35 Burst results for "Shema"

Gene Editing and Recovery from Radiation

Talking Biotech Podcast

04:10 min | 2 weeks ago

Gene Editing and Recovery from Radiation

"Welcome to the talking biotech podcast. Weekly podcast about agriculture medicine with an emphasis on biotechnology and the good things we can do for people and the planet names kevin volta. I'm a professor and a podcast host. Who cares about science communication mostly around the area of biotechnology. So today we wanted to talk about something interesting. Radiation and radiation has many places in biology. Of course our resistance to it. The problems that can be caused from it as well as its use as a therapeutic agent used to induce genetic variability when we do plant breeding but has some deleterious downsides and they've represented barriers both for remediation of radioactive. Waste as well as if there's issues with the side effects of radiation therapies for cancer. So i was excited to learn about some work. That's happening. The innovative genomics institute out at the university of california berkeley. There's work that's gone. Underway under darpa funding to attempt to use gene editing to solve some of the problems associated with radiation exposure. Mostly in acute radiation sickness. and so. today we're going to talk to dr feodor urnov. He's a professor in molecular and cell biology department at the university of california berkeley as well as the director for translation technology at the innovative genomics institute associated with berkeley. So welcome to the podcast. Dr urnov thank you for having. This is really a pleasure. I was really excited to read about this. Because it seems like such a cool project that's long overdue and i can certainly understand arpaio's interest in this. I tried to frame a little bit of the problem ahead of time. But could you give me a better explanation of. What is the problem with acute radiation sickness. And where do we see it across. The bay from the berkeley campus is one of the best if not the best teaching hospital in america. Ucsf in the chair of radiation oncology. Dr mary fung has told me how frustrating it is to have. Her patients succumb to cancer of the abdomen and of the pelvis. Oh things like pancreatic liver you. Try a variant. Despite the fact that she has a powerful weapon to pure those cure is a big word and the weapon is radiation as you pointed out as all technologies radiation has had a positive side in the negative side the negative side. Of course we think about weapons. We think about radiation disasters such as mobile in in the ussr. Where i went grow was born and raised three mile island Shema but then on the positive side radiation is used to determine how our teeth are doing or our lungs are doing which is particularly timely given. What's happening right now. In our nation and has also a really really powerful medicine to cure cancer. The reason it's not more widely available is what's technically known as dose limiting city and in english. That means you cannot give enough of the cure before it side effects overpower its benefits. So in dr funk's practice the physician. So i'm regurgitating. What i learned from her and other had the honor to collaborate with. She has a patient with a with a major cancer of the abdomen. Or or the pelvic area she can irradiate the tumor and eradicated. The patients do not recover because tissues that are inevitably also effective so the gut and the bone. Marrow where are aquatic stem cells live are irreversibly damaged by the radiation itself. So the patients Die off either lethal diarrhea which cannot be stopped using anything

University Of California Berke Kevin Volta Innovative Genomics Institute Dr Feodor Urnov Innovative Genomics Institute Dr Urnov Berkeley Campus Dr Mary Fung Pancreatic Liver Cancer Darpa Arpaio Ucsf Cure Cancer Dr Funk America Diarrhea
Ubisoft Is Developing A Massive Open-World ‘Star Wars’ Video Game

Game Scoop!

05:06 min | Last month

Ubisoft Is Developing A Massive Open-World ‘Star Wars’ Video Game

"Open world star was game is in development. Not at electron arts sits in development at. Ub soft it's from the division developer yousof massive. No indication has been given us u whether it would be single player or multiplayer. Or what part of the star was timeline or win and might be released but Ub eve chemo says quote on. It's an original stores adventure. That is different from anything that has been done before. Sam what do you make of that. It can't be two stories. you can't be star. Wars chess masters tarazi yummy. Oh it's none of those things. If you just eliminate all the way star wars has manifested itself. You can figure out what this game is because it's not any of those cannon whatever it is going to be cannon with with just films and everything everything our young everything hanan. I think this is such cool news. the division is not necessarily my cup of tea but like big aaa studio. That's really really well. Resourced and capable of of of doing star wars justice undeniably so Yeah i'm really really excited. We also dug into some of the jobless things because obviously now the the word is out there like our star wars project and they're able to be a little bit more descriptive there. Nothing to revelatory words like open world action adventure linear and lawn on linear storytelling. An rpg style progression were thrown around. So it's a video game folks you heard for as many star wars games as we've gotten. Yeah it's been a million where you know this this little trailer montage. That's running a showing several of them. We haven't really ever gotten a big aaa open world star wars game. There has been role playing games. And you know jet. I fallen order is. I don't know what you would call that wide. Probably i would. I would think on the positive side. This is just yet i fall. And were because it's a bunch of open areas and ed fine with me but i want i want like i want like sky rim levels of open like our fallout lending open area. Yeah i want like actual open world star wars game. Where like that's this weird hole in the in all the star wars games we've gotten in the past if it was that that that could work well but what worries me is seeing the division footage and thinking about the avengers and like you know we did our lessons being learned about what You know open world games are when they are also games a service or are thus not being learned about that and people really like the division say anthems that the thing that scares me as much as a jazz. Yeah that's a that's a very real you know. I'd like star wars as much as the next nerd. But the franchise assertive written into a corner because there are no jet. I in modern star wars so unless they go back in time to old republic all any player ever want to do is run around as a djeddai but the fiction of every single star. Wars game has to itself for why you know. I'm not a jet. I but i'm using a lightsaber or Or calcutta's in jeddah. Fallen order is a jet. I'd here's why you know. No one knows about him like i. It's this big stumbling block. That like every star wars game has to overcome so but even if you are jet. I like you can't be getting a new lightsaber and equipping new loot and being on this loop dried. Really like he got different different robes. Sure where they can make that work. that's horrible. I think that's why a builder public works of the time when there were there were a lot of it is. I'm definitely a fan of a lot of ubisoft. Open world games. A lot of the Is far cries but Yeah just to echo what you're saying. The divisions are really my cup of tea. Either a shared world sort of lewd or shooters not really what. I what i'm into. So i don't know i don't know what to make of this Tina i know you like a lot of assassins creeds. Obviously like open games shema. What what's your take on this. I didn't play of division one. I did actually like the vision to i think there are. Rpg elements that make sense and like you know really big dense world to go around and do different activities in could could be a really good fit to so. I have confidence that us off. Nasa is a great choice in general Breaking out of. Ea exclusively is a good thing for them if felt like felt like ea developing those games Was a bit of practice for what is now known as lucasfilm games. And now they get to branch out and pick like a clipper per the type of game that they're going for so that they don't feel necessarily like hamstring into Squeezed into one publisher particularly. So it's like they got a little bit confidence with the successive jet iphone. Order and star wars squadrons and a couple advancements the battlefront two. So they've figured out a formula that could work and now they get to poach essential essentially developers from different talents to figure out what else they're gonna do in this increasingly dense cannon star wars world.

Hanan Chemo Chess SAM Jeddah Ubisoft EA Tina Lucasfilm Nasa
Farming like Indigenous people did could bolster Hawaiis food supply

Climate Connections

01:12 min | 2 months ago

Farming like Indigenous people did could bolster Hawaiis food supply

"Hawaii imports more than eighty five percent of its food. So extreme weather disrupt shipping. It could have serious consequences for the state. You just kinda grow up knowing that we only have like a week of food on the shelves and if the barge doesn't come wearing in big trouble that's natalie courage shema while a phd student. At the university of hawaii. She studied whether indigenous farming methods could help reduce this food insecurity especially as the climate changes. I always wondering how can we learn from our iki. Kupuna extra knowledge to address of i-it's sustainability issues. Today she says before colonization indigenous farmers grew crops in areas. That people today would not they. Farmed terraced land that had to be flooded during cultivation and grew roof. Ish ables under banana and coconut trees. Those methods were productive. She studies suggest that they could have produced enough food for eighty six percent of hawaii's current population. So if implemented today indigenous farming methods could make hawaii's food system more resilient to extreme weather and help the state sustain itself in the future as it did in the past.

Hawaii University Of Hawaii Natalie
Ghost of Tsushima Wins Game Awards Player's Voice

Kinda Funny Games Daily

02:18 min | 2 months ago

Ghost of Tsushima Wins Game Awards Player's Voice

"Who shema winds players voice award at the game awards. This from wesley leblanc at iga jeff. Kelly has revealed that goes to shema. Is the game game. Awards players voice award winner this year. After three rounds of voting from fans the game awards will take place on december tenth. And it's there that awards like best narrative best direction and of course game of the year will be announced. These awards are voted on by both curated voting jerry and fans but in those instances the voting jury accounts for ninety percent of the vote while the fan votes account for the other ten percent. That's not the case for the players voice award which is which is entirely decided upon by fans. There's no weighing way. There's no vote weighing involved with with this award. So gauche seema is the game that got the most total votes out of all the other nominees. It beat out other twenty twenty releases like the last to haiti's and do maternal go sushila sauce placement in the rankings shift each round at it had a three percent lead over the last two during the second round of voting fourteen percent and eleven percent of the votes respectively and then when the when the final round began on december sixth last part to you climb to forty three percent of the vote while go see my only had thirty one percent then with just four hours to go before before the closing of the votes goes through your schema jumped up to forty seven percent in the last two dropped to thirty three percent. That was the last update. Kelly gave to gave the voting percentages before announcing tuesday. That ghosts shema is the players voice award winner of the game awards this year. M ron does this surprise. You trending that direction. I like we were talking about this a bit about games. Cassie were talking about earlier. Where we're predicting the awards. One of the things i said is less of us. Divisive but it's not devicive on critics. It is divisive among fans. So i i'm not stocked. People rallied around sima. There's a little bit of campaigning along stuff like this to like. I saw a sucker sucker punch out there on twitter like hey sima and like they were doing it pretty consistently i saw some of new haven over last of us too but not nearly as much and not as many people like i said last semester was divisive so i i'm not shocked. Goes one well. I'm not shocked to go. See what beat last of us. I am surprised that beat by that much

Wesley Leblanc Iga Jeff Sushila Sauce Kelly Seema Jerry Haiti Sima Cassie Twitter
Millennials heat up Seattle housing market

Seattle Now

07:41 min | 5 months ago

Millennials heat up Seattle housing market

"We've all had a lot more time to assess our living situation since the pandemic and it seems a lot of people are making the move to homeownership but that doesn't mean it's gotten more affordable. In fact, Seattle's real estate market is hotter than ever. We've got the fastest rising house prices of any city in the country after Phoenix prices here jumped seven percent in July since last year despite the pandemic Catherine Shema belong is a real estate reporter at the Seattle Times she's here to explain hi Catherine. Hi Trish. Thanks for having me. It's good to talk to you again. The heat in the real estate market here is surprising to me given what I keep hearing about the economy were you surprised Oh Yeah I was floored I think it's counterintuitive to a lot of people as hundreds of thousands of Washingtonians. Lose their jobs that home prices would continue to go up. Yeah and where is the growth the market coming from this time around? What are people doing here? Well. That's another thing that's really surprising A lot of the growth is coming from first time homebuyers specifically millennials people who aren't normally interested in buying homes but we're in this sort of perfect storm where it's cheaper than it's ever been to own a house because mortgage rates are historically low that's incentivizing a lot of people who might not normally have started their house search to get on the market. It's also incentivizing people who already own homes who might have sold them to hold onto them to refinance to take some cash out of their homes maybe a to better weather what's coming in the pandemic? But inventories. So number of homes that are on the market is very low lower than it's been by some counts in two decades. Simultaneously Demand just keeps ticking up that is a formula for rising house prices right there high demand low inventory, but I want to break this down just a little bit because from what I understand about millennials right? They don't have a ton of money. They are first time homebuyers. About getting into a market where the median home price is around seven, hundred thousand dollars are the overextending themselves. Well, most growth that we're seeing it actually concentrated in the more affordable end of the market. So homes in the Seattle Center prices are going up, but they're more or less where they were about a year ago homes in places like Tacoma Lake Taps Auburn up north in snohomish county. That's where prices are really writing. We're seeing price growth in the double digits for homes that are less than four, hundred, sixty, thousand dollars. That's for the millennials are buying their homes and and that's really affecting affordability for a lot of people in the Seattle Area That's still an awful lot of money to break into a market I. Think if you live in the Seattle area, you just get used to seeing incredibly high housing costs. But again, when a millennial enters into an agreement to buy this large large purchase, are they banking at this point on a market that's going to continue to grow because I've been around long enough that I saw people get underwater really quickly when the market didn't pan out the. Way They thought it was going to a lot of experts that I've talked to think that Seattle's market is destined to keep growing maybe not at the scorching pace that we're seeing right now. But Seattle like San Francisco is afflicted with what we call the curse of the superstar city. There's so much wealth concentrated in industries like the Tech Industry for instance, and that really drives up housing prices that wealth those incomes they're out of set in some. With the cost of living for the rest of the people who live in the Seattle area. You also reported Catherine that people are leaving their apartments in troves. What's driving that? Things are driving that one. We've already talked about the low mortgage rates that's really pulling people out of their apartments but I talked to a couple a couple months ago who said they're both working from home and they said they were just getting sick and tired of stepping all over each other during the day. One of them's working in the bedroom. One of them's working in the living room and they were sharing a bell an apartment, and me just really wanted to see some green. They ended up moving to manage quality of life. They're getting a little more quality of life what about people though who can't get into the market right now? Is there an advantage to renting since so many people are leaving their apartments. There is an advantage to renting. We're seeing that rents in the Seattle area have dropped by nearly ten percent since the start of the pandemic, and that's not even counting the discounts that landlords property managers are offering attendance. Some of them are offering as much as two months free rent. Those are big savings right now. So if you can find an apartment, Dow was a good time to sign a lease, but there are some real. Losers from the current growth even a mortgage rates are lower than they've been any time ever. The ability of people to get a mortgage has become more constricted ben anytime in the past six years, we look at something called the mortgage credit availability index, and that's lower than it has been since March twenty fourteen. What that means is that it's harder for people who don't have corporate credit to get a mortgage and we know that. Black Americans Americans of color are disproportionately likely to have lower credit scores than their white counterparts. What that means is harder for black. Americans. To afford a home now and West before the pandemic right banks are much less willing to give money away at this point to people who don't have perfect credit, which really really leaves a lot of people especially in the Seattle area where it is really hard to live out in the cold. Here do you think that there is a tipping point for the Seattle market where home affordability just becomes too much and people end up like just packing up for the suburbs or for a different state because like I said, we see these housing prices in this area and I look in other parts of the country and I think oh my gosh you know I could do a lot better for myself. I think the answer is yes. Then, it started I realized that I could afford to rent a larger home outside of the city packed up and moved in our north. I think that the pandemic is giving a lot of people the chance to reassess whether living that being said I don't necessarily see price growth slowing down appreciably in Seattle in the near future. We just have so many people with so much wealth in the city and the wealth and poverty gap here are just getting wider. It's becoming more and more obvious that the line between making it and. Not Making it is pretty thin here. What about people who aren't rocking a tech salary in this city? What is the other side of the picture for them? The other side of the picture is getting forced out of neighborhoods they've lived in for a long time because they can't afford riding property taxes and moving out into south King County, Pierce County, snohomish county, or even further outside of the Seattle area. The last time we talked you were downtown in billtown looking out at a pretty empty city Catherine where are you living these days? These days I'm I'm way up north I'm actually Skagit County. Where I can have a house with a yard and a new puppy. So you are an example of what's going on in the city. You're not just a reporter live the life. That's right. I know it's happening because I live it. Catherine Shema belong excellent to talk to you. Thanks so much for your time. Thank you, Victor.

