health and my mindset gets it. Yeah it right. So far behind. Right, but we also she goes, and of course it doesn't cure cancer. Yeah, but it improves your immune system. It. All these studies that prove this hundred percent, so we'll get into that, too about kind of the detriment, the the deterrence to quality of life and too much noise, which are movie also. into. Back up one big step though. You talked about your your kind of early. Interest in existentialism. was that rooted in any form of? Spirituality Christianity. That kind of stuff were you how how did that? What happened? Yeah I don't know it. I've always been. That type of person who has been very very curious about about the world, both externally and internally. I think. As I've gotten older. I've thought about it more and I. Think maybe it has something to do with the fact that I literally had a blank slate green up my parents. They weren't particularly religious. Okay, they weren't particularly available even to me. Grew up watching movies in reading a lot of books in listening to a lot of music, and that's really what kind of informed to I was. Being this naturally sort of this seeking to individual. I I started to find my own sort of ways into that. My own methods to kind of explore that further started out with native American spirituality. At many friends that were going to church in Christianity was always part of that. My wife is is Christian and so that's certainly part of my world view and his informed my. My own spirituality might relationship with the divine. And so I think it's rooted and just a really deep curiosity. Has Been always been curious. Curious person and wanted to explore that through my work. You know because. As a retired pastor someone who grew up with Christianity So both the experience in my own personal spirituality, but also than becoming professional about it, I would say. I think this is a fair observation. That at least in many of the forms of Christianity that I'm familiar with it actually seems to discourage the kind of questions and questing that you're talking about. I don't know if that you ever encountered that, but it's like no, no, no, no like we know. There's heaven ran me die read, and then there's no question that this instead of that and Yeah I've definitely gravitated more towards I. Guess You could say that the mystical traditions yet. the ones that sort of speak to what the divine is not right the sort of via negative The I think it's called apathetic theology where you speak about what got isn't. In refused to kind of apply our words in our definitions in our concepts are human concept very anthropomorphic. Yeah, yeah, exactly and understand. The divine is something that pure that exists beyond our mind beyond are constantly others yeah exactly. and so I I really identify with that so zen is something I'm very Toronto well, yeah, and asked aspects of you know the the mystical traditions at the root of some some of the Christians of beliefs Thomas Merton. A big fan of Thomas Merton a trappist monk that live in the sixties Meister Eckhart dental reading the strike carton in those kind of folks are really really fascinated me and I think at the end of the day. These, mystical traditions that at the root of all our religious traditions kinda converge at in this place, this place of the divine, being a concept another concept, but existing beyond concepts. Yeah, anyway I mean one of the critiques of American evangelicalism is. It's just too damn noisy. There's a lot of talking. Right talking one of silence a lot of talk. Yeah, well. One of my predecessors of He's a japanese-american retired minister is probably getting close to ninety He originally was a southern Baptist when Southern Baptist actually had room for people like him, and then he was A. Southern Baptist missionary in Japan Zen Buddhist priest if you can imagine that case and..

Thomas Merton Meister Eckhart Freud Nathaniel Toronto cure writer Mary A. Southern Baptist professor John Japan Zen Buddhist
"shen" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

06:53 min | Last month

"shen" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"On my conversation with Patrick. About the power in the need for silence. Gabe. Yup Patrick. I'm trying to think when we first met. Was it at this module playhouse, or did we meet prior to that so I went through my library this morning and found a book from you. That you had handed me in the lobby of new Song Church, many many years ago, I. I can't tell you when it was. It was a long time ago down in Irvine Fifteen. At least fifteen years ago. Maybe ten fifteen years ago down in Irvine, Yeah Dave Gibbons Church. And you wrote a nice little note in the in the front page in that was that was a brief encounter that we had that was the first time we met Oh, and then not again until Sierra Madre playhouse. Yeah, which last year last year I think you were hosting moderating during the run of the joy, luck club play right. The film series coincided with Yeah Yeah Yeah. Yeah that's right. Yeah and. You. Know this podcast one of the reasons why we started. It is to put a microphone in front of Asia for creatives right like Okay Patrick qualified. Interest. Yeah, but you know when when when we and I talked when you and I talked about bringing you on the podcast that okay you know on these various film projects I had no idea about in pursuit of silence and having watched it now. I just want to get a couple responses. One visually. It is magnificent. Thank you so much I feel like so. Many of the frames are composed like art pieces now meditation. Wow, that's great coming from photographer. That's that's right, and so like I'm awestruck is just like. How would you even think to do that? Right at all of that so so visually? It's stunning. Just just beautiful art piece, okay. The music now I know your friend. Alex Liu in a wrote this. Yeah, it just supports everything that's going on visually. Audibly so well and I'm hoping now that Alex Lives in Sierra Madre to I'm hoping to bring him on because I'm fascinated with the whole approach to giving sound to picture like debt. Yes, and how director worked with the composer all of that. The the last thing I will say because I really want you to unpack this. One of the things you said in one of the Youtube interviews I I watched was there's this nathaniel door skiers? Nathaniel Daursky? My Heroes, yeah right and so when you first said it. I think I watched your explanation before I watched the film so I don't know if that's bad for. But you said you know he kind of inspired you that a film should not be about a subject is should be of a suggests yes, big for me and I'm like what the heck is that right and I'm GonNa tell you. Patrick vis film is of silence. That's probably the greatest compliment that I could receive about the film I mean that is. That is at the end of the day. What we intended to do with the film you know. We knew that there be aspects of the film that would be about it. There are people throughout the film kind of we've that are talking about it right but in such a way that honors the silence right not a way that sort of demystified this mysterious subject matter, but kind of lifted up or speaks to the kind of place beyond words are kind of hope with the speaking portions of the film, but. Yeah, the struggle. or rather the I'll call it the struggle because it was really quite a struggle throughout the process of trying to let the silence speak for itself, You know we were talking about earlier about your your bonds eight trees. And how the there's so much about absence in Japanese aesthetics, and same with silence it's it's the absence as the silence that really gives personality gets shape to all the sounds and the noises that we hear around and so it was a big deal for me to to make it of silence a let it speak for itself. Let it be a voice. Just like the other spoken words you know throughout the film. Be a voice in the film. That's narrating the film. If you will yeah, because to me, it could have easily become about silence was all these talking heads were experts on silence. definitions and contrast, and all that kind of stuff and yet ironically the film itself would be noise. Right right right and so what I felt you've done with. Those would have already said our masterpiece visual. Meditative contemplative says settings so as you're watching this film. It's like there's these long periods of silence where you're just. You're just forced. Not Forced you're you're you're compelled? You're invited to enter into the very silenced and that you're exploring in this thing and I think that was incredibly inspired and why? Do it this way? Because the the film. Itself is an experience of silence. Yes. Yes, yes, yes. When we began the journey of making this film, we toyed with the idea of making it completely silent. Nathaniel Daursky who you just mentioned. Make silent films. In fact, he strips. There's no soundtrack whatsoever to his films, and so you literally sitting in a dead silent theater, watching images on the screen, and so we we I entertain the idea of doing something like that. Which I think. would be a beautiful gesture toward silence, and perhaps even more appropriate. But I felt like as an artist I wasn't ready for that. I wasn't quite ready for that I. needed this film to be an invitation, not just for myself, but for the audience as well an invitation use the word invite invitation a second ago I. Think is really appropriate. Into silence so that people can sort of understand the language silence at least in some way and have that point to something that perhaps they may want to kind of. Research on the road illuminated path for themselves towards silence. Silence is massive right? It can mean a thousand different things..

Patrick vis Nathaniel Daursky Sierra Madre playhouse Irvine Fifteen Gabe new Song Church Youtube Sierra Madre Alex Liu Irvine Asia Alex Lives Dave Gibbons Church director
"shen" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

07:47 min | Last month

"shen" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"The? They've assembled like I I. I can't even tell you the number. Fifteen twenty scrapbook delays pictures on thinking no, okay, maybe these pictures of me and Cristiano. Maybe they have a place in a scrapbook. While you know, I'm old, enough I've been married long enough not even to ask that question. I showed them the pictures to my wife and. She was bemused to see me right. But I can imagine the little bit of awkwardness just like because I've seen pictures of her before. She knew me with her old boyfriends and yeah, it's. Like okay. I don't know what to do with that. But it, you know it very clear that with no language spoken that these pictures from my one year relationship with a German girl were not going to have a place in the scrapbooks. So you know we went through them. I put them back together. And then I have this place where I have a bunch of old photos in a shoebox that are of me and my a family of origin growing up kind of stuff that also don't go in the new scrapbooks. and. Maybe when I'm gone. Whether it's my wife if she survives me or if it's our daughter. Going through my stuff A. Depends if these Germany photos will be saved alongside the growing up. Photos of of me. Because they're kind of a very unique sliver of just by life I think this has nothing to do with my life after meeting and marrying, my wife has nothing to do with our life as a family of three. And I'll have prompt that. As as fun as it was. To look at this chapter visually remember. So, much of what was wonderful in that year and especially in that we get half the painful few days at the end. You know that's the past and. I mean, Cristiana! Address their soul I mean. She died at such a young age. And I'm glad that I've been able to reconnect with today I'M Just thrilled that to be tunes in to listen to some of our podcasts. All the way in Germany, but you know. I really focused on. Getting through this pandemic. Focused on trying to anticipate what? is going to be like how it's going to be different. I don't think we're GONNA. Be Living the same life. Even once the vaccine comes out and there's herd immunity, and all all that kind of stuff. There's just too much right now in. That's coming needs, time and energy and attention. To put much energy and time and attention into things that are already passed. And that just kind of brings me to give you the update. To. The church that I lasted served as senior pastor You know they. They came to a decision. As was our mutual agreement that, after three years of my being retired that they would sit down as a board with the new senior pastor, and decide whether it was okay for me to come back and rejoined the church with my wife, and so they had their meeting us they had scheduled. And then we zoom call including my wife this past. Saturday and bottom line is after much thought and prayer deliberation They just felt it was unfair to kind of keep us waiting in limbo to see whether this is going to happen or not, and it was. Unfair to them. The disk kind of keep this issue on on on the burner, and whether it's back or front just on the stove, and so they share with me that they're requesting that I not returned to the church, except for funerals, weddings and baptisms that I'm invited to for the quote, Unquote Forseeable Future and. You know that that's nebulous enough for me. To know that it's. We're not setting up another time where they're going to have a meeting. And and what have you? It's it's not completely erasing the possibility that on their own. They're going to revisit this some later date and time and and issued invitation, but. In the meantime. I think right. I mean I have to move on. My wife has to move on They have to move on right so. It's kind of like getting those pictures from Germany. I. It's like definitely we have. I have forty years of cherished memories. And we tend to remember more of the good things just like in the photos right then the hard times, but sometimes some of the most cherished memories are how we work together to get through the hard times together. But. You know I also shared with them that. I. That something like this was going to be the decision. And you know as I've said on recent. The schering's in my introduction that I've already decided that I'm going to move forward. And so I'll be transferring my membership from my previous church to our new church in Pasadena. and. My wife and I will begin to focus on the people that are in our life now and look forward to finding a outlets for our passions pathways for our desire to serve in for the greater good. So many things to be excited about given the the people at this new church. and. I you know there's nothing preventing us from still being friends with people from our past. But it's just going to. Be In different contexts. It may take more effort than just showing up on Sunday and people that you know. You know. I feel like the timing of getting that packet of. Photos from. Nineteen seventy four. Was Good. Good and just the whole process of working through. What do we do with these? What are these represent? They represent something that really happened was meaningful, but it's also not now, and there are new pictures to take with a people that populate our lives now, and some of them are from the past and many of them are are people then have entered into our life in in the last year or so? and. You know what There's a place their scrapbooks their shoe boxes for. Memories and life live together. But there's empty scrapbooks in empty shoebox waiting for more. So. just wanted to let you know that that's been resolved and everyone's moving forward and I think that's good for everybody. Now, if you want to sit back, relax, be comfortable. Scratch your dog's head. Listening on my conversation with Patrick. About the power in the need for silence..

