20 Episode results for "Shel Silverstein"

What Else Did Shel Silverstein Write?

BrainStuff

05:52 min | 5 months ago

What Else Did Shel Silverstein Write?

"Today's episode is brought to you by Lexus. You at Lexus. Their greatest curiosity is you because the most amazing machines aren't inspired by machines. They're inspired by people. That's why Lexus asks different questions. Better questions more human questions like can you see with your ears and answers are as inspiring as you are which may leave you with one question. What amazing ideas will you inspire next? Discover the answers at Lexus. Dot Com slash curiosity. We'll come to brainstorm production of iheartradio. Hey rain stuff lauren. Vogel bomb here decades ago in the evenings around closing time a man with a very bald head and a very dark beard used to come sloping into the mysterious bookshop in New York City. His shoulders hunched is the warding off a perpetual cold wind. The proprietor auto pens ler had come to expect these visits indeed. He looked forward to them. He would close up the shop and guide the man back to his. Inner Sanctum. A book lined study with floor-to-ceiling shelves there the bearded man would deliver a Sheaf of papers containing a new freshly penned mystery story to be added to the theology. That Pencil publishing the writer refused to take any money for his efforts. Even though pens lawyer was paying well. He craved compensation. His eyes gleamed as pennsly- slid his payment across the desk between them. It was a stack of used books containing dozens of stories written in the mystery genre later that night he would devour them one by one but first pens lawyer and the bearded man would talk and talk. They talked about books about life. Auto pens layer was just recovering from a devastating break-up and so they spoke about battling in a recent phone interview for this article. Pennsly- remembered that at a certain juncture. His guests said something so piercingly insightful and eloquent about the break up that it took his breath away Henseler said I wish I could remember what he said but I failed to write it down what I do remember. Is that when I expressed my amazement at his facility with words he just shrugged and said I guess that's why they call me a poet. He could've added among many other things because our bald and bearded man was Shel Silverstein a true renaissance man. Of course many of us know him as the author and illustrator of the giving tree a light in the attic and where the sidewalk ends among many of the other wildly successful books that he wrote Andrew for children. That's only the tip of the proverbial Iceberg Silverstein also drew cartoons and wrote plays for adults and penned numerous songs especially country songs. In fact he won. Two grammys for song. Writing one of them for the Johnny Cash. Hit A boy named Sue Sheldon Allen. Shel Silverstein was born into a Jewish family in Chicago in nineteen thirty his father and a bakery which only began to thrive in the wake of the Great Depression. After high school. Shell spent some time studying at the Art Institute of Chicago and later Roosevelt University but was drafted into the US army serving in Korea and Japan. Silverstein began working for the military periodical. Stars and Stripes and it was there that he began regularly publishing his idiosyncratic cartoons after his military service Silverstein got a job as a cartoonist. For the fledgling magazine. Playboy for his playboy gig. He traveled the world sending cartoon dispatches from Bahrein wide in nineteen sixty three Silverstein. Met Book Editor Ursula Nordstrom. Who prodded him into writing books for Children? And that same year he wrote the giving tree a book about the nature of Altruism and selfishness there would become his most famous and popular work his sense of the absurd and the whimsical cartoon line drawings that illustrated this and all of his books would become his hallmarks in deceptively simple language. His exploration of the innocence and imagination of childhood made him one of the most celebrated and widely read authors for generations of children and adults like Auto Penn's lair recall Silverstein telling him that he spent a year living at the playboy mansion as a guest of Hugh Hefner. It was there that he met Susan Hastings with whom he had daughter named Shoshana in nineteen seventy tragically. Susan died in nineteen seventy five and two. Shana passed away. Unexpectedly after cerebral aneurysm. In one thousand nine hundred two by many accounts her death utterly devastated Silverstein in Nineteen eighty-four. He had a son named Matthew with Sarah Spencer. According to Pens Ler Silverstein was a deeply eccentric. Man Pennzoil told us for instance. It wasn't unusual for him to be having dinner in a restaurant with a group of friends and then suddenly announced that he was done. Get up take a taxi to the airport and flight of Chicago or Los Angeles or Florida or wherever he felt like going on the spur of the moment shel. Silverstein died of a heart attack in nineteen ninety nine at the age of just sixty eight but in story song and image. He left behind a remarkably prolific artistic record. Today's episode was written by Oseen Koran and produced by Tyler claim for more on this amounts of other topics. How stuff works. Dot Com? Grainstuff is productive iheartradio. The more podcasts. My heart radio. The iheartradio APP apple podcasts. Or wherever you listen to your favorite shows I'm Hugh Jackson. I'm a chef a restaurant or a traveler and now I'm the host of the passenger people. Ask me all the time. What's that list of places to go in this city in that city and this show is dedicated to that idea? Immersing yourself in that culture and finding out what's intriguing what resound and what we think about the future of that place as a visitor as a passenger subscribe. Now on the iheartradio APP apple podcasts. Or wherever you date your podcasts.

Shel Silverstein Lexus Pens Ler Silverstein Iceberg Silverstein Chicago playboy mansion Man Pennzoil pennsly cerebral aneurysm Playboy apple New York City Susan Hastings Ursula Nordstrom Hugh Jackson Pencil publishing Hugh Hefner Sue Sheldon Allen Vogel Johnny Cash
"Do Skunks Like Their Own Smell?" And Other Stumpers!

But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

20:48 min | 1 year ago

"Do Skunks Like Their Own Smell?" And Other Stumpers!

