35 Burst results for "Shen"

Get That Retinol Going

Forever35

01:52 min | Last month

Get That Retinol Going

"I'm going to add just a few things to my routine because realistically it won't be more than that. And i'm shooting for success here. What would you suggest prioritising. I'm thirty seven running on less than ideal sleep with some lines around my eyes and mild masked knee thoughts question mark. I do have thoughts. Do you have thoughts. I do. But i'm wondering if you're going to lead us down a path toward exfoliating shen but what i was going to recommend was a retinol me too me too. That's where i'm going okay. So we're on the same page here you if you want to kind of dip your toe into the land of retinol. Without spending too much money the ordinary has some good retina products. Kate did. You have retinal suggestions. I really likes consumables retinal. And i started with their retinol point three for face and they only go up from there then they have a point five and a one so it's sixty seven dollars which is a price tag that is high but that tube has lasted me a very long time a lot. And it's like it's you know how sometimes something is expensive and you get like two drops of it and you're like yes yes yes. I'm filled with rage. This is not that you don't need a lot and so the tube goes a long way especially because starting out. You're not going to be using it often. You know you might just want to try once a week twice a week etc but i like a retinol. Because you're saying you a fine lines that just feels like a nice thing to add only at night but it definitely especially. If you're getting into your late thirties. I say that retinal going

Kate
Independent Sports Consultant Leon Mann Discusses Racism in Soccer

ESPN FC

04:59 min | 2 months ago

Independent Sports Consultant Leon Mann Discusses Racism in Soccer

"So how you take it knowing that this has been something. You've been working on campaigning for ages. Now i mean vegetables. Thank you for me on can share some thoughts and views. It's great to be with both of you You know. I'm big fans of both your work. It's a real honor to be on here but It does what happened last summer. You know it was the realization of the problems that we've been talking about for many many years decades you know in. Shuckers dykes wallet. Back in terms of is what. Show racism. The red card myself. I've been working with campaign. Kick racism out football now known as kick out and guns but this football blacklist together and the black to a major spill around journalism and these conversations have been ongoing around right out week kind of diversify our industry. How do we ensure we see black leaders in our industry and how do we change. Dynamic swiftly and those conversations were incredibly frustrating because that would be a win in the room but it would be a lack of action to follow them So as a result of that we kept on having lots of conversations with barre barre slow progress but what happens in the summer it the game to store to reflect an actually as a community. We'll stood together and said no this is this is not going to continue anymore We cannot sell people treated this way. And we're not going to have this going to stand for. I think the fact that we're ruled on lockdown at the time meant that people were very very focused on this issue and as a result of that It feels like with with moving forward in a in a much more positive direction. in terms of the actions. And i'm you know privy to With the chief executives of lee seung susceptible associations etc and it lonely be judged on the actions. Of course bofill am. I do say this with some kind of kool shen because of twenty years of working on this. But i feel like we're in a place where we can get some real progress made leon as as transformative as twenty twenty has been i. I wanna talk a little bit about the start of couponing of the blacklist. What was you spock. And why kind of given the social challenges of the The last two years you felt the need to do that email as as as you already mentioned it was in and i'm sure you recognize would have been in such a frustrating atmosphere to not. Yeah i mean th th the black this was was born out of you know wanting to do something when type response. I had control over so looking for the kick out. Racism out full. It was a campaign was fantastic. Transitioning into a journalist with the bbc where it was working as a presents when report was great for me as an individual also had freedom to kind of put some actions in place. So i could control and drive myself alongside with my community. So i was as a campaigner meetings with various black people but black people that my friends and family from the black community would never know so when they're talking to me about How did you get get a job in football. And leon how why. Why do we never see any black representation. I said well the dead as many but they are there. So i thought well how do we shine a light on these people to celebrate contribution but also show the next generation of young black men and women. Listen you wanna be a lawyer in football. You can do it because this person has done it. And they're working at this. You want to be working in a major department. You wanna be a doctor. You wanna do all these kinds of jobs. You can't do it because these people have come before you. They all the pioneers that we should be celebrating in a similar way to how we celebrate a pioneering back players in every single position. We should celebrate these people as a way of opening the due to the next generation. Now of course that only works if that comes together with opportunity. Because i can go into community show about look you gamble Look here baltimat- live people arrive adult. It doesn't open Then they'll just turn around and disappearance of industries and just kind of have a relationship with football They will you on the tv or go to gags. So that's the bit. I think we need to work on you. Know in terms of where are the opportunities you know how much what the game is doing to attract retain and develop people bring a different diversity to the game and also not to see as as a charitable act.

Football Barre Barre Lee Seung Bofill Kool Shen Leon BBC
Why Biden's economic team would rather go too big on COVID-19 relief

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

05:29 min | 3 months ago

Why Biden's economic team would rather go too big on COVID-19 relief

"What is going to happen in this economy. Prison biden treasury secretary yelling and a couple of big name. Ceo's including j p morgan's jimmy diamond and sonia singapore from gap had confab in the oval office. Today the president's economic relief plan of course was the topic at hand. Barabra morty is the deputy director of the national economic council at the white house. Welcome to the program. Thanks for having me. Let's start with the news of the day shall we. The meeting in the oval office today between president biden. Insects are yelling and some big business. Ceo's the head of the chamber of commerce was there jamie diamond from j. p. morgan chase. What is the president trying to do getting big business lined up behind him and this relief plant. Well i think that he is looking for their support for the bill and for their knowledge that we need to go big in this moment. I think what the president is hearing from. His top economic advisers is that We are at a precarious moment. Just last week. The jobs report came out and showed that job. Growth is really stalling in america. Even though we're about ten million jobs short of where we were pre pandemic and so. I'm secretary yellen down to his other economic advisers. There is a uniform belief that we need to go. We need to fundamentally alter the trajectory of the recovery and we need to make sure that we're putting money behind putting a vaccine people's arms because the fastest way to get the economy. Moving again is to make sure that we be cooked. Totally agree with the vaccine being this economy right now. I cannot and will not argue with that. But i do want to ask you about this idea of going big as you know. There are some consternation by some that may be one point. Nine trillion dollars is too much that it is in fact more than the economy needs given where for example. The congressional budget office says. We're going to be this summer Where'd you get one point nine trillion dollars and is that too much. I know we don't believe it's too much. And so i wanna talk a little bit about the process by which the president and his team put this package together. I would describe it as a bottom up process so for example there are nearly seven million americans who are behind on their rent an at risk of addiction. We need to provide rental assistance. Those people in the package provides the match rental assistance needed to make sure we keep them in their homes from secretary yell and two other top economic advisors. You is your an asymmetric risks situation. And by that. I mean the risks of going to small with this package far outweigh the risks of going too big so we add that all up. I think the president is very comfortable with the size of the american rescue plan. And i think the american people agree with him. Because there's something like seventy percents support for the package. Let's talk about the the flip side of of going through small which is the concern. The president has one of the concerns about going to big is that there may be some inflation coming in this economy with so much money coming in so soon with the pent up demand. That is sure to happen. Once people can go out and spend and travel and and enjoy life again Are you not worried about that. Well a group monitoring all sorts of different risks to economy and secretary yellen and and others have made clear that they are carefully monitoring the risks of inflation issue. Is that if you do too. Little means that people are going to go hungry. It means that people are going to be booted out of their homes in the middle of pandemic and those are just not acceptable outcomes to the president and look. We are far below the feds inflation target and have been for a very very long time and not to get too wonky owner. I think that the chair powell and others have said the goal is actually to increase in play shen to get closer to that two percent target that they have were. We're a long ways off. I i wonder how Given the the makeup of of the president's economic team many of whom were around in two thousand eight and two thousand nine how scarred people are by the prospect of going to small with a relief. Bill well i can't speak for others and i was not personally there in two thousand and eight thousand nine but i do think that there is a an assessment of the latest and best economic evidence. You look at a where interest rates have been how they have been low extended period of time and you weigh You costs and the risks of adding to the deficit. And i think it very clearly comes out in favour of going big me pick up on something you just said because it struck me when the president said something similar a number of weeks ago that He is he is taking a page from the republicans. Playbook saying look we have to borrow. We have to do deficit spending. It doesn't matter how we pay for it. And i i. Maybe you don't know this. Maybe weren't in those conversations but how did he come around to. You know what we're going to borrow the money the heck with it again. He and his team have been Deep into the economic evidence. And i think over the last five or ten years yet. Economic evidence in support of more robust deficit financing particularly for a temporary emergency measures such as. This one is pretty airtight. The president has been clear that when it comes to permanent changes in policy in other words policy that involves spending each and every year for the foreseeable future that he does think that that should be offset with new tax increases on the wealthy and on big corporations so again i think that is a view that is backed up by the best economic evans

Secretary Yellen Oval Office J P Morgan Jimmy Diamond Sonia Singapore Barabra Morty President Biden Jamie Diamond Morgan Chase National Economic Council Biden Treasury Chamber Of Commerce Congressional Budget Office White House America Shen
Gogglebox faces union probe after reports of backstage bullying

The Media Podcast with Olly Mann

04:52 min | 3 months ago

Gogglebox faces union probe after reports of backstage bullying

"Let's kick off with some behind the scenes telling us a member of the crew on channel four's goggle box says that working conditions on the show Quite inhumane we know. These things are report by friend of the politics. Morrison adt the guardian ad for us. What exactly was alleged by this. Anonymous recently departed member of the production team and my understanding user as being a number of different allegations including People having to work extremely long hours in edit some you know. Obviously that has the kind of unsatisfied. Shen from the higher ups which is caused the shouting and various bullying bullying allegations from there And it just seems it's it's a production where the pressure was Just really piled on. I say union members to stop at anything union members off. It's kind of everyone that wasn't a top level. Seems to have really go in the neck when it comes to that production wished. Just frankly is i just personally. Don't get it. I think when you show. That's not big why it doesn't have all the resources to to make sure that everyone can run. That production properly is beyond me from my perspective. I joined the industry. Because i thought it was gonna be fun and i think that once you get into it because of the freelance culture because of the way that there's so much pressure and over the years because times and budgets have been squeezed. It's it's just become more and more stressful to to get things done and on also on top of that. There's been a huge amount egos creative egos existed in this industry as we as we all know and sometimes they can tip over into being a an incredibly toxic workplace And i just think it's i just think is really really sad that we have to wait until all of this outrage comes out and people have to make kind of complaints anonymously before inkling donna it. We should stress that they are compliant. Onuma sources as studio lambert gave the guardian a statement saying it takes the welfare of its teams extremely seriously across its productions and has a number of measures in place to encourage people to come forward with any concerns they may have as well as support systems for range of issues in the last twenty four hours back to his joined in as well having what if they've been saying they've set up their inquiry and i think they look they want to look much more broadly at the industry as a whole rather than To qassam on google books. But i think nobody box is a really good example because it is a very wealthy well established company. It's very well established brand that be making it. For years i mean obviously. There's the very fast turnaround on it. Which would put enormous pressure on on rolling those shows out but nevertheless it's a brand that's existed for a really long time and so by the time the series whatever you would think that you would have your production process. Fairly well oiled and organized. I just think it's about the culture of companies that can arise and as far as said when you go sania nia people who behaved badly. It becomes very very difficult for junior people to to call them out. It becomes very difficult. Doesn't it when it's a hit. That's kind of what we learn here. Isn't it because. I know from friends in the industry as well. The you actually take the job with a spring in your step as a freelance. Because you think we'll get through it for six or twelve weeks and then i'll have a terrestrial credit on my cv and it's well paid and there's no point making a fuss about out. Just do it because it's goku box and it's a hit sort of unlikely that studio lambert and gentlemen were completely unaware of the gossip. Everyone else was completely innocent. Yeah ice been known in the industry for quite a long time. And i absolutely would not believe they were not unaware and of course unfortunate that culture of coming in for twelve weeks thirteen weeks ain't going away and saying nothing encourages. The practice continued. Never she gets surfaced until for example surface. Now i think in a way this is not a new story and indeed on this very podcast. We've discussed this topic several times in the past and we've talked about it not just in the context of tv production within other sectors in the media industry but sick in the newspaper industry for example where As almost being an acceptance in the past by subs pushing people on stories pushing them to get more copy out and so. I think you know any industry that permits bullying by management should not be allowed to do so. It's not an acceptable practice. We all understand that deadlines can be tight. We will understand that. Maybe resources a tight. That's something you have to sort of live with. But how you handle that pressure or how you deliver. That pressure is difficult. I mean there's nothing wrong with the manager setting a deadline. But you don't shout at people you can always discuss things in a calm rational way to say. Look either it can be done or it can't so this sort of shouting culture bullying culture unacceptable but it does seem to be it's almost become endemic and almost accepted in certain sections of the media. And it really has to change. It really does.