Germany Cristiano Patrick Pasadena.
"shen" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

09:06 min | Last month

"shen" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"Hsien. He's also the founder of transcendental media and I believe it's the group that produced the two thousand sixteen south by southwest film called in pursuit silence, and it's actually that film that caught my attention and brought Patrick and I. Together and we recorded this in. Studio before the whole pandemic thing shut us down, so I'm guessing probably in January of this year really enjoyed meeting Patrick. And this film which I watched before and then I, actually bought a DVD for my own library. It really talks about the power and the need for silence. Because our lives are just cluttered constantly with more and more noise, both actual audible noise, and and I would even think ju just kind of informational noise, and you know what I'm talking about I. Found Patrick to be thoughtful, spiritual and quietly driven I hope that once. This shelter in place lifts that He and I can hang out a little bit more and love to meet his wife and you know he doesn't live too far from us, but. Now with all those pandemic, those all just seem like pipedreams. WanNa thank. Listeners who do go to our facebook page? In contact US or send us. An email directly to suggest guests for us to bring onto the show and we. Have brought on guests in the recent past because of listeners like you out there who have brought some of these folks were attention I. Think Our latest one was director Steven Kung so it works. we have three upcoming guests. Between now and September. That again are directly result of listeners. Who Said Hey, you know. I think it'd be great. We have author PHUC, Tron. We have actress and kind of Asian American icon Tomlin to Mita and we also have the winner of the twenty Seventeen Pulitzer Prize for fiction winner, author and USC Professor Viet Thanh new yen so. Keep them coming especially. If you know them, you can make the initial introduction for us if you happen to know what their contact information is. Let us have that, but even if you don't you know I figure these things out. Several One of the introductions I talked about. Hearing surprisingly. From. Someone from Germany. As, we were doing the. Transition from Christopher Wong Director Co producer of this show. to Chiang he, he was going through Some of the a e mails that had gone directly to our podcast account that went to his inbox that I hadn't seen and there was one. Maybe a year stale from Germany and it was from a the surviving younger sister two. Of. My girlfriend during go friend. In the mid seventy s This was when Gosh. We met each other at a Christian Young Adult Youth Conference in Portland Oregon. That was this global conference we met on the second to last day fell in love, and if you want to know more about that, you'll have to kind of dig up that episode I'll. I'll. A? Reference it On the facebook page when I when I list this particular episode number two hundred, Forty nine. Those of you who don't know to go digging through everything. All of that is to say. I've enjoyed communicating off and on with Tobia and. Kind of Os both of us sharing kind of different sides of the memory of my one year relationship with her big sister. Cristiana. Tragically died at age of twenty, four. Several years after we broke up and Yeah it. She'd been on vacation or holiday as they call it in Italy and had an asthma attack I need. No, she had asthma was misdiagnosed, not giving the right medication and she died and so. You know hearing from Tobia. Just kind of rekindled a lot of well recently to bay a rope me directly. Because now she has my personal email address. And she said Hey Ken. Given my age and stage in life. I'm downsizing and I moving into kind of more. Appropriate size space for someone who's approaching senior Citizen Hood. And as I was going through stuff and tossing stuff. I came across this bundle of pictures that my late sister had saved of your two week trip. In the mid Seventies. To to visit our family. Anti travelled around Germany with her, and I you know I, was all set to just toss it because they're not my memories, but I thought I. Offer them to you and you know I hope that's not weird, but if you don't want them I'm fine with tossing them on. An mmediately, said yes, please. I would love to have these pictures, so you know it takes awhile snail mail, and finally. The packet arrived a couple of days ago. And I pulled out this packet of maybe thirty fading pictures. and. It. It's admittedly startling to see myself at twenty. I can't believe I was ever that skinny and had that much hair. But, but also startling to see pictures of myself with Cristiana. And just brought back a flood of memories right? It was again just two weeks. Where we'd had two days to see each other after meeting each other and be with each other, in Oregon, at that conference, the conference ends. We both go home. We correspond through cassette tapes and actual letters. Sent through snail mail and then the following summer, she paid my way to come. visit her in Germany to have us. figure out what's going on with this relationship sound like twenty. She's like twenty. And You know the first week was magical. I mean we're just just enthralled to be together actually for this time and. I give lots of credit to debate and her German speaking parents. I don't believe that they ever had a chinese-american American little in Chinese person in their house and yet they were very very gracious. I never once felt any kind of weird vibe. You know by the end of the first week by the time it gets the second week. Yeah people are naturally asking the question we're asking is. Going and. You know we we both couldn't imagine. Changing, countries for each other. And, so it was it was it was hard. It was hard to say goodbye. Again, that's all in the other episode introduction. But the to see these pictures. Of Me and her in that two weeks especially. You. Don't see any of the angst. You know that I don't think we took many pictures in the remaining few days. I don't think many people do take pictures when it's like that, so all I seen these pictures are the hopefulness, the vibrancy, the vitality the love. So it was great. But then what do I do with these pictures? Now interestingly enough for a month until just a few days ago, my wife was cleaning out our garage and she had uncovered this case of old photos. Especially since we adopted our daughter at six days old and I, you know I can't remember taking that many pictures with film cameras, but apparently I we did. This is way before smartphones and so. My wife is very much an organized person, and and especially because dodgers, an only child. WHO's not wired like my wife at all? My wife's thinking, these are all going to be lost, unless these are sorted organized and put it into actual scrapbooks. Those things scrapbooks. And, so after multiple trips to Michael's craft store to get more and more scrapbooks, my wife with some assistance from our daughter, who actually had been home unexpectedly because of this shelter in place..

Germany facebook Tobia Patrick Cristiana US founder asthma Christopher Wong Pulitzer Prize dodgers Christian Young Adult Youth Co director Oregon USC Portland Citizen Hood Professor Viet Thanh Steven Kung
Jackie's Coming Out Story

Coming Out Stories

10:59 min | 5 months ago

Jackie's Coming Out Story

"Out for. The swearing comes Jackie. Haiku poet Comedian Anthony. To Mak- she grew up in skelmersdale in northwest England. I'm just white hair about her. First sheltered crushes. I think she's the first person that's ever taught me about being attracted to an object couple of into this. Well I always take the bisexual box literally but the small size ends than that isn't the I like. The word Queer is on fire with an lots waves produced Survive Queen just meaning like fucking things off like an assault of of quite like you know doing it wrong for any sort of purposeful goods. Why saw linked to and GAL rank had to go wrong. Even crepe wrong lights disabled wrong so that people can say me so got one leg and so I- folk that applied instead of being like the. Oh God of Gotland Lego. Pull me or you know whatever light the thing that people expect to be as I do like stump poetry. An you'd like you know you've got to get a celebrity is obviously so it's like things to fuck shit open. A really goes. Why THEM OPENLY SURF expectation? So that's your favorite subject to them. Basically yeah yes. That's what it's called like. Calm Yourself Queer. Because that's what I'm about ways so alike but then when you say queer people like what does she really mean. What's the real sexuality as if it's an umbrella term that means nothing? I don't think that I love it so then you like you're right. Yeah you just want to know. What jets wholesome into his own? Yeah so I mean some yeah. Yeah so all of them all of them and then as problem as advice actual isn't words now. It's the the problem of sexual I mean. A lot of people now are saying Pan Sexual as opposed to vice may be in the past. Marta said bisexual this big shift. Isn't that the problem with bisexual? So people again and a couple of ood might people's on from scam in Wigan listen cone means like he got he got gangrene loving bisexual because of buy into so people like that means that you only like men and women. I'm by taming. You hate transpeople. Or You are an unseen. Non Binary so. That's absolute bollocks. You know historically bisexual people of been translated some advice on use of limited space. It's not like Oh you're bisexual you've got twice. The amount of exceptions gay people hate you straight people here generally people just keep the fucking down which at some yes so historically. It's like being bisexual rights. I don't care about being accepted by any of the group of people Which is true as well of being non binary and Trans and you know occupying all. I'm spices song. Yes was bullshit just because just because the prefix by means ten means that people can really like so fixate on the Ron and going Oh do you know what this represents people and people more complicated than that? By definition you probably would identify as being panned. But you'll just quite happy using by sexual stuff is just like the underdog. I just wanted to defend the word bisexual. Rarely saw stay with it and also I just saw a fought for inside and outside to me. That's because it's you're yourself as well an fought for it for so long about. Just give it all you know so. We'll just fight the case for because there's a lot of sex was out there but the core find not enough people put their head over the parapet and go. Yes me. I'm bisexual. Well exactly. Yeah and especially when you've got a platform if you perform in some sense because you don't know that she giovanna you're gonNA pay the rent Matassa if you like. Oh Yeah Bisexual and the streets you folks on what Stacey Wipe People's so it was sort of come to the conclusion that you were by social what was like my first crush was multiple. Was on tremendously Sasi. Yeah like h three with multiple. I was very very politically correct when it was on the way. Multiple glomma model lovable and Rambo. Rambos Rob Rumba Joe Jr so take like Kinsey. You know it was the people you love some crushing Mongo. I'm moms what you call this. Big Massive St that Intel from the way of Santana big massive tape Zack. Were get so plus plus two. What about the guests that was in there with the group? I was as a Christian Catholic blaster as well. Okay well. This is moving into a whole news. Fair inanimate objects as well well you'll stay. There was just so didn't have any I mean. I think I haven't changed that much since I've lived like quite hard life but in another way quite charmed life because of never rarely socialized. I've never had an office job. I add my parents who great I was never really told off. Fancying ghetto blaster. So we're never stops at quick fair enough check. And you're the first person that's come out. Mister trump's object today like you. I didn't know that you sexually with age child. You wouldn't really so. When was the first time you sort of articulated that and said maybe to your family or someone that union Joran advance and Brooke signs and at been getting the balls up phrases. Well I should suppose that was some some of whom Ananta parents and it didn't say to them moms odds I'm bisexual because it sounds to sexual you know like even just saying the words something sexual Siemens feels embarrassing society as well. He's just embarrassed. The rivalry so aside at the the girl saying I'm not my friends. That's my girlfriends. Go thirteen year. But she wasn't she didn't really like me. That's why USC skips over at nine nine thousand virus so you were having a relationship with not just it was you liked to. I live in a world of delusion. It's like even citizens vets-go angle most the most the reality of this because one year reis from performing you re rice life the narratives in your own life because you use it using the angle. What really happened so at thirteen? There was a girl at school. Presumably that you liked. Did you tell her that you know I was studying like everyone I think is? Is that my sexuality? Always been like a won't the elicit thing on the saying I'm not meant today once a Catholic school. So maybe that's so you're not meant to go out with women but then once so as like very established in the lesbian community. It's like Oh you're allowed to go out with women now. So that's not fun anymore for how Lesbians Hate is shackled men. Let's go to that and then once it was like Oh Giannis just bisexual or okay. So now I'm allowed to Shag out everyone on so where to go. Now so did you. Really get flack from les pins than for food. Let me yeah. Yeah Yeah I was angry. Sort of twenty something. You get more people on the late. I didn't see you face. Those quad knock ECOWAS land. I wasn't this wonderful chairman. Of course you got loads of like bi phobia. I go threatened and stuff life performance pride and do stuff about bisexuality and go like threatens and the Beer Garden say threatens me and you know when you think Oh my God. I'm going to get my kicks usually annoyance and like some people get an annoys for being in Chris Vices or existence in general and then you got like straight people alike. Think just think that it means the Kinky and you WanNa go fronts while I watch so. Why is it so difficult for people to comprehend? I've never really understood. It's just proud. People love binary is learning. People are obsessed with like extremes. The idea that the world's and people are just very gray area and everything's fluid scares the shit our people because humans needs the categorize things like pick a solid any side. Exactly you feel miserable. Yeah it's just don't give a Shit. Choose one very very similar to the football analogy. Yeah it's interesting. I know why phobia exists. I've certainly dated a lot bisexual. Men over the years and a half off lesbian friends. Turn around and go Emma. Why are you bothering? Yeah and the assumption is. They'll never commit to you. Because in the end of the day they will go up and find him on these sump. Shen and then I guess in straight world. The assumption is for men that you're going to go off and leave them for women so you can just want you have kinky sacks. Yeah yeah difficult so you haven't told me yet. The conversation over brookside. What happened to be here for us? So let's go back in time and they were just like okay. It wasn't a difficult kid but I was fucking whimsical. You know thought could fly. It was a more lowest much so they were just like okay okay. I think they saw us. It was a phase but because it was a faizy kid not because they were pricks. And you said you couldn't say reverse bisexual. So how did he phrase it? What did he say? I sat this girl. I such as my girlfriend but then you start talking about what she really Alfred portion on you have to keep coming out so it was. It was years I was being bisexual. I would say it was bisexual swell the people and then Owens University and I was so excited about joining and it was just the algae bay then feel old. I was so excited about being around people and then I got there and it was like Oh okay. You know survival instincts that sends us and you like folk. I should say. Espn so then. There was a lesbian to try. And Fa these people are whenever fest with anyway so it was more of a class thing than a sexual thing but anyway he didn't think that except you. You said that you were born. Not Definitely