"This is but why podcast for curious kids from Vermont public radio. I'm Jane Lynch on this podcast. We take questions from curious kids, just like you, and we finance usually we answer questions that are all about the same topic in one episode, but today were answering ten questions that have nothing in common other than being kind of stumper the kind of question that the adult you ask might say that's a good question. Why did you choose gets boot? How come we don't suffocate in cars when they're driving where does this side while Kende those are three of the ten questions we're going to answer in this episode? So let's dive right in. Here's our first. Good question. Hi, my name is shin. Shed seven years old. I live in over in California. My question is there skunks like the smell of south? That's a good question. And we found just the right person to answer. It Mary, Holland is a naturalist, and she was actually the very first guest on. But why more than three years ago discounts like the smell themselves as often as I've encountered skunks and even Vince braid by one it is never occurred to me to wonder how the smell affects the skunk. I've always been more concerned with how it affects me, according to Dr Jerry tegu, an expert on skunks and head of the Dragoon institute for the betterment of skunks and skunk reputations. Skunks do not enjoy the smell of their own spray or the spray of other skunks Scott's rarely spray each other or other animals. They only have a certain amount of spray inside them and once in his all used up. They must go several days without it while their body manufacturers more during this time, they are defenceless. So they only spray another animal if they are seriously threatened. So if you don't wanna get sprayed Mary. Says it's best not to scare us gunk. They don't want to spray you prior to spraying a skunk will give ample warning to its enemy by stamping his front feet. If this is Nord then the skunk will spray as a last defense when Scott spray they rarely get any on themselves though, they can tolerate their own smell. They do not appreciate getting it in the face and is from another skunk. A skunk sense of smell is even stronger than humans. So if anything the skunk suffers more than anyone who has had the misfortune of being sprayed if a skunk dozen counter the spray of another skunk. It will rub its face in the dirt sneeze or try to groom itself to get rid of the sprays odor. Thanks for the question. Shanshan? Here's another question about an animal. Hi, my name is Cal I willing to Kogyo Eleanor. I'm four and a half years old. And I wanted to know if funky. Ever touched gland, or they just always keep swing by do monkeys ever touched the ground or do they just keep swinging Heikkala? I'm so FIA at it a PHD candidate at the university of Michigan. And I study monkey behavior. This is a great question monkeys are type of primate, and there are lots of different kinds that live all over the world monkeys that live in south Central America spent almost their whole lives in the trees. They swing on the branches eat leaves and fruit and even sleep in trees. But sometimes they do come down to the jungle floor usually to drink water. Other monkeys live in Asia and Africa most of these monkeys than their time both in the trees and on the ground. They switch really easily. But there are some monkeys that only live on the ground like the monkey that. I study any THEO Pia Judas other primates stay on the ground to like us, humans are primates. But we're not monkeys were apes. We might. Lime trees, but we don't live in them and some other apes like a real LA's almost never go entries because they're too big and heavy thanks for such a great question. Kala primates are so much fun to learn about, and I hope you keep wondering about them and their behaviors. Hi, my name is only and I'm from Florida, and I'm six years old. And I wanna know why this who live in water, and when it thunders enlightening, they don't get striked. You've probably heard someone tell you not to swim during a thunderstorm. So you don't get struck by lightning. So only is asking why don't fish get electrocuted during lightning storms. Good question. The national weather service says that before a lightning strike an electrical charge builds up along the water surface when lightning strikes the electricity discharges mostly near the water surface. The top of the water where it meets the air. That's because water is a good conductor of electricity, but the electricity moves over the surface of the water rather than down into the bottom of it. Fish are usually swimming deeper below the surface. And so they aren't likely to be hit. But if they are near the surface, they actually. Can be killed by lightning. So remember, it really isn't safe review to swim or be in a boat during a lightning storm. We're onto question number four. And I'm gonna get in my car for this one. Hi, my name's Elizabeth, and I'm ten years old and infirm Attleboro, Massachusetts. My question is how come we don't suffocate in cars when they're driving? Good question. Elizabeth I'm in my car now, and I can look around, and you know, kind of feels like a little bubble when you're inside a car, right? You stay dry and a rainstorm and warm in the middle of winter or even cool on a hot day with the air conditioning. But cars aren't sealed off like a bubble or even like a plane. They have vents that let in air from outside the car. In fact, the heating and cooling system for the car needs that air coming in from outside in order to work properly. That's why even with your windows closed. You can still smell stinky things like a smelly vehicle in front of you or a tractor with a full manure spreader if you're here in Vermont or maybe like the skunk spray. We talked about earlier in the episode because all of that air is. Coming in. You have plenty of oxygen to breathe in a car when you're driving. There's plenty of air when you're part too, by the way, but it's not a great idea to hang out or play in a parked car with the windows up because it gets dangerously hot very quickly. Here's question. Number five. My name sense. I live both Kono Novus coach. I'm six years old in my question is total emergency vehicles. But why don't they have shows like file tax, please? Because Nampula which also moved into the melody found a few people to help answer your good questions, Silas. Dan Goodman, poke fares manager for AAA Portland. Maine. My name is Jason acres. I only auto clinic and the auto planet towing covering and how long. And how long have you been driving tow trucks, started driving tow trucks, and I was about nineteen. So that's twenty years. What made you want to do that? It's fun. We like to help people. I mean, helping people is the most warding part of it. And it's it's a fun living. You know, it's good time. Okay. What about those tow trucks? Yes. So great question by Silas, and the the laws on sirens on different emergency vehicles is state by state issue. So right now, we're sitting in the parking lot montpelier, Vermont and Vermont's law is that tow truck drivers cannot have sirens on their vehicle. They can only have amber lights, gold colored light the only vehicles that are permitted to have sirens are law enforcement like police cars, ambulances and firetrucks. Do you know if there's any states Toczek can have sirens? So I know at least two states that that do permit tow trucks to have sirens, and that's Missouri, Idaho in the United States whether or not. Totes can have sirens is state law. So it's different from one state to another. But in most places they can't have signs in Canada. The rules about license 'Iran's are set by the provinces kind of like the way it is in the United States. So it also depends on where you go. But again most provinces don't allow tow-trucks to have sirens. But tow trucks are allowed to have bright flashing or rotating lights often it's that yellow orange color, but in some places, it's red or blue most states and provinces do have a Lago that drivers have to slow down and move over give space. So when you see a tow truck, helping vehicle move over and give them some room. Here's Dan again. So it's a law in all fifty states to slow down and move over for any emergency vehicle. That includes tow truck department transportation vehicles law enforcement fire EMS, do you think that truck should have sirens? There are times where sirens would be nice because people do recognize. Sirens. And when they hear them, they they know to move over. There are instances where you know, say like on the interstate where both lanes are blocked, and we need to get to the scene to clear the scene to open up the highway and yes 'Iran's would be handy. A lot of times what we'll do is. We'll ask for police escort through. So that that pretty much solves that. But sometimes that's not an option. So yeah, they they could very handy, by the way Jason. He's the towing company owner says some of the coolest tow trucks are in Canada. They have a lot of nice trucks in Canada. Some of the best looking trucks are actually built in Canada. Coming up. How did we here where I'm are? Phase. Even though we're not looking in the air. Why are little sewing? Support for but y comes from oak meadow, providing progressive homeschooling curriculum and teacher supported distance learning school for k through twelve oaks meadow has encouraged kids to discover their own answers to but y for over forty years to learn more sign up for a virtual info session at oak. Meadow dot com. This is but why a podcast for curious kids. I'm Jane Lindholm today were answering ten of your really good questions. Here's number six. Hi, my name is Judah seven years old. I listen Abington, Pennsylvania. And my question is why can little boy those be so annoying because I have a little brother, and he's really annoying. Hi. My name is mix in. I'm eight years old in my question is why are little brother the so knowing we thought of the perfect person to answer this question, I'm leaving. And I'm actually a little brother. Little brothers are so annoying because big brothers are known. Newly eater. Thanks for that Lincoln. Here are some thoughts on this from big brother. Hi, I'm Wanda. Xiv. Of you like my blood isn't Mullane because he sometimes plays from the sea. It's not also bad sometimes brothers and sisters and friends and cousins, and parents are going to annoy you maybe you don't want to do what they wanna do or they're trying to get your attention by singing annoying song kicking your chair in those cases, they might wanna play with you. And you might wanna do your own thing. You know, we're all still learning to get along that's one of the things about younger siblings. They're still learning. So give them time. And it's hard for us all to live together. Sometimes we get annoyed with one another. But we also get the good time. So you wanna remember that when you're little sibling is being annoying that they may be annoying now, but give it five minutes or tomorrow? You're going to really have a great time with them. Also. Someday, you're both going to be adults. And you're going to be really glad to have your siblings around trust me on that I have three siblings. And I actually didn't find them very annoying when I was younger, but boy, am I glad to have them. Now. It's a tree. Ms in your area. I'm a half years old. I'm from Virginia in my question is why do choose gets. Why do shoes get stinky? Well, actually, it's not your shoes that stink. At least not originally. It's your feet in those shoes some shoes because of the materials they're made of just absorb that foot smell more than others, especially if you don't wear socks in your shoes. Now your feet can get smelly because your feet sweat a lot. You have so many sweat glands in your feet sweat glands. Make the sweat and your skin is full of tiny holes called pours. And they let out the sweat, which is water and salt. When you're hot sweat is actually really good for you. It's the bodies air conditioning keeps you from overheating. But all of that sweat in a closed up shoe mixes with the bacteria on your skin. And that makes the stink. Another reason your shoes can get smelly has to do with something happening right now in our part of the world here in Vermont, mud and rain. Wet shoes are a great habitat for mildew. That's a type of mold that loves moist environ. Mints with plenty of bacteria to eat. So if you don't want your sneakers distinct don't walk through that mud puddle in your sneaks put on your rain boots. And then go back out and splash around. Here's question number eight Romanian on-loan five years or of I live in Norfolk Virginia. And my question is how do we know where mouth is even though we're not looking in the air. Hi, this is Dr Lori racia-. I'm a pediatrician at the VM children's hospital pediatric primary care. There's a map of our bodies. That's distributed over the surface of our brain. It's called the h- monkey Lous. There's a part of the brain that's dedicated to the head and arms and trunk in feet and all of that. And so that in coordination with a part of the brain called the Sara bellum organizes the muscles that are needed to activate to pick up. The piece of food move that in space into put it into our. Mouths. So it works all together to coordinate how we get food to our mouths. Here's question number nine mine. My name is Maggie. I'm six years old, and I live in east mount Puglia, Vermont. My question is why do children's books have more boys than girls? Hi, maggie. I'm grace Lynn children's book author illustrator of many books like the middle grade novel where the mountain meets the moon and the picture book a big mooncake little star. So Maggie your question was why did children's books have more boys than girls in them? That's a really good question and a really hard one to answer. There are many different ways to answer that. But I'm going to try it this way. So publishers are big companies that make books they take the art and stories from people like me, and they used their special machines to make hundreds and hundreds of copies. So they can sell and make money publishers want to sell as many books as they can and a longtime ago someone decided. That boys would not read books about girls, but girls would read books about boys. So publishers started making more books with boys in them because they believed that they could sell more of them. And that is why children's books have more boys than girls in them. And of course, this is not fair at all by doing this. It makes it seem like girls stories are not as important as boys stories and also make some boys feel like they shouldn't read books with girls in it. This is not good for anyone just because publishers believe that doesn't mean it's true. And you have the ability to help change things one way, we can all help to make things more equal is to make sure that you read and share books with female characters in them with boys and girls and always remember that there is no such thing as a boy book, and there's no such thing as a girl book. I've come out to a special place to answer our tenth and final question for today. This one comes from Gabby who's five and lives in Burlington, Vermont not far from where we are where does this side. While can where does the sidewalk end that question kind of makes us laugh here. But why because melody, and I don't live in cities we live out in the country where there really aren't a lot of sidewalks. In fact, I don't think my town has a single one. But there are some sidewalks near VP our studio, and as is all too common in Vermont, the sidewalks start, and then they suddenly end, and then you have no place to walk. It can actually be hard to find a large stretch of sidewalk. But for those of you who live in big cities with endless seeming sidewalks. It's probably fun to think about the place where the city turns into the country and the sidewalk stops, in fact, if you look hard enough, you can probably find the literal spot where the sidewalk ends by literal. I mean actual the real place, but we're going to go now. The figurative the imaginary place where the sidewalk ends a very famous poet named shel Silverstein imagined this place and wrote this. There is a place where the sidewalk ends and before the street begins, and they're the grass grow soft and white and there the sun burns crimson bright. And they're the moon bird rests from his flight to cool in the peppermint wind. Let us leave this place where the smoke blows black and the dark street wines and Ben's past the pits where the asphalt flowers grow. We shall walk with a walk that is measured and slow and watch where the chalk white arrows go to the place where the sidewalk ends. Yes. We'll walk with a walk that is measured and slow and we'll go where the chalk white arrows go for the children. They Mark and the children they know the place where the sidewalk ends that was where the sidewalk ends by shel Silverstein, and we're going to let that be the end of our episode. What do you imagine the end of the sidewalk is like is their grass across soft and. White a moon bird resting from flight. Or is there something different for you? When you imagine the spot where the sidewalk ends, and you go there inside your mind. You can tell us about it if you'd like send a note to questions at but why kids dot org? That's also where you can send your questions about anything. Having a dull record you. You can do it on a smartphone. That's a nice easy way to do. It. Be sure to tell us your first name where you live and how old you are. And then send the file to questions at, but why kids dot org, we would love to hear from you. But why is produced by melody Bo debt? Emmy, Jane Lindholm at for Mont public radio both inside and outside the studio. Our theme music is by Luke Reynolds, where the sidewalk ends by shel Silverstein is copyright nineteen seventy four renewed in two thousand two by evil eye LLC and was used with permission and our things we'll be back in two weeks with an all new episode until then stay curious.