Morrison Adt Onuma Shen Lambert Sania Nia Donna Google
Celebrated Black doctor resigns in protest, alleging racism at Seattle Children's hospital

News, Traffic and Weather

00:52 sec | 4 months ago

Celebrated Black doctor resigns in protest, alleging racism at Seattle Children's hospital

"The longtime director of Seattle Children's Odessa Brown Clinic, has suddenly resigned. Co most Patrick Quinn reports in the story First reported by Crosscut, Dr Danielson said quote the institution is replete with racism and a disregard for people who don't look like them and leadership. 2017 comes. Molly Shen feature Danielson fighting for expansion to reach more Families of color. Dr. Danielson resignation reportedly comes after two other colleagues. Both people of color also resigned or felt forced out. In a statement to spokesperson for Seattle Children's Hospital, said their board is looking into Daniel since claims and developing a syriza of actions, adding quote as an organization. We are committed to racial equity, diversity and inclusion will also holding ourselves accountable. We plan to show that commitment to our actions and thorough consideration of any claims of racism or bias. Patrick

Seattle Children's Odessa Brow Patrick Quinn Dr Danielson Molly Shen Dr. Danielson Crosscut Seattle Children's Hospital Danielson Daniel Patrick
China Orders Ant Group to Revamp Its Business

Bloomberg Daybreak: Asia

00:48 sec | 5 months ago

China Orders Ant Group to Revamp Its Business

"Chinese regulators have ordered and group to return to its roots as a provider of payment services. Bloomberg's Rosalind Shen has the story time is a central bank summoned and executives over the weekend. A statement from the PBOC says the company needs to quote rectify lending insurance and wealth management services. It also says aunt needs to understand the necessity of overhauling its business on once and to come up with a timetable for doing so as soon as possible and in response said it will set up a special team to create proposals and it timetable for an overhaul. The authorities didn't ask for a break up of the company, but this represents a serious threat to the expansion of Jack Mars Online finance empire. And a curb on its most lucrative business, consumer loans and wealth management in Hong Kong. I'm Muslim Chin Bloomberg Daybreak Asia

Rosalind Shen Pboc Bloomberg Jack Mars Hong Kong Asia
interview With Chad Lawson

Untangle

06:09 min | 5 months ago

interview With Chad Lawson

"Chad. It's really great to be here with you on tangled today. Thanks for being with us. Thank you so much patricia. Really appreciate that. Yeah so. I had the opportunity while i was preparing for this interview to listen to your music and i have to say oh my god. It is so beautiful. I've been listening to it for the last couple of days in the background when i wake up in the morning and i'm just so happy to be introduced to it. That means a lot. it really does. It's so beautiful. And i was telling somebody about it last night and we started talking about the difference between music with lyrics that inspires you and instrumental music like yours. Which is piano that you actually feel physically emotionally moved by it and i am wanna know more about you and your background and what inspired you to first of all. Choose the piano and second of all create this kind of music. Thank you very much. Those words are not lost on me when i was five years old. Who are talking about four years ago. There used to be a show television coach. Sean and so shot an hour's like ado band that had a television show and so each week as a family we would sit around and we would watch sean naylor. I wasn't raised in a musical environments. Why parents didn't play an instrument. My brother management with one thing that i think it was a simple fund attainment and there is a guy doing something on one of the instruments and he was having the time of his life. It was unbelievable. It means his smile is so infectious. And i just remember at the age of five. I remember looking like i want to do that. He's just having the time of life. That's what i want to do. Fast forward a little bit. My parents rented a piano goes. Who's gonna believe a five year old. And i started taking lessons dan and forty years later. I'm still taking piano lessons. I will until my fingers longer move. God forbid or i'm in the ground so there's something about always wanting to explore and go further with your craft and that excites me. So i was very traditional first class concerned Did the classical thing. Then i did start exploring different types of music. Not just classical and i really got into jazz heavily and the thing that i love so much about being brought up with jazz and classical as there's one key thing and you hit the nail on the head and the introduction a second ago and that's malady you have to have a song bird and music you have to have. That's why people love lyrics much because that's a somber something that they can seeing when they're not with radio so those lyric sages get into your ear also may find the way into your heart and your just. That's why were so moved by. Music is because of the melody the Together and i think what's so fascinated by instrumental. Music is when you remove that lyrical contents. You still have the melody. But at that point you're allowing the listener to create their own there. Because it's so interesting. Like with each song that i do. I try not to over exaggerate. When i'm speaking to people about what the pieces about because a lot of times what i found is it may be completely different. Who are the listener and it could be two different listeners. Naked hear the same song naked. Say well. I was envisioning this or i was envisioning this a lot of music. Particularly your favorite songs you have to go back and say why is that my fears and lot you look at it and you say i was going through this season in my life. This is a song that i i met someone with. And so that song is this. really mitt. Lot emotionally relational. And so i think the court part of music that i've always been drawn to in this. Forty years of studying is melody. How can you craft something that really. Just dials into the heart of the listener. And then you bring them to that point and you allow them to carry on from there. They pick up that torch if you will and take with them. Through whatever life situations they're experiencing. Yeah it reminds me of how i feel when we're look at a piece of art. We don't really know the intention of the artists necessarily but it holds certain meaning for us. And i wanted to ask you so you have this beautifully meaningful music and you seem to be from what i've ascertained so far deeply passionate about mezei shen. When did that start in your life. When did you begin to meditate. Why did you gravitate towards meditation. And then how did that intersect with your music. Love it thank you a number of years ago. Let's say run ten or so. I began to have some health issues. And so i found a chinese reflexologist who just completely turned my world upside down and the best of ways and at that point it was a very simple thing i walk and his. Oh it's this. let's fix your chee. And he did. I was sick. Great what it's two parts. At that point. I really became very interested in holistic food in the holistic lifestyle. Where does that fall in place. And how is it that were not made aware of it at least here in the states so there was a balance i mean i have grown up in church since i was knee high and so there that area of prayer that has always been part of my life but i knew that there are parts as well as it specifically when she starts speaking about your wellness your overall health until i knew that there was a marriage somewhere in between

Sean Naylor Chad Patricia Sean DAN Mezei Shen Mitt
"shen" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

06:04 min | 5 months ago

"shen" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"Yeah she said like. Where did you get this idea or bug of wanting to be an actor so yeah but my whole family is very supportive in very loving and they would help and do anything for me which is great. And let's go back to twelve years old when you said you. That's when you really felt like the bug bit you but you kinda kept it quiet. What was going on when you're twelve years old junior high. It was elementary school. This acting group came to our school and worked with all all of us and creating these stories of saving the princess and just imagining monsters and helping so just the imagination. And i just felt so alive and i believed everything and everything was so real and i was in the moment creating this and that that was that failing where wow i wanna do this. Yeah it was decades before you acted on it. Yes and it was my very first production was for the king and i and this was in vancouver british columbia for the theatre under the stars and the they were having auditions so i thought i want to do this. I'm going to take the plunge into it. So i went to audition and then i got a call back and it was very interesting the callback because they said when you come. Please look as asian as you can okay. That's that was. My reaction is like oh okay. It was funny. Because i was maybe there was only maybe one or two other actors that were asian in this production so everyone else was occasion and they had wigs and makeup to make them look asian. So yeah that was very interesting. My late sister she had the opposite experience. She got the acting bug back in junior high. Well i think she was early in high school it part of the drama club and in productions and there's this thing sacrimento called the music circus that every summer if big tent and they put on all these shows and so have they were casting for way for it the sound of music okay this way before colorblind casting. So there's my sister who's a wonderful singer as well as you know as ernest actress and she's standing in line audition to be one of the von trapp daughters right again. Someone comes up there. I don't know if i remember this correct. I don't know if it was someone else auditioning for one of the roles or it was someone from the production side. But they kind of quietly and and i think lovingly said to her. You know you really don't have a shot here. This is a blonde haired. Yes three and family. And i think you're really going to just waste your time And my sister that align and she came home and told us the story and she was still alive today. She probably be older than you. She never got to see more. This colorblind casting. That was going on. So i think it's interesting that here. Here's a prevention in canada where it's about these people. Yeah and they don't have enough to pull from. So i mean without even trying grace you more asia than most of the people trying. I know so wins very funny. Very funny i was kinda actually lower shots. But but i just went in and as a myself. Well if i remember the movie version of that and of course you'll bring plays the thai king so you know. This is a different time that we're living in now Yes yeah you have to be. It's been. I think two years now since crazy. Rich asians asian august. You have to be since you're still active in the business. Just thrilled at at least from my sideline viewpoint. It seems like there's a lot more opportunities. Now for asian. Asian american actors in hollywood is trying very hard. But it's it's still slow going. I think yeah. Yeah but there are a lot more opportunities definitely and a lot more asian actors are out there now because i think parents now are more supportive. Young people being actors now. It's not as difficult. I've had a number of veteran asian asian american actress on the show and they all have stories to tell where they were being asked to asian it up if you will not just look but accents that don't match their heritage those kind of things. Do you have any stories like that grace. Yes a lot of times. I would get characters for koreans or japanese and to be honest. I have a hard time creating the accents for that. So one time. I had to learn a lot of koreans and in a short period of time so i had to decline that audition because i felt i wouldn't be able to represent properly but i think they're getting more specific. Who do you mean by that actually. Having korean actresses to play the korean parts and chinese for the chinese parts so they're they're getting more specific that way. I think the way i look at that. That can be good and bad for the actor side. Because it's like okay. It's an asian american. Oh i'm chinese. They want korean..

