15 Burst results for "Sheldon Solomon"

"sheldon solomon" Discussed on The Adventures of Memento Mori

The Adventures of Memento Mori

07:46 min | Last month

"sheldon solomon" Discussed on The Adventures of Memento Mori

"An end, and therefore our actions have meeting. That's what used to think about used to think about how it's weird. They don't make pants that are just one big pant leg for both your legs. Miniskirt. Did you. Use any Ernest Becker in any of the of the episodes. I don't think I did now I'm not even sure I know who that is. Denial death. Now yeah he was a He died I think in the. Mid Seventies. And yeah, so his his premise. Was that everything? That we do. Is! In effort to manage the terror of our permanence. Like from religion love. Everything is like I mean that's the right the in in the garden. They eat the fruit of knowledge, or the the the fruit from the tree of knowledge, and that is consciousness, and ever since then the run downhill. Downhill from there. And that that it is just a an amazingly elaborate narrative. Just to manage that whatever consciousnesses right just to manage. That that impertinence great, thank you very much. Now I got another book I read. That's that's the premise of of the second season. Is that so? There's a social psychologist named Sheldon Solomon? Who then did a series of like thirty years worth of tests to do then, of course, prove that everything that we do is just managing that are. We did we came sort of close to that. We did a couple episodes that were vaguely or explicitly about existential ISM and specifically. There is an episode where Ted Dance Character for the first time. He's an immortal demon, and for the first time he becomes conscious of of the concept of his own demise, and really thinks about it, and basically has an existential crisis in the way that A particularly inopportune moment for him to be going through this. Michael Yeah. Is there any way that you can die? Actually there is called retirement. Okay, so that might actually happen, and if it did, there would be no more. Michael Kick about that for a second. Imagine, being retired everyone else here, but you who've gone nothingness, Niki Black. Done. Okay. Think about that. At episode that you're referring to the existential crisis episode, one of my. Favorite lines once. Michael Danson Scherzer has that existential crisis in he sort of medicine, the scene and then GDP super excited and he's sort of like. Pushes Ted Danson of his leppings like ooh. Let me go grab cameras yeah. Yeah! He says he's going to get a piece of chocolate cake. It's a one gallon reading from well. Harper, who played that Gary is going to go. Grab some Camus like he's just really excited. Once. Having absorbed the true weight of being mortal of permanence, Michael, the wants immortal demon goes into full blown existential despair. Eleanor Kristen's character basically says like you gotTA. Just bury that man. Just bury it. Shove it down deep. Do what humans do Chevy town stop thinking about it? And the result of that is he essentially switches from having an existential crisis to having a midlife crisis. Let's keep the party going. What now on hit the clubs? Vegas. No, no, no, no even better Dubai! Janette make us a Dubai. GotTa feel like. Maybe we should wind down hubbub. That can't stop can't stop hoping. They stop moving a start thinking start thinking. I'll start thinking about things I. Don't want to think about like depth. hoops. Thinking about it now. Thinking about deficit. I Know Jeanette and I've been taking Samba Cha. Let us show you how to do it. Existential is one of the Thornier you know little tendrils of moral philosophy, and as luck would have it, so we had to philosophy. Advisors are professors that we kind of called and as luck would have it. one of them was a sort of professional existentialist in graduate school in college and so. When we were going through all that stuff, we just kept calling him an email him and saying that. What is it again like and we would say so this writing go. No, no, no, that's sort like. Is this thing and it's just the you know Camo also like deny that he was an existential, which is hilarious. It's hilarious thing to do to deny to be like writing what he wrote in France. In nineteen fifties and sixties go. No, I'm not an existential, isn't it was like come on, yeah. But I really did like reading that stuff every time you think you get it, you then try to sort of apply to something else or to understand in some of context just slips away from you. It's it just constantly slipping through your fingers. it's really interesting. I really liked reading about it, and and there are definitely times. I mean especially right now. When you know one of the basic ideas? commutes ideas was like you just have to embrace the absurdity of existence like there's nothing else like you if you if you try to. You know if you try to run away and believe in some other system or that something else has some kind of meaning. You're just fooling yourself. You're committing. Suicide and you just have to live on this knife's edge where you are simultaneously. Understanding and internalizing the idea that that nothing has any meaning, and then also like choosing essentially to make that have make things have meaning out. You make meaning out of that meaninglessness. Right it's. It's the the process of meaning making and standing on that that cliff of. Faith and I guess nihilism and trying to to balance and not fall off into. Despair as they say into oblivion yeah. I mean that's the thing is like before Michael. The demon you know is correctly understands how a process what he's going through. He's basically just this shell. Who who just is like staring at into the void, and that's not a good way to live either right, so it's like it's just okay well, if that's how you feel like, choose to do something else and then choose to do something else and just keep making choices, and that's all you have, and you know I think everyone is going through some version of that right now, however, their own. They're processing it themselves It's just that the you know those guys and. Predicted or or put a name to this you know eighty years before the entire world went through the same thing simultaneously. I? Don't know if what I'm GonNa say is going to hurt or help but screw it. Do you know what's really happening right now? You're learning what it's like to human. All humans are aware of death. So. We're all a little bit sad. All the time. That's just the deal. CRAPPY DEAL! Well yeah, it is, but we don't get offered any other ones, and if you try and ignore, your sadness just ends up leaking out of you anyway. I been there in. Everybody's been there, so don't fight it. In the words of a very wise bed bath, and beyond employee I once knew..

Michael Yeah Michael TA Dubai Michael Danson Scherzer Ted Danson Ernest Becker Sheldon Solomon Michael Kick Vegas midlife Niki Black Eleanor Kristen Camus Samba Cha Janette Harper France Jeanette
"sheldon solomon" Discussed on The Adventures of Memento Mori