Vermont Canada shel Silverstein Jane Lynch Jason acres Silas Scott Jane Lindholm Mary Vince braid Kende Dr Jerry tegu California Maggie Florida United States Elizabeth Dragoon institute
Dum Dumss First Ad in 30 Years is Very Sweet

Business Wars Daily

05:01 min | 11 months ago

Dum Dumss First Ad in 30 Years is Very Sweet

"Business Wars daily is sponsored by audible audible has the world's largest selection of audio books and Audio Entertainment Start Listening with a thirty day audible trial by visiting audible dot com slash B w daily or by texting. Bw Daily to five hundred five hundred from wondering I'm David Brown and this is business wars daily happy Friday everyone dumb dumbs the classic Lollipop Bran. Dan just launched its first ad campaign in thirty years. It's animated simple bright and joyful inspired by Shel Silverstein illustrated children's books I think black and white drawings of characters pops of color come from the dumb dumbs which serve as stand ins for balloons barbells in in this one a bouquet of flowers hours handed by a nervous guide was new date who is delighted here. Listen to the soundtrack dum dum dum dum dum dum dum they make life uh the brands AD agency Smith Brothers says it's reviving nostalgia in an effort to give us all a dose of much-needed optimism and Cheer Oh and to stand out against what it says are or over the top splashy AD campaigns produced by dumb dumbs much bigger competitors fighting to get the attention of shoppers and inspire them to give into impulse purchases dumb dumb dumbs family owned spangler candy was founded in nineteen o six in the small Ohio town of Bryan but it didn't invent them dumps that credit goes to the Akron Candy Company which put a hard candy on a stick in nineteen twenty six Akron sales manager. I see bar named it a dumb. I'm dumb thinking it would be easy for little kids to remember and to say spangler bought dumb dumbs in Nineteen fifty-three today. spangler makes twelve million lollipops pops every single day selling them largely in bulk to businesses that give them away to customers but spangler isn't selling sweets as much as it selling nostalgia. The company claims it's America's only major manufacturer of candy canes it also makes old-fashioned suites like circus peanuts and candidates and last last fall spangler bought one hundred year old candy brands neck. Oh wafers and sweethearts from the bankrupt New England confectionery company remember sweethearts those little sugar. Agra candies with sayings like be mine on them. Spangler is planning to bring him back next Valentine's Day but before it gets Valentine's Day spangler has halloween sales on its mind mind when ten percent of all sweet sales happen the Candy Businesses Fiercely Competitive Candy companies have been consolidating attempting to build strength to succeed feet in a changing market. The desire for sugary treats has dropped shoppers turned toward healthy foods except for artisan brands which are doing well spangler fights fights with her. She's jolly rancher for sweet tooth with its small budget dumb. dumbs are the David to Hershey Goliath. Clearly spangler thought three decades as long enough to go without a dumb dumb ad campaign every few decades. I suppose you do need to get the public's attention in this case with the strategically redesigned pop up good cheer from this business worse daily this week's week's episodes were written edited and produced by Elaine Appleton edited and produced by emigrant our executive producer Marshall created by or non Lopez Warwick worry. I'm David Brown and we'll see you next week. So today's episode of Business Wars daily is brought to you by audible. Audible has the world's largest selection of audio books and audio entertainment right now. I'm listening to an audible original called it burns the scandal plagued race to breed the world's hottest chili hits kids wild. It's funny and it's about so much more than Chili's with a convenient audible APP. You can listen anytime anywhere on any device Mobile Alexa Enabled Bluetooth and in a whole lot more as a member. You can easily exchange any title. You don't love it anytime plus. You get to keep your library of listens. Even if you cancel start listening with a thirty he day audible trial choose one audiobook and to audible originals absolutely free visit audible dot com slash. VW daily or text w daily three to five hundred five hundred that's audible dot com slash V._W. Daily or Text B W daily to five hundred five hundred.

spangler spangler candy Audible Akron Candy Company David Brown Hershey Goliath Shel Silverstein Dan David VW Smith Brothers Ohio Akron Bryan New England Chili sales manager Elaine Appleton
IN-Q Wants You To Inquire Within