sacrimento von trapp british columbia vancouver ernest asia canada hollywood
"shen" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

06:58 min | 5 months ago

"shen" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"World war two imperial japan established military brothels known as comfort stations in the pacific region as their military campaign intensified. Many young women from korea. China the philippines and other parts of asia as well as the netherlands and australia. Some as young as thirteen were forced or duped into sexual enslavement. Serving the japanese soldiers as comfort women. Many of these women died or were killed before they actually had a chance to live as women. Meanwhile survivors of the harrowing militarized sexual. Enslavement bound up being shrouded in a profound sense of shame. Gil living in the shadows of their former selves resulting in an understated Of the war at even today remains an unfamiliar war story. Too many inspired by this true historical event breaking the silence tells the story of francesca. Who's finally coming to terms with her past after forty years by breaking her silence about being forced to work as a comfort woman. This was written and directed by award winning filmmaker saying jong and the star playing. Francesca is our wonderful guest. This episode gration. Who i i came across in our little local sierra rajouri clay house when she was playing on may shoe in the first stage production after years of the joy. Luck club so. I want to welcome you. Grace to the podcast podcast. I can thank you very much for having me. You are playing. What i have to believe is a very emotionally spiritually difficult role. As the current day elderly frencesco who has to open herself up to this terrible time of tragedy and injustice in her life yes very emotional and even talking about it and i didn't go through. What she went through is very emotional. Gets me all choked up a lot of times. But yes francesca. She was from maui. Actually that explains her last name. I was wondering about that. yes so. She's half chinese and half hawaiian. Oh and growing up in hawaii you know what why is just like paradise in a really good childhood and her father and grandfather were fought in world war one so when world war two came along she really wanted to help and serve and protect the country the land because why. The land is very sacred. She really wanted to help and serve so what she did. She signed up for the red cross and that was something where she felt. She could really help. And so she being eighteen nineteen young and just by basis in full the life and wanting to serve and so when she finished her training with the red cross. You got stationed in hong kong and at the saint stephen's college which is a real place in hong kong and this attack where the japanese soldiers came and just killed all the wounded soldiers. There the doctors rape and mutilation in just this horrible horrible. That happened and it really happened there. In hong kong and from there she was taken to these comfort stations and was a sex slave for her. It was three years but for a lot of these women was even more and these women who are just young fourteen fifteen sixteen eighteen and lot of times. They were tricked with their families. Saying oh we need these women to help in the factories making uniforms for the soldiers. These families didn't have money. So that's what happened in. This was not true and lot of times. They were just pulled from the streets into these trucks. So it's very tragic. And for francesca. After the war ended she really couldn't go back to her home and she couldn't tell what happened to her family. She didn't want her family to take that burden of what she went. Through with the shame in guilt in just the trauma on you know you felt filthy. So she that'll the new york and started a life and and she actually took to alcohol to numb the pain and she had a very difficult life in and she had this daughter and she couldn't really relate to her a lot so her daughter had a very difficult childhood and like and they kind of are a little estranged because she never told her daughter what happened to her either later on in the short film they see kind of fight i. The daughter comes to the united nations where she decided to speak out. And where the new york times reporter comes to her house and she actually find sanchez ska and wants to know her story and share her story and have her come to the. Un francesco was reluctant at first but then she decided she wanted to because she has lung cancer. So you want to share this before she passes. So that's the story in a nutshell. The approach creating this francesca character by sailing jong. That was an unexpected opening. Your starting with this hawaiian american in the american red cross vs being a young girl from a poor village somewhere in asia. That sort of thing for me. It felt i could be closer to her 'cause from hawaii from need the us. So i didn't have to put on an accent nsen so i felt closer when i first learned of the whole plight of the comfort. Women it was obvi- remarking fifty years since it happened. And i'd never heard of this and i'm sort of a amateur student of world war two my dad having served and fought in and all that kind of stuff and i remember occidental college. I don't know if you ever came across his. They were focusing on this and they had a whole curated experience of the comfort women on their campus. I took my staff and myself and we went down there and we were just walks impression. We got was most of these comfort. Women were from korea and now as this movie is talking about is yes many korean young women but there were wind from all over the place view. Do you know approximately how have historians being able to kind of put a number on like how many women were actually made it into the sex slaves during this.

francesca gration hong kong saint stephen's college red cross Gil jong Francesca asia korea philippines netherlands pacific japan hawaii maui australia China Grace Un francesco
"shen" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

03:30 min | 5 months ago

"shen" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"Unlike previous people that had gone before me. You know when i stepped off that stage i was still passer kin. Or maybe reverend fog it was kind of an interesting gut check for myself. Because i thought hey you know is this important to be. Is it not important to me. Why should it matter does it matter. And honestly there's moments when i in early on when i felt like hey come on. That's that's not fair. I have a doctorate now. I don't in any way shape or form. Compare the work that i had to do to get my doctor of ministry degree to the work that people have to do who get. Phd's or md's. But hey i didn't make up the system. My degree is considered a doctoral degree now. It's helped me when i had to teach as an affiliate professor at my alma mater seminary. It definitely helps to have dr in front of your name but by then and this is decades. After i earned my doctorate. I just gotten used to either be called pastor. Ken reverend falling especially in the drug clinic or just pretty much every day. Ken so then. I would run into my graduate students. Most of them are asian american again. They were raised very similar. Kind of cultural milieu. As i was and so there's no way they feel comfortable calling me can so one of the first questions after are introduced on the first day of class. You know all the requirements over the syllabus. The number one question that would come up was so what do we call you. Shall we call you. Dr fong you know and as much as the old me would have loved to have heard that president me was like nah. That's too formal. you can call me. Ken and again ladies asian students were like no. No no no no. We can't call our professor. How about professor. I like okay. But then i feel like. I'm on gilligan's island pastor ken. No that doesn't work. You're not part of my church. So i'm not your pastor. So in the end i said you know whatever is comfortable. I'm comfortable that you call me ken. But you can also call me dr following if that works for you and so that's kind of where things were left reflecting back on this about joe biden. I think it's completely up to her. And she's in a completely different category as a woman versus me as a man and she hasn't. Add so to me. It's not just what other people think. You should call yourself whether or not you deserve to have dr in front of your name or not. I think that's completely whether or not you actually earned a doctorate from an accredited institution and if that's your professional title and you go by that and it's it's kind of attached to your research and your kurt working and all of that by all that tyler is completely appropriate. If on the other hand are first lady elect actually chose for whatever her reasons were to. Stop referring. Herself as dr jill biden. That's also completely up to her but it's not up to some guy who last hot on adjunct class twenty years ago at northwestern university who doesn't have any kind of doctorate to be you know making these assertions to her. I just found his whole piece completely out of left field entirely disrespectful. And at the same time a a little bit triggering.

Ken reverend Dr fong Ken ken gilligan joe biden dr jill biden tyler northwestern university
"shen" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

06:04 min | 5 months ago

"shen" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"Is veteran gration. She was born in hong kong raised in vancouver british columbia but actually is based now here in los angeles and she has worked quite a bit in film tv and local theater. She's here to talk about a short film that she starts in called breaking the silence. It's been making the festival circuit and winning all kinds of accolades grace. Plays the lead of francesca. Ko hola who is a surviving comfort woman and thus far the film has won forty two awards and has had eighteen. Nominations and greater self has received multiple awards for best actress in this film. So definitely i hope you'll stick around and listen to my conversation with grace to talk all about this historic atrocity. The film that has tried to capture the emotions and the shame and the processing that has happened over the decades where these comfort women and to hear a little bit about grace's story speaking of women not getting respect. I came across a news item. Today where someone wrote an op. Ed for the wall street journal and this was an essentially encouraging. First lady elect dr jill biden to drop the doctor from the front of her name. That because she is not an md. A medical doctor because she has a educational doctorate in the writer of this op. Ed was basically asserting that she's not really a doctor. Anyway because she doesn't deliver babies really and You know having the title of first lady. The united states should be all the title that she should need so kind. His argument was a. You're not a real doctor and be nobody cares so does go with the title that you're about to inherit from melania this person's Piece got quite a lot of attention on twitter today and rightly so. I think that people are pointing out the fact that women with doctorates of even. Md's tent historically not be given the respect. That men with doctorates are given and that she has every right whether she has an e. d. or a phd a not just if she has an md to referred herself as doctor because she did the doctoral work and She actually uses it in her professional teaching career at the community college. So i just find this person's reasoning completely vacuous and another very recent example of how women throughout history around the world regardless of class or station or educational status or lack thereof are simply not given the kind of respect that they deserve. I'm glad that someone with such an educational background so much class and dignity. Dr jill biden is soon going to be the first lady of the united states. I will probably continue to refer to her as dr biden and totally appropriate and it works for me and if people have a problem with that they're the problem reading. The story did remind me of what happened when i earned my doctorate now. Some of you don't know that or maybe you once knew that. And it's just kinda slip your mind because i actually. I hardly ever used the term doctor in reference to myself on the business card. Actually for this podcast. I refer to myself as dr phone because number one do have doctorate and number two. I'm hoping that when passing this card out to especially would be guess but also possible listeners. That especially if they're asian american seeing that the our period in front of my name is going to give them a little bit pause. And maybe take this show a little seriously before they've even heard a syllable i'm saying now. What kind of doctor do i have. I don't have an education doctorate. I don't have dr philosophy. I'm certainly not a medical doctor. I actually have a doctor of ministry. And when you talk about this to me continues to be one of the oddest abbreviations of a doctorate. Because it's for someone who typically is a working pastor and wants to do additional graduate work and you write a dissertation and you know you have to defend it gets published and whatnot but essentially shorthand for doctor of ministry is demon now. That's not quite how we're taught to sit. You say oh. What kind of doctor do you have any say. We'll have a demon okay but it does still strike me as so bizarre as someone who was working as a pastor for four decades to tell someone in conversation oh by the way i have a demon church growth. Yeah weird now. I remember growing up. As a kid and occasi- meeting pastors who had earned their doctor some had dr ministries but if they're really old that degree didn't really exist back then so lots of times that they had a doctorate was a phd in something and yeah we were taught from the get go to refer them as dr and so i also know that i was never allowed to call any adult by their first name. Not even especially my parents but But yeah any adult. They're either auntie or uncle who didn't get his presence or they were. Mr so-and-so and certainly someone was a doctor of any kind were always taught to refer them respectively so so it just happens. I don't know who made the decision that the year i got my doctor of ministry my demon which was one thousand nine hundred. Roughly around that time it kind of fell out of favor but it kind of fell out of tradition for people to refer to people with doctors ministry to us as doctors. So here you know. I put it in all this work all these years and i do this work. I go across the stage. Get my doctoral stole. I get my doctoral diploma..