The Adventures of Memento Mori

11:00 min | 9 months ago

"sheldon solomon" Discussed on The Adventures of Memento Mori

"Are there any other species of animals all the planet that have suicidal tendencies. Most likely not back in New Jersey at the kitchen table with John Gun there are use social species like ants and bees. That die I to protect their their group. But it's not really suicide. There's a cognitive floor. You have to hit to a certain extent to be able to die by suicide and animals simply don't have the intelligence eligible to do. So would you say is like consciousness. yeah you have to understand when you have to understand that you exist in that you're going to die you have to understand how to implement your own death You have to understand what death is. All life forms in nature from bacteria to be chimpanzees are hardwired for survival at all costs except US Homo. sapiens who display the paradoxical anomaly of voluntarily taking our own lives ponder this did are forging forefathers have suicidal tendencies four his suicide a byproduct of human cognitive evolution or a byproduct of civilization itself. So if we are as All other animal species designed for survival. Why would we commit suicide? So if you look at neurological research if you injure someone to something that's painful physically to someone at activates certain areas of the brain if you then put them through a situation where they're ostracized. Mr rejected socially it activates similar neural networks. Physical pain would physical and emotional pain can stimulate the same parts of the brain. Say for example. You put your hand over a flame. The neural network get stimulated and the brain tells your hand via the pain. Ouch and it moves now. Now imagine a psychological fire. The same neural network get stimulated as before and pain is still generated but this time there's no hand to pull away from that emotional flame and the pain continues on and so my argument is that we are really attuned to social rejection because we're a highly social species and so interpersonal loss social rejection activates pain and that pain builds and let's psychological pain is what actually really causes us to die by suicide. We want escape the pain. It sounds obvious. But that's simple. reframing instantly changed the way I viewed suicide people don't want to die why they want relief from their pain in the last episode we talked about the happiness industrial oh complex how governments and corporations monitor and measure our emotional states through technology for National Security and Prophet in addition to that society Zaidi willingly accepts the fact that the Buhl in the facebook collect our personal data so much data that they know what we're going to do before we do now l.. Ponder this since they already have the data you think they should use that information for good to help identify somebody in need to significantly enhance suicide research to possibly save a light in the meantime. Here's the data. We currently have through good old fashioned academic research. So the number one predictor of. You'RE GONNA die by suicide. As if you've had a previous attempt this is based on the interpersonal psychology theory of suicide that argues that people who die by suicide aside having acquired capacity for it. You have to be able to stare down fear of death and you have to be able to to a certain extent you have to have increased pain tolerance because you know we make it look easy in media we make it look easy and movie and television trials but suicide is actually difficult you know. Your body's biologically geared to survive So there's fear fear there's pain So people who die by suicide typically have repeated exposure to self injury. They have made previous attempts. Just because they've acquired fire. The ability to actually enact least self harm is there more likelihood of teenagers committing suicide than you say. Mature adults in their thirties to fifties. no-show the greatest risk is actually later in life. A teenagers do attempt more so there is is a significantly greater attempt number amongst adolescents high-school college on put the death by suicide really. Your prime risk age is midlife is his men in their mid life into older ages in the worm at the core episode we spoke with my Philosophical Spirit Animal Sheldon Solomon who explained that the more labels we identify with the easier it is for the perception of ourselves and our world view to be manipulated and distorted win. Death is made salient. So I've been trying my handed some Buddhist practices for the last few months detaching from the unnecessary labels detri- being a self identification expoliation. So to speak but I do identify as a man my preferred pronouns are he him his and mathematically I am midlife putting me in the highest risk group so for every three male deaths by suicide. There's one female death by suicide. It's pretty significant. Yeah and then it actually flips in the opposite for attempt so women attempt at almost a three to one ratio. They attempt three times more than men but they die. Less often is because because men or the talking method here to do men just to use guns more typically males use more. I hate to use the term effective but more lethal means So firearms for example. Something like seventy five percent of firearm firearm first attempts are fatal so men do typically use more lethal methods and firearms is the biggest contributor to suicide in the United States in fact if and we often ignore it when we talk about mass shootings and gun control but The mask the vast majority of people who die by the gun violence in the US or suicide not murder order not mass shootings. So that argument I would assume from the NRA or the gun lobbyists or gun supporters nurses that they would have found a another way anyway they would shoot themselves in the head there. Then there's GonNa jump off a bridge anyway so that that's what they argue that the evidence doesn't doesn't actually support it. What the evidence does support? Is that if you restrict access in one method you don't tend to see increased rates in another method but does controlling access to potential methods of suicide like guns infringe on the rights of others. Is it a case of addressing the symptoms and not the real issues. You can't be borne being more prone to being suicidal than that others. So there is to a certain extent genetic influence But it's not as it's not particularly strong but there is increased risk of suicide if you've had prep apparent die by suicide or Kalou Sibling as most behavioral scientists will tell you it's hard to differentiate the impact of genetics vettix from the impact of environment. There is some predisposition Most likely to to the development of mental illnesses which contribute to death by suicide is there is a correlation between mental illness of some type Depends on who you ask so. The majority of the research finds that suicide occurs in in the presence of a mental illness at a very high degree of ninety ninety five percents of the bigger theorists in the field which is algae would argue. You always have a mental illness when you die by suicide but there's no real causal link So we know suicide. Mental illness are interwoven but mental. Illness doesn't call suicide because the majority of people who have mental illness don't die by suicide in the majority may not even suffer suicidal thoughts. Is there a correlation with people that are recovering from serious trauma with yes. There is some research with regards to combat exposure. There's elevated rates of suicide typically amongst people who've faced childhood sexual abuse so trauma does play a role again. I think it's probably just one factor of many that contribute to death by suicide. The inability how to reach out for help is another contributing factor particularly for men in Midlife. I started this episode by saying that suicide hadn't hadn't impacted my life but I discovered last week that it nearly did. I was on the phone with my dad. Giving him the low down on this episode recapping capping my conversation with John Gun and then I made a bad joke about being in the High Risk Group of suicide in America normally he laughs at my bad jokes but this time he didn't didn't this time there was an awkward silence. He broke it by telling me that he had been suicidal in Midlife at the same age that I am now he shared how divorce disability loneliness helplessness and a general lack of purpose in life drove him to want to end it uh. He shared the time. He attempted to jump off a bridge and how for year every night he slept with a loaded shotgun and every night he had had to convince himself not to pull the trigger. Most alarming is that he thought he didn't have anybody to talk about it and now twenty five years later her realizes that he just didn't know how my dad didn't pull the trigger but many others do and so I share the story because because well my dad asked me to. He encourages those who find themselves struggling with suicidal thoughts and have a difficult time communicating emotion to take take that first step in asking for help. He also encourages friends and families to pay attention to possible signs because as will learn after the break death by suicide may be far more common than you think and Palos feller provocateurs that believe death is topic was talking about. We need your help spreading the word Viva slightly odd yet. Endlessly Fascinating conversationalist at your next party and tell your friends about the adventures of Memento Mori have show show ideas. Contact us on site. Remember to die DOT COM. Be Sure to stay up to date with the quest for enlightenment on Instagram and twitter by following doing at remember to die and now back to the show.

John Gun Midlife United States New Jersey NRA twitter Sheldon Solomon facebook Palos feller Memento Mori National Security Zaidi murder America seventy five percent twenty five years
"sheldon solomon" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:37 min | 11 months ago

"sheldon solomon" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Of immortality is a human response to a terrifying idea the fact that one day we will die. we just spoke with psychology Sheldon Solomon he talked about how this fear shapes our actions often without us being aware of it. now we have it from psychology in politics to religion and history as we explore ways people have tried to resolve their fears. I guide is Stephen cave he is the author of immortality the quest to live forever and how would drive civilization. much of the book revolves around a philosophical conundrum that Stephen calls the mortality paradox we know we will die but Connolly imagine being dead it's impossible to imagine not existing. if you think of trying to imagine being dead you might imagine being in some other place you might imagine looking down on your own funeral but it all of these imaginings. under a kind of observing hi your somehow still there as the observer and that makes it very very Holland. to truly believe that we will completely cease to exist and the staff will give us a paradox on the one hand these enormous brains of us tell us that mortality that death is inevitable but at the same time when we try to imagine being that we find is impossible I'm not brains reject it. you argue in the book that we find four distinct ways and have found these four distinguished throughout human history to resolve this mortality paradox you say we come up with these immortality narratives for techniques that have been used in some ways to to sort of bridge the divide of this paradox I want to talk about them one by one look at some historical examples of how each of these narratives has been employed how they're employed in contemporary times but also some of the potential problems with each of these mortality narratives tell me about tell me about the first one that's right there of course the the fear of death and the realization of death is is universal that you find in all human cultures and in all human cultures we find these stories and the strivings he's imaginings for how we can overcome death or or avoid death and even though there appears to be an enormous diversity of views I think they actually fit into four basic poured categories on the first of them the most obvious says all right we know life has this body is this sort of human organism on this world the easiest and best way to stay alive forever is just not to die in the first place. now on the one hand this might sound very implausible when we look at the. extent to which death and disease and aging a part of everyday reality get it the same time almost every culture in human history has some kind of story of an elixir of life for fountain of youth or something that can enable us to just keep going in these bodies in this world forever. so these ideas have been explored at length in popular culture and movies in the nineteen ninety two movie death becomes her Meryl Streep plays a self absorbed actress who wants to stay young and beautiful so she visits the mysterious woman played by Isabella Rossellini who offers her a glowing purple liquid..