Seattle Catherine Shema Seattle Times Reporter Snohomish County Phoenix Trish Skagit County Billtown Tacoma Lake Victor DOW Troves San Francisco King County Pierce County
After 2011 Disaster, Fukushima Embraced Solar Power. The Rest Of Japan Has Not

Environment: NPR

08:06 min | 6 months ago

After 2011 Disaster, Fukushima Embraced Solar Power. The Rest Of Japan Has Not

"Before the earthquake before the NAMI and the nuclear disaster Japan got nearly a third of its energy from nuclear power. But after the Fukushima nuclear disaster in two thousand eleven, the country took all of its nuclear reactors off line, which has led Japan to increasingly rely on fossil fuels and also solar power. NPR's cat ORF continues our series on recovery and Fukushima. She only endo is saying a final goodbye. To the home she once shared with her husband and three kids and for Cosima it's less than a mile from the Daiichi nuclear power plant where three reactors overheated and exploded in two thousand eleven. They left fast only taking what they could carry. Their things left nearly exactly as they were the day everything changed to coffee, Cup sit on the kitchen table her daughter's old school uniform is laid out on a bed a calendar on the wall is still flipped to March two thousand eleven. clueless you the kit ago. Muluzi. Nice. This is sad. She says this House System Nice, but we can't come back. She looks around your moon to Ni life is so different diddle do remind us. To start from nothing even less than. A totally reinvent ourselves after the disaster digging up this. She's here to give the keys to government officials. This house will be bulldozed soon and the land used as part of a storage site for radioactive topsoil scraped from the earth and the massive cleanup effort Tschumi heads upstairs. And takes one last look at the bedroom shoes to share with her husband Hitter Yuki. He died a few years ago suddenly. And then she walks back down to hand over the keys. The thing is pretty unceremonious though in reality she only says, she said goodbye to this part of her life. Disaster when her family piled into a car and drove as far south as they go to the southern tip of Japan on the island of Kyushu. Here, she's a single mom to her bubbly ten-year-old son Cagey who was just a baby when the disaster happened, he doesn't remember Shema at all her other two children are grown and live nearby, and she only has found herself within unlikely job running a small solar farm. On a big hill overlooking the tropical landscape Ma hidden is yet. She never imagined. My life would be like this guy when we first moved here, I was in my late thirties my husband was in his forties unanue issue we were like, okay. Do we get new jobs? So we decided to do this. We saw as investment for the future month on her husband worked at the Nuclear Power Plant for over twenty years and for him, the switch to solar was purposeful. He felt that nuclear power had betrayed him do on didn't He grew up really believing nuclear power was safe and then he lost his home to come see today the energy collected by these panels has allowed her to build a new life. The power is sold to the local utility company and brings in thousands of dollars a month when her husband died suddenly a few years ago she only took over the work and the family placed his grave in the center of the solar panels show me walks over to tall marblestone. Hook. With an inscription that says. Good you send do essentially remember that this family is here because of the Fukushima nuclear disaster in two thousand eleven cocoa use. A message to future generations she explains looking away device. My biggest wish is for renewable energy to take over I mean look at my old home, it's going to be a storage site for nuclear waste. We can't deal with that kind of wasted drivers go. Joey's wish might not come true though her family started their business at the right time. The price was so generous and also delegration was sold loose. So anyone can register. Naida is the executive director of the Institute of Sustainable Energy Policies. In Tokyo, he says in the early years after the disaster Japan pushed renewables to help fill energy gap left after fifty four nuclear reactors were taken off line the. Government offered big incentives, new investors, lots of people like me and her husband jumped on board to build smaller operations. incorporations rushed in to build massive solar and wind farms but also the liberation was more strict compensation dropped. It got increasingly harder for alternative energy producers to connect into the power grid edith says, this was partly due to the big utility companies trying to maintain control and the government allowing. It to happen the sitting kind of a body of to north to Laputa increase anymore, the institutions make a big difference that's Jennifer Sclerosis of George. Mason University she studies energy policy in Japan, and she says, there is technology an interest for renewables in Japan, but the bigger power companies in government need to commit if people in place do not watch to implement policies to empower the economics and the. Technology innovation then it can't happen regardless of how advanced technologies earn regardless of how good the economics look many of the major utilities as well as the Japanese government are still waiting to see if nuclear power can make a comeback and renewables just aren't that reliable yet. So in the meantime, I would assume the defaults going to import gas import coal eater agrees is the most the early sick and Not so optimistic future, but one place in Japan that is optimistic about Renewables Hookah Shema the local government here has set a goal for the entire prefecture. The third largest in Japan to be completely fueled by renewable energy by twenty forty. It's a real turnaround for a place where nuclear power ruled only a decade ago especially in the former exclusion zone near Daiichi, there are solar panels everywhere from small ones on roofs and hillsides to massive mega-farms along highways making use of land available after the disaster some of these panels are run by big developers and others are not. Lake the solar panels on farmer. She get Yuki Corneau's field. He's seventy four years old and this land has been in his family for generations he gestures around it. This is all my land, but it's nonsense. Nonsense because it's relatively useless the wind carried radioactive material here after the disaster and the government has scraped off all the topsoil in decontamination efforts. The farmers here can't really far much anymore. So small local power company came and asked sugar. Yuki if they could rent land for solar panels, he said, yes could you go I was really worried after the nuclear accident how would we get power most of his neighbors also agreed but that means everything is different. Now he says there were Rice patties all around here with tiny frogs that created a kind of soundtrack for his life now it's quiet. He misses the frogs a lot and he says, and he doesn't make nearly the same amount of money as he did farming. But She Yuki says he sees this as a necessary change. He has nine grandkids they all live far away now but they were just in town the other weekend for visit running through the fields. Suze my grandparents farmed here my parents do. But now it's time for Change I've realized it's a new season pitcher. This he says looking out over the solar panels is for future. Generations Khatlon store NPR News Fukushima Japan.

Japan She Yuki Government Daiichi NPR Japanese Government CUP Fukushima Yuki Corneau Shema Tschumi
That history should not repeat: Hiroshimas storytellers

The Economist: The Intelligence

08:16 min | 7 months ago

That history should not repeat: Hiroshimas storytellers

"Seventy, five years ago, this week, the B twenty, nine, bomber, Nola gay dropped little boy, the world's first use of an atomic weapon. At Eight fifteen in the morning of August six Japanese time. The first atomic thumb has done enemy talk. It detonated over. Hiroshima immediately killing around one hundred and forty. Thousand People I'm was aimed to explode about zero point. In the city at the junction of. Untold River. Three days later, another stroke sake. As Japan marks the anniversary, it hopes to keep the wartime memories alive using the stories of people who survived the attacks. On all. Holland. But the average age of survivors is now over eighty three. But those. This'll be the last chance to hear from those witnesses during a major anniversary. August sixth nineteen forty five was supposed to be a day off for seventeen year old. Takeo to Toco. No Snyder is the economists Tokyo Bureau chief. She had made plans to meet two girlfriends at eight fifteen owning at a train station on the west side of Shema. She was running late, and then she stepped outside, she saw flash and heard a bang. Which you regained consciousness, she found herself lying thirty meters away a mushroom cloud rising over the city. People with charts skin peeling from their arms rushing over a nearby hillside. Mr K. Ohka left's to look for her mother. and. Found rivers filled with bodies took her six days to locate her mom who is still miraculously alive. Mom lived for another twenty two years. We stuck ohka became a prominent voice amongst the hypocrisy shower, atomic bomb survivors, atomic sufferers. Telling Her story abroad many times in hopes of preventing atomic bombs from ever being used again. I heard this tale from her daughter. He got no. Mario. Who's part of a fascinating unique project underway in both your Sima Nagasaki to help preserve the stories, of Hypoxia, for generations to come to, how does this project work? So there are still some hundred and thirty thousand living. inbox. Amiss. Gone. But their average age is now over eighty three and the number who can tell their stories publicly is declining drastically. Just. You got the fact that could have done this. So the city government's in both fishermen sake have been recruiting scores of volunteers like music Otieno to become what they call dense Shosha or legacies successors. These are essentially memory keepers, people who learned the stories of the hypoxia down to the most gruesome details in order to be able to retell them with power and veracity for years into the future do. So the volunteers in, Hiroshima, have to go through a rather rigorous course, three years of study training discussion with hypoxia before they're allowed to retell the stories in public. Ms Higashi, no is somewhat unusual in that. She inherited own story, most of the Dan Shosha, take on a stranger's burden. And it simply because that's that generation of of survivors passing that the these city governments have started this program. Yeah, it is. It's really reflective of the anxiety that many people in here, C.`mon, Nagasaki and throughout Japan feel about fading wartime memories I'm what will happen. Once this generation firsthand witnesses passes away the city governments and the peace museums. Atomic bomb museums in both cities have been collecting and recording testimony for many years. But this then social program is away, they hope to preserve these memories in living form to retain the emotional impact. The comes from searing these stories from another human being. and. So where does this fit in with the the wider of up the bombing of of the war in Japan? For Japan, the Hiroshima Experience became central to wartime memory and park has some scholars have argued because it allows victim narrative to dominate shifting the focus away from the atrocities Japanese soldiers committed abroad in Asia and the Pacific certainly oaks in China and Korea have bristled at the lack of context that some of the retailing's of the aroma and Nagasaki experiences or trey. and. If you look at Japan today, it's of course, wrestling a new with the legacy of the Second World War and its aftermath in particular the constitution that America imposed on Japan after the war, which renounces war bars Japan from maintaining armed forces. In practice, Japan does maintain a powerful military which it calls the Self Defense Forces and its Prime Minister Obey Shinzo years has hoped to change the constitution to revise the constitution in order to make explicit that Japan's military is constitutional and and perhaps to expand the limits of what they're allowed to do. Curiously, the public still supports maintaining the postwar constitution. So in short pacifism is still deep seated in today's Japan. and. What about the the the effort of auction others to to learn the lessons of the second. World War d? How does nuclear non-proliferation look at this stage from where you are. Well. This is another source for concern. Of course, non-proliferation efforts in recent years have been faltering just this January. The Bulletin of Atomic Scientists. It's doomsday clock. It's subjective measure of our proximity to self-annihilation closer to midnight than anytime since its establishment in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, seven, the hawks are are pleased and take solace in the signing of the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in two, thousand, seventeen, it invokes there unacceptable suffering in its preamble and a nod to how the memory of interesting Nagasaki continues to shape non-proliferation efforts globally yet at the same time, no country with nuclear weapons has signed up to that treaty neither has Japan in fact, which shelters under America's nuclear umbrella. And, and how does that sit with Hypoxia at this stage at this anniversary being marked. I spoke with US Akihiko the governor of the prefecture, and he expressed the view that I heard from many others both your seem sake, which was a wish that Japan would use its moral authority as the only victim of atomic weapons to push harder for their abolition. The hypocrisy. Have Long gramps and spoken about abolishing the bomb before the last houses away. Just to make the do. You call. You can. That's unlikely. But the hypocrisy hope that their stories at the very least. Deter the world from ever using his weapons again. Thank you very much for your time. Thank you very much for having me.

Japan Hypoxia Hiroshima Nagasaki Bulletin Of Atomic Scientists Sima Nagasaki Untold River Mr K. Ohka Dan Shosha Toco America Takeo Holland Ms Higashi Snyder Tokyo Bureau Chief Mario United States
beirut explosion latest news

Monocle 24: The Briefing

06:11 min | 7 months ago

beirut explosion latest news

"Good afternoon from Zurich we start in Lebanon where people are calling for justice following a huge blast in the country's capital Beirut at least one, hundred and thirty five people are known to have died in the explosion thousands more have been injured and many more have lost their homes. Komo mosaic is an entrepreneur who lives and works in Beirut, and he's very good friend of the MONOCLE team. He joins us on the line from Beirut Hello Komo. Good morning by the Hello Calico I I wanted to to start, of course with maybe you painting a little bit of a of a picture for us We are of course. Yeah. Now well, over day into this aftermath of this blast of course, we've spent a lot of time in Beirut together over the years in good times and in bad. But what is the spirit of the city today? What's the spiritual sippy can be after you know I'm not going think immature I think everybody's so this mushroom blast you know. And someone course barrel Shema. So it's the second. Sousa search biggest love ever the over so. I don't know what can be. She would emergency mode on Tuesday nights of trying I. I was I drove from the mountains to within like half an hour which takes maybe two or three times more time. I was trending on the streets just to meet by partner who was wanted at the other end of the street. So I think first, they were completely under the show yesterday we were trying to. To suck leaning. Roberson. Understand who's alive was that was one bit and today is our survey after Sabang and trying to understand what happens and it's devestation. There's nobody people's there's not once the. Organism is doing anything. People are in this three hour cleaning the streets. They are helping people took years, their houses they are moving. To you know and. It's just keeping. Others today the. which talking to understand what happened it took us two days to understand I'm I'm curious to to understand also the psyche because you of course have been through so much as all Lebanese have the decades and of course, there have been there have been car bombs There have been of course, mass protests, and of course we know that Lebanon has been. Through a particularly difficult patch of of late and of course, this this happens I want to about the resilience of of the Lebanese spirit. Are you seeing that because I think we all often always agree that the Lebanese have to be the most resilient people in the world given all that they've they've been through but what what is the spirit like right now? I don't want to hear sort at all anymore I even pronounce foods are. You know I can't hear it anymore I don't think it is what it is just sort of you know we have no choice but to survive But to be able to survive, I'm not able to to say the word was arch to be able to survive your orders need a minimum of strength or. or in your hearts, which is fine. Doesn't exist at all anymore I. think it's like treaties trump and we cannot take all anymore. It's. It's you know. It's lot of. Destruction seeing all your life what would you know over and over again? In the weight it's like bombs tighter cannot be but this. Is. Where it had suspended for dinner is. Completely. Destroyed the trees in front of our issues on how can you get down? Of A tree it is beyond that you can you imagine just like. An on bump and since too much to go over. Where we don't have the choice where we're where you know we're looking at our wounds now. and. I jumped out of meeting where we're trying to set up a kitchen was censored. was the. Central Kitchen full dress project to start cooking for emergency. So we're just trying to get out now of success of the emergency and seeing what can be done and what we can do, what must be done, but it's really very, very, very difficult to scale beyond anything you can imagine. Kamal over the last forty, eight hours. Of course, we've heard a number of countries probably France what am I talking about AIDS and and of course, emergency intervention in the country are you already seeing signs of that? Are you seeing troops or support from from elsewhere already involved with recovery? You Emmanuel Macron. And votes French president arrived city. To visit. That city and president haven't even said a word of on. Anything have been on the grounds so as or nationally and metro is now on the ground just planted and bill, and then the number I cannot. I cannot reply to France and seventy support trump over. So we're you cannot believe what it is. It is overwhelming it's warming our hearts it's giving maybe this is the only thing thousand giving us hope sore going to go on. So, yes. That's about specific receptacle trump something as to moral. That's for specific projects about play you we need everybody. To be able to grow up Camilla's in Beirut we will look forward to, of course, speaking to and Komo hopefully also. Looking forward to coming up to Beirut to join you very soon

Beirut France Komo Lebanon Zurich Sousa Sabang Roberson Partner Emmanuel Macron Camilla Kamal President Trump
75 years after Hiroshima, they're still feeling its impact.

