7 Burst results for "Shelly Archambault"

"shelly archambault" Discussed on Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman

Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman

07:31 min | Last month

"shelly archambault" Discussed on Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman

"I'm Bob. Sathian and I'm here with Shelly archambault. One of Silicon Valley's first female African American CEO's as chief executive at metric stream. She turned a struggling startup into global leader. She's now a board director at Verizon and Nordstrom. Roper technologies and OCTA, and is also author of the forthcoming book on apologetically ambitious, which is due in October though she's based in California Shelly is coming to us from Tampa Florida where she's sheltering with family, as I asked my questions from where I'm sheltering in my home in Brooklyn Shelley. Thanks for joining us. It's great to be here. This podcast until recently focused on the business adaptations imposed end required by the covid nineteen pandemic. But in the wake of George Floyd's death, there's obviously another kind of rapid response that has become an imperative. When did you first hear about George Floyd's killing? And how did you respond? Oh goodness I heard about it the same day. It was whore. It was outrage. It was disbelief. All of those emotions anger. And then it was also A. Oh goodness, feeling of. Powerlessness Realizing that. Not only did this happen, but that could have been my son, my son in law, my grandson just. Just horrible! Did you. Start to think about actions to take right away or was it more serve absorbing? In the beginning, it was really absorbing what was happening and then you go through. The whole grief cycle right? You start to feel like you need to do something which are not quite sure what you can do in terms of right then so you take an all the information you can find out what happened. Who was involved? What are they charging? And then he just get more and more angry as everything is slow. To unfold to actually demonstrate that there will be consequences for what happened, so it lengthens the frankly the trauma that you go through. Last week you wrote a commentary that emphasize the difficult shared experience of living as a black person in America. You posed a framework for how to move forward. One that stresses the role that businesses can play. What is that role? Where does business fall in this? Where's the responsibility? Well, we actually all have a responsibility what we're facing now with the racial tensions, the bias and all that we're experiencing. Unfortunately, it's not new. We've had moments like this in the past whether it was a civil rights, movement or the Rodney King Right. We've had instances to show that we have a problem that needs to be addressed, but I'll be candid. This is the first time that I've actually felt hopeful. That we may actually start to change the trajectory this time. I believe it's because for the first time. I'm actually seeing businesses. Truly get engaged. Businesses really didn't engage during the civil rights movement now they are I believe that businesses can use their power to. Call for accountability to call for transparency and visibility into what's happening in our local communities. I've always believed that if you have bad behavior happening. If you shine a light on it. Behavior improves if we can shine a light on many aspects of our criminal justice system to understand where we're having discriminatory practices where we're having abuse, actually take place under whose watch and whose hands and actually make those things visible. will act very differently. They know they're going to be held accountable. So many atrocious abuses, all the way to death have happened in the past. Many times charges aren't brought. It happens in the dark and nobody knows, and they don't believe that people who make the accusations. My biggest suggestion is let's shine a light. Let's understand the data and the statistics and make those things visible. You said that the worst thing a company can do is go back to business as usual. Your concern that that might happen. Well, absolutely, because that's what's happened in the past. Terrible things happen. Everybody says Oh, my goodness, they ring hands. They say it's terrible. It's awful and couple months later. They're back to their regular lives. They've kind of forgotten about it. That is a huge risk this marathon. I was just talking to a group of CEOS earlier today, and I said if you're really serious about helping to make change than strap in because this is a marathon, it's a long term effort. There's not one issue or one problem or one person or one group. There's not one thing to do. The embedded of Racism and bias throughout our culture as a result of hundreds of years. Is Deep. To unearth uncover, shine the light and fix. It's going to take time and frankly fortitude. The fact that as I said, businesses are finally rolling up their sleeves and saying okay, we want to help we WANNA. Make a difference. Matters. Apple committed one hundred million dollars to criminal justice and Social Action Initiative. There is this sort of urgency for quick winds right, which in some ways is at odds with the reality that you identify about how deep and difficult and tangible the need is over time. Are there quick wins that you think we should be looking for to build momentum that businesses should be doing? I do think there are actions can be taken. That will start to make a difference at least create some hope that will make. People feel that folks are serious in terms of moving forward I'm careful about quick winds because as I said. This isn't surface stuff. It's not like you can go wave a magic wand, and it's all better that said companies. Do need to communicate. I've seen a lot of CEOS. Put out letters, which is wonderful both internal as well as external and what I would tell you. It's all companies should foster communications. We need to start talking about racism. We don't talk about it with people sharing their stories and people listening really listening this time. I think it can make a difference I think there are a few things that people need to do. One is educate yourself. Black people are suffering from the weight of dehumanizing injustice and racism, and that's been festering for years..