Assault Skelmersdale Jackie Anthony MAK Siemens Northwest England Ecowas Marta Wigan Mister Trump Espn Stacey RON Rob Rumba Joe Jr Owens University Chairman Beer Garden Chris Vices USC
O'Reilly scores only goal in shootout, Blues beat Stars 4-3

AP News Radio

00:31 sec | 5 months ago

O'Reilly scores only goal in shootout, Blues beat Stars 4-3

"Cassius Winston their led winning four streak players to in seven double figures with a with twenty three points zero to help win lead over twenty the fourth stars ranked Michigan it's the third state time to a this seventy season eight Saint sixty Louis six is struggle win together over at least ninth seven consecutive ranked Maryland victories handing the the Terps vehicles their first available home loss of that the year David broad forward integrated Lee Shen call had who escorted sixteen four and straight guard games rocket watts the stars thirteen get tallies with Tyler the Sagan win was pay it is back for the Terps a come John from Klingberg behind win in east whose goal Lansing with nineteen earlier seconds this year left and with it forced keeps the the extra Spartans session alive for the Jake big ten Allen title picked up the win Xavier in gold Tillman Anton had fourteen Khudobin points would and twelve take the rebounds loss the from blues Michigan with the state shoot out while what Jaylon did nothing Smith with led the game the terms winner with coming twenty from points Ryan and o'reilly twelve rebounds Mike Reeves Greg St heist College Louis Park Maryland

Louis Park Maryland Mike Reeves O'reilly Ryan Smith Khudobin Allen Jake Spartans Lee Shen David Maryland Cassius Winston Jaylon Tillman Anton Lansing Klingberg John Terps Sagan
Coronavirus flight cuts on the rise: United reduces service to Japan, Singapore, Seoul

KCBS Radio Afternoon News

00:27 sec | 5 months ago

Coronavirus flight cuts on the rise: United reduces service to Japan, Singapore, Seoul

"United has announced it is further reducing flights to and from Asia due to the corona virus outbreak the chronicle reporting the company is cutting back on flights to Tokyo Narita Osaka Singapore and Seoul and is now suspending flights to Beijing Shen doing a Shanghai and Hong Kong until April thirtieth the company has already cut all flights to mainland China and has seen a seventy five percent decrease in flight demand in the rest of

United Asia Tokyo Narita Osaka Singapore Beijing Shen Shanghai Hong Kong China Seoul
Sleep Sustainably for the Rest of Your Life

Good Together: Ethical, Eco-Friendly, Sustainable Living

09:35 min | 6 months ago

Sleep Sustainably for the Rest of Your Life

"Mark. Welcome to good together. We're so excited to have you thank you. Thank you glad to be here. Yeah excited to talk about all things mattresses and I love the name Cada mattress. It's a good. It's a good marketing the name I love it. It's wonderful So you know in the past Few episodes we've been having a few different founders of ethicon on sustainable companies onto good together to share their perspectives as to why they started their companies and really how they believe their companies are helping us reduce our overall overall impact on the climate and the environment. I'm so mark I wondered if you could just introduce yourself and give a little bit of information about Avocado true Will Um thanks Mark Abriel. I'm one of the CO founders of Avocado And I'm also the CMO chief marketing officer and Avocado Avocado started. The it's about four years ago basically And we started a basically out of the idea that There were lots of Mattress out there. Not As many as there certainly are now seeds in the space but there are a lot but there were very very few options is when it came to something that was natural organic or sustainable or some of the other all the different allied in angles around around around that that were accessible And so it gave us the opportunity to earn inspired go out and actually see what we create and so a group of US leveraged our skills and technology and marketing and all sorts of other things and we belt the brain and so in a number of years later Were significantly larger than we were before. Were able to do so many more things at the time ever us so before we jump into all things that are definitely wanted to hear about the specifics sickness. And what's so special about Avocado mattress and how you are building a different more ethical ran I want to talk more about Starting like what kind of things at an average American consumer on average consumer menu in the world. Would we should be thinking about when buying a mattress Obviously loosely Wanted to invest. It's a big ticket item so we have to think carefully about that right. So what do I do. Do I read a ton of online reviews. Views go to assume showroom with friends. So what are the key questions to ask yourself Anada question. I had should ash consider buying a used mattress and Olsen people should expect to buy a mattress in their lifetimes. You've got a whole lot less a lot. They let me to to basically When you when you look at a different mattress Obviously should be picking one. That's comfortable for you and buying a mattress is a lot like buying any others sort of chronic in that there's a lot of subjectivity. That goes to it so that that goes with it but generally speaking when you're looking for a mattress a slightly firmer mattress tends to be better for you than a softer mattress is a lot of. What if you're looking for from a functional standpoint is keeping your back opry ally making sure the jets port and other things like that so those are sort of obvious things things to look for but You know actually it's interesting as we obviously have a very comfortable product Wouldn't be selling products and nobody would meyer mattress. But it's really not what we focus on. We focus more on on the materials on the environmental story that goes with social responsibilities story. That goes with it. We look at things more like the durability of our product. Tom And all of the other factors that go into it. Because we see this sort of basic comfort design and some of those other things is kind Donald Blake a given. Yeah I mean what can you do with a matching. What new design kidding Doing that make it black or gray or put a little bell ear tough there but you know it many ways you know. It's everybody is sort of focused on. That's the traditional way that the space would be is managed you know and and so Rather than sort of going that route we've gone out focused on on on really the materials on making and ourselves. Vertical integration. Everything that goes with it so it's kind of different way of thinking about so. Yeah have a follow up question. Listen to my five thousand dollars. So what humor's which terms than we should be looking for in terms of textiles and technologists something that role And maybe you can start talking about an annual generally speaking well. You know. There's something that you want to look for And of course we're biased in that we think you should be looking for organic and we think you should be looking for sustainable and healthy option. So I'm GonNa tell you those thanks to look for which would be things like the guts? Would you think global organic textile standard in the cover. It really should be one hundred under percents. Cotton there's really no reason to ebony other Ali Esther of things in there And then you should also be looking at what what other Sort of filler. Stuffing materials avenue for example used wool or wool is also a global organic textile standard. What's and You know because a lot of places used things POLYESTER MR fills in all sorts of other things You should also be looking at the flame retardants. It's a really really significant piece. That goes with it because the mattress I have to pass. Certain flame retardants a flame retardants he standard set by law in the United States. And so that that means there's really only two ways to do it. Use Chemical sprays or use something called like a fire sock which is something that doesn't burn and so that means anything defrost sprayed-on chemicals to fiberglass to all sorts of different things which can release the Oh sees off gas and so that he sort of go down a scary rabbit hole stuff. So you WanNa look at what the flame retardant is and then you want to look at the phone materials now we we believe that that there are more renewable and sustainable features consider that far. We use latex six rather than polyurethane And then you need to look at the construction of it. That matters awful lot too because If you look at all the pretty mattresses that are in the online ads to see it. Looks like they're perfect. Piece of toast. Everything the thing is basically sprayed on grew together whereas we actually ty ours together often in and an assemble everything with more of a hands on process. So it's really looking at the materials constructions. What's in it what's not you really league? It really does matter. If you consider is spent a third of your life in bed and it's a product that you're gonNA be so intimately in contact with your face will be right next to breathing in everything that comes off of it It only makes sense that of all the things in your house. It's humbly one of the most important things to make a considered decision. Yeah I think that's a great point mark and I one thing that I think we often get with. There's always going to be. Yeah this this tussle with for consumers between price and You know wanting to have something that's quality and also responsible to the environment and so you know I appreciate that you That you think through all all of these different factors for consumers and I think as you were talking about all of the different pieces One thing that came up to me that I think some of our listeners probably are familiar with is is is. What's so can you explain a little bit more about that certification Shen on and why it mattered to you in the Avocado team to make sure that you were getting out on on as many pieces as you could will dot says is just first of all? It's a thing it's a process. It's a third party body That basically certifies the the ecology in the Social Responsibility Angle of your which is something how we set our whole business so they look at Everything from what goes into the raw materials other Rome s decides in any chemicals that would be used all the way through into what is however the people that create the materials that were they treated. How ethical unconscious you are across Edwardsville? It's actually a holistic

United States Mark Abriel Cada Chief Marketing Officer Edwardsville Olsen Donald Blake Meyer Ali Esther Shen TOM DOT
Why The Doomsday Clock Is Closer To Apocalypse Than Ever With Rachel Bronson