Sheldon Solomon Stephen cave one hand one day
"sheldon solomon" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:56 min | 11 months ago

"sheldon solomon" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Sock to punish women who have broken the norms of that culture. of course there could be other explanations for this behavior so Sheldon is co authors decided to conduct a new experiment the reason that if they were right the same forces driving judges to treat sex workers harshly would also produce another effect when people are reminded of death they should also want to reward those who exemplify the norms of the community if somebody does something that's in accord with your belief system then being reminded of death should make you like them more so in a subsequent study we had participants either think about themselves dying or something on pleasant and then we showed them a newspaper article about a citizen who thwarted a bank robbery and we just ask them what how much monetary reward should the citizen receive in the control condition it was about a thousand dollars and in the death condition it was over three thousand dollars so I want to talk about a couple of other studies as well just to lay out the terrain here and what's interesting is that the studies have been conducted in many different countries you once Aust Germans about their preferences in food cars and vacations and some were interviewed in a retail setting and others were interviewed in front of a cemetery what did you what did you find yes this is a a great study for a few reasons we didn't do it and that makes it better because one other researchers can replicate your findings that's always important for scientific purposes it also used a very clever manipulation one way that we remind people that they're going to die is to just ask them how they feel about it a more subtle way is to stop people either in front of a funeral parlor or a hundred meters to either side and our thought was that if you're in front of a funeral parlor particularly in Germany where they often have them bomb corpses in the window what death should be on your mind. even if it's hidden from your own awareness and sure enough Germans reminded of their mortality become more supportive of buying German goods they also sit closer to fellow Germans and further away from other folks who looked like Turkish immigrants. so one of the things that I think would surprise people is not the thesis that death is terrifying but the idea that the terror of death has such widespread ramifications and effects in our lives and I'm wondering if you could just address this in some ways it is a form of criticism of your theory it's one thing to say yes you know we have concerns about death but how do you go from there to saying that this actually has a profound role in almost everything that we think say and do yeah people dismiss backer for being brought to the point of grandiose when he said that anxiety about is essential leave the central driver of what it is that motivates us as human beings when you talk to people about Becker's ideas will be like this is crazy I don't think about death all the time and doctors view is that you don't think about death all the time because you're comfortably embedded in your cultural world view in a way that offers you from death thanks ID by virtue of the fact that you feel like you're a person of value in a world of meaning. the idea here is that even though the anxiety about death is ever present we are largely oblivious to it because our mental defenses are strong we sued ourselves with our anthems and our rituals and our conviction that all religion is the best. one way these defenses are breached is when we come into contact with people different than us people who have their own beliefs. now we must either accepted believe suggests that believes or we must try to establish that our beliefs are better if I X. up let's say the full lawn a and Molly who say the earth was created out of a giant drop of milk well that undermines the veracity of the Judeo Christian account that were god created heaven and earth in six days what Becker said therefore is that when we encounter people who are different we tend to belittle them we tend to try to convince or coerce them to dispose of their ideas or we just Callum thus proving that our god and our ideas are better after all. Sheldon Solomon and other terror management terrace also find that people have a second kind.

Sheldon Solomon three thousand dollars thousand dollars hundred meters six days milk
"sheldon solomon" Discussed on Hidden Brain

Hidden Brain

01:43 min | 11 months ago

"sheldon solomon" Discussed on Hidden Brain

"But what little the interesting twist in this story is that around the same time there is a legend in Japan about a man who came from China with a boatload of provisions and soldiers so I'm not sure if they mentioned the virgins and to brought with him a great number of technologies like agriculture and martial arts and building and many other things and that became the foundation of Japanese civilization. This story tells us two things one humans have been trying to cheat death breath for thousands of years and to the hunger for immortality is inextricably linked to human culture almost everything we think of these technologies of civilization like agriculture and Martial Arts and building and clothing and so forth are if you like life extension technologies and and so I think it's unsurprising the heart of the promise the founding promise of civilization we find the promise of immortality This promise of immortality is a human response to a terrifying idea. The fact that one day we will die last week we spoke with Psychologists Sheldon Solomon about this fear and how it shapes our actions often without us being aware of it this week we pivot from psychology and politics to religion and history as we explore the many ways people have tried to resolve their fears the path to eternal life today on hidden brain.

Martial Arts Sheldon Solomon China Japan one day
"sheldon solomon" Discussed on Hidden Brain