The Rich Roll Podcast

2:00:37 hr | 4 months ago

IN-Q Wants You To Inquire Within

"The first of all however anybody finds creativity and whatever genre they find it in stoked because right now people need to use their voices more than any other time in history and they have the ability through technology to do that so everyone absolutely needs to be pursuing their creative voice in any way that they can and to listen to your own true voice because that is going to be the compass that is GonNa move you forward in life. The way that you want to be moved forward and I would say ultimately that's the lesson that I've been trying to teach myself over and over with my poetry is to be quiet enough to hear my own voice because that was always tells me what I need and where I need to go next. That's in cue. And this is the retro podcast. Rich role podcast. Hey everybody how you guys doing. What's happening. My name is rich role. I'm your host. This is my podcast. Welcome okay well. Things are definitely weird. They're getting weirder by the hour. And amidst the restlessness of our sequestration the apocalyptic Erie -ness of empty streets and closed businesses the harrowing stories of healthcare workers on the frontlines alive lost. The lives threatened the progressive dismantling of economies and the fear that accompanies all of it like a constant companion there is this unmistakable sense that the world has not only changed but that it is indelibly and forever altered and the Valence of this shift remains to be seen. I think but I'm holding space that it will ultimately serve as a call a wakeup call to catalyze positive change in elevation of conscious awareness. A shift in priorities. A transcendence of broken systems and behaviors that have led us to this place ultimately to be replaced by a more elevated approach to both governance and life more compassionate relationship with our brothers our sisters right sizing of our relationship with the material world with our base materialistic urges which will lead us to a greater nexus of understanding that everything is truly globally connected and a more sustainable relationship between humans and the biosphere amidst it all. May We find some sliver of grace. May we embrace beauty choose curiosity over rigidity compassion and fullness of heart over close mindedness and connection over isolation even if it'd be temporarily virtual difficult time across history have always resulted in explosions of creative expression? The shared human condition writ large through art and few people embody this ethos more thoroughly more beautifully than today's guest. One of my very favorite people breathing air on planet Earth Beautiful Generous present deeply curious and uniquely gifted man that goes by the MONIKER IN Q. And to know this expression of humanity is to love him as longtime listeners. Know well either. From our two previous conversations episodes eighty-one and one eighteen back in two thousand fourteen or more recently from our live event which I shared with all of you guys in episode four seventy three for those newer to the show. It's fair to say that you are in for a most delicious treats in Q. Is a national poetry slam champion award? Winning poet spoken word artist and multi platinum songwriter. Who has shared the stage with everybody from Barack Obama to eminent name to Oprah's super soul one hundred list of the world's most influential thought leaders in Q. Is also the first spoken word artist to perform with circus and has been featured everywhere from an e to ESPN and HBO's Death Poetry Jam inspiring audiences around the world through his live performances and amazing storytelling workshops which I highly recommend if you ever have the opportunity to participate in one? I have. It's amazing? Inc poetry his videos have a habit of going viral clocking over seventy million views to date following in the tradition of some of the world's great poets in Q. Crafts verse that not only entertains but challenge all of us to take a deep look inward and consider our place in the are impact on the environment and to recognize the threads of loss forgiveness transformation and belief that are woven into all of our lives. He's provocative he's entertaining. He's honest he's a beautiful man. Unlike anyone I've ever previously met and his wisdom and grace is coming up in a couple of few but first a couple of things primarily. It's very important during this highly stressful time to be doing everything you can to take the best care possible to ensure your body and immune system are functioning optimally that means of course keeping your physical distance from others getting of sleep staying hydrated physical exercise and of course eating well but how to eat well can be disorienting so we created an online platform. It's called the plan. Power meal planner. It takes all the guesswork and hassle out of delicious and healthy eating for just a dollar fifty a week. It provides access to thousands of delicious nutritious easy to prepare plant based recipes thoroughly customized to your specific preferences with access to our team of experienced nutrition coaches seven days a week in addition it automatically creates simple grocery lists based on selected recipes and even integrates with grocery delivery and most urban areas which is huge right now for obvious reasons. I'm really proud of the product. It's helped a lot of people and can help you guys to so to learn more and sign up visit meals dot rich role dot com or click meal planner on the top menu of any page on my website at ritual dot com in the way that we need to be smarter about nutrition and we also need to be smarter about sleep and recovery performance gains are measured not so much by how hard we push ourselves but really more by. How well we repair ourselves in between those training sessions basically small waterproof device strapped to your wrist. Woop is a high-calibre fitness tracker designed to help us better gauge how our bodies are responding to what we put them through by providing next level reporting and personalized insights to your mobile device. So you can be smarter about how you train sleep and recover so you can perform at your best for example comparison much sleep. You got to how much you actually need. Based on how strenuous your day was basically on the data that it collects resting heart rate average heart rate heart rate variability sleep amount and sleep quality. Woo provides an incredibly accurate daily analysis of how your body is recovering and makes recommendations on how much sleep you need and the ideal exertion level for the day and it's all designed to help you train and recover super smart and maximize your performance gains. I basically tested every. Gps Watch out there every training doodad every sleep optimizing gadget and I got to say that we really is the best thing out there that I've discovered I haven't taken this thing off my wrists since I got it a couple months ago and it really has been a game changer. It's super helpful. Plus they just pushed a new software update a daily diary function that allows you to customize inputs and that helps it make it even more helpful in terms of its determinations and recommendations this thing rocks to check it out go to whoop dot com and right now whoop is offering my listeners. Fifteen percents off when you use the Code Rich Role. At CHECKOUT GO TO WHOOP DOT COM. That's W. H. O. O. P. dot com use the code rich role at checkout and. Save fifteen percent off your unlock your best self today with whoop if you listen to my podcast a couple of days ago with. Dr Zack Bush. I don't need to tell you how important your gut health is right now. Microbial diversity is key not just to optimizing immunity but to all facets of wellbeing. 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Ats S E E D Dot Com slash rich role or use the code ritual to get twenty percents off okay so the occasion for this particular conversation above and beyond simple fact that any conversation within Q. Is a welcome and delicious? Treat is in queues. Long-awaited deeply authentic and really very inspiring new book called enquire within that's out this week and the book and this conversation both of which I should add were respectively written and conducted before our world changed is really a contemplation of universal issues love loss forgiveness transformation and believe themes. I think we can. All agree are more relevant today than ever in Q. Has a very developed facility for shining a light on the human shared condition a dynamic lens through which to think about ourselves and the world and today I shine that light on him and Oh what a glorious exchange. It is one quick thing again. This conversation was recorded on February third. Before the pandemic changed the world Q. Was originally slated to perform a slew of live shows surrounding the release of his book this week which we discuss in the conversation but which of course have all been since cancelled and although small matter in the grand scheme of what we are all managing at the moment my heart nonetheless goes out to him for the heartbreak of attempting to birth a book the result of years of creative toil into a world. That's really crippled by events beyond our control at the moment and yet I think work in his voice and his words are needed now more than ever. It's a self to our souls so if this conversation speaks to you and I know it will do me and yourselves a favor and pick up a copy of his book enquire within a final note in addition to the video version of this podcast on Youtube and the two poems that he performs at the beginning and the end of this conversation subsequent to our podcast in Q. Performed an additional third poem which we filmed and that is also viewable as a standalone piece on my Youtube Channel at YouTube dot com slash ritual. So check that out okay. Enough for me. Let's hear from the man himself. Please enjoy the presence of wisdom experience and the poetry flex courtesy of my friend. Thank you we begin. Why don't you kick us off? First piece is called Father Tom. I'm staring at the number wondering Fascia call. I can hear the tick tock from the clock on the wall as it meshes with the thump thump. Beat of my heart sometimes. Getting something started is the hardest part. I didn't meet my dad until I was fifteen. I'd seen his photograph but his image was sickening. A coward with Dick but no balls to back it up see when he left me as a Kid. I had cause for acting up. The funny thing about hate is the person you hate. Doesn't feel that hate you feel that? Hey but wait. The wait can be too much for a person to take him personally. I was hurt. Swatches locked it away. I was angry all the time and I didn't know why I couldn't handle my own rage so I would hide it inside pretending everything was fine. Became a daily pastime. Time passed and I started to believe in my own lies. I took it out on my mom because she raised me alone. The rage that couldn't own had left me totally numb. It was like land mines in my mind that I didn't understand when the boy inside cried. The young man outside yelled I think I learned about my masculinity from TV. The people weren't real. So I knew they couldn't leave me. I would sit there for hours right in front of the tube the images that I saw when my depiction of truth that was manhood in a box and I bought into the censorship of Anything. Inside of me that sensitive. The sentence is a lifetime of tears suppressed in a stone face in overblown ego. They've distracted to a paper chase back when I was nine. I imagined in my mind the my father was a spy working for the FBI nuts. Why couldn't stop by rider? Drop a line. He was off saving our labs from the bad guys. But that was just a lie that I used to get by so that you wouldn't see the tears welling up in my eyes when you're rejected by the person that you created by you secretly feel like you don't have a right to your life. I thought if I confronted him it would make it all right but since I couldn't forgive him. It just recycled my spike. I remember meeting him for the first time. Every time a person passed by I would ask him a look a little like him right. No Oh what about that guy? That was what it was like to meet the man that gave me my life to shake his hand in look into his eyes. We talked till he apologized