Big Brains

06:11 min | 6 months ago

Why The Doomsday Clock Is Closer To Apocalypse Than Ever With Rachel Bronson

"How far are we from the end of the world? A thousand years ten thousand or is a much closer to save fifty years. Some of the smartest scientists scientists in the world say were much closer than many of us think. Today the bulletin of the atomic scientists moves the hands of the doomsday clock. It is one hundred seconds to midnight nine doomsday clock has been a well known piece of popular culture since inception in the nineteen forties it is some Bala representation of how close leading eating scientists believe humanity is to destroying itself and this year it was move closer to midnight than ever before what we have called the new abnormal last year. Uh Dismal State of affairs in the rooms of nuclear security and climate change now has become an apparently enduring disturbing reality which things are not getting in better nuclear security and climate change scientists. Say these are the biggest threats to civilization combined with an era of alternative facts and misinformation information the continued use twenty nineteen of untruths exaggerations and misrepresentations by world leaders in response to what they deemed. Fake News Shen has made worse already. Dangerous situation according to the bulletin of the atomic scientists the organization that sets the clock catastrophe is upon us so my organization looks that man made threats to our existence. That's Rachel Bronson the president and CEO of the Bulletin of the atomic scientists was. There's just housed at the University of Chicago. She says that while the clock may be just a metaphor understanding the thinking behind that metaphor as a matter of life and death for everyone. We are fast moving into a period. Where all the rules certainly on nuclear issues climate as well and broader disrupted attack are either falling away or in the case of disruptive Tak not really even yet created it's very reminiscent to nineteen fifty three in many ways a global architecture that doesn't exist in terms of cooperation between countries countries lack of trust between countries at a moment where the issues are compounding each other from the University of Chicago? This is big brains. A podcast cast about pioneering research and pivotal breakthroughs. That are reshaping our world today. How we got to one hundred seconds to midnight what the Doomsday clock means and and what it would take to move it backwards? I'm your host Paul Rand since its inception the doomsday clock is symbolically measured are time till certain destruction in minutes this year for the first time the measurement was made in seconds the closest it had been to to midnight was two minutes to midnight where we moved it at twenty eighteen and we held there in two thousand nineteen was the closest it had been to midnight since nineteen fifty fifty three when it was also two minutes to midnight and it's when the US and the Soviets had that's right right in the beginnings of the Cold War so when the US us and the Soviets had exploded hydrogen bombs and we've been slowly moving the clock closer to midnight this year above twenty seconds closer to midnight with the fear of complete annihilation on the line. You might have the same question I had. Why twenty seconds closer exactly? Why not ten or thirty? What does this time really mean? So why twenty seconds. It's a really great question so the Doomsday clock is set by the Science and Security Board of the bulletin of the Atomic Scientists. And it's a judgment. There is not some computer somewhere where we feed all of these different facts in time POPs hops up. The clock is a metaphor and we answer the question. Are we safer or a greater risk this year compared to last year and this year compared to all all the years we've said it is humanity safer great risk and what time best conveys the message that we're trying to get out there and and that twenty seconds we really went back and forth is if we moved at ten seconds. Well it seemed more important. So it's it's it's really a judgment and and that's where they got to this sense of twenty second seconds closer. Yeah you know. It's interesting as I think through potential analogies on this. We're not all that far off from the Super Bowl this year. And you know when you get im- between the one yard line Yom assume it's a fatal complete that you're GONNA get into the end zone right here. We are already darn close certain if I applied the same analogy You just assume you're that close. It doesn't take much to push it over. Is that how you guys think about this. Yeah and the analogy analogy is is a is a really good one for that reason and another one. It's both on where we are in the one yard line but the other analogy. That's appropriate. I think is within the two minute warning. Any football fan knows there's one game that's played like up until the two minute warning especially when you're in the fourth quarter everything changes the intensity hence it changes the play calling changes and a lot happens in two minutes. We're kind of in that two minute warning. which is this is just a different game where we we are now and it really requires our attention and there is a moment where we can change the course of history? And that's not often true with these kinds of issues so if this is the end game what does it look like. How will we know when we've crossed the line into midnight? So midnight was really easy easy to define when it was limited to nuclear issues. In truth midnight was a exchange of nuclear weapons weapons. That's what drove the creation of the clock rate. It was really going to be the end of humanity as we knew it. That's very easy when you're talking about Out A nuclear exchange minutes. It's all over. We've been really lucky that there really that there hasn't been a strategic exchange. There's spend so many near

Bulletin Of The Atomic Scienti University Of Chicago United States Bulletin Of The Atomic Bala President And Ceo Paul Rand Rachel Bronson Shen Security Board Football
New York: Lawrence Ray Accused Of Forcing Daughter’s Friends Into Labor, Prostitution While Extorting $1 Million

World News Tonight with David Muir

01:34 min | 6 months ago

New York: Lawrence Ray Accused Of Forcing Daughter’s Friends Into Labor, Prostitution While Extorting $1 Million

"We turn next the allegations involving a college students father. He's accused of preying on his daughters friends. At at Sarah Lawrence College authorities. He moved into her dorm room and tonight among the charges now sex trafficking extortion. Here's ABC's Diane Macedo Tonight. Federal agents call it a crime that shocks the conscience sixty year old. Larry Ray accused of manipulating his daughter's college classmates committing extortion forced labor and even sex trafficking conduct. I'm makes you angry. According to the indictment it started in twenty ten when ray got out of prison and moved into his daughters Dorm Room at Sarah Lawrence College in Westchester New York. Prosecutors say he started convincing his daughter's roommate's they were broken and and in need of fixing it was here that he laid the groundwork for psychological conditioning. That would eventually lead. These young adults become unwitting victims. Prosecutors say he made eight up lies about his victims coerce their false confessions than US those confessions to extort roughly a million dollars from them even forcing at least one victim into prostitution to to Shen and at times resorting to physical violence rates high. This victim to a chair plays the plastic bag over her head and almost suffocated for the FBI says it launched the investigation after New York magazine. Detailed the story in twenty one thousand nine hundred and David Sarah Lawrence says it conducted unintentional investigation. After after that article came out but could not substantiate those claims in a statement they call the charges disturbing ray faces life in prison if convicted

Sarah Lawrence College Larry Ray Extortion David Sarah Lawrence Diane Macedo New York Magazine FBI ABC Prostitution Shen Westchester New York
I Run Out of Things to Say - Jason Bay

Daily Sales Tips

04:33 min | 6 months ago

I Run Out of Things to Say - Jason Bay

"You're listening to daily sales tips. PODCAST I'm your host Scott. Ingram this is going to be the last time that we get to hear a great prospecting tip from Jason Bay at blissful prospecting for awhile because he's getting ready to launch his own podcast here. He is with his final tip for now cadences or sequences. As they're called with outreach. I Os Platform is essentially a series of touches. That you can use to get a hold of a prospect so there's outbound sequences and Keynes's inbound sequences in cadences. I want to talk to you about outbound. And the reason why this is a really relevant thing is that it typically when we work with companies. I tell them that you need to reach out to the prospect ten to fifteen times over the period of thirty forty five days and usually get a lot of concerns and and number one concern hail rented it things to say. Number two is all. Aren't we GONNA be bugging the prospect and number three is. I don't want to be a spinner and these are all legitimate concerns concerns but the reality is that most sales people might call once or twice send one or two emails and then they give up an avid theory on why this happens and I want to share why. It's really important to not quit after three or four times. Even if you're doing it outbound sequence where the person did not sign up to hear from you. The first theory I have of it is fear of persistence in the best way that I could describe. This is through ad campaigns. And if you think about really popular companies like Nike and whatnot. A lot of the studies that with ad campaigns is that we need to see an ad seven to ten plus times. The rule of seven is a really good one to us but we need to see get seven to ten plus times before acting in. It doesn't matter if it's a well known brand like ninety or bringing that you've never heard of so the takeaway there is that most of us don't have the brand recognition. Shen of accompany length. Thank you for listening to this. So it's not normal for a prospect to respond to your first few touches if you think of your outbound sequence like a highly targeted personalized ad campaign you approach it a lot. Different so now it becomes. How can create enough intrigue for this person to respond to this email ordering answer the phone own. So just keep in mind that if someone doesn't respond they don't respond to ad campaigns from really well known companies. Either see gotta be persistent the secondary theory. I have and this is a lot of what people have shared with me is. Hey I have nothing left to say. What do I say if I got to reach out to the person ten fifteen times so the action and hear that you can focus on is not blowing all of your talking points in bullet point form in your first email. The big mistake I see. Sales teams make is that I.. E Mail has three to five points. And it's all their value props all the challenges they fix. It's this huge long winded email and leaves them with nothing else to say when they follow out. So what you can do is come up with two to three. A strong value. Props are talking points that address. What your prospect wants to accomplish and then challenges. That might get in the way of them doing that and then you're going to spread read it out throughout the sequence sequences and Kane is. There's no magic formula but a way that you can approach. This is if I have three talking points so talking point it is something around saving time and you want it to obviously be more specific than that. But I'm just be something very generic we could talk about saving money and then for us we might use. WHO's the third one might be increasing response rates. Let's say by doing something with your cold emails. So that I talking point that I e mail is only going to talk about the value props associated with saving saving money and then any challenges associated with that. And then you're gonNA call the person and your value prop that you're gonNA lead within the challenge that you're going to talk about is around saving. Money can help people do that. The second email. Let's say the person doesn't pick up or respond to the first couple of outreaches that third touch. So you've already done a phone touch in an email. Touch is at third touch is going to be an email with a really short follow up might say any thoughts or might say hey forgotten which we have a case study with a company. That's very similar two years and I wanted to share for this reason. So That's three touches right there and then you can add a fourth tach connecting with someone on Lincoln and just sending a connection request. So there's four touches this with two emails one phone call in Lincoln a message. All centered around that I talking point sets four touches for for one talking point. Multiply that by three twelve touches with three talking points. So don't blow all your talking points in that. First he most of you have something else to say when you follow up and make sure to spread it out through the cadence and you won't run out of things to talk about.

Ingram Lincoln Nike Scott Jason Bay Keynes Shen Kane
Why Is Snoop Dogg In a Social-Media Feud With Gayle King?

GSMC Entertainment Podcast

05:13 min | 6 months ago

Why Is Snoop Dogg In a Social-Media Feud With Gayle King?

"This feud sparked between Snoop Duke Dog and Gayle King after a controversial controversial interview aired between Gayle King and WNBA EX player. Lisa Leslie and and the issue stemmed from the enemy between the two when Gayle King asked Lisa Leslie if she thought Kobe. Bryant's legacy as complicated because of vase sexual assault charge back in two thousand three and interview Gilkey kind of persists as she pushes on the issue asking if the entire situation should be left in the past or is it really part of his history and let me pause right there. Oh quick so I can give my two sons. I don't think that was the correct time nor the place to mention that especially during you know this grieving time that Koby. Bryant's family is going through. So I definitely think Gayle King messed up right there by even mentioning are bringing that up. You're bringing up a Sexual assault case that was dismissed into dozen three and she had all those all those years to bring it up and talk about it when Coby Bryan was here but you decide talk about it when he's gone and he's not even there to defend themselves. So that's where my issue it. And that's where Snoop Dogg had an issue with as well like I said the case case was dismissed into doesn't three thousand four because the victim didn't want to testify and how Lisa Leslie responded to this question Shen She states I think the media should be more respectful at this time. I don't think it's something that we should keep hanging over his legacy and I hi. One hundred percent agree with Lisa. Leslie's answer I think she said it perfectly the like I said they had all those years to talk about the issue. She won't question Kobe Bryant but they wait until after he passes to bring up the issue and honestly. That's probably one of my biggest concerns with the media. I I know it's ironic because I'm in media. You know I do these podcast. I talk about entertainment news but my when I my thing with media is just being more sensitive imprudent with questions when you're interviewing everyone I know like the whole point with media like the you know you're trying to get the first exclusive interview or you're trying to be the first one find out about something but like I just think that a lot up journalists and people involved in the media industry needed just be a little more prudent and especially when it involves deaths and grieving and mourning of someone who we we all lost really. I think you know we need to be a little more respectful when it comes to that so following the interview dots. All the heat came came up many criticize gayle king honestly such as myself. I raised my eyebrows when I saw that interview clip and Snoop Dogg. Also criticised is who told her explicitly. Respect the family and back off. Be If you know what I mean by be you know what I mean by being before we come get get you okay. That's what snoop said honestly kinda sounds like a threat before we come get you you know and we all know uncle snoop. That's that's not a threat that's a promise. Almost like knowing snoop dogg's background and amongst the he said some other explicit very like vile language. Honestly that I will not I repeat on this episode on so Snoop Dogg was explicitly telling her like we're GonNa come get you and like calling her all these names and you you know following all the criticism Gayle King. Try to explain herself. Her side of the story via twitter stating that many people took her question out of context tax since. CBS News only posted the clip of that one particular question regarding Kobe Bryant so in her defense she stating you know things. Things are out of context. CBS News they only showed one part of the interview. They didn't like the four hour. I didn't Ask about the rape allegations asked about this this and that his family his relationship with other MBA players. But still even don't like my purse again. This is all opinion of mine right. My opinion still stands in which I still don't think Gayle King should have even brought up those rape allegations allegations or sexual assault case. That was dismissed years ago to taint his legacy or like to. I Dunno spiral some type of conversation nation especially during this extremely sensitive and crucial time where Vanessa Bryant and his girls and his family are just grieving still. I just don't think it was a time time or place and I don't think it should ever be brought up really ever. It hasn't been talked about in years and years. So why does Gayle King. What a bring it up and talk about the specific issue shoe now now that he has passed now that he's not here to defend themselves so I still stand in my position in which she should not have even brought up that a question