George Floyd Shelly archambault Sathian Verizon Tampa Nordstrom CEO Florida director California Brooklyn Shelley Roper technologies Rodney King America chief executive OCTA Social Action Initiative Apple
"shelly archambault" Discussed on Rocketship.fm

Rocketship.fm

11:50 min | 5 months ago

"shelly archambault" Discussed on Rocketship.fm

"Now back to the show in the last few years. The retail businesses mccullum increasingly competitive more and more retailers have been struggling just to stay alive. The survivors following a simple formula listening to their customers and meeting their expectations. That's not a formula for success. That's a formula suvival some retailers however not only survive but the why these businesses listened to their customers but then they take what they learn one important step further instead of simply trying to meet their customers expectations. They attempt to exceed them. Their goal is to build and maintain strong customer loyalty to attract new customers and keep our existing ones. Our goal at blockbuster is not just to satisfy customers but to delight them that video clip. It sounds a bit dated. Yeah well a lot of the clips. Were playing here and honestly I am all for it this trip back in time like I am loving US anyway. The the clip. We just heard was from an old blockbuster. Training video aimed at employs to help them brush up on customer service and at least through the early nineties where we left off the story videos like this must have been working. Business was booming and blockbuster have become an iconic brand firmly placing itself in the everyday lives of pretty much everybody. Yeah but Wayne Has Inga. Did see some writing on the wall that the good times might be soon coming to an end or at least would be a lot harder to maintain and it had nothing to do with the Internet yet but instead a different kind of medium that was developing cable are cable. Television was becoming more advanced with features. Like video on demand on the cusp and this was a real threat blockbuster. In fact at one point in nineteen ninety one time Warner announced all sorts of technological advancements that they were making an Wall Street saw that as a very bad thing for blockbuster so bad that its stock immediately dipped over ten percent. Yeah over the course of the next two years blockbuster came up. With all sorts of ideas to combat this threat that was beginning to develop they considered acquiring a cable company of their own but those plans got scrapped up. They even considered developing entertainment centers and amusement parks but ultimately. They decided to do something else. Like like selling the business in Nineteen ninety-four mass media conglomerate Viacom acquired blockbuster for eight point five billion dollars which considering the thirty five million dollar valuation that the business had just a few years prior seems like a pretty darn good outcome at the time but Viacom thought there was an opportunity. There were risks for sure but with its mass media power. It could develop blockbuster into being even bigger than it already was and it started to make new kinds of investments in one thousand nine hundred ninety. Eight blockbuster created a movie production company and began acquiring films for exclusive distribution through blockbuster. Yeah that's right. What's now a big part of the net flex Amazon playbook in acquiring in creating exclusive content? Like that is actually a thing of the past. I mean blockbuster was doing that. Back in the ninety s around that. Same time though blockbusters new CEO. John and Yoko was approached about a deal. Dvd's were the new medium of choice when it came to video and Warner Brothers gave Anti Ochoa and blockbuster and exclusive opportunity blockbuster would have the exclusive rights to offer DVD rentals of do released movies before the general public could get access to them. All water brothers would want in. Return was forty percent of the rental revenue which to be fair was the same deal. They had with vhs and anti okoh said he said no he turned down the deal. And as a result the studios dropped the wholesale price for DVD's. What was at one? Time priced as a premium in order to help the video. Rentals thrive. Dvd's were now price more competitively at retail. You could still rent movies for a few dollars. But it's just a few more actually own the DVD outright yeah and in fact some retailers would use DVD's as a loss leader pricing them under the wholesale price so consumers would come into the store and hopefully by other higher priced higher margin items. In fact after all this happened another company ended up becoming the number one source of income for movie studios wasn't blockbuster anymore. It was rolling back to save you even more always. Luke presents this reduction in wholesale pricing and giant competition from Mega company like Walmart. Who This all things. Very very difficult for blockbuster. Yeah and it wasn't the only competitor those eating at blockbuster there's also this little startup company. That was just beginning. No merge in the late nineties company founded in Scotts Valley California with just two and a half billion dollars in start-up capital one of its CO founders. That's right a company founded on the premise of eliminating a very big annoyance. That people who rented movies would deal with that Pesky late fee. It made me think I can't be the only one who is struggling with this late fee thing and just started me thinking about the Internet and DVD's and how something could work without ladies. That voice was Reed Hastings. The CO founder of Net flicks in an interview about the beginning of Netflix which was founded in nineteen ninety seven. So it was at this time. We're blockbuster was getting up by Walmart. Were Net flex almost quietly began nipping at its heels and twenty to think of Netflix Nipping at another company's heels. But it wasn't even seen as legitimate competition at the time it really was just a fledgling startup. Yeah that's actually true. I mean in its early years. Net flicks was really just a mail order. Dvd Rental Company it didn't start off as a