Between The Lines

09:42 min | 7 months ago

75 years after Hiroshima, they're still feeling its impact.

"This bomb has this frank for twenty thousand tons of TNT. Harnessing, the basic power of the universe. What I fifteen I am on August six, nine, hundred, forty, five, the US Air Force dropped the little boy uranium fission bomb on central hero. Shema. Making it the first city ever to be destroyed by a nuclear bomb. On August nine Nagy became the second when the bomb exploded around thirty percent of Hiroshima's population that were killed instantly many more died in the months and years to come. Now, the bombs brought to an end to world war two but the wool was horrified at the human cost. Russia has since become a byword for nuclear holocaust forever linked to the words never again. Now, this week marks the seventy fifth anniversary of the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki joining me to reflect on the legacy of those events. Tashi. Tauch. She is assistant professor at Georgetown University's School of Foreign Service and the author of political fallout, nuclear weapons testing, and the making of Global Environmental Crosses. Welcome. Tasha. Thanks for having me and Michael Gordon Professor of history at Princeton University and Co. it is a of a new book called the age of Russia. Welcome. Welcome. It's very good to be here. Now, Michael the fear of the nuclear age is the period after World War Two when the US dropped the bomb. The fee was that the nuclear weapons would become a common part of conventional warfare but in the seventy five years since he Russia and Nagasaki, there's not been a single bomb dropped in a conflict. Question is this because deterrence works or have we just been lucky I would say we've mostly been lucky It's quite rare that there are conflicts between nuclear-armed nations. The major example is the nineteen sixty, nine border conflict between the People's Republic of China and the Soviet Union. So there haven't been many occasions for things to escalate, and there's a strong incentive in those cases to de-escalate. There have however been very close near accidents whether missile just that needing on its own or people launching almost launching in fear of an attack and there. Have Been Plenty of conventional wars that could have escalated that way. So by and large, we've been lucky but we've been abetted by the fact that there has been an ambient taboo that has grown over the years against nuclear first use although that is rarely the policy of any nuclear power. Okay. Now from an Australian perspective, Tic- Japan was seen as an aggressor in the war, the war crimes but also as a victim because of the destruction wrought by the nuclear bombs have is the wool remit in Japan now aggressor and victim. Tarshi. Many pass through consider themselves as victims thinking that Japanese were misled by the government inter- Disastrous Wall Conquest. In this view here stands at the as the ultimate symbol of Japanese victim. But today is victim narrative faces two competing accounts. One is to recognize Japan's acts of wartime aggression, including tweeting massacres, forced labor, and sexual violence. If we see hero Shimmer from this perspective, it takes on a whole different meaning not. Not as a national tragedy, but rather as international event. killed not only the Japanese residents but also many colonial subjects and allied. POW's who are present in the city at the time of the Tom Bombing. The other interpretation that has also gained for Japan is to see the wartime conduct Japan as an act of self defense. This This lesion is narrative recaps here. As the ultimate proof of Western aggression. So fitting the predation of Japan's Joel Roles as. Aggressor and victim during the war will gain the upper hand in the future will depend on how sweet society around the world comes together and develops a shared understanding of the complex legacies or Corna reason on the war in the Asia Pacific region and back to the United States markle. There's a popular conception that Washington had to drop the bomb that it was the only way. To win the war, of course, the war in Europe come to an end in May of forty five. This is early August two, forty five is that true I mean what? What President Truman's options? So. This is a great question and it's one with a lot of confusion around it. Functionally. The only way the only government that had any power to end the war was the Japanese government which was in a position to surrender and the question was when would that happen would have happened later or earlier by summer nineteen, forty, five, it was already clear that the war was militarily lost. President Truman and the US government in general had basically fixed options of what they could do to try and encourage the Japanese government to take that move. There's only two that people usually talk about dropping the atomic bomb or invading the home islands of Japan. Both of those were on the table also having the Soviet Union inducing them to enter the wars of belligerent which happened on August eighth increasing the intensity of firebombing tightening the blockade of foodstuffs into the home islands. and modifying the terms of unconditional surrender to allow Japan to keep the emperor. The interesting thing is all six of those happen Truman pursued all sex and the war ended. It's unclear which ones were determinative. But the point is there wasn't like we had one option or nothing else. The US had plenty of options and exercised actually all of them. On the one level target for the bombs was obviously Japan on another level. Real target was the Soviet Union. How did the Kremlin of you? He Russia Mirror Negga? Second Markle. So. Really, the question here is a small set of people within the Kremlin stolen and his closest advisers and you that there was an atomic bomb project going on in the United States for years they've found that out from spies from Britain from spies in the United States, and they had their own uranium enrichment and bomb development program that was going on at I would say a medium scale What happens after the destruction of Hiroshima is I in absented himself for a few days he went into a depression and didn't. React to any of his advisors and then immediately massively escalated the Soviet development of their own atomic bomb. So they were both caught by surprise and not caught by surprise. It's true that the Americans didn't always think about the Soviet Union as a factor in any decision related to how the war was going to end but they also very strongly, we understood that the key issue was trying to get this the Japanese government to surrender faster because the faster they surrendered the less impact. The Soviet entry in the war would have to how the end game would play out in Asia, my guest, Michael Gordon, and Tashi Hitachi, and we're reflecting on the seventy fifth anniversary of Hiroshima. Tashi. One, hundred fifty thousand atomic bomb survivors still living in Japan. In fact, as a guest of Japan's Ministry of Foreign. Affairs this would have been in September twenty, sixteen I met one of one of the survivors now they're all in education and public law has plied an important part in shaping Japan's post-war Pacifism. Now, as generation dies out, is the role of pessimism in Japanese politics is that diminishing especially in the face of Rausing China Toshi? I don't think the passing of the atomic bomb survivors will diminish the strengths of pacifism in any short-term. The correctly memory of human magazine Japan has been fairly robust and the taken deep roots in popular culture. I can think of a good example that is Japanese animated wartime drama film released just four years ago in two thousand, sixteen cold in this corner of the world. This picture accounts of the wartime life in here she was a smash hit in the box office. Be, atomic bomb survivors will also active in passing down lessons from the world's first nuclear war to the next generation. The city's over here streaming nagy training. Many Japanese Ron Tears as storytellers who share the testimonies are waging victims and a second generation survivors are spearheading efforts for peace unjustice. Well, that brings me to today and really in the last that he is the end of the call was thirty years ago the US. And the Soviets on Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty non stop this was President Bush senior and Gorbachev in Russia in the inside at Union. Then just as it was collapsing now, both agree to significantly reduce their nuclear stockpiles and of course, the updated treaty between Moscow and Washington that expose I. Think it's February Knicks Jeez. So that's just a few days after the next president is warning Michael Do you think it will be resigned. I think that's entirely dependent on the results of the election. Joe. Biden has indicated that he would refine the treaty The trump administration has had many opportunities to re-sign the treaty, but they have not taken advantage of those opportunities yet. Russia's indicated that they're very interested in extending

Japan United States Soviet Union Hiroshima Michael Gordon Russia Japanese Government President Truman Nagasaki Us Air Force Tic- Japan Washington Nagy President Bush
Game Scoop

Game Scoop!

05:15 min | 8 months ago

Game Scoop

"Okay? Let's talk about what we've been playing I know at least seventeen on Ivan playing ghost of Sakina just their view. Our interview a came out this week. got a nine from Mitchell ends. Everybody seems to be really really enjoying it. I know I. Am that also true for both of you? Hands Down like gotta be the most gorgeous game I've ever played. It's very pretty. It's very pretty. I mean there's just there's firefly's everywhere. They're like little butterflies. flapping around the attention to detail is amazing, but like even when you're walking over yellow like yellow leaves from from falling from the trees you can see. They're like sweeping up behind you and they go faster as you run faster. It really is amazing to look at 'EM SALMON I. We're talking about this at some point off. Scoop. and Sam mentioned like it's such a bummer when it's nighttime because you don't get to see all of all of this like loveliness and all its glory. But. Yeah, understand are really cool, but sunny day really really makes things amazing in that game, and then there's these moments where like I I mean they sat when you go into a story, they set the time for that and that's like a trick they're using because sometimes you're like in the the golden forest area, and everything's like autumn looking because y'all. It's like all seasons at once in that game. And and you. The Sun is like as big as the screen is. Gold and everything is silhouetted in, and it's just like it's unbelievable, but it's still an open world game, and that'll just happen. Naturally were moving around. It's like the thing that breath wild did which I thought was really cool. Which says well is the wind like like these Grassy Plains, the wind looks amazing, sweeping through them, and there's giant fields of flowers, and you keep like our. That's probably going to be the most beautiful. Beautiful place in the game and then they went up it with like another field of flowers has cool rocks in it or something, or they have like a swarm of starlings that is the most realistic depiction of a swarm of birds have ever seen in any games in any way just looks incredible analytical. All three of those elements that you mentioned are also gameplay elements. The bird heads the flowers and the wind. The wind actually really liked that. They use the wind to tell you where to go. Yeah although really cool mechanic. Yeah, it's really windy and my Sushi Malvo because I'm just like. Wait. What direction wait am I going the right way? My Hair's total again. Just miserable, be a nice summer fall, maybe autumn or Spring Day, but it's just a little bit chilly because of that wind. I'm playing it coming immediately coming off of last part too, so it's a little bit interesting. compete playing those games one after the other last of his party was really like shooting for the stars and trying to get do something different. Give you an original experience play with the way narratives working games play with your expectations, trying to do all this new stuff or as ghosts of Sushi. Shema I feel like it's just a very traditional open world action game, which isn't a knock against it at all I just feel it's like the AAA open action game refined to perfection. It's honestly the breath of fresh air that I was hoping for following the. Exactly that kind of air. Thank you. Breath of fresh wind. Because I mean aside from all this stuff about like the last of us being this really like dark and brutal world that depicts humanity in such a like depressing perspective go Sushi Shema is pretty much the opposite of that in a lot of ways but I like like I'm going really slowly through the main story beats actually because I. Love The side quests in the site. I'll give you something different. level you up in different ways, or you can get legendary armor and weapons with some of the. Specific side quests so I I just love being in the world and spending as much time as possible searching everywhere like looking for all the little elements of the story that are living in these tiny pockets as opposed to the loss of us, which is just as like grand big cinematic experience, also you use triangle really dominantly in the last of us for like access points like opening doors, or whatever, and then in goes Chima. You are, too, so I have definitely accidentally hacked the hell out of my poor horse, trying to mount it, which which sources you big or jumped off the Horse I. Yeah! I picked the white horse and I named him Nobu for trust. three two three horses that you get to choose from Black Arstan puffy. That's exactly what I have class. Hacking I. Aside from the beauty of the game. I think there's a little bit of like Damon was saying like what? What's an open world RPG going for like it is trying to? It's more like assassins creed in anything else, but I I personally like it better than assassins creed I think it's like a a because I like the sword combat. Now it's been frustrating for a very long time, but now I have like these multiple stances. Stances them switching through. It's really fun. I found the way that I like to play, which is rolling a lot and dodging instead of parrying which I just suck at I'm just so bad at that and a better fighting games, too. I always knew like I. Play Friends. Wednesday got good at blocking and like street fighter two. I'd be like well. I can't play anymore I. Just don't like I'm out

Ivan Mitchell Grassy Plains Shema Black Arstan Chima Damon Scoop. SAM
Alone, Together - A Covid Nurse's Story

Israel Story

06:10 min | 8 months ago

Alone, Together - A Covid Nurse's Story

"March twenty second twenty twenty. My heart is broken on Friday night. My worst fears were realized as I watched. My beloved patient are Evan. Take his last breath on earth. To other patients rush to his side with tears in my eyes I watched them instinctively placed their hands on his eyes and recite the Shema prayer. At Him and said goodbye I says holy soul entered the gates of heaven. That's like Gamaa. Normally she's in oncology nurse, but back in March, when covert I hit, Israel will head was one of a handful of nurses transferred to the new corona virus warded. Her Hospital shallots Nick Medical Center in Jerusalem. She worked day and night, following strict isolation protocols that meant among other things wearing full protective gear in ministering care via video intercon's. She was often frightened as were many of her patients. One of them was eighty eight year old Alliott Evan who on March Twentieth Twenty Twenty, sadly became Israel's first covert casualty of at home shallots. They will show Lime Methuselah Hullah Evan Evan Bench morning. Wish antisocial anyhow by Damon Asoka de Corps F. When she'd come home after a shift, a hell would often sit down at her computer and recount her experiences on facebook those posts and will link to a bunch of them on our site. Read Lak- diary. This is her reading the post she wrote right after he passed away. I know what the next step is, and I'm already dreading it. Traditionally when a Jew dies, there's a series of rituals including washing the body that take place, but hunter the now with covert. Everything would be different missile heavily. The Ministry of Health has prepared us with instructions on how to deal with disease covid nineteen patients. We are the first hospital in Israel to implement this protocol. Similar to casualties of biological warfare, our treatment of the body needs to be done in a way that will not endanger us. Because of this there can be no purification or Tahara process. This Jewish. Ritual is sacrificed to protect us and everyone else who will come in contact with him? Me and the other nurse Mahal are responsible for identifying him for burial. will be the last ones to see and care for him physically. My dear Aria. You survived the horrors of the Holocaust immigrated to Israel. Established DEMOC deficit family, and your extraordinary journey ends here in this new word. We hoped we would never have to open. The circumstances of your hospitalization did not allow for your loving family and caretaker to be by your side for us in them. This was heartbreaking from the outside monitored you as closely as we could. We were an off as we watch the other patients care for you, keep you company and help you. However they could. They did not want you to ever feel. Are Yet, I wanna ask you for forgiveness. I'm sorry for how we were required to handle your body. We did our best to preserve your dignity and respect you based on the circumstances I know that it was done to protect us. It was a tremendous food and honor to care for you. When you're a final days, you've touched my heart, the staff and the patients that surrounded you. I know your life would spire the rest of Israel as well. Go to your resting place in peace. Look out for us from about. That fishermen witter no homage Caversham Madam Linda Goal highlights me live Gra, Helga Mar.. A few days later, she posted again this time about two moments one of extreme grief and the other extreme beauty march twenty, eight, twenty twenty. It's been only two weeks since my first shift and Koetter the COVID, nineteen word, and in many ways feels like an eternity. As panic and uncertainty, keep escalating around the globe for me. Personally the pressure and anxiety are quickly building up and it's nothing short of overwhelming. In the span of two weeks, the number of patients in my unit has quadrupled and keeps growing the everyday experiences in the word taking an emotional toll on me. On Friday, a daughter of a critical patient walks into our operations headquarters. Since no family member can go inside the unit. She has come to say goodbye to her L. Father through the video intercom system. She asked me to hold her phone and record their interaction. As I watched her cry and talked her father through a screen I have to physically turn my head to hold back tears. This is heart wrenching to watch I cannot even begin to imagine what it's like for them. At six thirty PM with thirty minutes left until the end of May shift. I'm rushing to finish my last tasks inside the unit. At this point, the moderate patients have all congregated in the middle of the word to do Tabet. I soon realized it's the only permissible Mignon in Jerusalem right now people from all walks of life and across the religious spectrum are singing and rejoicing together as bring in. I! I'm blessed to be witnessing the scene of unity and. I. I already know this. Coming Week is going to present more challenges physically and emotionally, but I know I'm not alone. We're in this fight together. We're going to come out of this stronger and more united as a nation than ever before to stay strong instead home God bless.