then. Saraga bias. I walked away on my own. I began to cry now for years after that acted like it was all resolved. I told them what I thought so I figured problem solved but adjust revolved. My insecurities were eating at my mental health. I took it out on the world because I hated myself when I finally decided I needed. Some help opened up started writing and sharing about my past. I got honest with myself. And I started chipping at my mask. I looked into the mirror and confronted what I saw accepting the reflection by embracing every flaw than directing the connection into breaking down the walls by reflecting the perfection of the God inside us all I stopped focusing on everything that I had been hateful for and started focusing on everything that I could be grateful for and personally there is a lot. I can be thankful for if pain is dragging you down. Just cut the ankle cord when the weight lifted and I really started living. That's when my hate shifted and I really started giving it's when my fate twisted it was like an ego exorcism. Your mind state can be the most powerful of prisons. My father never played catch with me or gave advice. But if nothing else that man gave me mas life and that's enough for me if that is all he could ever give cause. I'm appreciative for every day. I get to live and even though I don't need my dad validate me. I thought that I should write this poem to thank him for Cree. Aiding me because every moment that we are alive is like a gift and if that's not enough to forgive then what is. I'm staring at the number wondering faster call. I can hear the tick tock from the clock on the wall as it meshes with the thump thump. Beat of my heart sometimes. Getting something started is the hardest part. Pick the phone up. The dial tone begins to sing a punch number into it in the begins to ring ring ring. Hello Mike Hey man it's It's atom your son. It's all in their man. There's a whole life packed into that poem. Yeah and I've heard you perform it a number of times every time I hear it I get something new and more nuanced out of it and then reading it on the page is a whole different experience. I'm sort of you probably saw me. I was like tracking it on the page. As you as you were reciting it and it just continues to kind of reveal itself to me. You know there's a lot of layers to it and there's a whole like your like your whole life story is basically in there. You know what I mean. And it continues to reveal itself to me too. How has that evolved in changed? Because you wrote this awhile ago right. Yeah I mean everything that I write is really something that I need to be reminded on a moment to moment basis. So I'm doing myself a favour getting to perform these things to other people and I guess the meaning changes as I change. I notice different things in there At the beginning I think it was inspirational and aspirational and now more and more. I think I'm able to embody A lot of the lessons that I'm talking about at least in that specific phone and in that specific situation. Yeah I mean I would say the predominant theme of that is is forgiveness forgiveness of your father of course but also self forgiveness. Yeah but packed into that. Is the obstacles that you had to face and overcome within yourself to get to that place. There's a humility in And you know a beauty to it and And Journey of transformation. There's you know there's there's a lot of subplots and south names that are play as well. Yeah and I mean it's made me who I am in many ways. You know this team so gratitude gratitude and forgiveness. I mean I one of the main avenues to forgiveness is gratitude. You know it's looking at something that was painful for you and Seeing it from the standpoint of look at everything that I was able to learn from that situation look at who I am because of that you know who would I be without that situation. I mean I certainly don't think that I would have been a poet. Yeah because it forced me to be internal And to observe myself and my environment in a way that I don't think I would have experienced. Had I felt safe and comfortable growing up but at some point you had to grab a life line and do that work to that place. Yeah for sure and you know if if I hadn't than You know I think maybe it could have been something that buried me. Yeah rather than something that transformed me but I would say that writing the poem and then sharing the palm has been a part of that process so it just kind of reinforces that that that level of forgiveness when perhaps a little resentment creeps in or a little bit of anger you can remember that poem recited in front of a crowd or perhaps yourself. Yeah and I think in that specific situation I've done so much work around it. I do feel a piece. Yeah you know until maybe I don't write for the most part when I say that that feels true to me right now when I think of you and how I experienced you is somebody who is very present. Incredibly gracious giving grateful compassionate and curious like there's a twinkle in your eye like when I'm with you like I know you're here with me. You're not elsewhere. Maybe you are in the recesses of your mind but you're one of the most present people I know and I know that that doesn't occur by itself and I know you weren't born that way like there's a lot that has to be undertaken. I'm sure on a daily basis to inhabit that kind of head space. Well first of all I have the same experience with you. I own my own inner monologue of how I present myself very different. I promise the same exact way that I feel. I think it's probably rare that you'd meet someone where you know. They're complete perception. And how the world views them is aligned with their personal perception of themselves because they hear all of the noise they have to sift through in order to decide how to show up and be their best version of who they can be at that moment and continue to try to evolve that potential. You know. I definitely do practices around that. You know we've talked about that. In Times from meditation to Yoga to having different coaches and all sorts of areas of my life. That hopefully helped me to continue to evolve and move towards that for better version of myself and then I would say. Poetry has been a real trampoline to that in every area because it's forced me to be self aware in a way that I would say nothing else has But you know even as you were saying all of that stuff. The joke that was running through my head is What'd you say? I wasn't listening. 'cause I mean. Of course we still have all of those other internal dialogues going on and we have to almost continue to let go of them so that we can show up in the moment in a weird way. I mean that's what meditation is. It's like a gym for letting go just letting go of our thoughts and our emotions so that we can arrive and be more present before we get any deeper into this. I just I have to just publicly acknowledged you with a little gratitude for the ways in which you've shown up for me in my life particularly coming out on the night of the event in La and it just it just you know. Put the evening over the top and I'm just. I'm so thankful that you were kind enough to show up and bless everybody with your gift. Thank you my first of all. It's my pleasure and I feel the exact same once again about you. Feel like you've been generous to me in countless ways in our friendship and I think That's one of the reasons that I love being around you because I'm inspired to return to my own generosity and that way the other thing is I very much respect. What you've built I really do. I respect who you are in the world how you show up And the things that you continue to explore and create for other people so for me to get an opportunity to show up and to perform for your audience I mean. That's a blessing for me as well. I appreciate that when I think about your particular form of art and creative expression. It's something that that is so difficult for me to imagine being able to do it so distant from my own personal skill set and I was reminded of it when I was in. I was in New York City a number of months ago and I went to go. See My Buddy Karsh Perform at Freestyle Love Supreme. Okay show it just. It just rocked me to my core. I was literally agape the entire time just delighted at what I was seeing unfold in front of me and for people. That don't know it's A. It's a free style rap musical spoken word. Kind of performance with an ensemble cast that includes UCAR. She's been on the podcast Lin. Manuel Miranda showed up. There's a couple other cats and they you know they lop stuff out out to the audience. And they get a bunch of participation from people and then they take these little pieces or or facets of people's stories and in real time we've it into essentially a one act musical spontaneous performance of singing dance rap spoken word. That just comes out of nowhere and it's so amazing to watch somebody watch a group of people without level of facility perform in that manner. Because it's like I said it's so distant from anything I could ever imagine being able to do and although what you do is a little bit different from that. I mean you come from that tradition like very connected to free styling and hip hop and the rap scene and all of that so I mean how is it is it? Is it a gift? Is it a skill both? Like how do you develop that ability to react in that kind of artistic way? Well first of all. I didn't see the show but I heard but you can imagine I mean you. You have a sense of what it is. Yeah yeah absolutely do and Limon Wellm Rentis of brilliant brilliant artists and I've heard that the show is mind blowing so I actually really wanted to see. I'm going to New York tomorrow over exactly so off the wait until they do it again but I mean I started out free. Styling certainly not a the main focus of my career at this point. It's not even something that I practice on a regular basis. But that was my first form of meditation. You know I fell in love with hip hop and you know I started the process of free styling by myself and then in ciphers and then battling I mean. There is nothing super present to do that. Well that's why it really was the first form of meditation for me. Because it's just I mean you cannot think about anything else but the next word and the next rhyme you know and so it puts you so in the present moment like nothing else at least in my life at that time ever had and the other thing is is that you know. It's almost like a a dump of your unconsciousness. You know coming out through your free styles. And so there's this crazy experience of release when you're free styling. And so all of the Maybe thoughts and emotions that I didn't have another outlet for at that time you know with the different things that are already discussed in the palm and other things that were going on in my life growing up. This was my release and You know it was. It was my religion at the time. Well there was a pivotal moment in your career evolution. Right that involves free styling. Remind me I think you told a story when you were coming up when you were young where you have the opportunity to go on stage and I don't know if it was like battle rap thing or whatever but it was. It was a symbolic that it showed you that you could do this. Yes because I had I. I don't I haven't really thought of that story long time but yeah it was like fifteen and I was at a club and ended up battling the sky on stage and you know it just a crazy experience to watch two hundred and fifty three hundred people that were there respond to something. That was coming out. You know out of my mind and out of my heart And you know to win. It's different to win. You know in a cipher than it is to win on stage in front of a real audience and I think that was a pivotal moment of empowerment from me and I think ultimately that what I wound up later at the first poetry open mic that went to which is called the Poetry Lounge and It's every Tuesday night at the Greenway court theater and it turned out to be by the way the biggest open mic in the entire country. It was three hundred and fifty people every single week that would show up to watch. People perform their poems from signing up on a list and I just literally showed up there one night and I started doing my wrapping Cappella and that was the first time that I'd ever seen people