gration Ko hola dr jill biden melania Ed Dr jill biden dr biden francesca british columbia hong kong the wall street journal vancouver united states los angeles grace community college twitter Mr
Music Week Morning Riddles

Chompers

02:32 min | 5 months ago

Music Week Morning Riddles

"Good morning it's time for chompers your morning and night tooth brushing shout. It's nieves it week and today we've got some musical riddles to get your brain bouncing to the beat. The first start rushing on the top of your mouth on one side making small circles with your rush around each to three years i riddle. I'm a very heavy instrument. My keys are black and white. i'm both string and percussion. And what kind is upright. What am i i know. He anos are both percussion instrument and a string instrument because of the way they work inside. I'll explain but after you switch to the other side of the top of your mouth when you press a key on the piano a little hammer strikes a string inside the piano that makes the sound so because a peon has both strings and is played by striking. It's both a string and uppercut shen instrument. Here's your next riddle. It's a really hard one. Some types are found on fish and some measure weight but when it comes to music i'm in groups of five six twelve or eight. What am i. you'll find out after you switch. You're brushing to the bottom of your mouth should reached the molar teeth. All the way in the back okay. Time to shout out the answer. A musical scale is a group of notes like this in a scale. The notes are played in order from lowest to highest or from highest to lowest. Your music. teacher might tell you to practice your skills so you can get better at your instrument switzer rushing to the other side of the bottom of your mouth but don't rush to her. Here's our last riddle one note on a piano you use them to open doors. Many sons are in one many melodies and scores. What am i tonight. The answer and for more harmonious scratchers until then make sure to rinse and long

Nieves Switzer
How To Self Publish Your Book Online With XinXii Publishing

Self-Publishing with Dale L. Roberts

05:23 min | 7 months ago

How To Self Publish Your Book Online With XinXii Publishing

"What's happening? I am just absolutely tickled to death that you take a little bit of time out today to spend a little bit of time with me to talk about one of my favorite things in self-publishing books. And you know how long we've been talking about it. They're going on sixteen weeks straight of discussing all the different Avenues it rest assured. We're not quite done but this is probably going to be one of the last month or this type of publishing they're going to talk about we're going to switch over into aggregate publishing and audiobook publishing more importantly in the coming weeks. So let's focus on this long last option. Now, this is not to say that I've exhausted every Avenue. I've just hit all the major Avenues some of the areas that people have asked me about the thing with self-publishing a book on off online is it can be overwhelming it can seem like oh my gosh, there's Amazon. There's Apple there's Barnes & Noble. There's Kobo. There's racket since rackets in scope. Oh, I said it twice just coughing. Twice is nice. There's smashwords. There's draft the Jewelers published. Oh my gosh. Well, I thought what better way to break it all down then just do an entire podcast series about this off. So in any event, we're going to be discussing an aggregate publisher an aggregate publisher works like this you upload your content to their platform and they feed it out to numerous Avenues on your behalf. Typically, typically an aggregate publisher takes a percentage of the net profits that come in from the different areas. Okay. Now too bad, there's other ones like published drive that charge a fee a subscription fee to do it since she's not so much like that, but I'm going to put a little bit of an asterisk next to this. So we're going to be talking about Shinji full disclosure song. I'm just curating information here. I've never used them. In fact today. I actually started breaking ground and started uploading an audiobook cuz I'm really curious. They have some Avenues. I don't see a page or through other areas like a CX or find a way voices or published drives. So I said, let's go and give this a shot. There's a little bit of an ambiguity about it though, and I'm going to discuss it here. Get too far ahead of myself. So Shen she's the name of the company. It's spelled x i n x i i and look it up. Yes. It is pronounced Shen. She actually found a video of someone saying it that actually is from the companies and she so european-based company and I always try to cross check to see if they're legit. If any aggregate Publishers good the alliance of Indian authors is one of the best organizations to cross-check any kind of services for self-publishers. You have something that's called the Watchdog service and on that Watch Dog service, they fully vet competition and they don't mince words if there's something a little bit of skew a little bit off. They're not going to recommend it. They'll probably put a caution rating or even avoid it altogether. With Shadow, it gets a recommended rating. Now that is like the top award, you know, there is excellent partner. But since she's not a partner, they're just recommending. So it's without that partner relationship that they have the recommendation. So that speaks volumes ahead of time. Keep in mind Ally the alliance of independent. Authors is run by any authors for any others. Isn't that somebody getting their you know Palms greased saying well, you know, if you give us good words, well, we'll go ahead and pay a little extra. Something doesn't work that way. So in any event, they distribute ebooks and audiobooks but no print books. And so if you're looking for another print-on-demand Avenue Shane, she's not it off. I try to do some digging to see if that was something I was coming any time soon, but I didn't find anything about it. Let's learn. With the books. They accept files. Oh my gosh, like I think thirty different file types. I will mention these ones real briefly here doc ePub PDF. Text PowerPoint. What? Yeah, they accept PowerPoint Excel. Yeah, they accept Excel spreadsheets what PostScript and so many more years. There's no minimum requirement or maximum threshold. Now, I'm going to have a little bit of an asterisk here because I saw they said there's no minimum requirement off. No, ma'am ran out of pages. Technically there is there is and and looks like it too far ahead ourselves here distribution goes out to Amazon the example Bookstore Barnes & Noble Google Kobo Scribd. They have 27 Avenues in total Plus. the shaanxi author page now Shinji author page is essentially a way that you can distribute through the senshi platform and because it's an aggregate publisher. You'll be going to the various Avenues. Let's say you're Distributing ebook over to Amazon. Everybody knows that if you have your book price between 299 and 99 at 70% through Amazon KDP. Well,

Partner Amazon Publisher Shinji Shaanxi Author Jewelers Apple KDP Shane Google Bookstore Barnes
President Trump’s Campaign Sues Philadelphia Over City’s Satellite Election Offices

Morning Edition

00:42 sec | 8 months ago

President Trump’s Campaign Sues Philadelphia Over City’s Satellite Election Offices

"President Trump's reelection campaign is suing the city of Philadelphia. NPR's Jen Newman says the suit stems from city officials blocking campaign representatives from observing residents registering to vote and filling out mail in ballots in election offices. The campaign's 14 page lawsuit claims the actions of Philadelphia officials have undermined election integrity. Trump campaign employees arrived at recently opened satellite election offices wanting to observe City election officials prevented them but offered the campaign a tour. Instead, the state's top election official says there's no right under Pennsylvania law to watch people fill out ballots. That's NPR's Shen

NPR President Trump Philadelphia Jen Newman Pennsylvania Official
Ruth Bader Ginsburg, aka 'Notorious RBG,' was an unparalleled cultural icon

News, Traffic and Weather

02:32 min | 8 months ago

Ruth Bader Ginsburg, aka 'Notorious RBG,' was an unparalleled cultural icon

"Ruth Bader Ginsburg, dubbed in later years, the notorious RBG was the second woman ever to serve on the Supreme Court began her tenure in 1993 President Bill Clinton. Appointed her before that she had a celebrated career as an attorney fighting for equal rights for women. She eventually became a cultural icon for women and Americans of all generations. Lots of local reaction to the death of Ginsberg as of yesterday, one of our former law clerks now sharing a profound impact. Civil rights champion had on her own life and career. For this we go to Komal is Joel Marino small and simple gesture for an icon of the legal community. As people gathered the Seattle center toe honor, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, she really wanted to ensure that every American heavy equal rights viewed by many as the legal architect of the civil rights movement. In 2002. Ginsburg took on a young and aspiring law clerk who is now a professor at the University of Washington. I feel like I couldn't really hoped for much better of a life in the life that she designed and lived. Elizabeth Porter was there is landmark opinions were forged on same sex rites and affirmative action cases. The experience would shape our own understanding of life. The law in the fight for equality that continues to this day. This is a political tragedy for the country, In my view, were deeply polarized place and we're losing an important steadying voice. Ginsberg herself faced discrimination coming out of law school and turned that into a lifelong quest for equality for all Americans. I think she wass absolutely the best sort of patriot. Aside from a storied career, Porter says Ginsberg loved art and music and was surrounded by people She loved. I can celebrate a beautiful Joyous life well lived. Whatever happens next, Professor Porter says she hopes the legitimacy of the Supreme Court doesn't get dragged down by political scheming in the upcoming appointment process. Now Coleman's Molly Shen reading Governor, Jay Anjali statement on Ginsberg's death, saying, We lost one of the greatest American Patriots to ever serve on the U. S. Supreme Court. Until he went on to say Justice. Ginsburg was a public servant who kept America true to its purpose. She never shied away from vigorously dissenting when the court set back the course of justice. Anjali is among the dozens of politicians and celebrities taking to social media to mourn Justice Ginsburg. They also include former President Bill Clinton, who appointed her. Clinton called Ginsberg a magnificent judge on a wonderful person come on

Ruth Bader Ginsburg Ginsberg U. S. Supreme Court Elizabeth Porter Bill Clinton President Trump Komal Jay Anjali Seattle Law Clerk Attorney University Of Washington Joel Marino Professor Coleman American Patriots America
Seattle Police Watchdog Releases 1st Batch Of Protest Findings

News, Traffic and Weather

00:43 sec | 8 months ago

Seattle Police Watchdog Releases 1st Batch Of Protest Findings

"Of Police Accountability, releasing its first findings from nearly 20,000 complaints filed against Seattle police during recent demonstrations. 13,000 of those complaints were from this incident at a protest in May. Where a young boy was pepper sprayed by police. After reviewing bodycam footage, the O P A cleared the officer of wrongdoing after determining that the officer was aiming the pepper spray at someone else. The child was hit unintentionally. In another case, the O P A found an officer did not follow training protocols win for 13 seconds. He held his knee on the neck of someone who was being arrested. They're recommending that Officer be disciplined. More findings will be released in the next few weeks. Almost Molly Shen