Israel Evan Evan Bench Twenty Twenty Jerusalem Damon Asoka Nick Medical Center Facebook Ministry Of Health Mahal Madam Linda Goal Tabet Helga Mar
Producer Shima Oliaee on Making Dolly Partons America

Inside Podcasting

06:34 min | 8 months ago

Producer Shima Oliaee on Making Dolly Partons America

"Hello and welcome to inside podcasting the show in which creators discussed their craft I'm your host Sky Pillsbury today? I speak with Shima Oli. Who together with Radio Lab Founder Jad Abu Murad produced the award winning show Dolly Parton America. And when I say award-winning, it's kind of personal for me. You see Dolly Parton. America beat out the show. You're listening to right now for the title of Discover Pods Best New podcast of two thousand nineteen. I guess I should also mention that there show just won a peabody award, and sadly inside podcasting wasn't in the running for that one. Regardless the fact that podcast I produced was in the running with a show about Dolly. Parton will always put a smile on my face when I was nine I idolized. Does I spent hours staring at her glossy album covers imagining what it would be like to be glamorous singer. And while that dream come true, it was still an incredible thrill for me to talk to Shema about this show. In case you haven't listened to the series yet. I want to play you a clip. This is from an episode called dixie disappearance in which Jad and she might take a look at some of the contradictions behind Dolly's iconic, persona. The episode centers around a wildly popular tourist event called Don. DIXIE STAMPEDE! It's a Rodeo style dinner theater, in which the civil war is acted out as quote, friendly competition. The word slavery isn't mentioned at any point during the show. In this club Shema and One through the experience of attending the event. Okay so basically! Warn you walk into the, arena. It's huge I wouldn't say it's a football field I would say it's like an Olympic size pool like with arena seats all around. It's like going to the Rodeo. Basically. It's like going to the Rodeo. It's like a ton of der- in the center of this massive oval. How many seats wasn't again? It was one thousand. Dolly Parton. And the whole conceit of this situation. Besides eating a tremendous amount of food, I mean a full chicken and pork line and some soup that has a lot of cream and a biscuit. It was a lot of food decides that. Blue quickly. find out your competition a friendly competition between neighbors. Five folks. Are. For. The whole arena is split in half on one side. You've got the north wind on the other side. And, the announcer who rides in on this horse on his steed. They just. He encourages each side to jeer at the other. Side fireworks. He asked you to kind of jeer at them. And then he goes to the South side and he tells us outside. Northern. Third. Foul smelling. Slobber all gas. Good here, way out of a wet paper bag there. Before we get started. You may hear a few names that you don't recognize. There's Aisha Harris who wrote a critical profile of the stampede after which Dolly removed the word Dixie from the events name. By the way we have put a link to that story in our show notes for this episode. There is also Dolly's nephew. Brian seaver as a kid Brian was talented break dancer, who sometimes performed onstage with Dolly he gives Shima and Jad a tour of Dolly's child home. In Tennessee's smokey mountains, Sarah's marsh is list. Who wrote a book about Dolly? Parton and University of Tennessee, Professor Lynn Sakho taught a class called Dolly Parton America, which is where the series got its name. Okay, let's jump into the interview. We kick things off with Shima revealing how she and Jad prepared for an introductory conversation with Dolly Parton. He comes up to me. This is this is actually kind of fun. He comes up to me. He has a book he like goes into the cabinet behind. My desk gets out a piece of yellow paper painted around up a tape. Sit around the outside of the book and he's like this top secret, but I needed to read this and then. I, need you to prepare me for a conversation with the person now as you know, I've already been researching and doing other things for his talk and other and other ideas that we're kind of cooking up for other series, and so he tells me it's Dolly, and you know so I read. This book is covered in yellow fluorescent paper. Which I think was unnecessary I don't. Don't think anyone cares so I read it I. Write all the questions, and are you writing questions like? Are you knowing okay? We're GONNA do this. Do you have any premise for the show yet? We're like what kinds of questions are you writing down? Just questions pop into your head as you're reading it or this was a very yeah. This is a very moment so this. This is just the introductory conversation. So I also think we just needed to have an introductory conversation you know before you even touch certain things and we were both green, which is the beauty of kind of a jazz reporting is? He's okay with like not knowing anything when he begins which I think. adds to kind of the journey. You go on when you start telling. Telling the story, so the listener is going on the same ride you on which is very, I think emotionally fulfilling so we didn't really know when we started we. We knew enough basics and I brought to him everything I found really interesting. The passages I had compelled questions. We go way went over them edited and he went to interview Dolly and he comes back. I listened to the tape. And you hear this in the third episode of the series where she's like even GonNa. Get a question in because ninety minutes goes by. After his first question, and she just does the Dalai magic

Dolly Parton Dolly Dolly Parton America Jad Abu Murad Shima Oli Peabody Award Dixie America Sky Pillsbury Founder Tennessee Football Aisha Harris Brian Seaver Stampede Professor Lynn Sakho Sarah University Of Tennessee
A record-breaking year for ocean temperatures

Climate Cast

11:35 min | 1 year ago

A record-breaking year for ocean temperatures

"So this happened last week. We learned Earth's oceans. Were the warmest ever recorded in two thousand nineteen and the scientists found. The past. Ten years are are also the warmest on record that paper in the Journal Advances in atmospheric sciences included a Minnesota scientists. It's University of Saint Thomas Scientists. John John Abraham is part of the team that includes some names. Climate watchers will know Michael Man from Penn State Kevin Trenberth from the National Center for Atmospheric Research. So what does this mean for earth's atmosphere and for us here in landlocked Minnesota. We're fortunate to have study co-authored jumped Abraham here this morning to talk about that. Hi John Hey pleasure to be here Paul. And we're also thrilled to have Georgia tech climate scientists. Dr Kim Cobb here this morning. Her work includes going deep into our Russians analyzing corals deep sea sediments and cave stalagmites. Sounds Fun while come back. Kim thanks for having me and we want to hear from you This morning do you have questions about our oceans record-breaking warmth or maybe you're a Minnesotan who plans to travel back to a favourite seaside escaped this winter. What have you seen in the Russian where you visit? Give us a call and talk to these two great climate scientists six five one two two seven six thousand or toll free at eight hundred two four two two eight two eight John. Let's start with your recent study. What did you find out about earth? Oceans Will Paul in a nutshell. We found that the earth is warming alarming and it really matters So when we want to know how fast the climate's warming what we need to do is measure the amount of heat in in the Earth's climate now fortunately As the earth warms because of human heat trapping gases most of that heat ends up in the oceans in fact over ninety percent of it. So if you want to know how fast the earth is warming you've gotta measure the oceans what I like to say is global warming is ocean warming and my research team keeps track of ocean temperatures and ocean heat and we report those results each year and we found that the year two thousand nineteen set a record that record had previously been set in two thousand eighteen which by the way broke the record from two thousand seventeen so I'm sounding like a broken record but the oceans are warming their warming extremely rapidly. And what we need to know here in Minnesota as it has consequences even here though we're far away from the ocean and you had an interesting sort of nuclear clear comparison of just how much heat energy is going into the oceans. Tell us about that. Yeah that's right so the fancy term that we use to to tell people how fast the oceans oceans warming is a Zeta jewel. Now you haven't heard that in a long time if you can pull that out of a cocktail party tonight you extra bonus points but a jewel is a unit of energy. I'm not talking about a jewel on a you know jewelry or a ring or hearings but a jewel is a unit of Energy Zeta. Jewel is a one with twenty one zeros. After it I mean these are huge huge numbers so the earth warmed. Twenty eight Zeta Zeta jewels or about twenty-five Zeta Jill's last year. And I. How do you wrap your head around that? And it's crazy crazy number so I related it to the the energy released by hero Shema atomic bombs and it turns out we are heating the ocean at the rate of five Herro Shema bombs uh-huh per second per second day and night three hundred sixty five days a year so I just helps put into context the scale L.. What's happening to our Oceans Kim? As John mentioned we know that more than ninety percent of earth warming is being absorbed by the oceans. How does that extra heat impact the atmosphere and weather systems? Well it's definitely going to be the dog that wagging tail there so obviously the there's temperature globally as John said is really set by the oceans and that goes to the atmosphere as well and so we're the ocean goes the atmosphere it goes and so that is warming up the atmosphere and that causes the atmosphere to hold more water vapor which leads to one of the impacts that that we know is being caused by rising greenhouse gases which is more extreme episodes precipitation as one example of how how disconnection between the ocean and the atmosphere? And where we live is tightly linked and Kim looking at Johns recent paper here in this work. How does that dovetail with the work? You've been undoing for so many years on oceans and climate. Well definitely very closely related. So what I do is recover Corals that are growing growing in the surface ocean from data poor regions and so they make those estimates of ocean heat content from instruments like thermometers and put their monitors through the surface ocean to determine that heat content but actually if he wanted to play the current Global warming in the context text the last centuries you have to go to our guys that can push those estimates back with geological records like corals and so looking at the call records Over the last millennium which is one of my specialties from regions where we have very few instrumental records. You can clearly see that these last several centuries ah of warming this last several decades of warming. stand out like a sore thumb against the background of natural variability at these sites over the last several centuries and so that's again that kind of information that we used understand just how unusual and rapid these recent changes. It has been. Yeah so both of you. I'm hearing it's all tied together. The oceans the atmosphere. We know that. And we're still learning a lot about precisely how that works John. Is it fair to say because I'm curious about this that our ocean's ability to absorb heat may be one reason that our atmospheric warming so far has been limited to ron one degree Celsius globally. Yeah that's exactly right Paul. The Oceans Denison incredible favor by gathering this heat. And it's time now. The oceans haven't solved the problem with climate change. The only thing that's going to solve that problem is if we very quickly Reduce our missions to near zero But nevertheless the the oceans have bought US time you know. Climate scientists have been talking about climate change for a long time in fact if I were to ask people win win. The concepts concepts of global warming and understanding was set. They would be surprised that was actually in the eighteen hundreds. I mean this isn't rocket science. This is an Internet age. This is stuff that we've known for a long long long time and unfortunately we've done very little about it in the longer we delay the the harder it's going to be to take action so the oceans have done us an incredible edible favor but let's not Rely on them forever. Because as Kim mentioned that he comes out of the ocean and it drives weather the atmosphere. There is more humid now than it was before. And that is the juice that power see storms and it makes our weather more extreme. It makes things it makes weather either. Go from one extreme to the other more rapidly in Minnesota. What what are we experiencing what we know we because we can see it as we look out the window? But we're experiencing more dramatic swings in temperature more dramatic swings in precipitation. So you might get really heavy down bursts of rain with flooding. But then you might go to a hot dry period. Did and go to droughts here going from one extreme to the other and that has incredible implications for society and you know as these oceans warm. Can it reach a limit on being a heat sink. I'm curious then. What happens to the atmosphere? Could we see a more rapid atmospheric warming when the ocean sort of hit their limit. John can you jump in on that real quick. I can't and it's almost like you are a member of my research team and I have you been spying on me. I should be so fortunate. So wh WHOA. The one of the important things at the ocean is able to bring heat from the surface water down to the deeper depths and we liked that because it it pulls heat away from the atmosphere and there are parts of the globe where ocean waters will fall from the surface down to the bottom of their other parts of the globe or a waters waters will rise. What we want to know is will that process continue And will we get to a situation where there's a stratification nation that means the layers are more or less constant we experiences in Minnesota. We have Kim. You may not know this. We're called the land of ten thousand lakes but I've heard we have something like seventeen. Thousands of MINNESOTANS really understand water inversions in water temperatures in lakes and that happens in the ocean and if that stratification Asian changes if the ability of the ocean to bring heat down changes then we could be inferred even wilder ride and the reason why I mentioned our research. Is We actually have a paper submitted on that topic Kim you mentioned corals you study those where are we at with coral bleaching and death in Earth's oceans today and where are we headed current trends. Continue well certainly. We've seen a really sobering last several years with year on year bleaching across the great eight bear reef But the record for the extent of Global Bleaching and mortality in the corals is really remains twenty sixteen which which is currently by the way still holds the number one place for global temperatures on record Only second only well of course. Twenty nineteen is second only to twenty sixteen in that in that statistic so for corals we've seen real decimation of some sites that may never be the same Besides like my research site in the middle of the Pacific Ocean which was devastated by that? Twenty Sixteen El Nino event compounded by The the ocean warming that we've been talking about and of course going forward Projections show that we're going to lose. Maybe the vast majority of current Ryan Tropical Reef perhaps as early as twenty fifty if we do not take aggressive action to curb emissions immediately. And so you hear a a lot of News coming out every year in the Great Barrier Reef researchers studying the follow on impacts of these massive coral bleaching and mortality than. I'm hitting things like the ability of coral larvae to settle and be successful after these successive events Really understanding that. It's not just the one hit that they take it's really The beginning of the ecosystem collapsing on itself and a number of horrible feedbacks taking place and and so That's something that I think. People don't understand is as well as they need to in the sense that corals are not just Pretty place to die which is where most of us fell in love with these things but they really provide a huge range of ecosystem services that are incredibly valuable to us as a planet including supporting Global fisheries providing protein for a billion people Even in so far as drug discovery for some of our most advanced drugs today so again Really horrifying news from the frontlines of ocean warming with very vulnerable ecosystems. Nicole's

John John Abraham Dr Kim Cobb Minnesota Paul Pacific Ocean University Of Saint Thomas Sci Atmospheric Research Great Barrier Reef Zeta Zeta Zeta Energy Zeta Global Bleaching Jewel United States Kevin Trenberth
Tumors and their Entourage: Exploring the Tumor Microenvironment