Hidden Brain

11:39 min | 11 months ago

"sheldon solomon" Discussed on Hidden Brain

"It might be difficult to see how this is connected to onus Bekker's ideas so let's slow down a minute. The central idea of terror management theory is is that we cope with the fear of death by constructing mental defenses those defenses sheldon and his co authors found tend to fall into a couple of patterns. What's the first main line of defense when we have prompted to think about death is to retreat into cultural safe havens all religions our our communities our values the idea here is that by immersing ourselves in the language and norms of our cultural groups we we become part of something that is less mortal the groups that will outlive us when the judges were reminded of them tally they became in a way more conservative conservative in their morality. This sought to punish women who had broken the norms of their culture of course they could be other explanations for this behavior so sheldon co-authors decided to conduct a new experiment the reason that if they will write the same forces driving judges to treat sex workers harshly would also produce another effect when people are reminded of death. This should also want to reward those who exemplify by the norms of the community. If somebody does something that's in accord with your belief system then being reminded of death should make you like them more pursuing a subsequent study we had participants either think about themselves dying or something unpleasant and then we showed them a newspaper article about a citizen who thwarted a bank robbery and we just asked them well. How much monetary rewards should the citizen receive in the control all condition it was about a thousand dollars and in the death condition. It was over three thousand dollars so I WANNA talk about a couple of other the studies as well just to lay out the terrain here and what's interesting is that these studies have been conducted in many different countries you wants US Germans about their preferences in food food cars and vacations and some were interviewed in a retail setting and others were interviewed in front of a cemetery. What did you what did you find yes. This is a great study. for few reasons we didn't do it and that makes it better because when other researchers can replicate your findings that's always important written for scientific purposes it also used a very clever manipulation and so one way the we remind people that they're going to die as to it. Just ask them how they feel about it. A more subtle way is to stop people either in front of a funeral parlor or hundred meters to either side are thought was is that if you're in front of a funeral parlor particularly in Germany where they often have embalmed corpses in the window will death should be on your mind and even if it's hidden from your own awareness and sure enough Germans reminded of their mortality but come more supportive of of buying German goods they also sit closer to fellow Germans and further away from other folks who look like Turkish immigrants so one of the things that I think would surprise people is not the thesis that death is terrifying but the idea that the terror of death has such widespread ramifications nations and effects in our lives and I'm wondering if you could just address this in some ways. It is a form of criticism of your theory It's one thing to say yes. You know we have concerns about death breath. But how do you go from there to saying that. This actually has a profound role in almost everything that we think Sandu Yeah people dismissed backer acker for being broad to the point of grandiose when he said that anxiety about is essentially the central driver of what it is that motivates us is human beings when you talk to people about backers ideas. They'll be like this is crazy Z. I don't think about all the time and duckers view is that you don't think about all the time because you're comfortably embedded in your cultural worldview in a way that buffers you from death anxiety by virtue of the fact that you feel like you're a person of value you want a world of meaning. The idea here is that even though the anxiety about death is ever present. We are largely oblivious to it because our mental defenses are strong. We sued ourselves with our anthems and our rituals and our conviction that our religion is the best one one way these defenses are breached is when we come into contact with people different than us and people who have their own beliefs now we must either accept zapped believe suggests that beliefs or we must try to establish that our beliefs are better. If your beliefs about reality served to minimize death anxiety will then when you run into somebody who's different. That's a problem because if I accept let's say the Fulani Lana and Molly who say the earth was created out of a giant drop of milk will that undermines the veracity of the Judeo a Christian Account God created heaven and earth than six days. What Beker said therefore is that when we encounter people who are different we we tend to belittle them. We tend to try to convince or coerce them to dispose of their ideas or we just kill him. The thus proving that our God and our the idea soup better after all when we come back we explore how these ideas play out in politics support for hidden brain and the following message come from rocket mortgage by quicken loans imagine and how it feels to have an award winning team of mortgage experts make the home buying process smoother for you with a history of industry leading online lending technology rockette mortgage is changing the game visit rocket mortgage dot com slash brain equal housing lender licensed in all fifty states and m l last consumeraccess asks DOT ORG number thirty thirty rocket mortgage by quicken loans push-button get mortgage support also comes from nature's way maker of SAMBUC elderberry elderberry dummies nature's way believes nature knows best. This is why they've spent fifty years seeking out wellness solutions to help you be your best self. They travel all the world to places like Austria where elderberry are grown at the perfect altitude and hand picked at their peak nature's way. It's not just our way. It's nature's away find out more today at nature's way DOT com. This is heading brain. I'm Sean Covey Danton. We've seen how people respond to the fear of death by clinging more tightly to aspects of that Culture Sheldon Solomon and other terror management theories also find that people have a second kind of response to the fear of death. Ba- find ways to boost their own self esteem besides saying Mike Culture is superior. My nation is the best. My religion is the most profound the also say I'm the best. I'm better looking than other people. I'm smarter. Moder- I'm richer. We call it self esteem striving and so for example. I think the first study was by our re. Todman and Ben Ari in Israel and the participants were Israeli soldiers and they measured the extent to which the soldier self esteem mm-hmm was based on their driving prowess. I don't know if you've been to Israel but they are very maniacal. I say this with love and respect and then then they put them on a driving simulator and they measured how fast and how recklessly the soldiers drove and gone the good news is in the control condition. The soldiers drove quite modestly when they were reminded of their mortality. I I the soldiers who self esteem was based on their driving skills they drove faster and more recklessly closely other studies have shown that skin divers reminded of their mortality they say they would stay underwater in more dangerous weather her or when they were running out of oxygen people who value their basketball skill when they're reminded of their mortality they actually shoot better at the foul-line people that think they're strong if you give them something to squeeze when you remind them of their mortality they actually squeeze harder so these are just different demonstrations demonstration's that we shore up our self esteem in response to existential anxieties isn't there something ironic about the studies involving the skin divers averse and the Israeli drivers where reminders of Mortality Causes People to act in ways that increase their risk for mortality. Yes is that not a poignant. We wrote a book chapter wants death can be hazardous to your health and our point was very simply that because our primary goal psychologically is to maintain a sense of meaning and value there are times when we will do do that even at the expense of our physical safety so one of the studies that our students. Jamie Goldenberg and Jamie aren't did is is really remarkable where they showed that when people in Florida who self esteem is dependent on their appearance Sir in a world where being tan is considered beautiful while when those folks were reminded of their mortality a few minutes minutes later when they were asked. Oh next time you go to the beach. How long will you stay in the sun. And what kind of sunscreen will you use well. Those folks said they would stay out longer and use weaker sunscreen so here they are trying to boost self esteem in a way that could ultimately terminate them. I'm with cancer. I'm wondering one of the insights in in in these studies is that what we really try to avoid is actually not death but the fear of death and it's interesting and instructive that you've named your theory terror management theory as opposed to death management theory. It's not about avoiding death. It's about avoiding being the fear of death yes. I think you're quite right but in fairness backer he says at the beginning of the denial of death that death is in fact fact a complex multidimensional construct and people fear it. He claimed we all do but we may fear it for different different reasons and there is good evidence to suggest that for some it's really not the prospect of being dead. The Real L. Horror is to be privy to the moments when we're in the process of that transition itself.

Sheldon Solomon Israel onus Bekker robbery US Jamie Goldenberg Sean Covey Danton DOT acker Germany Beker Molly Austria Ba Mike Culture Todman Florida Ben Ari three thousand dollars thousand dollars
"sheldon solomon" Discussed on Hidden Brain

Hidden Brain

07:30 min | 11 months ago

"sheldon solomon" Discussed on Hidden Brain

"Support for NPR comes from national car rental who wants you to know that with a membership in our complimentary Emerald Club you can skip the counter and and choose any car in the aisle at participating national locations. You can even select an upgrade without paying extra learn more at national car dot com slash. NPR When Sheldon Solomon was eight years old his mother told him about death. This was the day before my grandmother other died of cancer and I remember my mom sank to me. Oh say goodbye to grandma because she's very ill and I knew that but then she died ride the next day and I just remember because I was looking at postage snaps that I collected at the time of dead presidents and I was like Wow Washington stead Jefferson's Jefferson's dead grandma step that would be fine except for me being on duck in the long run sheldon realize that one day his time would also come decades later. That story reemerged in his life. He was a young professor at Skidmore College. He was searching for a book in the library when something in the fraud section caught his eye but was a book by a recently deceased cultural anthropologist Ernest Becker and that one was called the birth and death of meaning than in the first paragraph Becker says I want to understand what makes people act the way they do and I said Oh me too. Finally somebody not writing turgid jargon. That's a non pharmacological intervention for insomnia just asking a straightforward straightforward question you know what makes people act the way that they do show some more books on the shelf by the same author site grab the next book the denial Nihil of Death and again the first paragraph Becca writes the idea of death. The fear of it haunts the human animal like nothing else else. It is a main spring of human activity and in my gut that brought me way back to being eight years old I I I knew that that statement was at the very least true for my own life and suspected that it was true for most folks looks as well. Sheldon reached out to friends. Tom Presents key and Jeff Greenburg like him. They were young psychologists. All three of them fell in love with Ernest Becker books. The central idea captivated them was that people construct mental defenses to ward it off the fear of death. The three psychologists wrote up a paper elaborating on this concept. They would eventually call this idea terror management theory. They sent off their paper to a top journal certain they were going to rock the world of psychology. We didn't hear anything for about six months and then we got the review in the paper was rejected with a one sentence review. The reviewer said something along the lines of I have no doubt that that these ideas are of no interest whatsoever any psychologists alive or dead so this is a bit of a blow well well Jeff and Tom said Oh. I don't think they like it and be an even more immature than they. I said no they love it. They're just being coy but it turns out they weren't because the same paper was then rejected at almost every psychology journal sometime in later the researchers ran into the president of the American Psychological Association at a conference and the asked him why the people had been rejected and we just said hey we you think these are good ideas to which he replied they might be but psychology is an empirical discipline. you guys are experimental. Boura mountains psychologists and so why not try to gather evidence in support of Bekker's claims and it was in response onced to that suggestion that we generated what we call terror management theory which is basically just our effort to take all of Bekker's is ideas to generate hypotheses that we could subject to empirical scrutiny so one of the criticisms of Becker as you alluded to a second ago is that his work was not empirical he was making claims that he didn't have evidence for he was making these these intuitive leaps involving logic and philosophy but they won't based John on empirical data and experimentation and and you set out to try and fix that one of your first experiments involve judges in Tucson Hooah dealing with prostitutes prostitutes. Tell me about the study what found sure certainly so you know a nutshell. What terror management theory states is that the uniquely glee human awareness of death gives rise potentially debilitating existential terror that we manage hence the term terror management management by embracing culturally constructed belief systems that give us each a sense that life has meaning and we have value and as you? I said what would people said back in the days in the nineteen eighties as well you know this is philosophical and psychoanalytic speculation. What we reason does is that if becker is right if our beliefs about reality serve to minimize death anxiety won't let's see what happens if we remind that some people of their own mortality because what should happen is they should cling more likely to their beliefs so the first study was is done on municipal court judges in Tucson Arizona. I think we had about thirty judges and we randomly divided them into two groups have for the judges judges were reminded of their mortality by in the middle of a bunch of questionnaires being asked to just write down their thoughts and feelings about their own mortality mortality and then we show them actual court case of an alleged prostitute which was the most common crime. Tucson's municipal court at the time and we just ask them well. How much bail would you set. That's the amount of money that you have to pay to not be imprisoned until your trial. So what we found is in the control roll condition. The judges set an average bail of fifty dollars and that was good because that was the average bail for that crime at the time however the judge is reminded that they were going to die. they set a nine times higher bail an average of four hundred and fifty five dollars in what was astonishing is not only the magnitude of that difference but also the vociferousness the judges resistance when we told them at the end of the study what we had done. They just said there's no way that your idiot death questionnaire could could have in any way altered the way that. I objected this particular case so I guess the tail message as if you're going to court for a traffic ticket you better hope that the judge hasn't driven past the summit. Jerry on the way to court that day.