Officer Molly Shen Seattle
The Pandemic Is Pushing People Out of Prisons

Science Magazine Podcast

03:51 min | 8 months ago

The Pandemic Is Pushing People Out of Prisons

"The novel coronavirus and prison is dangerous combination in the united. States. One hundred and twenty thousand cases have been detected in prisons and one thousand incarcerated people have died so far these deaths and the danger of more have driven prison and jail reforms that have been long delayed staff writer. Kelly Servic is here to talk about De car Suray Shen in the US what is happening how researchers are weighing in on the process and how it's affecting public safety and Health Hi Kelly is there the US is unusual not just? In a large number of corona virus cases that we've had, but also in the size of its incarcerated population, how does the United States compare with other countries? In this respect? The US is is sort of the leader in terms of mass incarceration. Unfortunately, the US has the highest prison population of any country in the world with over two million people in in prison right now, it was very clear from the beginning of the pandemic that the system of jails and prisons in this country was going to be especially dangerous for. The people living in them because not only are they not designed structurally to allow for social distancing but many of them are already extremely overcrowded. There's been calls for years to D Karsh straight or to cut down on the number of people in prison and jails, and now there's been a big push to make this happen quickly what's happened with the number so far have we seen a big decrease in incarcerated people? So some analyses have suggested a decrease pretty early in the pandemic of about twenty, five percent of the. Population of jails in the US, which is pretty dramatic. That's something that a lot of jails have not been able to achieve in any other way but jails and prisons are are a bit different in this respect. Jails are often holding people who have not yet been convicted and are awaiting sentencing are waiting trial prisons meanwhile told people who are already convicted and serving sentences have not budged nearly as much in terms of population despite some efforts by states to reduce populations of seen figures of eight percent thirteen percent so still. Pretty, modest reductions there the numbers are going down how is this happening who's getting out or are people just never going in in the first place it's happening for all those reasons is happening in a bunch of different ways which was one of interesting things in talking to corrections administrators about this some jail systems have focused on, for example, eliminating the bail requirement that was keeping people there if they couldn't pay to get out or eliminating the requirement of people, sit in jail on parole violations of picking out specific populations. Of People that they felt didn't pose any public safety risk and and were there sort of on technical violations of various kinds prisons, it's been a little bit more complicated in that they've had to select groups of people. They don't pose any public safety risk and also are particularly high risk for covid. Some governors have commuted the sentences of people in prison because they're medically vulnerable or older, for example, or if they have a short time to serve on their sentence and then beyond all this, there's also the factor that A. Major reason that jails strength is simply because arrests went down particularly early in the pandemic as police officers were making fewer arrests, fewer people out on the streets, but also likely officers were seeking to avoid physical interactions where could so yeah, all these factors are complicated and some of them are are a bit more locked in place, and some of them are likely to fluctuate again as states reopen and things change with the pandemic. So it's really hard to to sort of know what's GonNa happen next

United States Kelly Servic Staff Writer Suray Shen D Karsh
Typhoon moves onshore in S Korea after battering Japan isles

The John Phillips Show

00:18 sec | 9 months ago

Typhoon moves onshore in S Korea after battering Japan isles

"Of thousands in Japan are evacuating ahead of the arrival of Typhoon Hai Shen. The storm is packing heavy rain, flooding and 100 mile per hour. Winds. Forecasters say the typhoon will brush Japan's coastal areas today on its way to make landfall in South Korea Monday. The South Koreans are on high typhoon alert.

Typhoon Hai Shen Japan South Korea
Japan braces for Super Typhoon Haishen

WBZ Morning News

00:34 sec | 9 months ago

Japan braces for Super Typhoon Haishen

"The second powerful typhoon to slam Japan in the past week, unleashing fierce winds and rain on Southern islands Typhoon Hai Shen Blowing off rooftops, leaving homes without power as it moved north into an area vulnerable to flooding and mudslides. Whether officials warning the rainfall could be equal to a bucket of water. Being poured over your head. Typhoon Hai Shen packing sustained winds of up to 112 MPH, on course to hit the Korean Peninsula sometime this

Korean Peninsula Japan
Typhoon Haishen approaches Japan packing powerful winds

On the Road with Dane Neal

00:16 sec | 9 months ago

Typhoon Haishen approaches Japan packing powerful winds

"Japan. It's packing winds of 112 miles an hour along with very heavy rainfall is Hai Shen is expected hit Okinawa tomorrow. This will be the second typhoon to hit Japan in as many days as Typhoon My ask hit southern Japan earlier this week. Stay up to date online all the

Japan Hai Shen Okinawa Japan.
Guangzhou bans frozen meat imports over virus fears

Bloomberg Daybreak: Asia

00:28 sec | 9 months ago

Guangzhou bans frozen meat imports over virus fears

"I'm moving on to China's southern coastal city gangs. Oh, it's ordered all companies to suspend imports of frozen meat and seafood from Corona virus hit areas. All workers have come into contact with frozen meat and seafood will also be required to be tested for the virus once a week. The order was issued after Shen sends local government found the virus on a sample of chicken wings imported from Brazil. The World Health Organization has said there have been no examples proving the virus could be transmitted as food

World Health Organization Shen China Brazil
"shen" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

04:57 min | 11 months ago

"shen" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"To the way that he had of conduct himself over the past year, and I, just I don't know found that I found that really interesting is that speaking could be violent act and I think to what we spoke about earlier in how we should be conscious of the sounds that we make conscious of the words that form the sentences that we form thoughts that we form. And I think that words if not, if not honoring the space around it right and not thoughtfully composed. Could could be violent. Right could have a violent effect on people certainly could have a discomforting effect on people, and it can certainly serve to just sort of add more noise and chatter to the world. anyways made me think about that, but yeah, it was a really interesting story to follow. And not knowing ahead of time what your movie was really going to do, and when you introduced Greg in the beginning of the familiar. Oh, this documentary, this guy in the whole the whole film. Yeah, right and that okay that that'll be interesting, and then it just kept opening. Right and he was just more kind of an example. Of someone who is pursuing? I had this Patrick like. What if we did a four thirty-three and invite you to be on? Pike S and we just sit here for an hour. I would have done that. Might? My dream has been to be invited to do Tedtalk and just stand up on the stage and say nothing for the entire time. I don't know how listeners. While I'm about halfway through that episode that. There is a place. There is a place I think. Get a chance to hear you talk us your voice, in non guttural sounds. To to. Help us a appreciate. This subject and how it's drawn, you in continues to draw you I think that has value to. So appreciate. I'm glad we actually. Had A conversation. If People WanNA follow you on social media. How did they do that? They can find me on instagram. Twitter at Shin. S. H. E. N., in my website is Patrick Dot com can find all my information there. Okay, yeah. Well congratulations. I think you've accomplished something pretty life defining. That's all in this movie. Yeah, thanks! Yeah, it's an honor to be on this podcast. Is this is what number two hundred something like an? It's an honor to be. Yeah well. You know I'm glad we ran into each other again, yeah! I just i. think that artists like yourself. In a in a can of big way is artists are the ones who step away from that injury from the canvas Right and inspire others hopefully same right right but I. Think this project stepping so far back. In our noisy busy caffeine cacophonous yeah often is. I think it's so vital. I'm already thinking like. How can I get the our new church? How can they get us to screen this film? Right as a conversation starter started right missing the those kind of things and other other religious organizations I. Mean because you cover quite a bandwidth of different spiritual approaches, and how silence L. plays vital roles in this, and yet it kind of gets lost in the midst of being religious. So. I may be in touch. You know at least. Yeah love to come by, and if it's helpful, conversation afterwards and yeah the Great Okay Well Yeah I act on things like that those impulse. Well congratulations I definitely give you an open invitation. As some of these new projects release start to form and are ready for consumption and experience I love to bring you back. I think you're a thoughtful fascinating. Dina's type. TYPE TYPE gave myself a little space. But yeah I it folks if if you get an opportunity through whatever platform. To rent it by. I just this is such a worth while experience to make us all step back into realize the the hunger that we have for our health mentally physically right for the well being of those around us. To have kind of noise canceling. Efforts so that the silence can speak to us and and. Yeah, I again coming as an extrovert.

Patrick Dot S. H. E. N. Dina Twitter Greg Tedtalk caffeine
"shen" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

06:57 min | 11 months ago

"shen" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"Yes, it's educational. But it's experiential. Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, and so an I started with this, but I'll say it again me. Make your head just explode. In terms of being big I mean it's so beautifully. Painted the like every frame everything is just beautiful. Thank you, thank you so much. That's awesome. Yeah, so so the aesthetics of your of that I don't know if you carry that forward in everything that you do or just you know this particular. Yeah, I'm much very very interested in in cinematic language again being about something of something rather than about something. Again, this idea fusing everything together The work being experience and expression of the thing rather than have the work be a reproduction of the thing that's kind of what I'm after. Yeah, and so yeah, I feel imprecise was a glimpse of that, and I'm trying to do more of that as a as I go forward. I. WanNa make sure you tell the story of this young man that took a vow of silence walked across America Veer I think it's fascinating. After you found out about him. Yeah, what you went through detract coming down. As a lot of fun. The Tel the television that story, yes, Greg Hindi had recently graduated. I believe it was Yale and rather than you know. Run off and go get some high paying gigs somewhere. He decided to take a year off. And Walk from New Hampshire, where he lives to Los, Angeles or the span of a year. In silence. And he wanted to do it. As As as art project. I think he was interested in sort of Art Sorry silence as a as expression. is a performance. And so it was partly that I think was also partly away. cleanse his Palette. You know after years and years of schooling, Yale and killing himself to. To to. These, great good grades and I think he just needs for cleanses palate. go back kind of blank slate before he. Continued on with his life. And so I heard about this journey that he was on. When he was more than halfway through the journey I can't remember where he was exactly some in the Midwest. Maybe I don't know. And I just immediately knew that I wanted to find him. Some speak with him. But of course that proved to be very difficult because he had no technology on any soft technology, in was unreachable unreachable. I had found online an old kickstarter project he'd started at the before his journey had begun to raise some money for the journey to pay for some expenses and food and whatnot, and there was some contact info for his father. Somewhere in in in that page so I reached out to his father, and said Hey I really want to reach out to your son Greg. I know he's on this. You know cross country trek in silence with no technology. How how can I find him? And he says to me well. I've I've been checking into his bank statements in logging to his bank account, and I see where he swiping his credit card to purchase food, and by water and such and so I kind of know the trajectory that he's on kind of know where he where he's headed. And so okay well when I'm ready to go, I will call you, and you tell me where he lasts wiped in I will just head in that direction ads, so the day comes I'm. I fly up to. The the Bay Area San Francisco and. That he's kind of headed that way I call his dad and he says that he slapped swiped. Is Credit Card I? Think it was like a dollar, ninety nine cent store, or something like that for for some items, and so we just drive from the airport to this ninety nine cents store about an hour and a half away from the San Francisco Airport. We interrogate the The the staff there and we can find out kind of whether or not. He was there to begin with, and they said Yeah. There's this bearded guy that came through and bought some water. We think he headed that direction. In so we followed along. This path was bike path. That would naturally make sense that he would walk along. Safe from the roads and whatnot, and there is like you know we. We come around this bend and the there's this guy, this disheveled guy pushing around. Looks like a homeless bird. And I run up to him and I'm like you know I instinctively I get out a piece of paper and I'm like a my name is Patrick I'm writing this. The and I handed to him and he says. Back on his. He's rains piece of paper and he's. He ends back to me, says you can, you can speak. It's okay you can say you don't have to be. Like Oh yeah, that makes sense that will speed things up a lot. So I started speaking, he would respond with in written form. And that's how we conducted interviews, and that's how I got to know him. And I started following his journey. That way spent a couple of days with them on that particular leg of the trip when he was going from I, think Nevado, which is just north of San Francisco into the area, and then I met up with him again again same way. Maybe a couple of weeks later comes. DADS drove up pch and just found him. And spent a day with him that way. Was a lot of fun. Now have using I, mean I I imagine you guys like well head in that direction that he may not be they're. Like, wow, but have you had a chance to debrief with him? After he finished his journey, yeah, so we I spoke with him, so he the moment that he finished his vow silence in spoke, again was a very private moment, and he didn't want cameras around, and so we let him have that obviously but we spoke with him a couple days later, maybe a week after in an on camera interview, which we ultimately didn't use in the film. but the couple things he said I thought were were quite profound. In fact, let me back up, so he actually recorded himself saying his first few words. In House able to see that at some point, and so he relayed the experience of what that what that was like in? You know. When he got his voice back, it took a moment and it kind of. guttural sounds at first came out of his mouth. And then he started relay the random story about the kindness of this one truck driver that was passing by. He was really particularly thirsty that day I. Think didn't have any. Water is on a long stretch of road between cities, no water and the truck driver just pulls over in handsome like a bunch of water like a six case of six pack of the water bottles, just something. and. That was the first thing that he felt he needed to say A. Which I thought was really interesting. But I I think what was more interesting than that was like this guttural sounds that I came out and I think he had to sort of reacquaint himself with speaking with sound and relating to his identity to has speaking person you know He said later in my interview with him. That? Like using his voice almost.