subscription business and certainly didn't start off as being able to stream movies on demand but it was the new kid on the block. You actually got a chance to talk to somebody about one of their first interactions between Netflix and blockbuster right yeah I did. I recently sat down with Shelly archambault. Who now's a board member at verizon elsewhere but was actually the president of blockbuster dot com for about a year beginning in. May Nineteen Ninety nine and I don't have the audio to share from our conversation. But she recalled a story to me about reed hastings of net flex pitching an idea to her and the management team at blockbuster. Yeah and what was that idea? Well the idea was basically not flex. I mean at least the way we know it today. The general pitch was hey. We are net flex and we're a technology company. You are blockbuster. A consumer brand that people love. Let us as Netflix. Power Your online business and powering we can. Both grow. And Thrive and blockbusters said no they said no in fact. Shelley's boss at the time blockbuster. Ceo John Anti Okoh said Jelly that company ever becomes anything just by it and that was that. I'm sure blockbuster was thinking that. They were the big powerful company at the time that they were. They had a lot of leverage over tiny startup. Netflix but things move fast. Sometimes you can think you have an opportunity to acquire a small company but they grow so rapidly that you never ever get a second chance and actually blockbuster did get a second chance wait. They dip yup but we should probably take a quick break. I and AL explain more. So you're saying that blockbuster actually did have a chance to partner up with net flicks again. Yeah not only that. They actually had a chance to acquire netflix outright. I'll let Marc Randolph. Tell that story. Mark co-founded net flex along with three days things and he tells the story in this interview on an episode of on the money on CNBC. This was right after the crash of the DOT COM bubble And we decided we had a sell ourselves to someone and blockbuster was the obvious person. And when they asked how much We said fifty million dollars and they basically laughed at us so Netflix could have been had for just fifty million. Yeah which of course is peanuts compared to the net flicks value today which you know just one hundred and forty six billion dollars. So that was a critical mistake for blockbuster. Although in the eyes of blockbuster they didn't need to acquire net flex because they were about to introduce a video on demand service with another partner and they were very very bullish about the partnership into is that partner and Ron Enron. The Energy Company. The one that went bankrupt because of accounting fraud committed at literally historic proportions that very same. Enron. Okay well I Y Enron well Enron was an energy company and they were known for oil and gas but they also did offer broadband services. Here's a clip from an analysts conference back in two thousand one which explains the partnership between blockbuster and and run a little bit the little dry but it does have some pretty sweet background beats Iran. Intelligent network or ESPN is built to transport secure high-quality broadband content what makes the and particularly interesting to content providers is that we can deliver content. Not only the PC's but also the television that means that the content providers who traditionally broadcast programming can now distribute their high quality programming in a digital format Enron is well positioned to attract content providers as customers. We have the network. Plus we have Enron's unique commercial capabilities. This combination enables us to structure a flexible solutions for our customers and they have some pretty creative accounting methods as well they say. Well I'm guessing I can guess how well this partnership played. It actually never even happened. The movie studios ended up pressuring the partnership the fall apart before it ever even launched. They said that blockbuster never even really had the rights do what they're trying to do with video on demand and those creative accounting practices at Enron that They were ultimately called out for. It actually all started with this blockbuster deal like people started asking questions. About Enron's accounting methods and ultimately the whole deal unraveled and helped lead the bankruptcy of Enron. Oh and for Blockbuster. While it continued to scramble coming up with some different ideas it put a lot of money into new campaign called total access which was essentially. It's online presence blockbuster. Total access would allow you to order your DVD online. And let you return it at the blockbuster location near you and when you did you'd get a free movie rental right on the spot. Here's an early commercial for that program at blockbuster we're not just doing online movie rental. We're doing better with unlimited movie rentals to your door in about a day or two over fifty thousand titles and with blockbuster online you get something. No one else can get you a free in store rental every week whenever you want. That's fifty two free movies a year. You'd better get watching plan. Started his nine ninety nine. Sign up today at blockbuster DOT COM and start getting movies delivered to your door plus free movies. That are blockbuster star okay. I mean the program sounds interesting. Yeah it was interesting and expensive so expensive that one of its activists investors. Carl ICAHN started a campaign to put a Knicks on the program. And not only that but actually oust blockbuster. Ceo as well and soon. After John's Yoko was replaced by James keys the former. Ceo of Seven. Eleven and keys kept trying to right the ship He talks about some of the ideas here in a segment on Bloomberg soon after he became. Ceo for the kids actually transformation. I guess we are the granddaddy. But we're also the new kid on the block in many ways because we're we're going multi channel getting out of the box if you will so it's not just about being your favorite corner video store today. It's about making our content available anywhere anytime.