Ernest Becker Sheldon Solomon NPR Jeff Greenburg Tom Tucson Emerald Club Skidmore College Jefferson Becca fraud professor American Psychological Associa Jerry Washington Tucson Hooah president Bekker Arizona
"sheldon solomon" Discussed on The Adventures of Memento Mori

The Adventures of Memento Mori

11:08 min | 1 year ago

"sheldon solomon" Discussed on The Adventures of Memento Mori

"Palos feller provocateurs believe death is a topic was talking about. We need your help spreading. The would be the slightly off yet endlessly fascinating conversationalist at your next party and tell you friends about the adventures of memento Mori have show ideas, contact us on all site. Remember to die dot com. Be sure to stay up to date with the quest for Lightman on Instagram and Twitter by following at remember today. And now back to the show. Earlier in the show I was talking with Sheldon Solomon about the theory, Ernest Becker discusses in his book denial of death. The idea that in an effort to manage existential terror brought on by self-awareness, we created stories in which we or some version of us survived death. One of the most widely shared beliefs despite religion is cartesian duality. The idea, the consciousness is separate from the fragility of the body, otherwise known as the sole. Again, a lot of bekker's ideas come from auto wrong. In one of his books said, the soul was created in the big bang of irresistible psychological force. Our will to live forever colliding with the immutable biological fact of death. That's why every culture, regardless of how disparate they appear to be has some kind of soul concept. Rocks point is this is if you have an immutable essence, that's detachable from your physical carcass than you know, you can hedge all of your bets with regards to the prospect. That's that meant yourself can persist over time even if you're no longer here, bodily is the sole really just man's invention. What do you think it's time for my favorite segment of the show. Honest report. Sim- nosy, couple of deaths related questions to start the week of. Right. Do you believe that people have souls spirits? Yes, I do. I'm not exactly sure what that means, but I think there's an essence, a core of people. And and that is the spirit. And then the body is not that in the mind is not that, but it's something else think people can't have souls, but I'm not sure I'm not positive do if they do. What do you think happens to these souls spirits after we die, I've been thinking about like recreation and everything. I think that might be possibility. Well, I'm not sure I have the answer. Anyone does. No one has returned from death, but a do believe. I like to believe in the idea. Bryan carnation the more that I learn about reincarnation. The more that I am on board with that and and the idea of coming to earth in another body and experiencing that intil enlightenment is found maybe layment by all beings. I think that makes sense to me. Thank you Ruthie since Buddhists don't believe in God or an afterlife. I asked Trudy if they believed in a soul, what's a soul for you? Why? Why would you even need it or ask questions about it? What's important that you're missing? As a saying goes, when interviewing is in Buddhist, priest expect Sinn Buddhist answers, but when interviewing Christian pastor. So what is the Christian belief in the soul, get a biblical answer the Christian belief of the soul of minder standing in just a preface, everything. My foundation, an anchor of all the questions that I would try. My best to answer is of course, the biblical text Reggie Stutzman pastor of relaxed in the South Bronx. Welcome back to show. Great. Thanks for having me. Yeah. Awesome. So you're the voice. Very scary thing. Back to the Christian perspective of soul, and Jesus said to love the Lord God with all your heart, your soul, in your strength. So there's an understanding that just as God and I believe in the trinity, God the father, God, the son, God, the Holy Spirit, that there's also three parts of us, spirit, soul, and body. So we, we are try Yoon being of spirit, soul and body. The soul of a person is just their their emotional makeup if you will. But the spirit is, is that part of the human being that then would go on into the afterlife? Okay, very good vacation. Yeah, because I think often I think that would be across the board of any belief system. We have where human beings that have soul of our our anger, our love are all the things that we could say are. Are quote unquote, solich. But that is not what would move on to the next life. It would be our our spirit being that is also inside of us. Before we go any further here are the Christian basics. First Janati is the world's most practised religion. Its teachings are centered around Jesus. A carbon was born two thousand years ago in modern day Palestine. Jesus is considered the incarnation of God or the son of God. Christians believe he died for the sins of all mankind and rose from the dead. Like most religions, there are very Asians and pastor Reggie is a minister of the assemblies of God denomination. So can you explain for for the audience? What? What God is imperative that Ovation's assemblies have got his Pentecostal evangelical denomination. One of the largest in the country. Basically, Fogo spol- spirit filled. Denomination. The reason why chose these symbols of God perspective instead of say, Catholicism is because that was my childhood church. If you've ever seen the movie Jesus camp, that was my life, the rapture speaking in tongues and the whole ball of gospel wax. Okay. So we want to talk about the spirit versus so. So. Hypothetical, I'm on my deathbed. I'm in the final stages. Said, all you say to the chaplain and then it's time to make the transition into the afterlife. What is what does that look like with the Christian belief system? First of all, Jesus said that you have to love God with all your heart, your soul, in your strength. So. The beginning of all of this, the Genesis of all, this is having a relationship with God and the bible defines a relationship with God as the belief in him along with the confessions of our sins. So first of all, the word is the doorway for the afterlife, and there's clear verses in the bible that says that when we believe in Jesus Christ, that when we die, whether it's a car accident or cancer, or whenever our time is up. That when we have that relationship which is Christ, we have a guarantee that our spirit men will then be absent from our body, our bodies just tent temporary housing for the for the real man if you will, for the real inner being the real person side of you, if you will, to then. Split and be present with Lord. And and then what is present in the Lord in heaven. For a time being? Yes, I think what. To a lot of Christians. There needs to be some clarity of what does happen when you die. And I think a lot of people have different beliefs within that framework. To the Catholic. It's premature that you're there in heaven for time, whether you're center or a Saint to the Protestant to to my side of Christianity, faith, if you will, that when we have a relationship with Jesus Christ. The bible tells us that when we meet him at the pearly gates. So there's year. So there's here in Saint Peter's sitting there with the log of and he's like, looking down that and he's like checking for chicken names. Yeah, all t. Yeah. Is that describe any words of my? I just said in the in the book of life, there's actually. Forgive me for not knowing the exact location of the verse, but there there's actually a reference to two books. One is the book of life where all those names are recorded in the book of life that have been predestined by God. And then the bible says that there are other books are laid out of what we have done on earth. So as long as our name is written in the book of life and Peter, whoever's checking the names off, and if we get to those pearly gates and those names are checked because we have gained access into heaven because of our relationship with Lord. The bible says that we will meet with him and he will say, well, done that good and faithful servant. So in the meantime. What's some asked me this in comparison to a possibly stereotypical version of heaven. Pearly gates for started with Peter, checking off the name of life. So we make it. Better relationship with with God. We made into the book network through the pearly gates.