Sounds of Science

07:17 min | 1 year ago

Tumors and their Entourage: Exploring the Tumor Microenvironment

"Cancer Research is a complex in ever evolving field one of the most promising research areas involves the habitat that cancer is able to create for itself which is known as the tumor micro environment to discuss this topic. I've brought in Vienna Jenkinson Director of Science at Charles Rivers portishead site. She has over a decade of experience in the fields of oncology and immunology and she has agreed to talk with me about what exactly the tumor micro environment is and and how we can exploit it to treat cancer. Welcome rhiannon thank. You see me to stay today. Thank you for coming. So let's just start with the basics six. What is the tumor micro environment? So when we think that chairman Momaday on we often maybe think of all of tumor cells so quite a genius in the way that it's formed and these cells really foam from our normal cells which being incorrectly programmed maybe gone bad resulting in them growing up normally taytay an affecting the normal function of our organ all tissue but really the reality is a lot more complex as often is in these scenarios. I'm really uh not more different cell types get recruited by the missiles into the moncur environments to the tumor cells themselves along with these other south types. And the extra study in a mate checks at the cell. sit-in form the Cheema Might Kerr environments so then that raises the question of what are the cell types in the tme. and and why are they. They're severely if we think of the Cheema styles what they're trying to do is survive on and gray said to do this. They need gray. Factors this nutrients and sell staff is signals from types. So as they grow they send out signals and this results in other cell types coming to the Cheema not an infiltrating into the sort of Chima cells to form a tomb amass in addition in the Magrao's it might results into she strasse S. or dangerous signals and this results in the immune system which is constantly surveying the bulge coming along to see what's going on and that rain really is which tax help on these dangerous signals resulting in killing of the Cheema cells so the body is like attacking the tumor but is the tumor able to use news. Those attacks to its own advantage sometimes. Yes that's right side. Whilst I hope would be that the immune cells come in an act against the Shema resulting in killing the reality. Is that the tumor fights back against this. And what it does is generates immunosuppressive environment. Soup one in Wichita riches. Switches the T.. Cells off on the other immune cells and really on subverts them to support the Does this immunosuppressive effect extend then beyond the tumor micro environment to the rest of the body or is it pretty localized. It tends to be localized to the actual Chima micro environment itself. Because we've got to remember that the cells the at the a very very specific on full the tumor itself so it generates sort of a small niche weather cells. Become we'd programmed an influenced by the environment itself. So what does having all of these different types of cells present help us. When we're thinking about ways to inhibit tumor growth? So when we're thinking about inhibiting CI mccray we can think of to on strategies very broadly so the first strategy and the one that's traditionally Russian people total. When they were thinking of drugs? That could talk at the Cheema. would-be Chuma intrinsic mechanisms. So those would be therapies. which would die? We talk the Cheema sales but now we can think about hole of a subset of therapies and these are the ones that will be talked to the other cell types which within the Cheema Might Cram Graham varmints best supporting achievement rife so if we can impact on that function then then now supporting the Cheema and we can even turn theirselves against the Cheema and then that way we can fight back. So it's like you're killing the protection around the tumor and therefore leading the body. Do its natural natural thing and defending against the tumor. Yes that's right so effectively. We're reactivating on the immune response as it is and we will send may be switching the phenotype five of some of the other cell types. which in the Huma so we can think as well as the immune system we can think of the vascular cells? The within the Cheema Might Kerr Garment. Nice saleslady that and they form the Bulls of the blood vessels. They supply the medicament new chance. Perhaps that could be a target cutting off the food supply yet and changing the metabolism. So you could think about strategies by talking yourselves we can say. Think about lymphatic. endothelial cells those form part and emphatic drainage they're taking away debris and metabolites from the tumor itself essentially keeping the environment mclane so again if we could impact on that then we might impact on the amount of danger signals that the chew Miss Generating Sort of the other cell types would be cancerous icy I took five glass. So CAIN FIBERGLASS and normally they're voting but these ones have been subjected to produce despite fat to lay down extra study in a matrix such smooth muscle up ten Collagen If we could talk at these cell types than we talk potentially attention to the framework in which sits and again. It's sort of just about mobilizing those cells and reprogramming them effectively to stop then and helping matchy mccray okay. So we've got the cells. That are helping the tumor get fed. We've got the cells helping. Keep the tumor environment clean. So what would the role of immune cells be in trying to create a therapy based on targeting the tumor micro environment. Tma Chima micro environments often contains on several different types of immune cells. But as we just mentioned the tumor really acts to switch these cells off it wants to survive that wants to grow and then the opposite of the immune system. It's coming in there. It's looking for danger. Signals nuys the team as abnormal. So it wants to go back to its job of killing the Cheema Sales The the two must sort of in a way that it's able to educate on the immune cells ineffective be switched them all in a goal that you have the selective pressure of having the immune system and then the tumor adapts to type with sales in the micro environments support. We often end dot webs Chima which has been infiltrated by mean cells. He's at the team. has actually influenced these cells to become regulatory uh-huh suppressive or switched off and clearly the role of a lot. It's therapies with Ben's Bay either to switch southbound colon ole to drive an the influx of new fresh immune cells into the Environments Obesity just get cells sort of right into the Tumor Micro Environment Rothman perhaps just sitting around the edge itself. There's a few different strategies. We can thank cope when thinking of the immune system in the context of Chima

Cheema Cheema Might Kerr Garment Vienna Jenkinson Director Of S Chima Cancer Research Rhiannon Charles Rivers Chairman Mccray Wichita Momaday Gray Bulls Mclane BEN Magrao Rothman
The 2020 PS4 Games We Can't Wait to Play

Beyond!

04:28 min | 1 year ago

The 2020 PS4 Games We Can't Wait to Play

"The game awards the last week to go from the show airs. We saw a hefty goes to sue SHEMA trailer with a summer. Two Thousand Twenty eight. If you asked me. We're now at four heavily anticipated towels house for next year. We can open this up for debate but those four are according to Brigitte. Final Fantasy seven remake cyberpunk twenty seventy seven. The last of us are to an Shema when I I would like to ask the beyond crews this if you could only choose one of those four games to play next year. which would it be and why Virginia's first and says F F seven remake? Because I think it's still one of the greatest of all time. Thanks all the great content on the show each week and happy holidays cyberpunk. Yeah that's that's the answer. It's I think it's the most hosts new thing despite the fact that we've gotten eight hundred things cyberpunk shaped and we've also gotten a million games with cyberpunk in the press release. That's the one that feels was like a brand new thing. It feels like the most sort of future facing in terms of like this is a whole new generation video games. I the last of us is one of my favorite games of all time If it had never gotten a sequel I would have been perfectly happy because it was it had a perfect ending for me. It is the loss of us. Just because I think naughty dog are the best storytellers the AAA space. And like knowing that this sequel exists and not knowing where that story was going to be taken destroy Oye Mi and I would never recover. It would kill me not knowing where they take him. I agree with you Altana like if there there was never a sequel. I would be fine with that but the fact is like if I knew that in this alternate reality if I knew that that game existed yet I just couldn't play it like I would did. I would go crazy and this alternate reality. All four games are still coming out. You just only get to play one. Oh Santa telling you wouldn't I wouldn't. I wouldn't get to experience it. That's the thing like what some like some really telling what like in five minutes about products products that I actually hit that. We're going to have to make last of us to ending. Explain some sort of like feature feature. You'll Middle Ages ages on them sort of elderly Irish lady I got I got really excited. About fantasy seven remake. I think some new screen shots were kicking around and I just I was kind of looking at the being like holy crap. We're getting this like we're eating this soon. And that's GonNa be the beginning of that of that game and like I have really fond memories of the original Movin Ninety seven I've tried to go back and replay it and it's just it's rough. Yeah it's just one of those games like many games on the original playstation. That is just so beautiful in your head and then you play them again and it's like Oh dear new Evidence new curve soul now but so am I.. Someone's GonNa Naughty in addition to this this list which is very good I'm weirdly I'm kind of. I'm kind of not lukewarm. I'm just like I I think the last of a set such a high bar the first time around and the fact that it is sort of. It's it's not a known quantity but it is a familiar universe. I'm so much more excited about cyberpunk just being like this. Is the thing that we first heard about in twenty thirteen thirteen. Yeah we've been thinking about this for seven years like it's nuts There's also on top of this. I was looking at the calendar. The release schedule for the next here. And like I'm excited drag Abbasi Korat. I realized it's just me on that front. No no Max. Speaking of the fact that I run features at DOT com. I need you to make some features about that place. Seven seven hundred reasons that yeah job as the best. We're trying to do a holiday here where you don't want assignments. Yeah that's held. That's the least you can't say an idea around Lucy without it becoming each. It's you know we've given me. Oh love to go sushi okay. So here's my thing is not fair running down the list of the four. I actually if the only game I can't play can play for the year I'm ruling up the last of us because on the off chance hands as much as I love the first one. It's one of my favorite games of all time on the off chance. This one isn't good or doesn't live up to that one right and that's all. I have to sit with for a year. I don't know if I could handle that. I personally chur understand why most of our offices excited. I don't really care about type of punk.

Lucy Brigitte Virginia Altana Abbasi Korat Santa
Possibilities and Advantages in Machine Learning With Jonathan Ross, CEO and Founder at Groq

Artificial Intelligence in Industry

09:09 min | 1 year ago

Possibilities and Advantages in Machine Learning With Jonathan Ross, CEO and Founder at Groq

"Listening to me. Dan Vigil with Jonathan Ross of Brock Huron a industry Jonathan. I wanted to start us off with a first topic. Just not up a term that I'm almost certain our audience isn't intimately familiar with which is software defined compute. Can you define that and thanks for asking so the word software defined has been used a bit in hardware art where in particular networking and recently it's been used by several different companies for describing what they're doing with accelerators and the reason they talk about this this is there's a conception that when you're building custom a six for machine learning that they may not be considerable or they may not be programmable what it really means is for machine learning in particular since it takes quite a long time to build a chip two to three years and the machine learning models are changing so rapidly that oftentimes you're unable to build a chip as quickly as the researchers are coming up new techniques new machine learning models yeah so yeah and so to be to be able to build something that people wanna use have to make it very flexible and so software defined really just means that you're making a device that will be adaptable to what coming in the future in so adaptable what's coming in the future. Obviously he's very open ended because neither you nor I have any precise idea of what that it is. It sounds as though this is an unschooled perspective here my good man I know a decent amount about GPS and about a at a conceptual level that we need to sort of get a sense of what kinds of algorithms what kinds of use cases what kinds of essentially processing might happen on this chip and build something that we believed to be adaptable there we're to that by itself is very vague definition but I may have gone wrong. Can we go a bit deeper into kind of what that implies sure and setting up a level. One of the things often happens when new technologies become available as people start to take advantage of what's available an example is people used to use very sparse sparse machine learning models they would deploy them across a large number of servers. Amazon treat a lot of other companies and what happened was they. I started getting devices that were capable of working with denser compute which I'm not even GonNa try and define but one of them happening with people started using that denser answer compute and so when it comes to software defined this element of flexibility where you can you can do what you want. You can take these new techniques comply him but it also means that researchers can experiment and see what they can do with these devices and come up with things themselves so for for example. We've seen that GP use have been used a lot from Shema earning. The reason is they have a lot of compute density but their memory bandwidth is very slow and this has been a bit of a problem people thought that this would prevent very expensive machine learning models from continuing to get performance gains as you tweet but what happened the researchers started to take advantage of that extra compute power and what they would do they would do a lot more compute per memory access so in terms of the flexibility. It's not just that you're able to support things that the NFL researchers have been doing in the pass. Yeah it's also that they can explore in in make better use of hardware that you give them okay so better. You hardly give them in. You're you're talking about in terms condense compute. I think to myself when I think about. Gps I think about use cases. You're referring to maybe different hardware to be better for different use cases. You know we have a bunch of vision data data. We heard it through as many neural networks as we can and as many as we can and and that sort of setup seems to be adequate for that kind of processing. Are there any maybe discreet cases where you can talk about different kinds of software defined compute that might be even better than sort of this just brute force as many layers players as we can hurl into that thing search. EU kind of approaches her way that we can make this tangible to say okay. Here's a discreet instance in the business world where the software defined game. It's better than Jacobs sure. I've got a I've got a great example so one of the unique features of the hardware that we're developing is that it takes advantage of something uncalled batch size one. Would that basically means. Is You remember playing the game twenty questions growing up really really roughly yeah yeah yeah so the way the game works. Is You have twenty questions. Someone has a item in mind person in mind and ask questions where you get. Yes or no answers until until you figure out what that item is. Oh Yeah. Is it an animal Yada Yada directly okay now. I was talking about the density of the compute you and one of the things that limiting for the hardware today is that good use of it oftentimes you have to run the same program at the same time on many different inputs so imagine you're driving down the street and there are three stop signs but to get really good performance you really have to run on sixty four stop signs in order to identify them and and get that good performance so if you have only three it cost you the same as if you had sixty four well now imagine you're playing the game twenty questions and you have sixty four inputs that you're trying to guess and so those questions have to be very complicated because you're not guessing what is one item is. You're guessing what these four items are and so one of the things that unique about the partner that we're building in the software defined hardware aspect of it is that it's not built for any particular model you can change the kinds of models that run on it and you can take advantage of the smaller batch size but breaking taking your models apart and instead of playing the game of twenty questions on sixty four different items at the same time you can do it on one item at a time which makes it much less expensive so now you ask is it animal vegetable or mineral and the answer isn't always yes because you always have an animal vegetable. Oh and mineral got it okay and now a way that that might translate into. Let's say right now. As as you speak we have leaders in insurance. We have leaders in and pharmaceutical. We have leaders in banking. We have leaders in heavy industry. We have leaders in a great many sectors tuning in with their ears to this episode. Do we have some sort of individual instances ince's where this sort of animal mineral all present dynamic might translate into better performance whether it's lower energy a faster processing than a crank in themselves full of as much videos they can buy one thing that you're trying to make a determination for a potential insurance clients so you're GonNa have a bit of information mation about the clients but if you run a model that has to take into account every possible bit of information about that clients then it's going to be a very large model but if you can look at a little bit of information you have like what information you actually do have about the clients and then Hiccup. Ekka model that sort of right sized for that problem it gets less expensive and it also gets more accurate. Another example would be if you're trying trying to build an anonymous car and driving down the road. You might identify that something is a treat or you might identify something as a sign of some sort. You may not know that it stop sign when you then are able to run a very particular model on that object right so you got. Maybe two hundred objects in the scene but you have. I have three signs. What it means. Is you can run a sign. Classify are on those three signs in its very specifically trained just to identify what the signs are. You can imagine also in strategy when you're trying to make predictions the for example the way that the also go model worked as the game evolves. You can actually really use different models or if you believe that there are several different ways of the game could have all you could use several different models some with more aggressive play styles with with a less aggressive play style what it really does is it allows you to just try a whole bunch of very different things on the same hardware without having to have have custom hardware each of those different things got it and so obviously this has given the fact that we don't exactly know what algorithms rhythms what kinds of approaches are going to work right so having something that's potentially malleable in that regard might be useful because who the heck knows what. Algorithms are going to be hip and popular for natural language processing in four years. When you look ahead into industry you look out into the world and you ask yourself where software defined compute sort of gaining traction might be one side but I realize a lot of. Ai Hardwares is in what we could describe exceedingly nascent phase so maybe tractions too strong of a

Dan Vigil Jonathan Ross Amazon NFL EU Brock Huron Ai Hardwares Partner Jacobs Ince Three Years Four Years
Inside the border's migrant detention center in Clint, Texas