Greg Hindi Yale DADS San Francisco Airport Midwest Patrick I New Hampshire Bay Area San Francisco San Francisco Nevado Angeles Los
"shen" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

07:09 min | 11 months ago

"shen" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"Expect during the making the film I. We had to visit some Aniko at chambers. I was just thinking of that and these are rooms that are built to be ninety nine point nine percent silent. Go to all the sound panels every wall around, even though you and so you walking on like this almost like chicken wire, and there's like more soundproofing materials underneath, and it's a room built was in a room the. The ones that are done right and the one that I was in. We're had this really profound experience was in MINNEAPOLIS MINNESOTA. It's called or fueled labs. At the time it was the quietest place on record on the entire planet. Now why building these places for testing test product? They need to test the the sort of noise footprint of a of a particular device, dishwasher or something, and so they need an absolutely silent room and the Acoustic Acoustic Studies in the research, and that sort of thing as well so I'm in this room. It's negative thirteen decibels. which is thirteen decibels below possible? It's. But you know it's. It's thirteen decibels below the threshold of hearing. Okay, you know sophisticated recording equipment and some animals can detect sounds below zero. DB, but we can. And so it's negative thirteen decibels, and it's just like it's suffocating. Right in this room and I told these people. That ran northfield. Let's turn off the lights close the door. I'm GONNA lay on the floor in in. Have this be as depriving of all sensory information as possible. And I told him to lock me in it for forty minutes just to see what would happen because the rumor was the story. The story that's often told about aniko chambers is that at the forty minute mark is when you begin to start hallucinate game. Start to go a little crazy. I wanted to feel what that was like so the second I step into this The first thing I noticed and this was awful. was my Tinnitus, I didn't know that I had tinnitus which is ringing in your ears that many many people suffer from some people temporarily many people permanently. If you've ever been a very loud concert, and you step into quiet room right after when you get home that evening or something, you'll know what I'm talking about them. Ringing ears that just kind of persist for a little while so I have a permanent case of from what I understand. From having played in rock, bands and stuff growing up, not wearing earplugs, it's totally makes sense, but anyway step in his Oh chamber, and they're just ringing in my ears, constant ringing in my ears. That's there all the time, but you don't notice I. Don't notice it because I'm rarely in such a quiet environment. I've noticed that It's gotTa be around thirty five to forty decibels in quieter for me to detect my tinnitus in most environments. The your house at the moment is probably this is thirty five ish, probably maybe forty So the chances of me actually hearing are pretty slim, the most environments so after kind of sort of deal with the Tinnitus and calm myself down kind of immerse myself in in the space. That I'm dealing with this inner dialogue. That's going. It's just constant running running running this dialogue. That's happening. What am I supposed to be feeling? What am I gonNA say when I get out of this room. Making a film about this space about silence like what am I supposed to feel right now? Tell the story I must be profound, I have to have an instagram. and. It's like it was just constant constant Inner Chatter and it probably took another thirty minutes from me to quiet that voice. Dan In just focus on the breathing focus on the space that was in in that last ten minutes was awesome. You know it was beautiful and I think that's what happens in silent spaces in silence for a lot of people. At first, it's really scary when we step into it because that inner dialogue comes in, there's this lack of definition lack of direction. And we don't know what to do with ourselves, but if we sit with a long enough, I think the other face of silence. The other face of that kind of space shows itself in sort of welcoming warm kind of embracing kind of silence that. I think that I think we don't often have the patience to to get to know anyway. Yeah, I the. That section of your film was was quite remarkable. Just for all the reasons you said, and then I would dovetail that with the performance of John Cage's. Four thirty three yeah, like I've never heard of this guy right? And and he kind of had this epiphany five following the story writing, and so he's there in front of his piano. If you're reading and is just sister for four minutes and thirty three seconds, and he doesn't play anything and I'm thinking okay now I find paid for ticket, you know. And then near the end of the film I hope I'm not giving anything we and now you have these orchestras performing his piece right a- unlike okay, so everyone knows I mean whether it's a small hall or Big Hall. They now know what this is highly regarded. Yeah, right and and it's just like. The the sitting there it just to see the musicians. These world class musicians sitting they're. Not playing anything the conductor with his arms down. Here a little cough over here, right? But people and I kind of visually saw the way he depicted it I saw that evolution. Apparently happen to the audience to. And at the end they're like giving standing ovation, and and it's always always feel like. If I didn't watch this film I would feel like. This is the emperor's new clothes. You don't want to be the one do in the audience that we've had a lot of those. Because we would start off. Many of the film screenings with performance of four thirty three. Oh Lord has poets in the area to align performed a piece of their own, and then followed by four thirty three, and on many occasion people will just. Maybe two minutes in the what's going on. Where's the film with what's? Just like? It's it's remarkable you like. How much we expect all those spaces to be even two minutes have expect all the spaces to be filled constantly, and it was something. Yeah, so I think the. The getting through it and I've gone on per walks FBI. Trees Roy Okay we're GONNA. Take the afternoon as just you and Jesus you know and I. I know that it takes a while. To declutter your mind right and and yet I feel like. Even being in touch with the clutter and your fight with it is part of the process. Yeah, right instead of feel like. Oh, I'm so defeated. I just can't do this like. No. You have to kind of go with it. Yeah, that's the first lesson of meditation writing. In Easter tradition is like those thoughts are going to bubble up right all negative thoughts. Going to bubble up, you let yourself feel defeated like you have to sort of invite those things into your mind, and then let them leave your mind, and then you go back to sort of the silence. You go back to the reading But yeah, it's it is part of the process it's. In Zen particularly there's no delineation between. Meditation in Activity Right It's all one of the same..

Tinnitus aniko chambers Acoustic Acoustic Studies MINNEAPOLIS MINNESOTA northfield John Cage FBI cough Big Hall Dan
"shen" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

07:26 min | 11 months ago

"shen" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"He ended up learning to read and write Sanskrit. All GonNa stuff and. Kind of came back into an embodiment of his own cultural ethnic identity through the avenue of. Zen. While still retaining his Christian earrings. And so when he retired in came to us to live in Los Angeles with the then his still living wife, he would show up at our church sometimes. And so I go. Hey, man, you know. It's good to see you and he's like well. The reason why it looks like we're always late. is we always go to Zen temple before we come to service here? I'm like why right and he's like. Because it's too damn noisy and. It's like there's no. He didn't use the word silence. Yeah, but but it's like there's no. There's no plan space. Where we just let. kind of things be right like someone's always talking singing putting something into this the announcement, the songs of topic servants. Yeah, sermon songs. Yeah, he's like why. Why can't we trust the actual voice of God to speak in very specific in very nuanced waste, everybody? It's almost quaker. Yeah, right right right right and I never forgot that unlike. That's a beautiful idea. I think at the end of the day for well. I'll speak for myself I. Think I think religion mean the the root of the word religion? I had to research. This for this book notes on silence that I co authored means to bind. Rela Gary I think is the Latin word to bind to fuse things together right and I think at the end of the day. That's what we're after with. The sort of the the seeking of transcendence is is. As just Campbell said to to find resonance between. The outer physical reality that we we live out each day with the inner reality you know, and having be one and the same and not something that we retreat to for every once in a while we go on a retreat or whatever we go on vacation, or we have a moment at the airport or whatever? But it's literally something that that's fuse together like to wear. Every moment is an opportunity. Never moment is an expression of of you could say worship, or prayer or meditation or Silence and so I feel like. Yes, I feel like Many churches are kind of missing out enough, Jimmy Opportunity. To, invite people into that divine space in instead of talking at them, and giving them these words and definitions and concepts that great a great in May speak to something beyond those sort of human elements, human words and concepts, but Ultimately like the film that we were talking about like infrastructure silence we. We need to have aspects of this experience where it's. It ray of the silence of that divine space otherwise, how do we find her own path towards it i? Don't know what and again. I, think religious leaders, and I was one this. There's a big part of us I think starting being with mice for myself that we don't trust people. To find the right path on their own right, so so we're no, you know. and. It's like when I go on these kind of. Elaborate vacations with cameras with my family I'm always left behind right 'cause because there. My wife in this sense. She's very goal oriented. It's like Oh. We need to go to this temple to the writer and I'm I'm this is where we switch. Personnel is temperaments and I. Slow Myself Down to notice when I'm not noticing. Yeah, right, which sounds very zen. But as a photographer. Unlike, yeah, like a these these professionals in Michigan. A I've taken classes with a knife traveled with him a little bit. They said okay. Take the whiskey shot. And then take the wine shots and I'm like talking about they go, so there's this adrenaline like i. this camera Emma plays and there's the waterfall just shooting. And or even taking pictures of people people, you know you don't know right, and it's like okay. Get it out of your system. And then slow yourself down, slow your heart down. And, even put your camera down and Change Heights like move locations and notice what you're not even noticing. Yeah, get twice as close right right WHA-. What what? What is happening in the scene before you even got there right? And then those shots. The wine shots is like those the, and so it's it's funny because I I have to wear bright clothing on vacation, so they can spot me from artist. Give I, get lost because I. get lost in what I'm discovery. then. We come home I. Process only pictures and a non putting him into the digital like coffee table books. Because otherwise, it's just hard drive like they see Deborah. Cameron froze vase. They never really see what I do. Yeah, and then like I didn't see that yeah. When did that happen? Yeah, yeah, right, so that kind of what I'm talking about is I think organized religion. Maybe that's more Christianity than Buddhism, but organized religion, and it almost sounds like Islam is like this. I don't trust people to notice. The things they should notice. Right right and this in there's there's a reason for that right, I. Mean I think that that especially in the West, we gravitate towards definition and we just we crave it like we're so uncomfortable with. With living in the spaces between those words right like in the in the. Knee ancient languages, the space between the words was just as important as the words themselves. If not more important in the words would speak into the silence, it would breeze silence. The words And I don't think we understand what that means in his day NHL. Right where everything's accelerated we, every moment is filled. Every moment is filled with. Activity that that that moves closer to a goal, right? In productivity exactly exactly. And you know we're business like like a badge of honor, right and There's just no time in this space. Because it's scary, it doesn't move toward any goal. It doesn't give us any definition or or or focus I'm so just for the antithesis of of who we are at I. Think as a people species in this day and age so I I get that you leave people in. I'll tell you a quick story So a lot of people would ask me in QNA's after I would show in pursuit of silence and ask. Why didn't make film that was purely silent. It was stripped of a soundtrack or whatever they would criticize the film and say you know her her. The trees rustling in the wind like that's not silence. And it's like I would always say to people like if I. Would have just thrown into a silent room and set up. Just do silence. You know having experience of silence. People would whip out their phones. They wouldn't know what to do themselves right. They would evidently whip out their phones or do something, and they would fill their minds with thoughts, all some sort of clutter or inner dialogue, and they would have no experience of silence. And so that's that's kind of time that we're living in. Especially now more than ever especially now. Yeah, and I had this experience myself. Even during the making the film in a.