blockbuster Netflix Enron John Anti Okoh Ceo Reed Hastings DOT COM Dvd Rental Company US Walmart CO founder partner CEO Carl ICAHN Viacom Bloomberg Ron Enron Warner Brothers
"shelly archambault" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:47 min | 1 year ago

"shelly archambault" Discussed on KQED Radio

"In short if you try to avoid risk you're actually risking total failure or worse mediocrity I wanted to speak to Shelly Archambault about this because he knows exactly how to take the big risks that maximize your odds of long term success Shelly pulled off the most incredible Silicon Valley turnaround that you've never heard of she accepted the role of CEO for a failing tech company there was only months from bankruptcy she led the company to a complex merger head spinning pivot and grew in the metric stream which is now a leading governance risk and compliance company valued in the hundreds of millions of dollars how did you do this by setting clear goals and taking big and incredibly smart risks for Shelley extreme risk taking and long term planning have gone hand in hand her whole life I started planning early because I realized through a series of experiences and things wrong up that the odds just were in my favor to get what I wanted out of life I decided I wanted to be a CEO when I was in high school super rare especially for a black female and therefore it was always about how do I improve the odds and the way I improve the odds was to actually make a plan and then figure out how to execute on the plan so I've been a planner my whole life Shelly didn't leave it as a nebulous stream she made an action plan how do you become a CEO the steps where are they so I looked around to see okay where the CEOs and you know what it confirmed my suspicion I didn't find any that look like me he showed ask yourself a question one that she repeat again and again all right.

Shelly Archambault CEO Shelley
"shelly archambault" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:17 min | 1 year ago

"shelly archambault" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Is the nitroglycerin that launches your idea to the next stage rather than obliterating you have to play the long game understanding how a risk now will maximize your gains much later expect turbulence and when you hit those bombs stay on course you can harness that turbulence for an extra bit of left in short if you try to avoid risk you're actually risking total failure or worse mediocrity I wanted to speak to Shelly Archambault about this because he knows exactly how to take the big risks that maximize your odds of long term success Shelly pulled off the most incredible Silicon Valley turnaround that you've never heard of she accepted the role of CEO for a failing tech company there was only months from bankruptcy she led the company to a complex merger head spinning pivot and grew in the metric scream which is now a leading governance risk and compliance company valued in the hundreds of millions of dollars how did you do this by setting clear goals and taking big and incredibly smart risks for Shelley extreme risk taking and long term planning have gone hand in hand her whole life I started planning early because I realized through a series of experiences and things wrong up that the odds just were in my favor to get what I wanted out of life I decided I wanted to be a CEO when I was in high school super rare especially for a black female and therefore it was always about how do I improve the odds and the way I improve the odds was to actually make a plan and then figure out how to execute on the planned so I've been a planner my whole life Shelly didn't leave it as a nebulous stream she made an action plan how do you become a CEO the steps were are they so I looked around to see okay where the CEOs and you know what it confirmed my suspicion I didn't find any that look like me he shall ask yourself a question one that she repeat again and again all right how to increase the odds well where they come from business so I decided I needed to go to the top business school.