Fresh Air

11:14 min | 1 year ago

Inside the border's migrant detention center in Clint, Texas

"Although president trump was forced by the courts a year ago to end his administration's rations policy of separating migrant children from their parents at the U._S.. Mexico border recent reports from the border have described hundreds of children teens and toddlers being held in squalid conditions at a border patrol station in Clint Texas. Our guest today is New York Times immigration reporter Caitlyn Dickerson who's been reporting on the overcrowded and unsanitary conditions at these migrant detention facilities last year Dickerson was among the first to reveal that the trump administration had instituted attitude policy of separating families at the border. She recently reported for The New York Times T._v.. Show the weekly on a four month old boy who was taken from his father Caitlyn Dickerson joined the New York Times in twenty sixteen before that she it was an investigative reporter for N._P._R.. Where her work was honored with a peabody award and an Edward R Murrow award in today's Times Dickerson reported that officials from Ice Immigration and Customs Enforcement told her they planned to begin deportation tation raids this Sunday targeting I at least two thousand migrants who recently entered the country but didn't show up for court hearings well Caitlyn Dickerson welcome to fresh air? Let's start with the conditions in the border station at Clint Texas X.'s. How do we know what conditions were like? They're so we originally learned about the conditions in the border patrol station in Clint Texas from a group of lawyers who were given access to the facility not to do an inspection but to meet with children who were being housed there they got access under an ongoing federal lawsuit that sets the standards for how children can be held in immigration detention being interviewed about sixty kids and then this kid's described a lot of sub standard conditions beginning with the fact. They said they were malnourished. Every child that the lawyers interviewed said that they had gone hungry at at least some point during their stay there they were basically given three small meals a day. <hes> regardless of their age the youngest child the lawyer saw was five months old. The oldest was seventeen and then the children also said that the sanitation was very bad that many of them hadn't showered at all all since they crossed the border weeks earlier they were wearing the same clothing they weren't allowed to brush their teeth and not only that but there were infants who are being cared for by other children so the infants in the facility had either been separated raided from family members they'd cross the border with or they were there with their teenage mothers and the separated infants had to be taken care of by somebody so they were being taken care of by other children so we originally learned about the conditions from these lawyers we reported those stories but then short after <hes> Inspector General reports from the Department of Homeland Security that had been prepared even prior to the lawyers visit to clint started to come out and they documented the exact same thing so at that point we had the inspector general reports to corroborate the conditions and then finally <hes> just last week the Times embarked on a big investigative reporting effort where we talked to border patrol agents who worked at Clinton and they to describe these conditions for us now this ended up in court. There's a famous bit of tape at a this is U._S.. Appeals Court <hes> you want to just describe what was happening here. How this got there sure so the now famous exchange in court had to do with something called the floor as settlement settlement? That's the federal lawsuit I described that sets the standard for immigration detention of children. It's a lawsuit that was filed in the late nineteen eighties and settled in the nineties but has been litigated in an ongoing way ever since because the judge determined in that case that the Department of Homeland Security and the health and Human Services Department had to maintain a certain set of standards in taking care of children and the judge also gave the lawyers in the case the plaintiff's lawyers the ability ready to check in on the government and make sure that they were holding up their end of the deal and so- periodically all these lawyers end up back in court because the plaintiffs will say that the federal government hasn't been maintaining the standards is that the judge required and so in one of those hearings that took place in June you heard federal government lawyers arguing that the government should not have to provide things like soap or toothbrushes in temporary holding facilities like the Border Patrol station in Clint Texas. The government lawyers justification was that these are temporary facilities kids are only going to be there for a few days and so therefore it's not necessarily required wired in order to maintain you know what the judge asked for which was safe and sanitary conditions that the government gives soap or toothbrushes in those temporary places as opposed to longer term facilities those weren't in dispute the three judge panel who was listening to the arguments very openly balked at the lawyer's argument and really seemed to openly struggle to wrap their minds around how the government lawyer could possibly think that something like Sopra toothbrushes refreshes when be required in order to keep these facilities safe and sanitary and this sort of back and forth between the lawyers and the judges went viral so let's listen to a bit of the sound. This is from a hearing the Ninth U._S.. Circuit Court of Appeals <hes> the judge judge will hear from speaking as a wallace to Shema in. It's interesting that he is addressing this issue because he himself was interred in a Japanese internment camp in World War Two. Let's listen it's within everybody's common understanding that you know if you don't have a toothbrush if you don't have so if you don't have a blanket it's not safe and wouldn't everybody agreed to that you. Do you agree to that well. I think it's I think those are there's fair reason to find and those things may be part of our apart. What do you say maybe there are circumstances? Where person does need to have a toothbrush toothpaste until for days? Well I think in custody there's free. It's frequently intended to be much shorter term so it may be that first order terms day and see B._p.. Custody that some of those things may not be required. I don't think that was the situation of course confronted I mean. It wasn't as though those people were there for twelve hours then moved onto the Hilton hotel knowing they were there for a very fairly sustained period and at least according to the evidence that the judge believed they weren't getting these things for a fairly sustained period so Caitlyn Dickerson has this resulted in judicial orders or is there ongoing litigation around the conditions in Clint. There is ongoing litigation so we're still waiting for an order order over the exchange that we just heard around specifically toothbrushes and so in these border patrol stations that act as temporary detention facilities but it was pretty clear it seems based on the reaction of the three judges in court court that they will in fact aside those are items that the government needs to provide with regard to clint when the lawyers who were involved in this flora's lawsuit left Clint they went back to their home states and they started working up a new motion which which they filed it was a temporary restraining order that they requested hoping to get access to all the facilities where customs and Border Protection Federal Agency at issue here houses children and to make sure that that all of those facilities are maintaining flora's standards and if they're not to immediately bring them up to standards that temporary restraining order was granted and a judge ordered that a mediator go in inspect all of the facilities and make sure at that they are indeed maintaining safe and sanitary conditions and so that process is underway right now. I think it's quite possible that in the next few weeks we may see even more litigation because there's so much attention and right now being focused on the facilities that customs and Border Protection runs especially those that house children and the Inspector General reports that I mentioned earlier suggests that the conditions in Clint were not unique that a lot of the same same issues are popping up in border patrol stations across the southwest border and so I think it's likely that you'll see the floor as lawyers continue to to fight those conditions in court and try to get them addressed right. I mean the the government responded by moving a lot of the kids out of Clint and is it. Do we even know where they went so yes so at the time there were about three hundred kids in clint when the lawyers went to visit within a few days the government had transferred about about two hundred fifty of them into the care of the health and Human Services Department. That's the federal agency that's responsible for housing children long-term and is in general more equipped to do so some of the kids who are in Clint. We don't know the exact number bird but it's a handful were sent to a different border patrol station. It's a newer one it's called El Paso station one or rather its new expanded and has newer facilities that are designed to house children and families and so thinking was conditions. There would be better but it's worth noting that El Paso station one came up in those inspector general reports and again you know issues with health and safety issues with basic sanitation were prominent and and the other important thing is that <hes> though the majority of kids were moved out of Clint in the aftermath of this sort of backlash against the conditions there the government almost immediately started moving other children into clint. They emptied the facility and then started filling it back up very quickly after and again you know it's very difficult for us to get access to the facility to understand how much it's improved. We think that the population count is lower that it may not be as far above capacity as it once was is but beyond that we're left to request information from the government and hope they give it to us. It's probably worth going back to what this facility was built for. In the first place it was never intended for keeping families long-term right Lord. No this is a border patrol station that was intended to house at maximum one hundred adults and the population that the government had in mind when they built the station was was adult men <hes> this is a population of border-crossers of your if you will I mean <hes> for for decades historically. The vast majority of people who cross the border were adult men on their own who were looking for work and who were trying to cross the border illegally Wrigley so their best hope was to sneak pass border patrol agents get into the country get a job and start sending money very often back home to family either in Mexico and Central America.

Clint Caitlyn Dickerson Clint Texas New York Times Border Patrol Border Protection Federal Agen Department Of Homeland Securit Times Federal Government Appeals Court Mexico Circuit Court Of Appeals Peabody Award Times Dickerson Donald Trump President Trump Investigative Reporter Sopra
What Would Happen if an Asteroid Hit New York City?

SPACE NEWS POD

05:06 min | 1 year ago

What Would Happen if an Asteroid Hit New York City?

"Recently, a planetary defense exercise, NASA and its partners have come up with a scenario where New York City gets destroyed by an asteroid, and this asteroid is a about a thousand feet in diameter in. It's been cited in given a one percent chance of hitting the earth, April twenty ninth of twenty twenty seven so this conference. The NASA was at the bunch of people from different countries different organizations and things like that that were coming up coming up with ideas of what could happen to the actual asteroid. How could we deflect it in what we can do to prepare the people on the ground for the best case scenario if this asteroid were to. Hit the planet. The conference saw about two hundred NASA staff, astronomers emergency response specialists, and they have new information they make decisions and the receive further updates from the organizers of the game spread pretty much game. They're planning to figure out what would happen, and they. Talked to engineers they talked to scientists, and how this stuff can affect humanity in this particular simulation. The chance of this asteroid hitting the earth was only ten percent at the beginning. And then it raised up to a hundred percent in the major space powers of the United States Europe. Russia China Japan decided to build six Connecticut impact, there's which approves designed to hit the asteroid changes trajectory altogether in it took them time to build these impact ours, and they had to wait for the right lodge window to make sure that the rocket carrying them would be able to get to them properly. And then they figured out that they could impact this asteroid in August of twenty twenty four I'm going to tell you all about if these impact is actually hit the asteroid in this plan right after this. Hi, everyone. I would let you know about inker dot FM. That's where I hope. By podcast in. I find that. It's the easiest place to do that. And it gives you everything that you need in one place for free, which you can start podcasting from your phone or from your computer. You don't need special crazy equipment to start doing it. You can talk into your phone, you'll need editing equipment that costs thousands of dollars to start a podcast. You can do it from anywhere in when you're done. Recording your episode anchored at FM will distribute it so it can be hard everywhere on Spotify, apple podcast, Google podcasts, Stitcher, every place podcasts can be heard, and you can make money with your podcast. It's pretty simple. There's no minimum listenership to start making money with anchor. So if you wanna make a little bit of money while having a cool podcast while download the crap or go to anchor dot F M to get started. Now, these impacts have been sent out into space to collide. With an asteroid and knock it off course. So it doesn't destroy the earth in three of them manage to hit the asteroid. The main body was deflected, but a chunk broke off it continued on its deadly path towards earth in its path. It led it to the eastern United States more, particularly the New York City region. And in this demonstration, Washington DC, the political powers that be decided that they wanted to send the nuclear bomb to deflect the sixty meter space rock, which would destroy it would bounce it off course possibly, and they didn't get the political backing for it. People didn't want nuclear weapons going into space. So that idea didn't work, and then the only had six months left. So what are you do in six months? It's you don't have enough time to do anything else. You can't deflect the asteroid in six months. Well, they had to prepare for impact. Basically, New York state New York City was going to be decimated by this asteroid in before it hit the earth. It was going forty three thousand miles per hour. Ended exploded nine point three miles over central park in New York City, the energy of the blast was a thousand times bigger than the nuclear bomb that was dropped on here. Shema in it would destroy everything within a fifteen kilometers. Now, that's unsurvivable. If you're in that radius, you're gonna die everything in that area is going to be destroyed Manhattan would be completely

New York City Nasa United States New York Manhattan Washington Dc Connecticut Spotify Russia Japan Google Apple China Six Months Fifteen Kilometers Hundred Percent Thousand Feet One Percent Sixty Meter
"shema" Discussed on SmoshCast

SmoshCast

04:10 min | 2 years ago

"shema" Discussed on SmoshCast

"And of course, like, the it's like in typical like Japanese fashion like the way that they make it is like incredibly like precise and fast, and like officiant like the way that they like they have like they whipped up poured into these like little like multi molds. But it's like perfect every time like zero drips as I do. And then the come out looking amazing, and I want it so bad. Yeah. You're obsessing over it last time. He didn't get it. I know because we we went past it because we were in Tokyo. And then we went down to. Here's your mom Shema who that's a that's a weird. That's a weird place because like I didn't know such a huge acidy. Like, it was almost like it was almost like a middle finger to the US to be like, oh like you guys decimated. Well, we're just going to make this place like three four times bigger than it. Once was it's a huge city and no idea so big and then like the the buildings that got affected by Tomic bomb are still like as intact as possible. And it's just so like in the epicenter of the entire city. It's very sad. And hopeful at the same time, you feel that wherever you go in the city. Yeah. You feel the weight of it because we we walked through that area. There's domed building. That was it was right below the explosion. So because he explosion happens like in the air didn't know because they detonated air. Yeah. Well, the fucked up thing is that the reason they do that is so it has a wider spread. So centrally like, the the, you know a nuclear bomb. It's not the it's not the blast force that is deadly. It's the heat because you're centrally creating a son for like one second. Right. So it'll burn everything. But because this like domed building was directly below it. The blast went straight down in the structure actually held in place. So they kept that structure there sort of like a memorial to the to the, you know, people. But it's that's crazy. Yeah. I didn't know the nuts. I would like to go to Japan at some point to check it out. I got a translator right here. Man. Yeah. They don't work. I guess I did kind of us translator. It's hard not to because I wanna like me Rahman, but also. Everybody in the in the cities like most people understand English. Like, even if they say, they don't speak English. They do they just don't want to because they're embarrassed imperfect. No, I don't speak any English. Really? Because that's an sounded. Good yet. Surprising. I just I don't speak any English at all. Kojima like he he spoke he used to speak English at some like the presentations than it wasn't like the best English, and he got embarrassed. So he said he would he wouldn't do it again. I didn't know that. But I will say one thing about her Hsina though, or here Shema Okinawa Miaki. Oh. Oh, dude. It's weird pancakes. How do you explain it? So it's like you. I mean, it's like a savory pancake. It's gonna get the ingredients wrong, but like Russia style. Okinawa Miaki is like you have a base of -lica- like a batter. Right. And so they they make this giant Griddle? So they do like the batter and then they have like Yawkey soba noodles, and they have like a layer of that. And then they you know, you can do different kinds of things with it. But what we did was like, pork. And then all-stars because like officers here Shema thing, and then then a li- then like an equal kind of like flat layer of like AIG. So they crack an egg the kind of whip it up and they make in the shape of like a pancake. They put that on top. And then they get the QB. Man is. And then they got that black sauce. I don't know what the black sauces, and he's like an oyster fish sauce. Yeah. And then they got like green onions, and dude it is so good..