Zen temple Los Angeles Jimmy Opportunity NHL Deborah Gary Campbell writer Michigan Emma QNA Cameron
"shen" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

07:47 min | 11 months ago

"shen" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"The? They've assembled like I I. I can't even tell you the number. Fifteen twenty scrapbook delays pictures on thinking no, okay, maybe these pictures of me and Cristiano. Maybe they have a place in a scrapbook. While you know, I'm old, enough I've been married long enough not even to ask that question. I showed them the pictures to my wife and. She was bemused to see me right. But I can imagine the little bit of awkwardness just like because I've seen pictures of her before. She knew me with her old boyfriends and yeah, it's. Like okay. I don't know what to do with that. But it, you know it very clear that with no language spoken that these pictures from my one year relationship with a German girl were not going to have a place in the scrapbooks. So you know we went through them. I put them back together. And then I have this place where I have a bunch of old photos in a shoebox that are of me and my a family of origin growing up kind of stuff that also don't go in the new scrapbooks. and. Maybe when I'm gone. Whether it's my wife if she survives me or if it's our daughter. Going through my stuff A. Depends if these Germany photos will be saved alongside the growing up. Photos of of me. Because they're kind of a very unique sliver of just by life I think this has nothing to do with my life after meeting and marrying, my wife has nothing to do with our life as a family of three. And I'll have prompt that. As as fun as it was. To look at this chapter visually remember. So, much of what was wonderful in that year and especially in that we get half the painful few days at the end. You know that's the past and. I mean, Cristiana! Address their soul I mean. She died at such a young age. And I'm glad that I've been able to reconnect with today I'M Just thrilled that to be tunes in to listen to some of our podcasts. All the way in Germany, but you know. I really focused on. Getting through this pandemic. Focused on trying to anticipate what? is going to be like how it's going to be different. I don't think we're GONNA. Be Living the same life. Even once the vaccine comes out and there's herd immunity, and all all that kind of stuff. There's just too much right now in. That's coming needs, time and energy and attention. To put much energy and time and attention into things that are already passed. And that just kind of brings me to give you the update. To. The church that I lasted served as senior pastor You know they. They came to a decision. As was our mutual agreement that, after three years of my being retired that they would sit down as a board with the new senior pastor, and decide whether it was okay for me to come back and rejoined the church with my wife, and so they had their meeting us they had scheduled. And then we zoom call including my wife this past. Saturday and bottom line is after much thought and prayer deliberation They just felt it was unfair to kind of keep us waiting in limbo to see whether this is going to happen or not, and it was. Unfair to them. The disk kind of keep this issue on on on the burner, and whether it's back or front just on the stove, and so they share with me that they're requesting that I not returned to the church, except for funerals, weddings and baptisms that I'm invited to for the quote, Unquote Forseeable Future and. You know that that's nebulous enough for me. To know that it's. We're not setting up another time where they're going to have a meeting. And and what have you? It's it's not completely erasing the possibility that on their own. They're going to revisit this some later date and time and and issued invitation, but. In the meantime. I think right. I mean I have to move on. My wife has to move on They have to move on right so. It's kind of like getting those pictures from Germany. I. It's like definitely we have. I have forty years of cherished memories. And we tend to remember more of the good things just like in the photos right then the hard times, but sometimes some of the most cherished memories are how we work together to get through the hard times together. But. You know I also shared with them that. I. That something like this was going to be the decision. And you know as I've said on recent. The schering's in my introduction that I've already decided that I'm going to move forward. And so I'll be transferring my membership from my previous church to our new church in Pasadena. and. My wife and I will begin to focus on the people that are in our life now and look forward to finding a outlets for our passions pathways for our desire to serve in for the greater good. So many things to be excited about given the the people at this new church. and. I you know there's nothing preventing us from still being friends with people from our past. But it's just going to. Be In different contexts. It may take more effort than just showing up on Sunday and people that you know. You know. I feel like the timing of getting that packet of. Photos from. Nineteen seventy four. Was Good. Good and just the whole process of working through. What do we do with these? What are these represent? They represent something that really happened was meaningful, but it's also not now, and there are new pictures to take with a people that populate our lives now, and some of them are from the past and many of them are are people then have entered into our life in in the last year or so? and. You know what There's a place their scrapbooks their shoe boxes for. Memories and life live together. But there's empty scrapbooks in empty shoebox waiting for more. So. just wanted to let you know that that's been resolved and everyone's moving forward and I think that's good for everybody. Now, if you want to sit back, relax, be comfortable. Scratch your dog's head. Listening on my conversation with Patrick. About the power in the need for silence..

Germany Cristiano Patrick Pasadena.
"shen" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

09:06 min | 11 months ago

"shen" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"Hsien. He's also the founder of transcendental media and I believe it's the group that produced the two thousand sixteen south by southwest film called in pursuit silence, and it's actually that film that caught my attention and brought Patrick and I. Together and we recorded this in. Studio before the whole pandemic thing shut us down, so I'm guessing probably in January of this year really enjoyed meeting Patrick. And this film which I watched before and then I, actually bought a DVD for my own library. It really talks about the power and the need for silence. Because our lives are just cluttered constantly with more and more noise, both actual audible noise, and and I would even think ju just kind of informational noise, and you know what I'm talking about I. Found Patrick to be thoughtful, spiritual and quietly driven I hope that once. This shelter in place lifts that He and I can hang out a little bit more and love to meet his wife and you know he doesn't live too far from us, but. Now with all those pandemic, those all just seem like pipedreams. WanNa thank. Listeners who do go to our facebook page? In contact US or send us. An email directly to suggest guests for us to bring onto the show and we. Have brought on guests in the recent past because of listeners like you out there who have brought some of these folks were attention I. Think Our latest one was director Steven Kung so it works. we have three upcoming guests. Between now and September. That again are directly result of listeners. Who Said Hey, you know. I think it'd be great. We have author PHUC, Tron. We have actress and kind of Asian American icon Tomlin to Mita and we also have the winner of the twenty Seventeen Pulitzer Prize for fiction winner, author and USC Professor Viet Thanh new yen so. Keep them coming especially. If you know them, you can make the initial introduction for us if you happen to know what their contact information is. Let us have that, but even if you don't you know I figure these things out. Several One of the introductions I talked about. Hearing surprisingly. From. Someone from Germany. As, we were doing the. Transition from Christopher Wong Director Co producer of this show. to Chiang he, he was going through Some of the a e mails that had gone directly to our podcast account that went to his inbox that I hadn't seen and there was one. Maybe a year stale from Germany and it was from a the surviving younger sister two. Of. My girlfriend during go friend. In the mid seventy s This was when Gosh. We met each other at a Christian Young Adult Youth Conference in Portland Oregon. That was this global conference we met on the second to last day fell in love, and if you want to know more about that, you'll have to kind of dig up that episode I'll. I'll. A? Reference it On the facebook page when I when I list this particular episode number two hundred, Forty nine. Those of you who don't know to go digging through everything. All of that is to say. I've enjoyed communicating off and on with Tobia and. Kind of Os both of us sharing kind of different sides of the memory of my one year relationship with her big sister. Cristiana. Tragically died at age of twenty, four. Several years after we broke up and Yeah it. She'd been on vacation or holiday as they call it in Italy and had an asthma attack I need. No, she had asthma was misdiagnosed, not giving the right medication and she died and so. You know hearing from Tobia. Just kind of rekindled a lot of well recently to bay a rope me directly. Because now she has my personal email address. And she said Hey Ken. Given my age and stage in life. I'm downsizing and I moving into kind of more. Appropriate size space for someone who's approaching senior Citizen Hood. And as I was going through stuff and tossing stuff. I came across this bundle of pictures that my late sister had saved of your two week trip. In the mid Seventies. To to visit our family. Anti travelled around Germany with her, and I you know I, was all set to just toss it because they're not my memories, but I thought I. Offer them to you and you know I hope that's not weird, but if you don't want them I'm fine with tossing them on. An mmediately, said yes, please. I would love to have these pictures, so you know it takes awhile snail mail, and finally. The packet arrived a couple of days ago. And I pulled out this packet of maybe thirty fading pictures. and. It. It's admittedly startling to see myself at twenty. I can't believe I was ever that skinny and had that much hair. But, but also startling to see pictures of myself with Cristiana. And just brought back a flood of memories right? It was again just two weeks. Where we'd had two days to see each other after meeting each other and be with each other, in Oregon, at that conference, the conference ends. We both go home. We correspond through cassette tapes and actual letters. Sent through snail mail and then the following summer, she paid my way to come. visit her in Germany to have us. figure out what's going on with this relationship sound like twenty. She's like twenty. And You know the first week was magical. I mean we're just just enthralled to be together actually for this time and. I give lots of credit to debate and her German speaking parents. I don't believe that they ever had a chinese-american American little in Chinese person in their house and yet they were very very gracious. I never once felt any kind of weird vibe. You know by the end of the first week by the time it gets the second week. Yeah people are naturally asking the question we're asking is. Going and. You know we we both couldn't imagine. Changing, countries for each other. And, so it was it was it was hard. It was hard to say goodbye. Again, that's all in the other episode introduction. But the to see these pictures. Of Me and her in that two weeks especially. You. Don't see any of the angst. You know that I don't think we took many pictures in the remaining few days. I don't think many people do take pictures when it's like that, so all I seen these pictures are the hopefulness, the vibrancy, the vitality the love. So it was great. But then what do I do with these pictures? Now interestingly enough for a month until just a few days ago, my wife was cleaning out our garage and she had uncovered this case of old photos. Especially since we adopted our daughter at six days old and I, you know I can't remember taking that many pictures with film cameras, but apparently I we did. This is way before smartphones and so. My wife is very much an organized person, and and especially because dodgers, an only child. WHO's not wired like my wife at all? My wife's thinking, these are all going to be lost, unless these are sorted organized and put it into actual scrapbooks. Those things scrapbooks. And, so after multiple trips to Michael's craft store to get more and more scrapbooks, my wife with some assistance from our daughter, who actually had been home unexpectedly because of this shelter in place..