Jesus Reggie Stutzman Holy Spirit Sheldon Solomon Palos feller Ernest Becker Twitter Peter bekker Lightman Fogo spol Bryan carnation Sinn Ruthie Trudy Yoon South Bronx Ovation
"sheldon solomon" Discussed on The Adventures of Memento Mori

The Adventures of Memento Mori

06:23 min | 1 year ago

"sheldon solomon" Discussed on The Adventures of Memento Mori

"Most chaplains, it's very important to have your own religion to have a foundation with own religion, but you're not, you're not pushing that Ford just need that in a way for yourself because the worker, so emotional. At the end of our conversation. During the last episode, the act of dine chaplain and then Buddhist priest. Trudy Hirsch Abramson suggested that I would make a good chaplain. You're interested in people your questions and, and your way of being personable. It's really nice recruiting numbers may have been down, but since most of my significant life choices are made from peer pressure dares and flattery, I'm actually looking into it. The problem is and it's a fairly big problem. I don't have my own religion and to complicate things even more according to Wikipedia, it's estimated that there are currently right now in two thousand eighteen four thousand and two hundred different religions. That's a lot of podcast episodes. So instead of forty, two hundred in three part series called the myths of immortality. I'll be exploring perspectives of the afterlife from the viewpoint of six major religions. Contrary to the way this setup sounds, I will not be handing a rose to the winning religion. Picking one is not the point at least going into it. I actually have no idea how this whole thing is going to end. The point is to simply get educated. If you're the curious type with an open mind, please join me as I speak with a priest, pastor a priestess, a monk and Amman and a rabbi to get a deeper understanding of their beliefs and Beuys on what happens after we die. We begin this series with Jesus and the Buddha in part one of the myths of immortality. From the Jones story company. This is the adventures of memento Mori a cynics guide for learning to live by remembering to dark the podcast that explores mortality, here's your host. DS moss. Back in one of season two psychologists, Sheldon. Solomon makes an interesting argument. He suggests that religion and the concept of an afterlife the myths of immortality as he calls them are narratives created by mankind in order to alleviate the terror of our own in permanence I mean, that does make sense. Imagine for a second year, the new self-aware species on the block and you catch a bad case of the existential dreads. What do you do? What any talking software bipedal with an imagination would do create a story in which you or some version of you survives death. Duster hands. Problem solved. Is there evidence of win this behavior began as Feige ultimately. Did we come winter, become self aware back with philosophical spirit animal Sheldon Solomon? Yeah, good question right. To be silly. I wish I could answer it if I could. I be chugging out of coconut on my beach, the Nobel prize somewhere. Of course, mental processes leave no fossil records. But scholars do agree that something incredibly significant happened to the home sapiens around one hundred and fifty thousand years ago. It's known as the cultural big bang a relatively simultaneous appearance of art language, body, dormant, and most significantly in the context of this episode ritual burials certainly ritual burials with grave. Good, you know, like pyramids and stuff where people are buried with their servants with their putts with musical instruments with incredibly wash, just food and alcohol. The event is that those are relatively clear signs of immortality, beliefs and interwoven with these immortality. Beliefs are the cultivation of mythical narratives, aka religion. What a lot of folks claim as that mythical narratives would not have been sustainable in the absence of of physical reality that kind of made those notions concrete meaning in order for mythical narratives to stick. They also needed to be supported by rituals. One way of describing rituals the in our book, we talk about rituals as wishful thinking in action. I actually just googled bizarre rituals to see if I could find a ritual that wasn't wishful thinking and action Sheldon's right? I couldn't. I also can't. See the incredibly weird shit. I just saw everything's going well. There's like no need for a ritual if the crops are well irrigated because it's raining and you don't really need a rain dance and and it's only when things are not going well, particularly in life threatening circumstances. The rituals arise essentially in order to do something, but we're shit is understandable when your daily life is consumed with surviving famine, weather, catastrophes, war disease, and sabertooth Tigers. It makes sense that we'd create myths of immortality to exert control over a world that is alternately uncontrollable, and it's that logic that leaves me in my current state of religion. Louis blind faith in the supernatural is not my strong suit. So then that's the conflict. How can you help people transition over as chaplain if you don't believe in a God.

Sheldon Solomon Solomon Trudy Hirsch Abramson sabertooth Tigers Ford Nobel prize Amman Mori Feige Wikipedia Jones Beuys Louis fifty thousand years
"sheldon solomon" Discussed on The Adventures of Memento Mori