respond the way that people responded in battle rats for example but to vulnerability it was like when somebody got up and they said something that was true. The whole audience would be like. Oh you know I mean because they were action. Yeah the mirror of their own humanity. You know sharing something that was so true that it made the audience feel less alone Noah something really beautiful and powerful and inspiring about that night. I literally went every single week. From then on yeah will vulnerability is at the core of everything you do. Yeah I mean I try to be as open with myself as I can through my work because I think the more open that I am The more than it at least opens up a window for someone else's healing. Yeah it gives people all permission and a safe place to experience those emotions in their own life. Yes for sure you know yeah. That's a huge part of of these workshops that you do. I did want to your poetry workshops. I think it was a that conscious capitalism of that I do. I know you do these all the time. But there was something just so magical about seeing this group of people they're all like CEO's and stuff like that yeah you creating this like crucible of safety to allow them to explore their imagination in a way that you know maybe they had never done before and then encouraging them to share these poems that they would work on over the course of the afternoon and then receive the the support and the cheers in the kind of love from the group was incredibly enriching experience. And I'm sure you see this. You do this all the time. So it's gotta be Just as gratifying for you as it is for the people who are participating. Yeah I mean it's it's a really beautiful experience and it's something that I stumbled across. I mean I I never almost like anything else in my career. Intended it to be what it is you know. I certainly didn't set out and think I'm going to be professional poet. That wasn't even a fucking possible. So what I mean when you're at a cocktail party in somebody says what you like. How do you that? I'm a poet I mean it's equally as ridiculous as saying you're a race car driver like people look at you like what do you mean? I think you're more likely to meet a RACECAR DRIVER THAN ONE. Rest car driver. So you know I think it depends upon whether or not I wanNA talk about myself right. You know if I say I'm a poet. Usually people are so dumbfounded it becomes kind of like the center of the conversation. You can't just go. Oh cool and move on right right. So you're either the biggest Douche in the universe. Exactly which by the way is Acura either that or something else or both. So you've got to read the room. Yeah of course can and read myself. Do I want to actually have this conversation right now or I wanted to say on a song writer. And then you know what Blah Blah Blah and. I can switch the subject pretty quickly if I want to but did it come up like a will you teach. Will you teach people how to do this? Like how did that arise? Well when I was in my twenties and I was trying to figure out how I was going to monetize this passion of mine. I was open to anything because I was just trying to make rat right pretty much any consistent money until I was thirty years old or something like that and And so one of the things that I wound up doing. I had an opportunity to Perform and do these workshops at a place called Archer and I just stopped by there the other day. I had to do something downtown. And it's an amazing amazing artists like community in Commun- they had a bunch of kids that would come in from east. La and so for about four or five years. I would run these workshops with these kids And we would explore all the things that were going on in their lives and then I was doing upward bound which is for kids that their parents had never gone to college the first generation in their families that were going to college and so I started doing these poetry workshops with them and so originally it was just for people that were younger and they were figuring out their lives and I did it over and over and over again you know all sorts of different environments and ultimately I ended up getting opportunities to do it with adults too and I realized that adults needed it. Sometimes just as much right then Then kids did and so Having an opportunity to provide a space for people to explore Moments that changed who they are in front of strangers very quickly become family because we realized that it. Even if the circumstances are different the humanities the same is been an absolute honor you know and people come up to me over and over again. They've experienced something from the workshop and made major life changes based on something that they explored through their poem and they thank me for it. And I'm like I literally feel like all I did was provide a space for them to hear their own voice You know we were talking about that before. The podcast started the technology's amazing as a tool. But there's a difference between using tool in the tool using you and we're not sitting with ourselves and hearing our voices very often anymore and so I think that this poetry workshop is a doorway into people doing that and there's usually very surprised and moved by comes up. Yeah a couple thoughts I mean. I think you're correct in that. You know we do have these amazing tools. Technology that allow us to create on a level unprecedented in the history of humankind. The flip side or dark side of that is that and we were talking about this. Previously also is that you actually have to create structures around them in order to engage your imagination. Otherwise you're constantly stimulated by scrolling on this after that and to do what you do requires a I would imagine a lot of deep introspection and quiet time in order for these thoughts to congenial into words and phrases that ended up coming out of your mouth or on the page and if you're constantly distracted you're never able to basically grapple with that with that voice and that's my concern for myself because I know what it's like to try to do battle with technology in order to find quiet time but also with the younger generation. That's never known differently right. Yeah exactly I mean look the way that I even write poems in the first place is I just pay attention. You know. I mean if something inspires me or moves me or annoys me usually. That's the beginning of a poem and so I just kind of stay aware and when one of those things happens I will write it down and if I write it down and I start the palm in a place. That's true and then I give it time and space. The rest of the poem will almost right itself You know I consider myself like the vehicle and the obstacle for these poems to come into the world I mean they come through me and through my perception but I also have to get in the way or get out of the way on the way for them to really show up the way that they want and sometimes outright something and it's dope you know but it's more about me than it is about the poem it's not right you know it's dope but it's not right so I have to go. No this is what the poem actually wants to say and to bring it full circle. You know writing. This book was a really fascinating process for me because because I start always in just a place that's true. I don't really strategize my inspiration. I'm not like this is what I want to say. I'm usually surprised by where the palm goes. Because I'm just following the breadcrumbs and so to put all of my art into one place and to look at it and read through it myself. It was almost like I realized what I've been trying to say all of these years it's revealing itself to you. Yes exactly. That's super interesting right because when I look at the book first of all a lot of these poems certainly not all of them but a lot of them. I've heard you perform many times but the experience of of reading it is very different. Of course I have your voice in my head as I'm reading it and I'm trying to recall like your particular points of inflection. An emphasis is undoing. It But it quickly is very apparent that there is an intention -ality in the ordering of these poems and that You know a sort of character. Arc or a hero's journey begins to emerge and I know you've broken the book into two discrete kind of phases one is about your own personal transformation and then it kind of shifts focused to how do you use that transformation to transform the world right but they're all in lockstep with each other in this really beautiful jigsaw puzzle that I was unaware of because I've just heard you perform individual poems and I never really thought much about how these poems inter relate to each other but this greater sense of the whole begins to kind of percolate as you immerse yourself in the work. Yeah I I'm really glad to hear that. You felt that when you read it. I mean the idea of enquire within first of all my name in queues in question and really in question was the second incarnation of it. The first was inquiry so enquire within you know it. Just kinda makes sense. And I've had that name since I was fifteen years old but it really also is the central theme all of the content in the book. Because as we're discussing you know with technology there's all these incredible opportunities. I mean. There's no way for us to quantify the ripples of even this podcast who hears it how they're impacted by what you've created. I mean you have really no idea the changes that people are making where the inspiration that they feel when they continue to come back to you as an artist and listened to the things that you put out into the world. That's really an unbelievable opportunity for us to continue to use our voices in ways that no one has ever had the opportunity in the history of the world but it's also very isolating and people are not connecting in the same ways that they used to and they're not taking time to be on their own. Were basically trained by consumerism. Mean everything wants something from us. It wants our money once our time. It wants attention once our likes. It wants our love and since we're always looking outside of ourselves for the answers if I don't know something I look on Google. I listened to a podcast. I go to a book and all of these. Things are absolutely amazing. But as I said it's the difference between you using a tool in a tool using you and so just to be silent for a while and to listen to your own true voice because that is going to be the compass that is GonNa move you forward in life the way that you want to be moved forward and I would say ultimately that's the lesson that I've been trying to teach myself over and over with my poetry is to be quiet enough to hear my own voice Because that voice always tells me what I need and where I need to go next. Well IMPLICIT IN THE TITLE. Enquire within is that those answers reside within yourself. Yeah right and we're in a culture as you mentioned where everything is about extra analyses and there's no driving force telling US affirming that those answers are within ourselves instead. Were constantly questioning ourselves or were unlikely to trust that voice right and instead look to the experts or who does what does that guy doing person saying right and I think that that's part of the problem of hero worship in the in the culture as well. It's like you know we look at our heroes and we just project all of this shit onto them and then we resent them when they don't live up to our imaginary projections of their perfection. You know and they reinforce it often. But that's why I tend to be drawn to people who are Very honest about their own human struggle. Because I think that's more interesting. It's more interesting for me to look at somebody who I feel like is human and is dealing with all of these different things but is still willing to wake up every day and strive to be the best version of themselves that they can be because then their accomplishments are something I can look at and say. Wow that inspires me rather than something. That discourages me. You know. Because they're so amazing that they're almost like separate from me and I could never achieve something like that and so. I think that that takes us. Being more honest about all of our processes you know And not just the product. Well that's what I was going to say. It's just honesty right. Everybody's going through