Gayle King Kobe Bryant Snoop Dogg Lisa Leslie Assault Vanessa Bryant CBS Wnba Rape Koby Twitter Gilkey Coby Bryan
The State of Indian Nations

Native America Calling

06:48 min | 6 months ago

The State of Indian Nations

"You're tuned into native America calling. I'm Tara Gatewood from misled a Pueblo. We're listening to the State of Indian nations address today a day New National Congress of American Indians President fond sharp from the Cornell nation gave the speech earlier today in the first part of her speech. We heard her disgust threats to native nations including challenges to tribal decision making and the Indian Child Welfare. ACT WE PICK UP. We're sharp left off in addition to these existential threats. We have threats caused by federal inaction and indifference difference take severe chronic underfunding of the federal government's trust in treaty obligations to tribal nations powerfully illustrated in the recent broken promises MRS report. This report is a trebling. Glimpse into the pervasive impacts that federal budget shortfalls have on the health and vibrancy of tribal tribal communities. It comes fifteen years after another. Congressional report came to the exact same conclusion that the United States is failing to hold its end. The Grand Covenant is struck with tribal nations in exchange for hundreds of millions of acres of tribal lands invaluable resources they contain needless interruptions and delays in federal funding also pose a significant threat the two thousand nineteen government shutdown. The longest longest in history is the latest example of an incompetent federal budget process jeopardizing travel nations ability to provide vital services to our citizens from law enforcement to healthcare to emergency response and just once in the last twenty two years has congress passed a fiscal budget on time time an inexcusable sign of a broken system in addition tribal nations must compete with one another for federal grant programs a gross gross violation of the federal government's trust entreaty responsibilities to us. Meanwhile Congress left Indian country completely out of the two thousand seventeen seventeen tax cuts and jobs at despite years of hill advocacy by NCI and our partners in promoting Indian countries tax reform priorities priorities. That will clearly boost tribal efforts to build sustainable economies and grow local job opportunities. Congress has also neglected its responsibility sponsor ability by failing to pass legislation that reaffirms the inherent right of tribal governments to regulate Labor permanently reauthorized. The remarkably effective special diabetes program for Indians. reauthorize is the native American Housing and self determination act to curb Indian countries severe housing shortages. And take long overdue steps to curtail the missing and murdered indigenous women epidemic. That is ravaging so many of our communities and families but federal connection and indifference is perhaps no more destructive than with a current failure of the administration and some in Congress to address press the rapidly accelerating impacts of climate change or even acknowledged that it exists as chief. Seattle went said what we do to the earth we do to ourselves. The damage human beings have done and continue to do to this planet disrupts every facet of tribal life from our subsistence life. Ways to our ceremonies to our continued stewardship of the natural world. My nation of quilt is already feeling the brunt as ocean shen sea level rise are forcing us to permanently. Relocate are two main villages to higher ground when it comes to climate change and sustaining humanity humanity on this planet. We have no time left to lose and yet our government is nowhere to be found finally tribal nations face threats from an administration ministration that appears committed to obstructing the express will of Congress take the Indian Trust Asset Reform Act while ratified nearly four four years ago the administration has refused to implement key provisions notably the creation of an under secretary for Indian affairs to protect an advanced it's tribal interests within the Department of Interior and the establishment through a meaningful dialogue with Indian country of trust asset management. Plans eagerly. Disgraceful is the inner agency. Mo Way the administration develop to implement the new four seven seven tribal workforce development law that that law is specifically passed to expand the successful program and play self-determination squarely at the heart of Indian country workforce development yet the MOH was purposefully written to ignore the law by allowing federal agencies to veto individual programs that tribal nations have every right to include in their four four seven seven plans. A dynamic law is explicitly designed to stop despite these darkening storm clouds tribal nations continue to shine brightly. We do so much with so little because our people count on us to find a way no matter what we devise advise innovative solutions to the greatest challenges facing our communities. Because that's what governments do from the sled of the Pueblo of a sled. A WHO's innovative partnership with the State of New Mexico is reducing arrest in incarceration rates among Pueblo youth by providing them culturally appropriate diversionary generic services services designed to set them on the right path to the Miami tribe of Oklahoma. WHO's Miami Awakening Program is bringing back the tribes language wage from the brink of extinction and the strengthening of its people's cultural identity and kinship ties with one another in the process to the court? Elaine Elaine tribe. In Idaho whose education pipeline approach identifies and fill gaps in the systems of academic support for students which has dramatically atakli decrease the tribes highschool dropout rate and increase. The percentage of tribal members pursuing college degrees. Tribal nations are doing amazing things things and we could do so much more. If the federal government would finally once and for all abide by the timeless pack it made with a so long ago to create the country that we share today. We have upheld. Our end of this arrangement is long past time. The United States upheld its end of the agreement meant

Federal Government Congress Pueblo United States Indian Child Welfare New National Congress Of Ameri Miami Tara Gatewood America Cornell President Trump Seattle Elaine Elaine Idaho Department Of Interior New Mexico NCI Oklahoma
The State of Indian Nations

Native America Calling

08:21 min | 6 months ago

The State of Indian Nations

"This is native America calling. I'm Tara Gate. Would climate change the federal government's trust responsibility and congressional action on violence against women. Child Welfare and tribal sovereignty are among the issues tackled today in fond sharps first State of the Indian nations address. She is the president of the National Congress of American Indians. She didn't hold back in her address. Press criticizing federal elected leaders for what she called inaction and indifference. When it comes to native nations she also touted the gains tribes continue? We need to make in spite of challenges. In the congressional response to the address New Mexico Representative Deborah Holland a Democrat and a citizen of the Laguna Pueblo continued criticisms of the administration and issued a call to all need of nations to act in the best interests Anita values. We're going to hear both speeches beaches this hour. If you WANNA comment send us an email you can send it to comments at native America calling DOT COM or tweeted to us at one eight hundred nine nine native. Here's President von Sharp. Kyo which I'm just Jack. I wish Guy Good Morning. My name is fawn sharp. I consider it my life's greatest honor to have this opportunity to share with you today. I thank the Creator for gathering us together for this historic dialogue between Indian country and the United States on behalf of the five hundred and seventy four federally recognized tribal nations dozens of state recognized tribal nations and millions of native people across this country country. I welcome the distinguished. Guests assembled here today and those watching around the globe to the eighteenth annual State of Indian nations address. I stand before you today. As a humble servant of all tribal nations fulfilling my duty to share Indian countries story of perseverance and resurgence with the world to convey with absolute clarity Indian countries expectations of the United States government government and to cast a light on the immense power and proven wisdom of tribal nation's governing their own lands and affairs solving difficult challenges and forging brighter futures on their own terms. I embrace the enormity of this task for I have been groomed for decades aides to carry it out by transformative leaders in his footsteps I follow leaders like Beatrice Black Elizabeth Cole Tiny Kapoma. He's Rosanna in Ramona Bennett to name just a few these matriarchs kindled a great fire in me to give my life in leadership to my. Don't people in all of Indian country just as important. They showed me the way and for that I am forever grateful I also it draw great strength as they did from our Almighty creator. The advice of my fellow tribal leaders the spiritual nourishment in life lessons end of canoe journeys the inspiration passion in Ingenuity of our brilliant native youth and the ancestral teachings of our elders their wisdom encouragement and guidance have prepared me to meet this moment. So why do we gather here today. The purpose purpose of this annual address is to memorialize in affirm the enduring government to government relationship ship between tribal nations and the US government. It provides our assessment of the current health of that relationship and how it must be strengthened. This hallowed discourse not only speaks to elected officials political and judicial appointees in staff the federal government nor is it limited to tribal leaders employees in citizens it has meant for all Americans especially those who have been disenfranchised and rendered hopeless hopeless bi racial injustice economic inequality and the rapid decay of our American political system. They seek answers during these troubling times and they need to look no further than tribal nations to find them in that spirit. I stand before you today. Supported supported by more than six hundred tribal nations and governments across this land to share with you this undeniable truth. The state of Indian nations nations is strong across this land. Tribal nations are writing remarkable stories of cultural social political and Economic Mike Renewal. In the face of great obstacles we relentlessly plow forward in our eternal quest to create futures of hope Opportunity Eighty and cultural vibrancy for our youth in those generations yet. To come we do. So by invoking and practicing the greatest indigenous in his core values of all self-governance the crater gifted tribal nations with certain inalienable rights among them the right to steward word and draw nourishment from our traditional homelands cultivate extraordinary potential of our youth develop thriving economies that that provide opportunity for all of our people and manage our own affairs and control our own destinies as my mentor former Cornell leader in NCI CIO president Joe Delacruz so perfectly captured it. No right is more sacred to a nation to a people then the right to freely determine its social economic political and cultural future without external interferences the the fullest expression of this right is when a nation freely governs itself. We native peoples not only the inherent right but the sacred responsibility to live the way our creator intended speaking are indigenous languages living our traditional core values imparting them to the next generations practicing our life ways conducting our ceremonies and freely governing Orleans and Communities Tribal Nations are not nonprofit organizations. We are full fledged battle-tested governments guided by time honored cultural trope principles and recognized as such in the northwest ordinance the US Constitution and hundreds upon hundreds of treaties and Supreme Court precedents accidents however many Americans including many policymakers still don't understand the unique status status of tribal nations are unique political status. They don't recognize the indisputable fact that we are argh genuine governments with the right and more importantly the ability to govern our own lands and communities govern those in accordance with the values that make us who we are as native peoples but through mechanisms like this annual address address more and more Americans and others around the world are learning this truth and in doing so are turning to Indian country for inspiration shen direction and most importantly solutions to our common challenges in this great age of uncertainty acting with the next seven generations wins in mind our ancestors endured great hardships to forge our path to this day so that we would be able to be there answer to a prayer for thriving cultures healthy children in robust communities. We must and we will be worthy of the great sacrifices they made to who gives us this chance to sustain not only our way of life but our world for future generations.

Indian Nations Nations United States Communities Tribal Nations Federal Government America President Trump National Congress Of American Tara Gate President Von Sharp New Mexico Laguna Pueblo Joe Delacruz Supreme Court Orleans Jack Cornell Deborah Holland Mike Renewal Beatrice Black
Is Copying a Shameless Tactic?

Marketing School

06:19 min | 6 months ago

Is Copying a Shameless Tactic?