The Adventures of Memento Mori

06:51 min | 2 years ago

"sheldon solomon" Discussed on The Adventures of Memento Mori

"We do use the turn total body failure. That's what this is. That's one way you could define death. It is total body failure. In the previous episode, I sat down with my philosophical spirit. Animal psychologist Sheldon Solomon to discuss how the fear of death influences just about everything that people do the worm at the core of consciousness. If you haven't listened to it already, please do. But here's the spoiler okay. Now you realize the reality of the human condition. You like all other creatures or finite mortal. And when you let the real anxiety of that realization sinking to the point where momentarily, shatters these belief systems that you in voluntarily adopted then. And then can you start to kind of metaphor the reconstruct yourself where you have a hand in choosing your loan meanings and your own values. Reminds me of something. My grandpa used to say, come to terms with death thereafter. Everything is Gucci never want to shy away from shattering involuntary belief systems. In this episode, I'm allowing death anxiety to sink in by actually dying. I frankly think it's going to be comfortable and interesting. I have my own personal spiritual beliefs and you do too. But I think it's going to be a fascinating experience in her most recent book advice for future corpses and those who love them. Sally provides a directive for how to prepare for death to include what to expect in those final moments of life. And so I've asked her to sit with me bedside and guide me through the process of my own total body failure. What do you see? What do you hear? What do you feel is a peaceful or is a painful and full of fear? If you've ever been curious about what happens in the moments of passing, then please join me on my deathbed as I transition to the other side. And so two of season to the act of dying. From the Jones story company. This is the adventures of memento Mori a cynics guide from learning to live by remembering to dark the podcast that explores mortality, here's your host DS mass. In this episode, I'm going to die. Imaginary. I'm eighty four years old and dying of natural causes chronic illness. Perhaps I'm not entirely sure what does and does not qualify as natural in modern medicine, but the main ideas that I've managed to survive the coming apocalypse and made it to the year twenty sixty without getting hit by the proverbial bus. Into life nurse, Sally TIs Dale has agreed to talk me through what I should expect in the final moments of life. The purpose of me doing this exercise is not to curate my last moments, but rather to meditate on the expiration of my body to hopefully alleviate some of that subconscious anxiety talked about in worm at the core. Okay. Here we go. Time to start dying. We begin the process that d- minus two two more days until the end. I'm lying in my bed at home, propped up by pillows with any pain controlled. You're not interested in eating? Probably haven't been interested in eating for a while. You may be having trouble swallowing anyway, and you may not feel much in the way of interest in drinking fluids. Some people are thirsty, but it's been found that there I even if they're hydrated. It's a different kind of thirst Thurston. So he probably have dry lips, dry tongue. Your mouth feels a little bit sticky. The person with you can give you a few ice chips or war wet cloth that might feel good. Hospice nurses there along with a few close friends and my future children, perhaps all five of them. Oh, how nice it is that they've set aside their differences to be here. If you're urinating it's pretty thick and dark might have a strong smell and you're not, you're not peeing very often, and your body is moving pretty slowly if at all very limited movement. You feel really profound Teague and fatigue is a specific thing where we just simply don't have the energy to do something. You're not tired. You can't find the strength to move very well by yourself. No real strong intentional movements unless there's a big emotional moment person you've been waiting for, who do you want to see more than anyone in the world. That person comes in the room. You're going to muster everything to turn toward them, but it will take everything. And so I can't talk. You might be able to talk you might or might not make any sense to the people who are listening. You might think you're talking. You might hear your own voice, but it comes out in such a whisper that others don't here. I have heard people speak coherently a few hours before they died. And for the most part, it's days before they die. When you hear the last thing. And like I said, we don't know if it feels coherent to the person who's dying. They may be saying exactly what they need to say and getting done exactly what they need to get done. It's now d. minus one. I'm no longer eating talking or have the energy to make any intentional movements. Perhaps your hands and feet are really cold. That's a very common and strong sign that deaf is close.

Gucci Sally Sheldon Solomon Dale Teague Mori Jones eighty four years
"sheldon solomon" Discussed on The Adventures of Memento Mori

The Adventures of Memento Mori

06:18 min | 2 years ago

"sheldon solomon" Discussed on The Adventures of Memento Mori

"Esteem. Thirty years and hundreds of studies later Sheldon, Jeff TOMS terror management research has shown that Becker was correct that human beings manage our fear of death through conformity of poultry standards and self esteem. Specifics to include the two thousand sixteen election. All right. After this. Hello, fellow provocateurs Aleve. Death is topic was talking about. We need your help spreading. The would be the slightly art yet endlessly fascinating conversationalist at you next patchy and tell you friends about the adventures of memento Mori have show ideas, contact us on site, remember to die dot com. Be sure to stay up to date with the quest for light on Instagram and Twitter by following at remember to die. Back to the show. We're back with experimental psychologist, Sheldon Solomon, talking about how humans manage their fear of death argument is that were bombarded with intimations of mortality and the what we have, what we claim and what we have experiments that we think demonstrates this point is whenever death is on your mind, general way that instigates an automatic process. We call these proximal defenses for the rest of your day. Count the number of times you're exposed to a death thought be at a news headline TV film podcast, nearly being hit by a car. Anything. Then at the end of the day, tweet that number and the country you live in two at remember to die with the hashtag death count and check out how you compared to the rest of the world. I bet you'll be very surprised by the number I of course, know that I have frequent death thoughts, but out of curiosity, I asked Ruthie to ask you. How many times a day do you think about death? Don't normally maybe couple once or twice a day for me. At least once occasionally twice, maybe three to five times. So you said not that often. However, it turns out it may be much more frequent than that and that we use active efforts to stop consciously thinking about death called proximal defenses. Once that happens, then instigates qualitatively different defenses and those offenses, we call this toll defenses and that those are defending your cultural worldview and boosting self esteem. An argument is that the distant defenses are designed to keep us thoughts from becoming conscious and welcome to the world of the subconscious our own personal little wizard of Oz, hiding behind the curtain and pulling all of the condition strings. In our one of our first studies, for example, we had Christian particip-. Parents at the university of Arizona. They were either reminded of their mortality or something unpleasant, and then we had them rate other fellow students who were very, very similar. This particular study is testing bekker's theory that we manage the fear of death by subscribing to constructed belief systems that we share with other people in a group that he refers to as cultural worldview. What we found was quite striking and the control condition, the Christian participants didn't differentiate between their cell. A student says a function of their religion. However, when they were asked to think about dying, I now they like fellow Christians a lot more and they dislike Jewish people a lot more and miss has nothing to do with Christianity per se. So in Israel, Jewish people reminded of death. They like Jewish people a lot more and they dislike Arabs and Christians, and this doesn't just apply to religion a race. It's true of any group belief system, your sports team. Politics, nationalism, gang affiliation. And even things like veganism that basic finding the when you minded of you like people who share your beliefs and you hate people or will harm people who are different. Well, that's been now replicated in more than twenty five countries on five continents by independent researchers. And I say that not to boast, but so much as to claim that these are very robust findings that can be tamed cross culturally. They've also been found and kids as young as nine or ten and an elderly folks as old as eighty or ninety. That's interesting. Because what boy, when my knee jerk reactions were, I guess. I suppose what I what I imagine my reaction would be to the study which is counter to that, which is if I am feeling this threat of death, then that it becomes more. At ease in that we're all in this togethers, sort of like the best of humanity. It's very romantic concept of if I feel threatened. I'm like, okay, nothing else matters role in this together, all human, but the findings are are the exact opposite. That's right now, but you do make an important point, the soap, most humans. You know, this is been described as tribal, you know, in a lot of people in the US today, say that generated to tribal mentality where it's us against them, and and so that's correct that most folks on the other hand, we have done studies for example, where we look at how people respond to them, which is

Sheldon Solomon Ruthie Jeff TOMS Becker university of Arizona Instagram US Christian particip Israel Twitter Oz Thirty years
"sheldon solomon" Discussed on The Adventures of Memento Mori