Germany facebook Tobia Patrick Cristiana US founder asthma Christopher Wong Pulitzer Prize dodgers Christian Young Adult Youth Co director Oregon USC Portland Citizen Hood Professor Viet Thanh Steven Kung
Akbar

Tell Them, I Am

05:10 min | 2 years ago

Akbar

"I remember getting to Karachi and Sunday. Everything changing the tension was lifted like literal weight was lifted. Often asked to how did we survive? Why did we survive because the train the previous train which will booked on from Delhi to Karachi and my mother just insisted? She said, no, I'm not taking the train. I need to buy some food for the journey, and lintels or whatever. And my father argued with he said, we've been not be able to get any place on the next train is critical leave. And she insisted and then he agreed and on, he would say this was a woman's into Shen being complement to our mother hand. What she did was she literally saved us because that entire train, all the passengers would then kill the slotted. I was fall and that literally my first memory and it left to deep impression on me as to why there would be so much hatred in people that they would want to both my bed nets and the siblings and myself. I've been back to its subsequently over the is one of my earliest essays at been home school. I was at boarding school. And I remember writing an essay, I must have been in the junior Cambridge, which is the equivalent of high school. It had description of a train compartment. And I described it as, as a cost Guetta death. Gos- Catta, a cylinder debt and the teacher, one of the fathers mocking the S his hit this avai striking image at vegetated from and I wasn't sure guy just used it in Ovid's stayed in my mind and then over the as I am constantly having a sort of dream. Not really nightmares but dreams of being a train, and there's another train moving at great speed and bosses me by my whole family in that train, and I feel help us, I feel my arms and ex-con to move have a cell phone, which doesn't work, but the message of the, the dream is that the other train just speeds by and I'm then stranded on my own without any communication with the entire world. And survey lonely feeling. It's only now in hindsight. Look back, and I feel like God, that is the experience. I lived through the same experience that I had my Hindu colleague, had inverse, which means her family was escaping from Pakistan to India and the same same sort of tension. Same sort of problems logistics, how you get out what you take with you. Who do you trust all the same issues she faced? And she was also a young girl than men. I was doing my piece in, in London at soya's I met her and at that time, a handmade very many Indians, and when we became friends, we began to swap stories and joke about each other's cultures. And, and she said, you know, that we were told it if you ever see a snake and the Muslim, you actually kill the Muslim, I because the Muslim is more dangerous more venomous than the snake an ice mileage. She said, why he's smiling as I said, I've heard exactly the same story except in my story to seek. The Hindu whatever and we both smiling, realize it. I experienced were like a a when when human relations break down to that level. These stories assume a far greater importance of their magnified inflated, and they in a sense, personify the behavior of the other, and that is very dangerous. It's interesting, you say that because I'm Pakistani, I grew up in Karachi, and I moved here. When I was twelve and I have never had negative experiences with Indian people are Hindu people, but I do feel somewhere deep down like this, this bias, it's so bizarre. You know, like I am so surprised as 'cause my partner is Jewish like, I'm very accepting and living that lack of hatred in my life in a lot of ways. But at the same time at like, I have this thing even though you live through this, like really time you didn't. You didn't feel that be ideas ahead the images. I had from the discussions, so my claws fellows from the people, I met about inducing, six vague negative. So I had to overcome that. In fact, wonder stand who these people were widely hated us why we hit to them, and that is when I met by Indian print, many as later in London, where really began to understand these people very much. Like us and in a sense experienced exactly as what we had experienced. So when I became adult and understood some of these different permutations and combinations of human relations, I began to get very involved in what's called interfaith understanding interfaith dialogue. And I began to ask questions and began say the people I meet a friend EBay, normally just like us. They just like me. So what keeps them away from me is my lack of understanding? I own prejudice on my own. Ignorance

Karachi Ovid London Gos- Catta Ebay Delhi Guetta Cambridge Pakistan Partner India
"shen" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"shen" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Shen? Welcome back to always in fashion. Here's your host, Mark Webber. Mrs work whipper feel. That's one sexy. Soul music about drinking. It's great. I don't do very often. Man. Oh, man. Great. Drink when you're home you're out on. Party when dating.

Mark Webber Shen
"shen" Discussed on Mental Illness Happy Hour

Mental Illness Happy Hour

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"shen" Discussed on Mental Illness Happy Hour

"None of that external stuff gets you this internal experience of. Joy, purpose, painting focus piece, right? And again, this is not to say that that it doesn't. Include other human experiences of suffering. You can. The the amazing thing that I'm seeing in. To some extent my own life. But especially as many advocates in suicide prevention speak about their experiences. They talk about their daily struggles, their chronic, recurrent struggles with whatever it might be an anxiety disorder, chronic suicidal Ita Shen, but they have this new perspective that uses tools and discoveries that knows how to manage it, and they're actively doing that. It's it's a day to day moment by moment, sometimes experience and when they drawn network of others to help them with that, it's incredibly empowering. It's beyond words beyond words. It really isn't. And. One thing that that you said, maybe think of something that I really want to talk about which is for that person out there whose thinking will what is talking to somebody else going to do for my problems, which are real problems. I have financial problems. You know, I'm under this tremendous amount of strain and talking about it does nothing I have chronic pain or something, you know, and and this is both. I want to say talking about it with a therapist can help shape the this mediator. That is the layer of your mind that while it might not change your financial.

Ita Shen
"shen" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

The Projection Booth Podcast

04:16 min | 2 years ago

"shen" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

"Itunes where we can review the show and patron where he can make a donation donors get early access to every episode as long as I'm not running late every donate. Shen every rating we get helps the projection booth take over the world. Like. The perfect. But I. Right. If you enjoy the show in what more people to know about it head on over to. I tunes leave a.

Shen
"shen" Discussed on Capital Allocators

Capital Allocators

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"shen" Discussed on Capital Allocators

"Shen and maybe make three or four however the the odds are pretty good that you're going to lose the dollar and so it's a good newsbad news my risk is limited but my potential lose all that is pretty high but that's on the on the buying yo no one's ever been really hurt well phrase it you're less likely be hurt by an option you might bleed to death over a long period of time which i can be taken out tomorrow on a stretcher if you're buying options conversely when you sell an option you get paid and even if you're wrong you can win meaning you know you think the markets toppish is sell a call it's out of the money the market still goes up but it doesn't go up far enough to get richer call strike and guess what gets you stick it to keep the premium or you think the mark markets bottom than you sell a put and the market still goes dominant doesn't go far enough problem is is in while you receive upfront your maximum gain is known and that's the premium receive your maximum loss can be infinity hanoch all sidon can can be all the way to spotless zero on on the put side so i think were people really get hurt is when a either the short ball and be they don't have guard rails and place in the simplest way to think about a guardrail is is is if you sell options to sell p spreads or if you saw an option to own the underlying so if you sell a call on something hopefully on the underlying because if you sell a call and you're wrong and you can get hurt very badly in conversely when you sell a put than you'd better at least have cash set aside to buy that underlying you know if that event happens the idea of being long the market and selling puts his probably well it it it'll work fine if the market goes up so if the market was the other way that's that's obviously at the side of the coin are so many perceptions that people have about.

Shen
"shen" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

02:21 min | 3 years ago

"shen" Discussed on KTRH

"Shen about the particular time location were further identifiers about the person who posted the comments the complain had provided the same information to you to youtube removed the comments after receiving this information fbi jackson conducted an interview of the person who made the complaint this person lives in mississippi has no connection the south warda and has no knowledge about the person who posted the comment the fbi also conducted internal database reviews in open source checks no additional information was found to positively identify the person who posted this comments there was no connection found to south florida moving forward we will continue to gather all information about the subject as we try to identify his motives is associates and his actions leading up the yesterday's events we are looking into a social media post his movements his conversations leading up to the shooting as well as any other indicators they may have he out there i'm a little unclear about this mr producer maybe audience who can help is he sang that it was a different person who posted it or they couldn't tracked down and determine if it was this eventual mass shooter who posted it they couldn't track it down i i find this little odd i find it almost a little scary that they couldn't tracking down i am i the only one is an impossible to track this down how could it be impossible to track down it may be forward thrown around more gun control and everything else should we figure out what took place here and shouldn't we figure out how to protect our schools protect our schools protect them dammit school boards and school administrators working with the community's working with local police can figure this out.

jackson mississippi fbi florida producer Shen youtube
"shen" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"shen" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Shen on i mean it looks incredible the trailers have been amazing like the marketing campaign is is huge there's something magical about this movie and it reminds me of 1989 right before batman came out i don't i don't know if you remember though of it'll everybody was kind of he really great about it you will seem like batman shirts everywhere and that was really unusual this fuel similarly and lake i i've i feel like it's going to surprise a lotta people before we go to this washer break you know that were given away tickets to see black panther at our upcoming screening on tuesday february thirteen at seven thirty pm at the mc orange let's give away a pair right now caller tin give us a call at eight hundred five two zero one kfi eight hundred five two zero one five three four un a guests will be joining us at our exclusive screening of marvels black panther when we come back more with dennis kover marvels black panther the illustrated history of a king the complete comics chronology kfi am 640 more stimulating talk microchip he has the news a ban on a residential woodfires is it a fact for most of the south coast airbase at until midnight because of unhelpful air quality residents of orange county a non desert nonmountain areas of la riverside san bernardino counties cannot ordered loyd in fireplaces woodstoves firepit sir and the other appliance man woman and two children if been heard what a vehicle crashed into a home on west fifty seven straightening park mesa heights area of south la the man who was thirty years old in critical condition the other three people heard are said to be in good condition victoria beckham says he's not going on tour and neither are the spice girls.

Shen batman loyd victoria beckham dennis kover la riverside san bernardino thirty years
"shen" Discussed on The Wellness Business Podcast

The Wellness Business Podcast

01:38 min | 4 years ago

"shen" Discussed on The Wellness Business Podcast

"So we're really were really gearing this podcast to be difference to really be different than what we view as the traditional podcast format where you have a guest come on and you interview them and what's their history an you know what's their claim to fame and and really it's like at the end it was a great story but there wasn't really anything to take action on so arco our intention with every single episode is to give you a a shot a tip a and some type of action item but you can go forth matt next week and implement like we want to give you the the resource ord thenld step by step up to make it happen in your business and again simplify this so little little word taking that overwhelming frustrates shen out of the business building a part of your business and making it really simple yeah i love that becausei think that is one thing that is really missing you're listening to podcast not all final one full but can now underway deal widow ice yeahi love that every episode we are going to have at least one take away that you can use so um you can go ahead and implement that and start making more progress what would be the thing that you would say a while nece professionals are struggling with the most what do you think is like the biggest um neck and their business okaythe topped that come to mind will one the the big one.

shen