"I'm Eric Su and I'm Neil Patel and today we are going to top talk of Valla Tornado going to talk about it. We're GONNA talk about well if copying is a shameless tactics of what do we mean by this. Exactly we're talking about Copying Neil. Yes Oh in marketing marketing. Your competition is doing something or other people in your industry even if they're not your competition they're doing something to grow their traffic to go. There leads to grow their sales now. The question Shen is if you copy what they're doing. Is that a bad thing. Or is that a good thing and a prime example of this is Eric. I've done it as well many times. uh-huh but Eric. Recently I talked about one of his new features on click flow and I submitted a product top and his new feature tells you if your content is decaying in other words is you're getting less and less traffic over time and what you should do to fix it and best of all the feature is one hundred percent free correct hundred percent free so one of the comments that someone left was. Hey you're copying us. This isn't cool. Some people got website. Most people didn't really care about some people got upset. Some people said I was copying even though I submitted Eric's Url and it wasn't my company the hot air to respond those funny funny enough. Some of them even hit up people on my team being like this and they're like this isn't Neil Company in their dislike. Sure it isn't okay. Sounds but in general you know is it okay or not and before before I answer that and I would. I'd love to answer before you Eric because usually I want you to break down. What was your logic behind doing this? So we launched a feature recalled content decay for click flow and basically the way we saw was that it's a feature so wanna give credit where credit is due. There's a content marketing agency called animals and they launched a they launched it on product called revive the last couple of months ago. Now here's how I saw it my logic behind. This is what I look at facebook and facebook has. The instagram has stories. FACEBOOK has stories right. They have to get the stories feature from they got up from snap. And so when I look at this I'm like okay. This is a good feature. It's a nice little lead magnet that we can use premium to get leads to drive into our software which fundamentally is not competitive with animals at all they might use it to drive leads for their content marketing agency but we have an entire software suite with a bunch of different features the testing. I'm not even GONNA go into all features but that's why the way I explain it when one guy came in I said look they have a really good feature and where we're using it to basically generate leads obviously to toll the US news but fundamentally were not competitive at all versus when you look at like a facebook copying snap that is they are competitive and they are copying but even in that scenario Ariel My personal opinion. But I guess I'M GONNA turn it over to you to answer first and then I'll give my thoughts on it because I think you wanted to answer i. So that's my logic behind it and turn it over to you. The reason I want an answer I guess is you who got the negative press for. I got some swale even though it wasn't me but the reason on answer. I is a want to give my neutral troll viewpoint on this no matter what business. You're in someone's GonNa copy a question of when you look at all these venture backed companies people copy each other. Google isn't the only player in around you know there's being who tries to copy their features. facebook tries to copy snap. Apple will copy whoever else. This is out there like Samsung. The list goes on and on and this is just the reality of the world that we're in now in most cases in marketing. You're seeing people copy things he's like all you're doing sem Seo or paper click or hey you're doing e books Ahmadou e-books or you did one on this topic I'm GonNa do at are you. Did a conference around inbound marketing marketing ominous do my own inbound marketing conference and as I mentioned the list goes on and on no eric did was he did that. What the software feature? That's not as common but it'll become more and more common. You see the bigger companies do that and I know they weren't happy with him doing so but the reality is Eric's not going to be the first. I've done this as well. I'm not saying this is great. And everyone should do. I'm saying this is the reality of the environment wherein if your competitors are doing something that's amazing that other other people love you better start doing it too or else your users are all going to go to your competitors and events. You're going to be out of business. It sucks but it's the reality whether whether you like it or not so when you think about copying it's not about hey is it cool or not. It's the reality is consumers. Don't care about the company Buzney as much as they did before what they really care about is experienced the price are they getting all the features that they want. And if you don't provide it someone else's and if someone else's and you're not you have no choice but to add it in. Yeah I mean that's well said the last part you said about the customer experience that's ultimately what you're trying to do. You're trying to. You're trying to help your customers now. Let's take it on a much bigger scale. Let's look at Amazon now. Here's people are complaining about this right now. Amazon is using the data that they have and their copy. A lot of people they copied Alberto products are copying a ton of different products. Right now because they know what works. What doesn't work now? Would you say that shameless. Some people might say shameless. Because it's hurting them or some people you might not like. Jeff bezos Amazon. But you know what tough luck. That's what happens and same thing with when I look at this podcast. A lot of stuff that Neil Ni- share. Guess what want. Sometimes I'll mention something or neil might mention something and it actually hurts. Someone's entire business. Because we reveal the niche dot. They're in at everyone starts copying right so copying is is. What does that quote neal is that I think it's something about Picasso? Great Artists Steal and nothing goes steel. Right but I'm saying if you're going to copy do something ethically and don't try to in my scenario. I'm not really hurting anybody right and again. We're not competitive with that company. So whether you are learning from podcast and you're copying tactic modifying it for yourself. That's exactly what I'm looking at it. I'm taking the feature which is Great. I'm giving credit where credit's due revive by animals and taking it and switching at a little because I'm I'm using to drive leads for a software not for an agency which is what they are

Eric Su Facebook Neil Company Amazon Valla Tornado Shen Neil Patel United States Samsung Neil Ni Jeff Bezos Apple Google Neil Neal Buzney Alberto
Heart Disease in Women

Dishing Up Nutrition

13:53 min | 6 months ago

Heart Disease in Women

"We only had to worry about men getting heart disease but now we know that one in sixteen women will have coronary heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease for women is actually the narrowing or the blockage of those coronary arteries. That supply. The blood vessels to the heart. It now as a nutritionist. The fundamental question. I believe we need to ask is what is causing this dramatic increase in heart disease and win in and women so listeners. You may be asking well. What causes the narrowing of the arteries? Or what can we do to prevent disease. He's now as a nutritionist. I know that food is very powerful. So we want to share some of the new research about the causes of heart right disease in women and what we can do to prevent heart disease. I'm shelby. I'm a licensed nutritionist with a master's degree in nutrition. Shen and I am in the studio this morning with to fund people. Now first and foremost I get to introduce Mel. UH melania Beasley a registered Dietitian with several years of working with clients in a variety of studies including the navy. But the one person that I have in Studio this morning is my dad. How come we're not giving him the Mike this morning? Although he he probably has has lots to say about nutrition after our discussion last night but Malloch just have to tell you briefly I used to go to take your daughter to Work Day with my hi dad and so I thought it was only appropriate that it's Spanish your dad to work day barry appropriate exciting. So we're going to have a fun show this morning. We've we've got some good people here to talk about heart disease now mel you and I both work with clients one on one. We work with clients dance utilizing nutrition therapy. Good word nutrition therapy right. What does that really mean? That means that we are using nutrition to you. Make changes dramatic changes in how people feel and live therapeutic changes exactly now because we're seeing more and more of these clients lance having positive results with real food in balance some health insurance companies are getting on board and pain for the cost of nutrition. Therapy love it so it's nice now. Melania we also teach a variety of nutrition classes in the community we teach luncheon learns for some local businesses. Now Melanie besides all of the things that you do outside of nutritional weight and wellness. I imagine you cook a lot. I I cook all the time but you know shelby you know. I raised a family. I made food from. Scratch my So I like to do things a little bit on the quick side and You can do that in your busy lifestyle. I don't WanNA stand for days on end in the kitchen. But I'm I'm not going to compromise my health anymore so I cook real food. Yeah yeah now on this route real food idea. Of course today we were going to be talking about that connection between real food and heart disease but first we want to look at the research. So how can you tell us a little bit about the research. I I'd like to say to all of our listeners. Good Morning and thanks for listening today. Fifty years ago back in the nineteen in seventies a diverse group of researchers proposed from their research that refined carbohydrates especially sugar and a low intake of fiber. Were major factors causing coronary heart disease but unfortunately as many of you know their research was overshadowed by the belief that saturated actuated fat was the culprit of heart disease And we were able to stop We were told stop eating butter and Lard and dark chicken meat and the skin the poultry. That right there is sad as a southerner I got and of course fatty Cuts of steak pork. Because they were the cause of heart disease. The theory that saturated fat caused heart disease really prevailed from nineteen seventy four to two thousand fourteen and sadly some. Some people still believe I here in clinic. I'm sure you do too. That saturated fat causes heart disease. And the I call it fat phobia. They're really afraid of it right well. That was actually the the cause for much of our discussion. After dinner last night My parents were listening to a nutrition. Talk on their drive up to Minnesota yesterday yesterday and being truly my father's daughter he was asking the question why why has saturated fat Ben Tempur so much in the past so we went through the technical term right there exactly so we did we. We kinda talked through these things but we we know that research since two thousand fourteen has continued to show that saturated fats now listeners. Those are things like butter. Her Coconut Oil Organic Lard. Organic tallow those play a much smaller role in heart disease whereas whereas sugar the grains those process cereals and other carbohydrates are the foods that we actually need to keep our eye on in order to prevent heart disease so shall be talk about. What exactly that means from day to day perspective Well it means that in the past. We were told to eat a Bagel with margarine. Or I can't believe it's not butter and I always say what the heck is it. That's right Then we topped. Our toaster are Bagel. Nagel with some jelly or some jam but absolutely no butter or cream cheese. You remember this being in the navy and it was a Bagel with Jelly. Yeah today. We're told to eat eggs cooked in butter with Bacon Yum or sausage an aside of vegetables sauteed maybe coconut oil or ghee which is just clarified butter cutter right You talk about confusing right. Yeah so which is it. Sugar fat that Causes Heart Disease Older research from the Nineteen Seventies. He's found that sugar was implicated. Or perhaps even the cost is of many many diseases right well because of this research in the nineteen seventies about sugar and refined carbs. Their sugar industry became alarmed. They do. They're losing money right so they went out and hired their own. Researchers to say that eating saturated fat caused heart disease right well. The knowledge of this scandal that the sugar industry actually hired researchers who were well paid to point the finger at saturated fat. As being the cause of cardiovascular problems was only brought to light in two thousand sixteen right I think we both Had that article when we did a lunch. Learn one tie and actually for you listeners. WHO WHO WANNA look at this with your own eyes? I Have The New York Times article right here. The titles how. The sugar industry shifted blame to fat and the the date on that is actually September twelfth of Twenty sixteen so just for years ago. Yeah I just googled New York Times sugar article and popped right up so you can read more about that after the show. And it's really it's false is very misleading research. So it's so well ingrained in the minds of consumers that many people I still believe it is saturated fat. They need to avoid. I have clients once or twice a week easily. telling me their doctor said They need to avoid fats. Can I eat tags. How many can I safely eaten a day? So I'm really worried about this and They still believe it's saturated fat that they knew devoid right. Even though the current research research shows that refined carbs and sugar are the leading cause of heart disease you know in Staten Companies. Also the pharmaceutical companies. They they don't WanNa lose money on this either so right now when we think about that major research we're looking at that connection between clean what people are eating long term and how that's influencing their health exactly so another major research study published list in the Journal of the American Metal Medical Associations Internal Medicine Journal. That's a mouthful reported that a sugar Laden Diet may raise is your risk of dying from heart disease even if you are not overweight so this information reported from the research shows does that sugar and refined carbohydrates lead to heart disease. Not your eggs cooked in butter with the site of vegetable oils sauteed it in coconut oil. So here's what else that. That research study found people who ate twenty five percent or more of their calories from sugar. Sugar were more than twice as likely to die from heart disease than those who only eight ten percent of their calories from sugar. So maybe you guys thinking well. How are people consuming all of that? Sugar Yeah I think a lot of people don't think they're really eating the sugar And I think we should talk about that but I think we have to take our first break. If you're just joining us this morning. You're listening to dishing up nutrition brought to you by nutritional weight and wellness. Today we want to share with you. The scientific evidence that found eating saturated fats of any kind have have no effect on cardiovascular mortality. So if you're concerned about heart disease I recommend you keep listening to our show this morning because we've got some ideas for you. We'll be right back. Welcome back to dishing up nutrition. Here's another conclusion that was made from the review of data from randomized control. All trials diets that replaced saturated fat with polyunsaturated fat do not reduce cardiovascular events or mortality Taliban. We like to put that in real people language which basically translates to what we have been recommending to our listeners on our clients for years even decades is Ethan Bader avoid the margarine from soybean oil cook in coconut oil and avoid soybean in corn canola and cottonseed oils. Of course we love the research but we wanted to help you realize how to use that research to make healthy choices for our listeners. Another radio show that I I love and I will go back to and listen to and I feel it. Explains this very nicely as on October fourteenth. Two two thousand seventeen you can download our dishing up nutrition podcast or search it on our website. is a podcast by Sally Fallon Morale and it's called called why we need animal fats. It's fantastic nation. We had sally On dishing up nutrition a couple of other times but really talking about the importance of of eating those good fats for good health. Yes yeah the quality is important. Though because you had mentioned the four types of oils the four types of fats we would consider bad exactly the corn oil the cottonseed oil the canola oil and the soybean oil so listeners. If you're at home this morning morning going to the cupboard and see what are the types of oils that you're cooking with or pull out that salad dressing from the refrigerator and scan the label if you see soybean gene or corn oil or canola oil. That's not the best choice for your health even some quote unquote healthy protein. You Watch everything right right you really do have to be reading those labels. That's the best way to make sure that you're getting those fats now. One of the reasons. Why we're we're talking about fat this morning Lena's because we're talking about heart disease and we want to talk more specifically about that food connection between what we eat and how? Those vessels also related to our cardiovascular. Disease are working. We don't want the narrowing or the hardening of those arteries that contribute to more heart disease now before we went to break listeners. I gave you a statistic. I want to repeat because I think that it really drives home. This overall idea gray. So here's what the study from. I'm the Journal of the American College of Nutrition Excuse me the American. The Journal of the American Medical Association found People who ate twenty twenty five percent or more of their calories from sugar where more than twice as likely to die from heart disease than those who who ate only ten percent of their calories from sugar and then we asked the question. Well how are people consuming all of that sugar so these were researchers. I found that Soda Energy Drinks and even sport drinks are by far the biggest source of added. Sugar in the average. American's Diet. Now you may be saying to yourself or maybe you're talking back to the radio this morning saying well. I don't allow soda in my House or pop or Cola. Whatever you call it the south? It's so maybe you don't have soda in Your House but what many people drink on are afternoon breaks when they need a pick me up or what drink is served two runners after a marathon or even what are those college students and high school students drink the day after they stayed up to pull an all nighter