Shit Right. It's a question of whether you're willing to be transparent about that or not the way that you hold yourself out to the world. We're all wearing masks. And you know there's a difference between our interior lies in that which we project onto the world or what we want people to know and And I think there's a place for privacy in that regard but I think there is something super refreshing about the person who is willing to fess up to those struggles and those are the people that to me. Just feel that I'm more drawn to and attracted to because of that honesty. There's a trustworthiness. I think that comes with that. I agree absolutely. How do you think about that as you? Comport yourself in public Well first of all I need to know what it means how you hold yourself out you know what I mean like on some level. You're a public. Figure your for your art. But you know you're in the world and I would imagine people project onto you a certain idea of who you are and how you think about yourself is probably different from whatever that projection is. Yeah I mean I'm a work in progress like everyone else and I think You know if people project onto me. It's because they may be see some sort of a finished product in a palm you know and they think. Oh this is something that he fully embodies rather than something that I am embodying right you wrote it because you're trying to work it out for yourself. One hundred percent yeah. Yeah and that's what's fun. Is I get to continue. You know it's not like I'm going to run out of material you know because I'm always going to be searching for something new. I was having a conversation with someone yesterday and we were talking about it. Some Birds Chirping and in the background she was like in a beautiful place in nature and We were just discussing the birds and I was just saying basically like the birds aren't trying to win a grammy. You know right. They're not trying to go platinum and I was. That's the start of a poem you know because that's something that's moving in meaningful and interesting to me and I still have that within myself that you know the things that I'm trying to create of courses still want to be validated you know. Might you go once people to like who I and to be successful and all of that stuff but Me Striving for that validation actually gets in the way of the true communication. I want and that the poems want because they were written from this moment of truth and they have a desire to be expressed in their truest nature. And so that's why I think on the vehicle and also the option for them. How long do these poems ferment? An age in the wine cellar before you release them onto the world like I I. I suspect there's a station period where they're kind of evolving over time and that there's a window in which you know you allow them that space to ultimately become what they become before you share them. Is there a timeframe on that? Typically for you to some of these happened really quickly. Some of them take a lot of time. And even some of the ones that you've been performing for a long time. Do you make edits to them. Do you change them or are they. Just you put them aside and say these are finished works. Whoa they've always been living breathing documents before the book because this is the first time written down. This is literally the first time I've had notebooks though I mean there. Are you have an incredible memory like you're able to recall? I don't know how you are able to do that but I would imagine you've got tons of notebooks at home. Yeah before I transferred to writing on my iphone. I had notebooks notebooks on notebooks. But they were always like crossed out and you know impossible to read and and so like those eminem you see those notes of Eminem and it's just like Earth there's no room on the page and just tons. Yes you know what I'm talking about if Yeah I've actually eminem writes in a really interesting way that I've seen when he writes on pages to because he writes like in different pockets if my memory. It's not linear there's like little circles in. It's all over the place like crazy diagram. Yeah which is cool to see a representation of how an artist creates you know For me it was very you know. 'C crosses out in big letters and all over the place you know but definitely like in a linear way. But then it was difficult to edit because I would have to go back and forth and when I transferred it over to the iphone the cut and paste made my editing process a lot cleaner. You know the poems all have a different justification period Some of them have taken six months before some of them have taken. You know six hours and then I guess some have taken a half an hour and they just kind of pour out of me And they're always different and sometimes I'll get to a place where have written maybe half of the poem and I don't know where it's supposed to go next and just kind of assume that I haven't lived enough is go out and live a little bit more and then all of a sudden I'm like Oh this is where the poem wants to go And so I'm not like in a rush I don't force it to come out of me and I do think that strategizing inspiration is dangerous. Because you're trying to control something that is made of infinite possibilities right. There is a discipline to what you do but so much of it is about the allowing getting out of the way and becoming as clear of a channel as you possibly can exactly so people ask me all. How long have you been working on this book? And I'm like well a about a year. You know but then you know the oldest poem in the book is probably fourteen years old and that poem took me like ten years to right right pretty much. So I'm like twenty five years pretty much I've been working on. The the truest answer is it. Took me my whole life right exactly. There's not about how long it took you to construct a poem. It's the expression of a life lived. That's right and then it's also not only the home that's created but the giving away of the poem you know. The Miles Davis quote. I'm going to butcher it but it has something to do with it. Took me my whole life to be able to play like myself from you know really truly being able to show up and give it away you know. I think that's something certainly. I'm still learning but more and more I'm able to really land when I'm performing. Well that becoming yourself is part and parcel with the getting out of the way. None the becoming yourself all the work that you did to do battle with your demons and overcome these resentments and all these things that you had to contend with emotionally psychologically to become a more self actualized human being right that would have the clarity to be able to grapple with these ideas and convey them in a in a clear manner. Yeah for sure so that ultimately is what. I hope that the book is. I hope it's a window into people finding their own voice. It's you know enquire within the pages of the book. It's that I had to enquire within myself to create it and that the person that reads it. It's an invitation really for them to enquire within themselves. What's interesting and what I didn't expect reading. The book is that it's almost memoir and poetry. At least the first part of it is clearly like I was expecting. I thought like Oh. There's going to be poems but it's going to be punctuated with more of your own writing. Maybe expository or stuff about your life to kind of conceptualize your perspective. But it's not that you go right into the there's a little stories here and there then aren't in poetry format technically but it's really you revealing yourself through these poems that you've written Yeah and it does function like a memoir in a very interesting way and I've never seen anything like that before. Yeah I'm glad you said I mean we definitely you know we didn't want to strategize the inspiration but we did want to strategize the conceptual through lun. And I wanted there to be this poetic Hero's journey in the first half I mean there's there's two halves to the book there's inhale and there's exile in Hale is the personal journey. Everything that I went through and then exhale is more social and political. And it's the idea of changing yourself and then changing the world as above so below And so it was definitely something that we thought of consciously in the creation of it would have this jagged poetic conceptual through line. And then when you add in the illustrations that it would have almost like a philosophical Shel Silverstein feel tomb where people would have an opportunity to delve deeper into the work by looking at these images that have kind of layers of depth. Yeah the illustrations are also. Yeah you're GONNA WHO's the artist most Shariq. Yeah this guy who lives in London. Who's a really brilliant artist and he came on and we worked with him A really long time to create these images that have a deeper meaning to them. It's pretty cool. It's got to be well. I was going to say it's unique thing to put a book of poetry out in the world but I think poetry is kind of having a moment right now in a way that we haven't seen in a very long time You know obviously we have rupee cowers book that just like exploded for sure. Internet and I don't know how you think about her or that book but it's it's proof positive that people are interested in this medium in a way that I think a lot of people would not have imagined absolutely and I think it's the beginning of that wave. I don't think it's the end. I think that poetry is gonna be a really huge genre in popular culture. I think in the next five years I think so and I think it's going to be very different from how people perceive it right now. I think the possibility of what poetry can be is just kind of scratching the surface and think poets are going to have their own specials and their own sitcoms and Beyond all the late night talk shows and everything like that and I think that we need that type of voice right now in popular culture of voice that speaks truth to power but also truth to allusion So Ruby anybody out there who is Furthering the art form absolutely support them and I'm really excited whenever I see a new poet Bruin somewhere. Do you know this Guy George. The poet I know George. Oh you do from years ago. Brilliant I love. I was just reading about him. The other day Because he's got this podcast now. Are you familiar with us? You talking about George Watson. No this is no last name is a British. Do goes by Georgia poet Wakowski. Who's poet you gotTA check this out? He's got he's got an he's he's a very from what I understand. I'm perhaps I'm butchering this. Because I don't know that much about this guy but I believe that he is like a working class kid from Britain who ended up going to like Cambridge. He's a very well educated guy and started. His trajectory was similar. Your own and then he start he got a music contract and he was doing music and hip hop and and you know that he was. He was expressing his art in that vein until he had a moment. Not Dissimilar from the experience that you described of doing his doing his art in a more spoken word format and really connected with people and he's become like thing and he's got this podcast now called have you. It's called have you heard Georgia's podcast and apparently I gotta check it off and listened to it yet. I was just reading about it but he he. We've spoken word with all different kinds of sounds and like you know From Nature Technology from music and he creates this kind of auditory experience. That quite unique. That people are really cutting onto. I'll I'll definitely check it out like ironic names for podcasts. Have you heard? Georgia's body gets a great very cheeky. But it's to your point of of this medium being pushed forward and given like a modern veneer. It's like like okay. This is what we think of poetry. Being what if we brought in these other auditory elements and wove those into like this constant reinvention. You know that we see in music all the time but we think of poetry as a very static medium. Yeah for sure now. Yeah and I'm excited for that. I'm excited for where it is and where it's going and I'm excited for where it came from because I mean the community that I came from was absolutely brilliant. And stow is I mean some of my most amazing art experiences whereas an audience member you know watching other poets and