Shema Okinawa Miaki Shema Kojima Tokyo US Japan AIG Russia Rahman one second
"shema" Discussed on Other Side of Texas

Other Side of Texas

04:03 min | 2 years ago

"shema" Discussed on Other Side of Texas

"Well, it is. Oh, there it is. By contrast, the bomb dropped on hero. Shema had fifteen kilotonnes. So about half as strong is the worst atomic attack in the history of the world being produced right outside Rydin outside Amarillo, just when you didn't think Amarillo could get any cooler here. They are building a new nuclear mini hero Shema bomb. They were going to get Panchen Varas on this big show stick right with this here on the other side will get Representative on in these roll along here on the other side. In. Began. Hung and saw. Mm on the phone with us. He is state Representative out of house district seventy four here in Texas down in eagle pass. He is Pancho Navarre's. Glad that pond from the Vars could take some time with us this afternoon to get in with other side of Texas issues. How're you doing? Chairman now. I'm great. I'm great. I appreciate that. I I'm just kind of putting myself together in terms of the committee and getting ready to do, you know, figuring out what kind of bills are going to be hearing what's going to get referred over and visiting some of the new staff on that. And just kind of it's different than the vice chair of the last two sessions, but so different in the chairman spot. And so there's a lot more angles to cover, but we're looking forward to it. We're up to the challenge, and we're very grateful that the speaker's office, and the speaker, himself, speaking dentist bond and considered us and decided that you know, we were up to and you know, we're we're not going to disappoint them. Yeah. So chairman new is still selling new to you. Yeah. I mean, it's it, you know. And again, it's a it's it's it's humbling because I think we're the first chair to to sit on a sitting house committee in the history of maverick county. So I think that's pretty cool and the and the other side of is like I said I've been on the committee two sessions of speed at third. And so I think that you know, just kind of experiences we've had and then not being in this position it prepares us for one. And then the other is just if feels new which is good. Yeah. So let's song about the aim and scope of homeland security and public safety. I as you're aware, you know, generally, where in charge, basically, a overseeing law enforcement, which starts with to DPS, and then, you know, forensic labs and anything emanating out of law enforcement, and then, of course, emergency management and the issues surrounding us just kind of generally our purview. And then, and you know, I think it stretches if you read the charge stretches into the logistics of the infrastructure of what actually is security from you know, Brownsville to Beaumont tell Tasso Tom Morello makes sense. Yeah. It does make sense. So the president making a push President Donald Trump. We don't get into a lot of national stuff. But you gotta contrast state with federal every once in a while present is preparing what it sounds like to proclaim a national emergency due to an executive order about the border. He says it it's a crime. In your purview in a said earlier. I think that your backyard sit some thirty feet off the Rio Grande right warming. And I'll set my, you know, my chairman had aside from it and just address it as a landowner, and you know, someone that's been around the issue. Not just you know from my proximate, but just kind of watching and involve them, there's no crisis. I mean, there's not it's ridiculous..

Chairman state Representative Tasso Tom Morello Texas Amarillo Shema Rio Grande Panchen Varas vice chair Rydin Representative Donald Trump president eagle pass Brownsville executive Beaumont thirty feet
"shema" Discussed on SuperTalk WTN 99.7

SuperTalk WTN 99.7

02:44 min | 2 years ago

"shema" Discussed on SuperTalk WTN 99.7

"Like everybody else does and get with the cheapest most affordable electricity. But here we go me in green this all we I know we've talked him in this because he's people coming out of the woodwork everywhere. It's funny. I saw survey the other day more and more people are believing that man made global warming is real. We gotta do something about it. And I'm going how can this be? How can this be with no evidence and all of this time? Oh, I know they got them hooked line in synchrony. It's guilt. It's all guilt. I want to be part of the solution. Phil what I think a lot of young people are buying it. Because they're hearing it in college. They're getting indoctrinated. They are is exactly what's going on. And so they just take that out, you know, out of college, and they take it into the workforce. And people think, you know, this must be true. It's not. And all I ask you to do is prove it is that too much. They asked with somebody comes up with some some hypothesis that wants to change the entire economic bed rock of the country, just prove it. Well, they can't they go. What do you mean? Prove it. I mean, you have this theory that we are causing the earth to warm than show me the proof. Well, we got ninety seven hundred now that's not prove. Well, we got a climate. That's not proof there should be proof their everything else on your scientific proof of it. I think we can circle the earth with a spaceship. Well, now, we have pictures from the spaceship, contrary to the Flanders authors out there who think the earth is round. We have we have pictures we have proof. My gosh. Hey, I think the we can actually turn atoms into a bomb. Hello here, Shema that's proof or I think we can turn atoms into power. Hello nuclear power plant. That's proof. This is what happens in science, you move from theory and a hypothesis to proof, and they can't get there with the whole global warming thing. It's all still theory. How can still be theory after all this time? Oh, by the way, we linked to this today. I send this out on Twitter. Matter of fact, we're going to take a break out play this for you or Luther somebody who plan tweeted today, and we have to re tweeted so it'll be up at the top. We'll do that. It is some guys. This is the end of it's a very short things some guys at the end of a conference and some of these are scientists and some of the points. They make are just unbelievable. I mean, people just, you know, it's common sense. But we'll get to it in a moment. Take your phone calls too. It's six one five seven three seven nine nine eight six back after this. From.

Twitter Phil Shema Luther
"shema" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

03:33 min | 2 years ago

"shema" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Sorry, muted my Mike get the break. The I don't I don't see with Fukushima that it would be affecting us that way Shema is a nuclear volcano, the cores are down and there pumping a tremendous amount of radiation into the Pacific. I think they're going to basically just kill off most of the Pacific. And we're going to see more of these Fukushima style. Vents? I think the caller has got a good point in terms of his concerns. That's the GE Mark one reactors which are known defective by design. They should have been pulled a long time ago. But they said we spent so much money to build these defective. Ridiculous things. We're going to keep them. When things start going sideways, and we lose the power grid. You know, our own government tells us that if we lose the power grid nine out of ten Americans are going to die documented this extensively in my new book Radio Free earth. I even have three and tired chapters devoted to EMP electromagnetic pulse. Both natural and weaponized. And so these are real concerns, and we're going to the grid fails. We're going to have. Powered nuclear power plants going Fukushima on us from shortage shore. Areas because you can scramble the core. But it takes two years to cool it afterwards. And if you don't have electric city to run the pumps to cool the core after you've scrammed it you're going to have a Fukushima. That's it. So this is between the nuclear and the fracking vast areas of the country that at one time would have been highly survivable, no matter what planet x threw at us. And we've got more depth zones across the country. Now, it's I do a lot of consulting with people that are asking me about locations. And fracking took a huge chunk of that. Right there. And these are he's definitely concerns for your caller. I would say that. The general rule you want to be at least fifty miles up wind or one hundred miles down wind of any nuclear plant or nuclear facility, and you don't wanna be around fracking fields. Because those casings you're going to feel like crazy when things start going sideways, and it's all going to be poisoned, water and dead earth. Any ain't gonna be able to make it there. You're not going to be able to survive. So we're the industrial threats that we have on top of the natural threats. Are what are going to be awful? And then for those who do survive that one in ten who survive when this fly by happens? They're not going to have long life spans because they're going to be dying from cancer as a result of all of this industrial and nuclear and fracking and all of this stuff so answer the magnetic field will if it dissipates will be having widespread dancers as well. So, you know. Doom and gloom,.

Fukushima Pacific Shema Mike cancer two years
"shema" Discussed on The Tim McKernan Show

The Tim McKernan Show

03:09 min | 2 years ago

"shema" Discussed on The Tim McKernan Show

"This was the hero Shema of the Kansas City, Saint Louis relationship background. I grew up in Perry, Missouri population, eight hundred thirty nine halfway between Hannibal and Mexico and liked all Missouri. Sports teams except the big red being Catholic and having a Catholic captain America quarterbacking America's team I was a Cowboys fan. Plus they were on TV all the time loved watching the royals because they're on TV more in the late seventies. As. The cocaine cardinals couldn't make the postseason but went to four to five cardinal games. A year as opposed to royals game. Every couple years two hours from Bush from the K George Brenton, Keith Hernandez. My favorite players growing up is a freshman at Mizzou in nineteen eighty-five with the cardinals postseason run. It was amazing. I pulled the three oh. And my first semester met kids from Kansas City who didn't really hate Saint Louis, but they weren't fans I loved everyone then the series started. The cardinals took a three one series lead and cardinal fans were bandy and then the crater happened. I was dating a Kansas City girl. We went to a costume party as doctor and nurse the night of game six I asked if there was a TV at the party. And she said, yes, as it was a Casey Centric party. I thought all would be well, then Dinkins your happened. He was fucking out which rang out over the royals. Cheers. He was totally safe. Dude, said some baked fucker from blue springs, and I yell out or are you fucking blind. Now, the nurse had a Dylan Harper quality to her and I was. Looking forward to playing doctor later as it was our fourth date, and it was taking time to cross home plate. She asked me to calm down. I took a deep breath and said fine then after a couple couple of cocktails. She starts like it's graphic. She keeps saying he was so safe. I finished my beer. It was some cheap. Shitty. Cake beer. I said later in left left her at the party and went back to my dorm. I got so hammered on Seagram seven and mountain dew during game seven that I kicked something outside lost it somewhere in greektown. My birthday was coming up in a couple of weeks. So I asked my grandmother for new shoes. Hashtag blessed. I didn't talk to many Kansas City FOX for a couple of years. I was almost over until they started openly routing for the twins in nineteen eighty seven. I met a north county jail in eighty six and we're still married eventually got over. It was happy for the royals recent success, Missouri. Blood runs deep even living just across the river in Quincy probably more than you wanted. But there it is happy new. Year. Hey, Brad, Pitt was three hours short and he turned out fine as well. You can use that pitch to learn him onto the podcast on that comes from Bob. So that's what I was wondering if like started with the eighty-five thing, and then Kansas City one, but it was a win with an asterisk, and it was their only world championship. And so maybe that was what was going on. I don't know. I really don't just know it exists, and it certainly exists more on that side of the state than than in Saint Louis, and I don't know how to explain it. But I gather that Gabe sees it as being from both sides, and you know, and in like, I think some people are irritated when Saint Louis don't acknowledge that it's a rivalry. But I don't really feel like it's a rivalry..

Kansas City royals cardinals Saint Louis Missouri Dinkins Pitt America Mizzou Kansas Seagram Perry Hannibal Dylan Harper Cowboys Keith Hernandez Mexico Gabe
"shema" Discussed on Conspiracy Theories

Conspiracy Theories

05:17 min | 2 years ago

"shema" Discussed on Conspiracy Theories

"Areas of the city, even so Nagasaki witness, the same horrors as Harris Shema the instant obliteration of everyone and everything within a half mile of the explosion, the bright light and heat and the massive fires all in all an estimated forty thousand people or a third of the city's population died in the aftermath of fat man's explosion. But the blast wasn't the worst of the damage beginning about a week after the bombings people who had been in or near hero Shema in Nagasaki began exhibiting strange symptoms of an unusual medical condition dubbed disease X or the atomic plague patients blood wouldn't clot. So they bled to death from minor injuries. Others watched their flesh rot away seemingly healthy people would begin to feel ill and. Then dropped dead of no obvious cause and the best doctors in Japan were unable to explain what caused the strange illnesses based on prior testing United States. Scientists knew that the bomb would emit radiation. But they had never end -ticipant at the radiation would be enough to cause sickness or death. They believed anyone close enough to the explosion to receive a lethal dose of radiation would die from the blast. Well, before they could begin exhibiting the symptoms of radiation poisoning on August, twelfth nineteen forty five in anticipation of imminent, Japanese surrender groves issued orders to form Manhattan project, atomic bomb investigating groups. These groups comprised of Manhattan project engineers, and physicists would travel to hear a Shema and Nagasaki to study the results of the atomic bomb explosion, the terms the United States had offered the Japanese included. Allied occupation. Until the Japanese could offer convincing proof that they were completely d materialized and the investigating groups would work with those occupying forces while Manhattan project. Researchers had already conducted tests in the desert. This was their first and only chance to review the aftermath of bomb's explosion in a city where people lived on August seventeenth. The first investigating group arrived in Nagasaki. They spent about a month examining the physical damage of the atomic bomb. Typhoons delayed the hero Shema investigating group who didn't arrive at their destination until September twenty sixth and only had ten days to gather data in order to be compliant with their orders for a prompt report. Both investigating groups determined that while ambient radiation in and around here. Shema and Nagasaki was elevated. It was still within a safe range visits to hospice. Settles demonstrated that there were no cases of radiation poisoning. Among people who had arrived in here Shema or Nagasaki after the bombs were dropped as for those who had been in the cities at the time of detonation, the evidence of radiation poisoning, was unavoidable and sobering. Based on the reports they received general groves decided to cover up evidence of the so called atomic plague reports from the Manhattan project, atomic bomb investigating groups were classified photography and video recording in and around here, Shema and Nagasaki was banned when a Japanese film crew recording footage for a film reel arrived in Nagasaki on October twenty four th nineteen Forty-five the US military officials occupying the city ordered them to stop recording and confiscated their footage around that same time. The US army deployed a cameraman named Lieutenant McGovern to record the. Aftermath of the hero Shema and Nagasaki bombings and send the footage back for review among officials posted stateside McGovern combine the Japanese newsreel footage with his own original shots destroyed buildings. The sick the injured and those suffering from the atomic plague the finished project clocked in at nearly three hours. The officials who viewed the movie determined its content top secret and classified it. So it would not be available to the public a member of mcgovern's crew. Herbert Suzanne would later say, quote, the government could not release the film what it showed was to horrible. And quote, the footage wasn't declassified until nineteen sixty eight after the Japanese government spent over a decade pressuring the US government to release it that year a film scholar named Eric barn. Oh, found the old footage in the national archives. And edited. Down to a sixteen minute short that screened at the museum of modern art in New York City for the first time, the American public was able to view firsthand the effects of the atomic bombs that had been developed and dropped twenty three years earlier in nineteen forty five newspaper articles in.