Heart Disease Disease New York Times Navy Nineteen Seventies Journal Of The American Colleg Bagel Melania Beasley MEL Shen Shelby Malloch Mike Minnesota Melanie Nagel Sally Fallon Journal Of The American Medica
Jeff Bezos asks court to dismiss defamation suit

NPR News Now

00:30 sec | 6 months ago

Jeff Bezos asks court to dismiss defamation suit

"Amazon was on founder. Jeff bezos is asking California court to dismiss a defamation lawsuit against him filed by his girlfriend's brother. The suit filed by Michael Sanchez. Alleges Bazo Jason. A security consultant falsely told reporters that Sanchez provided nude pictures of bezos to the national enquirer in court documents filed this week. bezos argues the activity. These Sanchez is accusing them of are protected by his right to free speech. Bazo Sanchez also failed to point to a single example of him or security consultant making such an accusation Shen

Jeff Bezos Michael Sanchez Consultant National Enquirer Amazon Bazo Jason Founder Shen California
Death and dying: how Indigenous communities grieve, survive and thrive

Unreserved

05:07 min | 6 months ago

Death and dying: how Indigenous communities grieve, survive and thrive

"A Dula is someone who supports another person through a significant health related related event the most common being a birth Dula. But there's another kind of Dula a death Dula. They help people through the end of life transition. My Kelly's an elder from the Schwab Hamill first nation and he is a death Dula. He joins me from Vancouver. Welcome Mike Thank you Wonderful trip down here in coming weather so this is a field that I never heard of before. Can you tell me what a death Dula. Dad's we as first nations people. We've been doing it for while myself. I've been doing it for almost half of my life on ready to Help the people crossover back into the spirit world way. And how do you do that through prayer and encouragement and Just making sure that they're comfortable with the prayers say always one hundred percent feel better after prayer in in a few words. So how did you get into this field of work back in seventies here when I changed my life into Christian life and started from there just doing funeral sedan after that asked go. Pray the people on her deathbed in hospital sending Zenden at just transpired from there So how do you incorporate your first nation culture into your practices at as Death Dula. It's pretty similar to what a death Dula does today. I go in and talk to the family and make sure that I can go in and talk to their loved one. That's laying there and pray with them. Talk to them. Encourage them narrow that there's life after the deaths and stuff like that and help them to let go of their fear and doubt and what's going to happen to them after the leave this physical plane. Is there kind of ceremony that that That you take people through everything we do with prayer and encouraging me is ceremony. I mean that's what I call her then as I talk to them I pray with them and sometimes I do the hands hands on healing tennis similar to Ricky. We do that kind of work to and that alleviates. Lots of the pain and fear that they have after I get done praying with them and encouraging them they always say way I feel better. I'm not so frayed today. Now it's it's all positive encouragement and a prayer and offering for their goal is a good place to after they leave the physical plane of life. So when you're taking people through this process what kinds of things do you do you. Tell them to to ease their pain or ease their krief. They're going to a place where there's no more pain. No more sorrel All of the Christians they call them angels and US as native people we call them ancestors and we meet all of our ancestors on the other side and they're singing and dancing missing while we're over here on this site Mourning and weeping. Hey it's sometimes when we lose an important person person on this scientists. It's a really big loss for sure. This must be very difficult work to be doing. What kinds of self care do practice to make sure that you're okay or go to we have what we call a nineteen ten Indian Shaker Church and we do prayers in hands don healing brushing in there? I have A sweat lodge. They're going pray in sweat large and and Downtown we have Asana were we going there and we use our medicine and abuser prayer scenario and to lighten the load off of our our own selves our mind our heart and our body. Why do you think that this this kind of work? It is important portent. This work is very very very important because lot of our people that you know we've turned to a different different cultures and our own and a lot of our people don't know our culture and all day knows you're GonNa go to hell or you're going to go to heaven to encourage him you know that there's a place of peace on the other side. It's not erasing what Man Says it is right. Well thank you so much for your time today Thank you for having me. That was my Kelly. An elder from the Schwab Hamill first nation. Shen he is a death Dula.

Kelly Schwab Hamill United States Vancouver Mike Indian Shaker Church Zenden
Garth Greenwell: Cleanness

Bookworm

08:56 min | 6 months ago

Garth Greenwell: Cleanness

"I'm Michael Silver Blood and this poor for today. I'm excited to have as my guest Garth Greenwell you know. He's been on before with the previous book. Called what belongs to you and yet his new book called cleanness I think is still more extraordinary. Although the response to the first book was the response to the greeting of a brand undo writer of Great Dunk AC- beauty importance and Garth greenwell began his writing life as a poet. What turns you to pros? That's such a difficult question for me to answer because because it's so mysterious to me. I think it had to do with the seven years. I spent teaching high school which I think You know doing that. I discovered new a new capacity in myself to be interested in other people's lives and In the world around me and I think it had to do with moving to Sofia Bulgaria where I lived for four years and where I spoke a language other than English everyday some combination Shen of those things made me start hearing sentences. That aren't broken into lines. It's really interesting because was on the one hand there is in this new book cleanness which is a novel divided into stories stories kind of and sections stories form sections sections lead to the novel. And we're watching the the narrator develop his sense of sex and love their in Bulgaria and so when he falls in love. It's was someone who's done more frightened about public expression but the pros does. Your pros is not frightened of the six Russian. You're taking great care in sort of if James Ian Steps Comma by Comma to tell us what is thought and felt but vis mash up of James and pornography is absolutely you know. It's the first time time I think. Oh well thank you. That's a a wonderful response to the book. I mean the sentence is for me. The unit of composition. You know my great poetry. Teachers were three poets who are obsessed with the expansive capacity of English Syntax. The poets Frank Bidart Story Graham and Carl Phillips. Oh my I knew about Frank Bidart I am. I am friends with an I love jury. What a wonderful wonderfully strange person? She magnificent the real jealous But so is Ba- Dart and the third is Carl Phillips Owen. I know Karl to you or very often. I was extremely teachers. I mean this boy from you know Tobacco Farming Kentucky getting to study with these people. It's a real blessing and while you're a boy from a tobacco farm in Kentucky. It's only slightly exaggerated. I was first generation raised off the farm but every weekend every not every school break we were on the farm. Yeah and somehow or other though you had three brilliant poets who who were able to accept that you were going to become a novelist I got to have an extraordinary education. I did an MFA in poetry. With Carl Phillips Saint Louis and the night did half of Harvard which is where I worked with jewelry and then I dropped out of Harvard and I disappeared and didn't have any contact with them for seven in years while I was teaching high school for of those years in Bulgaria. But here's the thing I mean you know I wrote what belongs to you without ever studying fiction as a writer later or as a scholar without ever being a fiction workshop. And I really I think you know I wrote it using the tools that I had which were not the tools of a fiction writer the tools of a poet. Yes I think. In the case of this book it was very good for you to be in that circumstance because I think one of the program program could have done would be to expose you to people whose draws would draw with agitation about your subject brighter which in your short preceding novella mid go develops into your I novel. What belongs to you? And these are books about falling in love with a male prostitute Trieste and this is a subject matter. It's not that it hasn't been broached own. But it's not been broached easily and certainly it hasn't been broached without melodrama your book. These two who are unknown dramatic. They're calm passionate books about the fear. The comes along when you reveal yourself to another person and the other person in the first two books is that prostitute who is not used really to passion being directed at him by someone who wants to know what it's like to live a life with all the doors and windows open Right that's beautiful. That's a beautiful description of that relationship. Ya now frank. BIDART is not only one of your teachers to me. His one of the very very best and riskiest poets wits riding in America but his life is a very different kind of risk. Yes he keeps his sexual nature on a high level of the sacred and the spiritual and without that he'd rather not be involved so when he read how open you were going to be as a prose writer. What did he communicate Kate to you will so for me? I mean frank was my most important teacher and to me. He is the most important living American writer I agree and the great example of his work is a kind of utter fearlessness and determination nation. You know I think one thing that artists do that a certain kind of artists has to do and maybe to make the kind of art that I most value one has to go into an abyss and one has to follow one subject. All the way down you know. We've become very skeptical of a kind of romantic myth of the artist and I think that skepticism is a good thing but I also think that there is real risk and making that kind of art because when one goes into an abyss there is no guarantee one will come back out and writing parts of this book cleanness. I felt quite frightened frightened and I found myself in places I did not want to be. Frank was the great example. I called to mind about what what fearlessness in art looks like one of the things that most amazed me about the response to what belongs to was how much people talked about sex and just how surprised they were by the sex in the book. It didn't even occur to me to think that it was anything extraordinary because Frank Bidart was my great teacher. Frank Frank Bidart is the great potent. Nothing is forbidden in his in his work.

Frank Frank Bidart Writer Garth Greenwell Bulgaria Kentucky Sofia Bulgaria Michael Silver Harvard Carl Phillips Owen Carl Phillips Saint Louis James Ian Carl Phillips Ba- Dart Shen Karl America Kate Graham
Akbar