Shelly Archambault CEO Shelley
"shelly archambault" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:58 min | 1 year ago

"shelly archambault" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Know when and how to defy conventional wisdom like Danny Meyer who abandon law school in favor of the restaurant world and Shelly Archambault as a young black woman we see ambition she decided to move to Japan tune in to master the scale here on KQED tonight at eight o'clock I'm Joshua Johnson governor Jay Inslee of Washington state wants to be our next president he'll answer your questions next time on one A. one A. comes on tonight at eleven from NPR news it's All Things Considered I'm Audie Cornish and I'm ari Shapiro sometimes a parade is not just a parade even when it's a glamorous ticker tape parade winding through New York state fans turned out by the thousands to cheer on the trampoline athletes of the U. S. women's national soccer team following their fourth World Cup win as in pairs that it will be reports this parade was a party with a mission and the message where is it contained a letter for Broadway the ceiling of the phone calls or something to the perfect spot to catch a glimpse of the women's teams they were fine during the World Cup differs said she was glued to the television it is it's in that city and just a the vigor and intolerance you know that in from the first game still the last squeeze next to her in the crowd was thirteen year old Aussie brothers and her dad it written about two hours from Pennsylvania to get here I love soccer women do it also because god created a plea to essentially made by making her keynote right after the parade the star co captain describe but a champion team looks like to the crowds at city hall at city hall the mayor of New York build a placebo presented the players with keys to the city in an enthusiastic ceremony that included his wife for lane we welcome our heroes back home to bless you bought at the team's accomplishments the first to ever win twelve consecutive World Cup matches nine different players scored goals a record and they show that playing like all then she started a chance you could hear the parade all morning you equal U. S. women's national team filed a lawsuit in March is the US soccer federation because they're paid far less than the men's team in spite of being vastly more accomplished and popular it could not have been easy for U. S. soccer federation president Carlos Cordero to take the stage he addressed the champions directly in recent months your raise your voices for equality broke into cheers supporting the team continued on behalf of everyone and U. S. soccer he said we hear you we believe in you and we're committed to doing right by you in fifteen minutes later Megan Rapinoe affectionately peas holding those speeds in five repeatedly to point of thinking for his support and like her the teammates and coaches she barely touched on the controversy of her pay to looted only fleetingly to her ongoing political arguments of president trump and the question of the team visiting the White House instead her tone is conciliatory we have to be better we have to love more Hey lance in more and talk less we got to know that this is everybody's responsibility every single person here and there were a lot of people listening as many as nineteen million people watched the final game on Sunday this.

Danny Meyer fifteen minutes thirteen year two hours
"shelly archambault" Discussed on Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman

Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman

04:26 min | 1 year ago

"shelly archambault" Discussed on Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman

"I think actually it's a random accidental example, people who are really close to us often want to protect us. So they say things like Louis if he goes and tries to start this company and fails, he's going to cry is going to be upset. And then he's gonna move back in our basement. You know, you're doing really well at the police department. Why don't you stay there and it's not it's not not in your best interest, but it's also playing. Safe because they don't wanna see you fall on your face. Yes. It's not naysayer hang, it's they're trying to protect us, it's out of love. But by the way, it isn't whether or not you take risk remote. We almost always take risk and everything even saying that the police department is actually taking risks. It's a question of taking the smart risks. I'm actually going to interrupt rates train of thought here because he's leading right into another rule rule fine. Take bigger risks. There's a story from masters of scale that matches this perfectly. The story comes from Shelly Archambault, she's not a household name, but she was responsible for one of silicon valley's most incredible turnarounds. She's a huge fan of taking big calculated risks and in this next clip, she's describing a series of risks. She took while working for IBM. Shelley ascended through IBM to level of junior executive the time was right to ask the question. All right. What's it take to actually get into that C suite where your direct report to the CEO? She had dented one factor that was common to almost all of IBM's top executives almost all of them had gone and done and international sinement. But more than that. A good chunk of them a high percentage had actually gone to Japan. And I thought that's not obvious Japan was probably our smallest marketplace. Shelly didn't know why all those executives have chosen Japan but she knew it had carried them in a direction. She wanted to go. So she set herself up to enter a new current one, she believed was particularly risky for was a big risk to do tall African American female under forty going to Japan with her whole family. Early on the face of it. Shelly was at a disadvantage. But in fact, what cetera part in this also set her up for success? Men who come from the US, do international Simon, they assume that everything they've done, their reputation, whatever all comes with them whereas, whenever I get a promotion or new job, and I walk into it. I know that people are going to assume that I'm probably not quite qualified or not quite ready. So I always have to go in and prove myself established myself. Well, because I have that mentality when I showed up in Japan, I took that same approach and the approaches I could help my team be successful that will make me successful. The big thing I learned on that experience was for the first time in my entire career having the experience of being a minority wasn't asset. I tell people all the time, women minorities go doing international silent, you will actually have a edge above people who have not been minorities and experienced being minorities in a new culture. Shelly started her time in Japan by taking a risk. She'll always remember the story begins at Shelley prepares to me too key colleague for the first time. Okay. So here I am my Japanese team is my biggest team Yamamoto, son, who was running that is indeed, the person that is going to be very important to me. So I need to meet with him before we meet I meet with his right hand person. Gosh, two or three times it's kind of the process. He's go between to make sure that the very first meeting goes well. L Yamamoto Sohn's right hand man was trying to stress the importance of going slow Americans have an unfortunate reputation of charging into meetings and barking out to do lists. So he was encouraging a gentler approach. He said now Shelly, please. This meeting is just a nice meeting. It's a get to know you meeting. It's like and he's looking for an analogy and he says it's like a first date. Shelly understood the message, but his choice of the expression I date. Also gave you an idea..

Shelly Archambault Japan L Yamamoto Sohn Shelley IBM US Louis CEO executive Simon
"shelly archambault" Discussed on Side Hustle Pro

Side Hustle Pro

02:35 min | 2 years ago

"shelly archambault" Discussed on Side Hustle Pro

"People think the not mentors people to help you plan out your career through the next doubt all forwardlooking but franklin and most important tour i know i can help you do the job he currently have because you don't get that opportunity unless you are nailing your current job in your heart you're listening to side hustle pro the podcast that teaches you to build an grow your side hustle from passion project to profitable business and i'm your host michaela matthews the komi so let's get started hey hey guys welcome back to the show so the other day i heard someone say that in order to be in original it simply means to do things your own way on your own time and february resonated with me in it reminded me of today's guess today in the guess chair we have shelly archambault i'm excited to share showy story because it's an approach to entrepreneurship that deserves more attention often times when entrepreneurship is discussed including on this show it's through the lens of someone who had this big idea and got to work to bring it to fruition but the team and the cofounders that help them to build that company are often not given as much of the attention you see not everyone with entrepreneurial instincts comes up with that milliondollar idea sometimes people are better on the execution front and you need that person who can take a vision turn it into an actual viable business with employees inau and grow your company year over year that show story shelly is best known for being the chief executive officer of metric stream inc up until january two thousand meeting she is somewhat of alleged in silicon valley having grown metric stream to what it is today she's received numerous awards also in two thousand fourteen she was named one of the four t six most important african americans in technology by business insider in september two thousand fifteen shelly was recognized as the ninety seven th most influential business leader in america when she not busy building software companies or sitting on fortune 500 boards shelly is simply a family oriented energetic goal driven foodie we can all stance learn a lot from shelly when it comes to living a full life an.

shelly archambault shelly chief executive officer america franklin michaela matthews metric stream inc milliondollar