The Adventures of Memento Mori

05:34 min | 2 years ago

"sheldon solomon" Discussed on The Adventures of Memento Mori

"All fear ultimately is the fear of death. The fear of death exercise is really about connecting to your deepest darkest fears. That's Tricia Eastman a modern medicine woman who my caught up with after talk. She gave on two of my favorite topics, psychedelics and death. The most important part of the exercise is having a witness having someone else witness, your own inner dialogue related to fear, so we do it. Yeah. What we are doing is an exercise to relieving Zayed's stemming from the fear of death location, the assemblage New York City, a co working space for self exploration and discovery. It can be best described as the SoHo house of mindfulness, a social club of sorts for the beautiful. And so there I am at the assemblage. Sitting under this giant designer, drink catcher, take a moment corner, my inner dialogue and write down my death fear. Then I looked Tristian the eyes and say. I fear nothing this. I fear the black. Tricia reciprocates shares fears with me and then guides meditation in which we visualize our deaths. Start by closing your eyes. When it's time to actually die. Will be happening in ordinary living moment. Just like this. Process of dying. We'll take place now. This may sound morbid because it is, but it's based on a Buddhist Marin Assadi meditation that is actually quite common in southeast Asia, the purpose of a moron. Assadi meditation is to diminish death, anxiety of the physical body and create a sense of spiritual urgency, a memento Mori of sorts. Now. Slowly open your eyes wake up. Usually take a few t- frappes. How do you see on out. Sti- in Ben reborn. Although I see the power sharing wants death, fear, followed by Marian Assadi meditation doing the exercise just once really didn't do much to relieve the anxiety of nothingness. And so understanding that there is no quick fix for eliminating the fear of my non existence. The question then becomes, how do I recognize and control the influence, the fear of death has on my life. I named Sheldon Solomon, and I'm a professor in the psychology department. Moore college, Sheldon Solomon alone with Jeff Greenberg and Tom present sqi wrote the worm at the core on the role of death in life. We've been studying decades how the awareness of the influences just about everything that people do, what were aware of it or not mostly not aware of it. Art war religion, plastic surgery, celebrity worship, greed, mythology, prejudice, many consumers, tribalism, Instagram, ego love. Oh, according to the findings, detailed in the book are mechanisms for which humans manage the subconscious terror of mortality. Nothing like questioning the entire human narrative to start the season. Please join an episode. One of season two as we peel back the layers human behavior to see if the fear of death truly is the worm at humanity's core. From the Jones story company. This is the adventures of memento Mori a cynics guide for learning to live by remembering to dark the podcast that explores mortality, here's your host. DS moss. Welcome back to my office. Thank you. It's going to be. It's good to be back Devon Morton as you may remember from season one is my former life coach turn, death, coach turned Wasco, ego, death coach is tell me what your life has looked like since coming back from the jungle. And more importantly tell me about we left off season one in the Amazon jungle with me attempting to reach white light ego death, although that totally looted me, there was however an astonishing revelation that surfaced during the last ir Wasco ceremony. But then something even crazier happened. I started to seal vs these breadcrumbs that were totally obvious, and they led me to.

Mori Sheldon Solomon Tristian Tricia Eastman Buddhist Marin Assadi ir Wasco ceremony Tricia reciprocates Marian Assadi SoHo Devon Morton Asia New York City t- frappes Zayed Moore college Sti Amazon professor Jones Ben
"sheldon solomon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:41 min | 2 years ago

"sheldon solomon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Raise money to pay for our cryopreservation service because like it or not i'm probably going to die soon from brain cancer i've been overwhelmed by the response needless to say kim was adamant that her death would not be the end of her story she turned to the internet to raise money for what would be an extremely expensive venture she needed eighty thousand dollars to have her brain cryogenically frozen so that it might be preserved until science could find a way to bring her back to life it's not that i'm scared of dying but i don't want to die knowing that they could have done more in two thousand fifteen at the age of twenty three kim took her last breath standing outside the hospital room with two employee's from alcohol one of the biggest and most established cryopreservation companies in the us as soon as she was pronounced dead they rushed in and took over kim's body was taken to a specialized facility where they detached her head and pumped it full of cryer protectant fluid are chucked in throughout the process and then got to see her one last time before she was put into the more permanent storage right now kim's head sits in the giants steel that it shares with seven others all kept a constant temperature of minus one hundred and fifty degrees to prevent any decomposition and there she waits until science reaches a point at which she can be brought back to life at least that's the hope one day josh plans to join her hopefully if i kick the dust i will also have my brain preserved there's no one else like her that i've met so i think it'd be amazing tavern chance to talk with her again today there are around three hundred fifty corpses around the world floating in liquid nitrogen awaiting a leap in science to provide them with immortality if that's all we thought about on any given day i'm gonna die by could walk outside and get hit by a meteor basically a cold cut with an attitude i'm spam with a plan we wouldn't be able to stand up in the morning we would just be twitching blobs of biological proto possum cowering under our beds groping for large sedatives sheldon solomon is professor of psychology at skidmore college in new york he studies how the uniquely human awareness of death affects our behavior he says.

brain cancer kim us skidmore college new york josh sheldon solomon professor of psychology eighty thousand dollars fifty degrees one day
"sheldon solomon" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

Bulletproof Radio

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"sheldon solomon" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

"Every person on earth first question yes do you have all these quotes stored in your head i do i mean i take a lot of notes on the notes application my iphone i tend to transcribe and write things down that inspire me particularly if a quote is well written i feel like a half to transcribe it so i take notes and i write down musings but it's not like i it's not like i study those notes and those quotes in order to be able to recite them verbatim it just happens that when i'm in the zone i tend to be in an associational thinker so i start talking about an idea and it creates a butterfly effect and thought we're like these different lines start to emerge and served up to my frontal lobe which actually reminds me a lot of that film limitless yes remember when he first takes the drug and he talks about how like just start to connect the dots quicker and the right thing just served up in the right moment the right right connection when i'm in the zone that tends to happen to me and the rest of my life becomes the labor of coal tiv aiding rest diets and all these other things so that when i'm in the zone i have all the resources that i need i know that state i do that when i'm on stage they're going crowd i always have and it's like i just know what to say even if my slides all jacked up it's it's right there thousand percent but i don't usually quote people because i don't remember the right are you paraphrasing actually nail these because like i have a nail a lot of them so here's one that i love for a guy called sheldon solomon he was talking about the ideas of ernest becker in the denial of death he said the explicit awareness that you're breathing piece of defecating meat destined to die and ultimately more significant than elizer potato is not especially uplifting.

sheldon solomon ernest becker thousand percent
"sheldon solomon" Discussed on WXAV Live365 Radio

WXAV Live365 Radio

03:16 min | 4 years ago

"sheldon solomon" Discussed on WXAV Live365 Radio

"I didn't show me so i'm comin experimental social psychologist it's give more college this ranks new york sheldon solomon and a group of other psychologist coin determine called terror management theory which might explain the paradox of hb love craft so when we first are talking you know use it you hadn't read a new glove crafty yes he is somebody who lived in a constant state of terror did you think about the series and ratings and i still finding his work just haunting and what were your thoughts on uncut through you know my thoughts are that it is very typical we call it terror focal is asian matt it gives about some concrete and embodied entity upon which to project are deaths fierce basically we all know we're gonna die if we were to focus on that obsess over it like love crafted we would hardly be able to function on a daily basis the primary function of culture of it is to mitigate that things are headed by giving us eachus science that we live in a meaningful world and then as an individual spin now world we are uniquely now you born significant and therefore when ever wear reminded our mortality that that instigated supposed of defensive reactions that we're used to restore confidence in our culture and confidence in our worthiness isn't of the tools did you then go ahead and decided i wanna test this would studying we've done hundreds of experiment sometimes we bring people into the lab and then we have them read swings on the computer and while they're doing that unbeknownst to them we flash the word death so fast twenty eight milliseconds you don't even know that you've seen anything and when study they brought in a judges and asked him to send bail for fictional prostitute the judges that were prompted to think about death set a bail that was many many times higher people reminded of death time i had very in tolerance use of other racial and alleges scripts they even agreed with a proposition that we should bomb other countries and then they flipped the script and the us people though they wanted to be famous or have a star named after them the noche way the group prompted by the word death and for raced those ideas you know you may not be here forever and i may not be here forever but i am comforted by the proposition that some less that you've my existence will persist over time nonetheless also perhaps in the form of having children perhaps in the form of a seen great fortunes since spraining my name all over buildings airplanes and casinos it could be via a producing a great work art or science.

sheldon solomon us