Tell Them, I Am

05:10 min | 1 year ago

Akbar

"I remember getting to Karachi and Sunday. Everything changing the tension was lifted like literal weight was lifted. Often asked to how did we survive? Why did we survive because the train the previous train which will booked on from Delhi to Karachi and my mother just insisted? She said, no, I'm not taking the train. I need to buy some food for the journey, and lintels or whatever. And my father argued with he said, we've been not be able to get any place on the next train is critical leave. And she insisted and then he agreed and on, he would say this was a woman's into Shen being complement to our mother hand. What she did was she literally saved us because that entire train, all the passengers would then kill the slotted. I was fall and that literally my first memory and it left to deep impression on me as to why there would be so much hatred in people that they would want to both my bed nets and the siblings and myself. I've been back to its subsequently over the is one of my earliest essays at been home school. I was at boarding school. And I remember writing an essay, I must have been in the junior Cambridge, which is the equivalent of high school. It had description of a train compartment. And I described it as, as a cost Guetta death. Gos- Catta, a cylinder debt and the teacher, one of the fathers mocking the S his hit this avai striking image at vegetated from and I wasn't sure guy just used it in Ovid's stayed in my mind and then over the as I am constantly having a sort of dream. Not really nightmares but dreams of being a train, and there's another train moving at great speed and bosses me by my whole family in that train, and I feel help us, I feel my arms and ex-con to move have a cell phone, which doesn't work, but the message of the, the dream is that the other train just speeds by and I'm then stranded on my own without any communication with the entire world. And survey lonely feeling. It's only now in hindsight. Look back, and I feel like God, that is the experience. I lived through the same experience that I had my Hindu colleague, had inverse, which means her family was escaping from Pakistan to India and the same same sort of tension. Same sort of problems logistics, how you get out what you take with you. Who do you trust all the same issues she faced? And she was also a young girl than men. I was doing my piece in, in London at soya's I met her and at that time, a handmade very many Indians, and when we became friends, we began to swap stories and joke about each other's cultures. And, and she said, you know, that we were told it if you ever see a snake and the Muslim, you actually kill the Muslim, I because the Muslim is more dangerous more venomous than the snake an ice mileage. She said, why he's smiling as I said, I've heard exactly the same story except in my story to seek. The Hindu whatever and we both smiling, realize it. I experienced were like a a when when human relations break down to that level. These stories assume a far greater importance of their magnified inflated, and they in a sense, personify the behavior of the other, and that is very dangerous. It's interesting, you say that because I'm Pakistani, I grew up in Karachi, and I moved here. When I was twelve and I have never had negative experiences with Indian people are Hindu people, but I do feel somewhere deep down like this, this bias, it's so bizarre. You know, like I am so surprised as 'cause my partner is Jewish like, I'm very accepting and living that lack of hatred in my life in a lot of ways. But at the same time at like, I have this thing even though you live through this, like really time you didn't. You didn't feel that be ideas ahead the images. I had from the discussions, so my claws fellows from the people, I met about inducing, six vague negative. So I had to overcome that. In fact, wonder stand who these people were widely hated us why we hit to them, and that is when I met by Indian print, many as later in London, where really began to understand these people very much. Like us and in a sense experienced exactly as what we had experienced. So when I became adult and understood some of these different permutations and combinations of human relations, I began to get very involved in what's called interfaith understanding interfaith dialogue. And I began to ask questions and began say the people I meet a friend EBay, normally just like us. They just like me. So what keeps them away from me is my lack of understanding? I own prejudice on my own. Ignorance

Karachi Ovid London Gos- Catta Ebay Delhi Guetta Cambridge Pakistan Partner India
"shen" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

01:50 min | 1 year ago

"shen" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Shen? Welcome back to always in fashion. Here's your host, Mark Webber. Mrs work whipper feel. That's one sexy. Soul music about drinking. It's great. I don't do very often. Man. Oh, man. Great. Drink when you're home you're out on. Party when dating.

Mark Webber Shen
"shen" Discussed on Small Doses

Small Doses

01:40 min | 1 year ago

"shen" Discussed on Small Doses

"So if someone is using the exclusive this just who I am first of all the game don't change for nobody. So whatever you give to the game the game. We'll give back to you. So if you run it like this, why am I can treat people like shit because this I'm an artist or this is makes me better. The game is going to give it right back to you. Now, if you're not prepared for that you shouldn't be in the game. That's why you give the game love and pre Shen in blessings in the game. Don't get learned game. Better respect the game about learning better respected respect you have to respect. Period. This should not change for nobody. Nobody is exempt while I always say, you know, when people are always like anyone who thinks are exempt from karma's, like the basic facts is the earth is round literally goes into circle. So what goes around comes around whether you like it or not this one of my greatest lessons and things that I've heard that you get to keep what you give. Right. So whatever I get to you. I keep. So if I give you love and appreciation honesty, those are things that I get to keep to I'm not there's not a lack of those things. It's not like, there's an abundance of that in the say, I gave you shadiness but trail those are deceit. Those are things that I'm keeping. So if I'm trying to be shady in let's say, I tell ally on you or spread a bad rumor about you. I think that I'm doing this to you. I'm really doing into myself. Let's plate of food. I gotta eat. You know what I mean period? They don't be knowing that you'd be knowing they don't know that. Because what I know. Flood..

Shen
"shen" Discussed on Mental Illness Happy Hour

Mental Illness Happy Hour

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"shen" Discussed on Mental Illness Happy Hour

"None of that external stuff gets you this internal experience of. Joy, purpose, painting focus piece, right? And again, this is not to say that that it doesn't. Include other human experiences of suffering. You can. The the amazing thing that I'm seeing in. To some extent my own life. But especially as many advocates in suicide prevention speak about their experiences. They talk about their daily struggles, their chronic, recurrent struggles with whatever it might be an anxiety disorder, chronic suicidal Ita Shen, but they have this new perspective that uses tools and discoveries that knows how to manage it, and they're actively doing that. It's it's a day to day moment by moment, sometimes experience and when they drawn network of others to help them with that, it's incredibly empowering. It's beyond words beyond words. It really isn't. And. One thing that that you said, maybe think of something that I really want to talk about which is for that person out there whose thinking will what is talking to somebody else going to do for my problems, which are real problems. I have financial problems. You know, I'm under this tremendous amount of strain and talking about it does nothing I have chronic pain or something, you know, and and this is both. I want to say talking about it with a therapist can help shape the this mediator. That is the layer of your mind that while it might not change your financial.

Ita Shen
"shen" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

The Projection Booth Podcast

04:16 min | 2 years ago

"shen" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

"Itunes where we can review the show and patron where he can make a donation donors get early access to every episode as long as I'm not running late every donate. Shen every rating we get helps the projection booth take over the world. Like. The perfect. But I. Right. If you enjoy the show in what more people to know about it head on over to. I tunes leave a.

Shen
"shen" Discussed on Capital Allocators

Capital Allocators

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"shen" Discussed on Capital Allocators

"Shen and maybe make three or four however the the odds are pretty good that you're going to lose the dollar and so it's a good newsbad news my risk is limited but my potential lose all that is pretty high but that's on the on the buying yo no one's ever been really hurt well phrase it you're less likely be hurt by an option you might bleed to death over a long period of time which i can be taken out tomorrow on a stretcher if you're buying options conversely when you sell an option you get paid and even if you're wrong you can win meaning you know you think the markets toppish is sell a call it's out of the money the market still goes up but it doesn't go up far enough to get richer call strike and guess what gets you stick it to keep the premium or you think the mark markets bottom than you sell a put and the market still goes dominant doesn't go far enough problem is is in while you receive upfront your maximum gain is known and that's the premium receive your maximum loss can be infinity hanoch all sidon can can be all the way to spotless zero on on the put side so i think were people really get hurt is when a either the short ball and be they don't have guard rails and place in the simplest way to think about a guardrail is is is if you sell options to sell p spreads or if you saw an option to own the underlying so if you sell a call on something hopefully on the underlying because if you sell a call and you're wrong and you can get hurt very badly in conversely when you sell a put than you'd better at least have cash set aside to buy that underlying you know if that event happens the idea of being long the market and selling puts his probably well it it it'll work fine if the market goes up so if the market was the other way that's that's obviously at the side of the coin are so many perceptions that people have about.

Shen
"shen" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

02:21 min | 2 years ago

"shen" Discussed on KTRH

"Shen about the particular time location were further identifiers about the person who posted the comments the complain had provided the same information to you to youtube removed the comments after receiving this information fbi jackson conducted an interview of the person who made the complaint this person lives in mississippi has no connection the south warda and has no knowledge about the person who posted the comment the fbi also conducted internal database reviews in open source checks no additional information was found to positively identify the person who posted this comments there was no connection found to south florida moving forward we will continue to gather all information about the subject as we try to identify his motives is associates and his actions leading up the yesterday's events we are looking into a social media post his movements his conversations leading up to the shooting as well as any other indicators they may have he out there i'm a little unclear about this mr producer maybe audience who can help is he sang that it was a different person who posted it or they couldn't tracked down and determine if it was this eventual mass shooter who posted it they couldn't track it down i i find this little odd i find it almost a little scary that they couldn't tracking down i am i the only one is an impossible to track this down how could it be impossible to track down it may be forward thrown around more gun control and everything else should we figure out what took place here and shouldn't we figure out how to protect our schools protect our schools protect them dammit school boards and school administrators working with the community's working with local police can figure this out.

jackson mississippi fbi florida producer Shen youtube
"shen" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"shen" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Shen on i mean it looks incredible the trailers have been amazing like the marketing campaign is is huge there's something magical about this movie and it reminds me of 1989 right before batman came out i don't i don't know if you remember though of it'll everybody was kind of he really great about it you will seem like batman shirts everywhere and that was really unusual this fuel similarly and lake i i've i feel like it's going to surprise a lotta people before we go to this washer break you know that were given away tickets to see black panther at our upcoming screening on tuesday february thirteen at seven thirty pm at the mc orange let's give away a pair right now caller tin give us a call at eight hundred five two zero one kfi eight hundred five two zero one five three four un a guests will be joining us at our exclusive screening of marvels black panther when we come back more with dennis kover marvels black panther the illustrated history of a king the complete comics chronology kfi am 640 more stimulating talk microchip he has the news a ban on a residential woodfires is it a fact for most of the south coast airbase at until midnight because of unhelpful air quality residents of orange county a non desert nonmountain areas of la riverside san bernardino counties cannot ordered loyd in fireplaces woodstoves firepit sir and the other appliance man woman and two children if been heard what a vehicle crashed into a home on west fifty seven straightening park mesa heights area of south la the man who was thirty years old in critical condition the other three people heard are said to be in good condition victoria beckham says he's not going on tour and neither are the spice girls.

Shen batman loyd victoria beckham dennis kover la riverside san bernardino thirty years
"shen" Discussed on Dunc'd On Basketball Podcast

Dunc'd On Basketball Podcast

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"shen" Discussed on Dunc'd On Basketball Podcast

"Shen but you think about is longterm role in enemy now with covington simmons and embodied looking locked in has three key pieces of this venue alight the colangelo can look at this overall picture in terms of who makes sense with those guys and there are kind of lottery ticket type players that they can that they can try and i don't think they should necessarily he's the best as on that and then also i believe they still have the room exception which they could present only throw some throw some money yet if the if the right person either through a by out or whatever circumstance just just gets on the market to just try to find an answer and that would be nice to use because does it require any assets and it's not like they're anywhere close to the tax so it could be a good a good little asset for them to use a tool for them to use moving forward who would have to be so obviously on the fridge marco there are a lot of teams that have some fire part of their billets futher analysis in the western the really well that was going to be my random question so we can titles in my question was built growth my question was going to be how many wins do you think the eighth seed ends up with in the less uh well as of now the blazers are projected to be the scene and they are projected to have forty two wins now the pels are projected a fish one game behind the blazers their number nine but then you go down to the clippers with thirty win so you know i think probably forty one it would be right about at forty one 42 but we'll see them in the jazz of continue to play okay without go bear they have a lot of depth other than him the thunder clawed back to five hundred but they're not really playing any better in in some ways actually playing worse than they were of beforehand i think they're point differential as they were at one point eight in twelve and now of of clawed back to five hundred making them seven in three or their last few they actually got an extremely lucky in close scheme over these last few and if kind of been playing worse the deepens has slipped a little bit in the.

Shen covington simmons colangelo blazers clippers
"shen" Discussed on The Wellness Business Podcast

The Wellness Business Podcast

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"shen" Discussed on The Wellness Business Podcast

"So we're really were really gearing this podcast to be difference to really be different than what we view as the traditional podcast format where you have a guest come on and you interview them and what's their history an you know what's their claim to fame and and really it's like at the end it was a great story but there wasn't really anything to take action on so arco our intention with every single episode is to give you a a shot a tip a and some type of action item but you can go forth matt next week and implement like we want to give you the the resource ord thenld step by step up to make it happen in your business and again simplify this so little little word taking that overwhelming frustrates shen out of the business building a part of your business and making it really simple yeah i love that becausei think that is one thing that is really missing you're listening to podcast not all final one full but can now underway deal widow ice yeahi love that every episode we are going to have at least one take away that you can use so um you can go ahead and implement that and start making more progress what would be the thing that you would say a while nece professionals are struggling with the most what do you think is like the biggest um neck and their business okaythe topped that come to mind will one the the big one.

shen