Shema Nagasaki United States Manhattan Lieutenant McGovern Japan US army museum of modern art New York City Harris Herbert Suzanne groves Eric barn twenty three years sixteen minute three hours ten days
"shema" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"shema" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"We're great Brenda. Hope you are to go ahead. I have a migraine at the moment. Okay. I was diagnosed six years ago was Shema Belichick migraines. And I'd like to know how to take care of them. Okay. Sunday, say Bo talk shots. But go hill. I would avoid that one. But yeah, both talk shots and have the same paralyzing mechanism that can slow down the vibrations the opening and closing a blood vessels the causes the migraines but much better to go to the cause of the problem. As far as pain goes CBD's, a great anti-migraine strategy might want to get on the head this X products in jeopardy the osteo MAG from you in Javadi magnesium is a great anti migraine supplement. Same with the be Biden's, especially vitamin B two which is riboflavin you'll find that in the healthy start packing. The beyond Tangy tangerine. You also want to see if you can track your migraines to either foods specific foods can cause migraines toxins in foods or intolerances that we have is the civic ingredients may wanna do a little food diary and chart your migraines and your flares. If you have steady migraines when you're migraines flair and link those two foods or you can do it to your menstrual cycle because the hormone estrogen some sometimes. Involved, and you may notice that as certain period in your menstrual certain time and your menstrual cycle. That's migraine spike. If that's the case you wanna struck balancing out, your estrogen with essential fatty acids, the ultimate EFA's from jeopardy, for example, or also helping the body eliminate estrogen making sure eating enough, fiber and using the nightly essence, probiotics for intestinal health and Asha Janik health challenges, by the way, or a really big issue. Many if not most chronic diseases have a gender prevalence skewed towards females toys, women, depression, fibromyalgia, hypothyroidism, and quite a few of the chronic degenerative inflammatory diseases autoimmune diseases, especially gender or gender specific for women, and it's fought estrogen. That's the problem or actually breakdown product. So that's Trajan.

migraines Brenda Asha Janik EFA hypothyroidism Bo Javadi Biden six years
"shema" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

02:29 min | 2 years ago

"shema" Discussed on 710 WOR

"I wanna i wanna go back and reestablished my point about how big anti nuke was to the left of the democrats i've got another photo here nineteen eighty to june the twelfth almost one million people protests nuclear arms race in new york city this is during the reagan administration one million people have got the photo here it's a black and white photo i'm not gonna bother putting it on the dittocam and here's obama barack hussein oh as recently as may twenty seventh two thousand sixteen listen to this among those nations like my own the bold nuclear stockpiles we must have the courage to escape the logic of fear and pursue a world without we may not realize this goal in my lifetime persistent effort can roll back the possibility catastrophe we can chart a course that leads to the destruction of stockpiles we can stop the spread to new nations insecure deadly materials from fanatics how you can make one effort to do it but now obama wasn't hero shema and every year as when i was in sacramento the mayor out there it wasn't aim and all don't fail me now what was her hand and gruden can route every year big press conference we need to apologize to the japanese and she wanted to go over there and apologize japanese every year on the anniversary date of hero shema nagasaki to left would have these massive ceremonies we're so sorry but of course we didn't mean to do it and it one and ended a war my only point here is that these people have been on this anti new crusade for thirty five or forty years it as the dominant issue as big as if not bigger than climate change emma's recently as two years ago this this sound bite from obama says classic among those nations like my own that whole stockpiles we must have the courage to pursue a world without we may not realize this goal of my lockup well we're going to get a lot closer to with trump and we did with you and the same people that were celebrating you would applauding you're trying to destroy donald trump for doing something they've wanted to happen for thirty five years it takes reasonable intelligent people like me the analyze this and keep it.

barack hussein gruden shema nagasaki emma donald trump new york reagan sacramento thirty five years forty years two years
"shema" Discussed on KARN 102.9

KARN 102.9

02:37 min | 2 years ago

"shema" Discussed on KARN 102.9

"Radio one zero two not i want to go back and reestablished my point about how big anti nuke was to the left of the democrats i've got a photo here nineteen eighty to june twelfth almost one million people protest nuclear arms race in new york city this is during the reagan administration one million people have got the photo here it's a black and white photo i'm not gonna bother putting it on the dittocam and here's obama barack hussein oh as recently as may twenty seventh two thousand sixteen listen to this among those nations like my own that hold nuclear stockpiles we must have the courage to escape the logic of fear pursue a world without we may not realize this goal in my lifetime persistent effort can roll back the possibility of catastrophe we can chart a course that leads to the destruction of these stockpiles we can stop the spread to nations insecure deadly materials from fanatics how you didn't make one ever to do it but now obama wasn't hero shema and every year as when i was in sacramento the mayor out there wasn't any and all don't fail me now while it was her hand and gruden en route every year big press conference we need to apologize to the japanese and she wanted to go over there and apologize japanese every year on the anniversary of hero shimano nagasaki to left would have these massive ceremonies we're so sorry we didn't mean but of course we didn't mean to do it at one end of the war my only point here is that these people have been on this anti new crusade for thirty five or forty years it as the dominant issue as big as if not bigger than climate change and was recently as two years ago this this sound bite from obama says classic among those nations like my own that whole stockpiles we must have the courage to pursue a world without we may not realize this dolemite lifetime well we're going to get a lot closer to with trump than we did with you and the same people that were celebrating you applauding you're trying to destroy donald trump for doing something they've wanted to happen for thirty five years it takes reasonable intelligent people like me the analyze this and.

barack hussein shema donald trump new york reagan sacramento gruden thirty five years forty years two years
"shema" Discussed on AP News

AP News

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"shema" Discussed on AP News

"In the next four years and shifting the company primarily toward trucks and suv's the to hold overs will be the mustang sports car and a compact focus crossover ford we'll do away with the mid size fusion the taurus the cemex hybrid and the fiesta subcompact in the us canada and mexico although lincoln has been identified as low performing ford chief financial officer bob shank says the brand is safe i mike rossier there's big news from nintendo on earnings and leadership i up earning the companies reporting solid sales and profit for the fiscal fourth quarter it says of january through march profit total forty billion dollars reversing a more than three point six million dollar loss at racked up the previous year tend to get a lip from strong sales of the hybrid game machine switch which sold fifteen million councils in the fiscal year through march meanwhile quarterly sales rose twelve percent year on year to one point eight billion dollars it also announced it will be getting a new president director at the pokemon companies should taro for a cal will replace tatsumi shema subject to approval at a general shareholders meeting in june instead the move is an attempt to hand over the leadership to a younger generation california serial murder coldcase now has a suspect in custody the ed donahue says police have connected him with the golden state killer murders joseph dangelo is facing eight counts of murder for the killings in the late seventies and early eighties he's a suspect and as many as twelve murders the entire reservoir of victims out there my sadness with you bruce harrington's brother and sister in law were killed in one thousand nine hundred eighty or the fifty one ladies were brutally right.

canada bruce harrington joseph dangelo president nintendo mike rossier chief financial officer ford mexico suv murder ed donahue director bob shank lincoln us eight billion dollars forty billion dollars
"shema" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"shema" Discussed on TechStuff

"Consoles in terms of sales contrast it with the we the predecessor to the we you and that was the best selling home console nintendo ever produced the we sold more than one hundred one million units the only nintendo device to outsell the wheat was the handheld nintendo ds which sold an astonishing one hundred fifty four million units putting it right behind the playstation two for best selling video game system of all time it's hard to see the we you as anything other than a commercial failure one other thing i should mention that i covered in the third episode of the nintendo story was the passing of sato awasa he had served as an antenna does fourth president the first one not of the amati line from two thousand twelve to two thousand fifteen a wada gets a lot of credit for nintendo's focus on creating acceptable and innovative methods of playing games rather than on raw computing power or graphics so contrast that with like the x box or the playstation consoles his death and twenty fifteen from complications due to bile duct cancer shocked the video game industry it wanted successor in the fifth president of nintendo is tatsumi kimmy shema kimmy shema worked at sanwa bank of japan for more than two decades before he transitioned his career in a big way because in two thousand he was elected the chief financial officer of the pokemon amman company so he went from working in a financial institution for twenty seven years to becoming the cfo senator around cartoon characters that are forced to fight one another for our entertainment it's quite the leap in two thousand and two the first president of nintendo of america minoru our chole he retired so hiroshi yamauchi decided that kimmy shima was the ideal candidate to head that part of nintendo's business and kimmy shima became the second president of.

president nintendo chief financial officer senator kimmy shima sato sanwa bank of japan cfo hiroshi yamauchi twenty seven years two decades
"shema" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"shema" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"Idea was how to assure them under no circumstances could they achieve this so here i who had grown up within a horrid so the idea of nuclear war going right back to even before here will shema as you've read an and at the time if you're a shema when i was chaplain when i was fourteen cure i was working on nuclear war problems but with the purpose of avoiding any nuclear war ever occurring which we thought most likely way would occur would be his russians exploiting their supposed ability to uh destroy our ability to charlie in the course of that i became aware of the decision problems of the president who would be faced with a particular problem of decisionmaking under uncertainty which was whether to launch his bombers and eventually missiles on the basis of warning from our early warning stations are radar and eventually satellites and one aspect of that struck me very strongly at society fellows and elsewhere i'd been particularly interested in defining a kind of uncertainty that was greater than could be represented by a probability distribution it reflected differences of opinions differed estimates supposedly very low level of evidence or a lot of evidence that was conflicting and i call this ambiguity as opposed to risk which was a probabilities what struck me was that the articles by the leader of the economics were albert will center whose becker was in mathematical philosophy by the way the emphasizes warning would be ambiguous and that word was not common at that time in the in this general literature of course it leaked out at me because that's what i've been working on ambiguity by my later phd thesis was titled risk ambiguity and decision so we said the warning will be equivocal it will be ambiguous there will be different kinds of evidence saying yes or no in the question is what to do under that and so that that.

president
"shema" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:21 min | 3 years ago

"shema" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Nuclear war going right back to even before hero shema as you've read an and at the time of hiroshima when i was captain when i was fourteen here i was working on nuclear war problems but with the purpose of avoiding any nuclear war ever occurring which we thought most likely way would occur would be this russians exploiting their supposed inability to destroy our ability to tony in the course of that i became aware of the decision problem of the president who would be faced with a particular problem of decisionmaking under uncertainty which was whether to launch his bombers and eventually missiles on the basis of warning from art early warning stations are radar and eventually satellites and one aspect of that struck me very strongly at society fellows no for i've been particularly interested in defining a kind of uncertainty was greater than could be represented by a probability distribution it reflected differences of opinions differed estimate supposedly very low level of evidence or a lot of evidence that was conflicting and i call this ambiguity as opposed to risk which was a probabilities just shooting what struck me was that the articles by the leader of this economics work albert will center whose becker who was in mathematical philosophy by the way he emphasized since a warning would be ambiguous and that word was not common at that time in the in this general literature of course it leaked out at me because that's what i've been working on ambiguity by my later peach confuses was titled risk ambiguity and decision so we said the warning will be equivocal it will be ambiguous they will be different kinds of evidence saying yes or no in the question is what to do under that and so that that attracted me particularly and i specialize then now won't go on at this moment a specialized in the question of the command and control of nuclear weapons not just the weapons themselves which my colleagues were mainly working on shelters hardening this sort of thing to the question of what information will the.

president nuclear weapons
"shema" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

WBT Charlotte News Talk

02:30 min | 3 years ago

"shema" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

"Oceans they atmospheres to light off four 400000 hero shema atom bombs a year that's laws it's not getting out in space it's being blocked by carbon clouds and stuff and so it's heating up the oceans as was done in the pacific in the northern pacific is he hit up to a point where it's weakening and flattening the polar vortex arctic jet stream and which is now bleeding storms into the east and southeast 95 no they're not stopping one after the other yeah but guess what's going to happen what happened in the first one in january it got unseasonably warm the next week and guess what's going to happen uh next week after this current blacks couldn't get in the '70s in some areas even though weather channel today was worried that there might be major tornado outbreak because of all the weather changes still so it's in it and this is also happening in a line nina uh cycle which which makes me concern for the hurricane season that might be pretty strong and especially i would say watch out and be prepared in tornado alley especially in the south because i think uh the things are lining up in the future that with uh with the climate that might see a what looked like the great outbreaks of 2011 may be repeated i hope not but so so be watchful everybody in the south could it could start around april a dramatic warming uh after the storms come income leave their recordbreaking cold it could also get back into being recordbreaking hot because that is the majority temperature's of that are being broken around the world we had the last three years the free hottest years in temperature records in history uh in the last three years and the this third year 2017 um was during a alani ah which use should kind of neutral year amid style the even those third it's for hottest year in of any neutral year and climate record history so it's either and i can tell you here in the seattle area we are we have been unseasonably warm a few days ago it felt like march 15th and the buds are already starting to come on the trees and then bang so i'm free to say that warmth is winning this one so far not not a future ice age but a future hot age going to add in.

seattle three years
"shema" Discussed on The Bone 102.5

The Bone 102.5

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"shema" Discussed on The Bone 102.5

"The first lady is such a figure in our society looks for al's act alone others not this one missile dalzell odorless show obama she was the shema solid dracula no she did not through her digital trendy low figures from be effect hey you don't call matt their beautiful were bloomberg the fat kids their beautiful she's one of the healthy yet our beautiful is that sucks the also liu you know whatever i don't have a problem with lu lu fettke cine either i think they're cute meet there well let's let's take a little break here i wanna stay on schedule now's the time to take a break i'll yeah we're pretty much there the away oh oh we're actually where we're a little ahead so let's just shove this in there before were done now to jerry richardson his cell in the panthers at the end of the season we'll figure out why all the dirty a command a couple of days what will figure it out puff that he wants to buy the teen how he wanted the identified if what he wants to buy in the first thing he thought was let me tweet because he i saw the tweet i want to buy the panthers retweeting like tell everybody know that's how is going to get out this is a this is a warming how many how many followers does he has probably better to be in our cnn lab just saying like you saw it there's probably a legitimate way that you put your your hat in the range winner is legit well he's he's testing the waters because one of the first responses he he got was from steph curry was from north carolina he says i want in now this is not new puff daddy has talked about for years about their not being in the african american owners right and he was saying oh maybe i should start my own lee to rival the nfl he was just talk in putting feel is out there then all of a sudden this kind of falls in his lab puff that is definitely good for the money and good for the connections to get a team together with the with the money as already guaranteed the best halftime shows are only be in if maces involved mace asked to be involved murder makes amendment yard not harlem earlier did he made in pretty well he.

al obama panthers steph curry north carolina lee nfl mace murder matt liu jerry richardson cnn harlem
"shema" Discussed on The Daily Zeitgeist

The Daily Zeitgeist

02:21 min | 3 years ago

"shema" Discussed on The Daily Zeitgeist

"Ducking cover it is like what they used to tell kids to do and that's insane because obviously you're just going to be disintegrated by nuclear bomb and that's actually not necessarily true i dunno that ducking covering help split certainly i was surprised to learn that wearing two pairs of close could help because that has never been a thing that anybody has ever say uh you know the woman we talked to she was pointing at the plane in the sky the in all the game when the bomb exploded and because her arm was up like that the underside of her arm is like the most burnt part of her body it's like still to this day it's like got that like kind of polish church really smooth look because she had a really bad burn on the underside of her arm so it's a lot of it is weirdly like covering your skin from the initial explosion her father was like i guess in a fishing sort of shack and he had a big cement ice box that was in there like a basically a refrigerator and when he saw the bomb following he jumped inside his ice box and that is what saved his life so again that is one of the most laughed at scenes in the history of cinema indiana jones in the kingdom of the crystal skull indiana jones jumps inside a a alleged lined refrigerator lined refrigerator and like the refrigerator is like tossed fifty miles away by the nuclear explosion he's fine i don't know that that is exactly accurate but the idea that you could jump inside an ice box and survive a nuclear explosion again a nuclear explosion of a size that happened back in the 40s but still it is you know i'm assuming that you know even if they're they are bigger and i think most nuclear bombs are calculated in like so this would be like 10 corocha mazar hero shema's the is it prompts terashima well if you're japanese it's heat oshima hiroshima area the one thing that kinda makes it very bizarrely personal enemy is so during the world war.

shema world war
"shema" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"shema" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"As you said the lgbt yes activists will we with the way they they all campaigning for it will take the situation back to two thousand fifteen no this you're basically criticising the way they are doing it okay people who oppose trump will take i see them taking any pretext and turning it into a brouhaha in order to undermine trump which i think is ridiculous because there are so many things he actually is doing that are bad and in jewish areas this is a great example because trump denies the holocaust please okay over and over first of all that statement that they put out saying that didn't mention jews was written by a jewish staffer and also so it didn't mention jews everybody knows that the holocaust was about jews if there was something condemning harry shema that didn't mention that the victims were japanese would that be offensive but even sell it's not like trump got involved and he refused to apologize he hasn't apologized and thirty years for anything that has anything to do with it semitism right and over and over he is accused oh there's this period where people were shocked shocked that trump and they can't even prove that he said it shocked suggested that some of the antisemitism that were being reported came from jews and a week later we found out that many many of them did come from israeli teenager so these things are just they want to attack him for anything that they can be selective and focus on the real problem yes and what are the real problems of note to his demeanour and the way he handles the government well the answer before the last couple of weeks was his attitude towards the system that he does not respect or even understand our democracy amounting say something terrible.

trump harry shema thirty years