being blown away by Them just getting on stage and the simplicity of expressing story through Either poetic rhythms or rhymes and just watching. How other people and I was moved by that. Well there's there's a there's a difference between poetry in and of itself and the performance of the poetry right right. There was a day in age when poetry existed outside of of that performance. Element of it like you look at you know. I don't Know Robert Frost. Walt Whitman Henry gave it through. They weren't perform as to my knowledge. They weren't getting up and doing it in front of the front of groups of people know but I really love to see that right so it makes me think like if that's sensibility was born at a young person. Today I would imagine they're going to get directed towards hip hop or perhaps now with the growing medium of spoken word performance that they would find their their groove in that in discipline. Yeah I mean first of all however anybody finds creativity in whatever genre they find it in Stoked because right now people need to use their voices more than any other time in history and they have the ability through technology to do that and So everyone absolutely needs to be pursuing their creative voice in any way that they can But you know for me if I think of what you were just discussing. I mean seeing Robert Frost live would have been fucking rat like Rumi. I've heard in the native language it rhymed you know. So how incredible would that have been to see roomy perform? You know the palms live. I mean because I think that the rhymes are almost like a window into another rhythmic spiritual dimension And so you know yeah it's not only the creation of it it's the sharing of it and I would say that that's a not only for people who are professional poets but for anyone who's creating art. I mean there is a completion in the giving away. There is a release when you allow it to not be yours anymore when you allow someone else to interpret it in whatever way that they feel. And that's why I don't really have a strategy of how I want my audience to feel when they hear my work however they feel whatever it is that happens to them is what they need to take and even when we were creating the audiobook which we just finished. And I'm so fucking excited about man like both of these the actual book having something that people can hold in their hands and experience the illustration and then the audio book you know and all of the different voices and styles that I used in the book that are actually showing up when people can listen to it. You know the intention of making something that people could listen to completely focused on or in a passive way you know while they're fucking vacuuming and then whatever sentence pops out that they needed to hear is the one that they needed to hear. That's what we were kind of able to do is just like combine the feeling of me being on stage in front of fifteen hundred people with me talking to one person and having that intimacy still there That's what's exciting is whatever it is that people need to take. That's there's it's not mine anymore. You know what I think is cool. Is that with things like this. Usually somebody will buy the audio book or the book. Yeah but when you were performing that poem at the outset I was following along on the page. I could see people doing both because they wanna see it. There's something about visually seeing the words that at least for me like help root it in my consciousness but I also want to know how you perform it right to be able to experience those in tandem. Yeah I think would be. Its own unique experience as well. Yeah and then you know if people take shrooms or whatever fucking do both simultaneously. I mean that you're just really enquiring with. I think that I mean it's not something that I haven't thought of. I definitely you know like anything else. Sometimes you can delve deeper if if you get kind of into a different level of consciousness and so you know certainly. That's there's the invitation for that as well right now when you were recording audio book so I I assume you're just performing like you're performing the poems the way that you would in front of an audience. But you're going to the whole booker. Was there something additional that you did in that? That made it special for you. Well I would say that. This experience of writing the book was the biggest opportunity for me to evolve as an artist. There's nothing else that I've ever done. That is brought this much growth to me as a poet and so specifically now. When we're talking about the audio book when I went to record it I was recording it just like outperform on stage and what I realized in listening back to it is that was the wrong approach. Because it's not something we're on performing to a large group of people. It's really where I'm talking to one person And really communicating with one person. How did that changer delivery? I had to find an area in my voice that allowed me to hold onto the passion but also to have it contained in the intimacy and that was an interesting thing to find but I I really was able to find it and Create something that. I'm unbelievably proud of you. Know I was listening to it on the way over. 'cause we're just doing like last minute edits and it doesn't get boring at all. I was like forty minutes in every single time. You know there's a stylistic change or a conceptual change that allows you to ride the wave and I'm really excited to give it away and and have it be whatever it needs to be people you had told me previously that writing. This book was like the hardest thing you've ever done. Yeah explain that to me because it's easy to look at the book and just go. Wilson's two collection of poems. Like how hard could that be right? Yeah and that's what I thought you. How you have got some illustrations and you play around with with typeset and Fahd's that one poem where it starts off really tiny and gets a little bit bigger. You do some interesting cool things. Well actually that one specifically like for example that sound the alarm and so the reason that we did it that is very small and then it just kept getting bigger and bigger because the actual palm gets faster and faster So when you're listening to it in the audiobook it's sound the alarm. Something is wrong. People are tired of Lebanon calm but then it winds up being sound the alarm. Something is wrong with people that tired of living COM WAKING UP. We'RE GONNA walk into that type of thing. So we wanted to find a way to visually represent the style of how I do. It live on a page so there was a lot of just that man. It was like exploring my work in a way that I never had. It was editing my work in a way that I never had since. They've always been these living breathing documents that they would change. I would change and you never had to think about how it would be presented visually. No right how do you convey cadence and speed right on a page right or emotion? Yeah you know how do we? How do we create emotion on a page? You know separate from the illustrations in where it is on the page. How do I put rhythm on a page? So all of those things were interesting. And then you know Just me looking at all of my material and saying all right. These edits that making right now. I can't just change them in real time. Five off after. Make sure that what I'm saying is something that as to the best of my ability. Something that all stand behind in twenty years or thirty years so I think there was a different level of like intention in the final decisions then made So I think those were two of the reasons that it was a complicated process But an amazing one then I think getting through the mountain of writing the book and putting it in the conceptual order. That really made sense because I wanted people to have the experience of picking up the book and the option after they read it through from beginning to end to just choosing palm. But I didn't really just want it to be a thing where they just flip through and did a poem. I wanted them to have the experience at least of feeling the poetic story that we were trying to create so anything. That was unnecessary. It didn't matter if it was a great poem. I took it out Because I wanted the story to take you somewhere. Yeah add my my first inclination when I got the Galley which I know you you you want. You want people to see like a an excellent like control freak the after my own heart but before. I even read a page. I kind of flip through it just to get a sense of like how this thing is structured and I was like. Oh it's it's basically all poetry. It's not you know it's it's not what I thought it might be and and then I thought well this is going to be that kind of book that you could crack open But then I just go to the first page and you know basically. You're like part one part one. Inhale and I was like Oh. That's not going to be the way that this goes. And then you read the first poem and you're like Oh this is the beginning of of a of a bigger story like you're going to have to read this all the way through from beginning to end. Yeah I I yeah right and then. Interestingly enough now in the audiobook hearing it from beginning to end that story comes through in a different way so even for me man you know it was like listening to it. was like listening to my poems for the first time and a nice for me because I got a chance to Experience them from the outside looking in you. Also do these interesting things with like page breaks and where you place text on the page like in this growing up poem was this. I mean it's kind of an e. Cummings thing that you're doing here a little bit Is this the way it looks in your notebooks? Or did you have? Did you think intentionally like about how you wanted it to look written down for the first time when you were putting no all the formatting stuff is unique to the book when I ride I just pretty much right and I'm much more interested in getting it out? I don't really care how it looks at that point you know and and yet now. I'm so excited about this because you know. I'm taking my own advice. Finally you know which is that if you create something you have to truly give it away in order to release it and move on so for this to have a new life for other people. There was almost like a mini death for me but it was beautiful and so now. I'm super excited to see what? What am I going to create next and now even creating it in the back of my mind? I'm like well. Then how would I form out this? You know which is never something. I even considered right in the sense in the same way that a comic who does a special now has to kind of retire that material. Because you've been doing these palms for a long time right right. See Time to turn the page. I don't think I'll ever fully retire them but I do think that there is going to be a sense of release I already feel it and I feel a sense of ownership and also feel a sense of just completely giving it away. Yeah how do you reconcile the control freak? Who wants everything perfect on this like? It's not gonNA before we started. The podcast is like Oh. That's the Galley now. The new book looks so much better and I wish they did. Would this whole thing right? How do you reconcile that with this? The important notion that in order to do what you do you have to let go of perfectionism and be in that allowing like you can't let That attachment to perfection be the enemy of good so to speak as the goes like you have to be in the flow right. Yeah there's a there's that allowing and then there's also that like clamping down to make it just so yeah I mean I think both are important and both are necessary and I think if we're going to take the book as an example there was never a place and I was very very conscious of this where I was over editing in a way that was actually hurting the project and I think that's the thing that people need to be conscious of you know when they're thinking about the side of themselves that's controlling is. There's a difference between making a project better because you have attention to detail and your meticulous and you care about the thing that you're putting out into the world you want it to be. The best can possibly be to be world class to know that you left no stone unturned and then actually clipping the Banzai tree to the point where it's just branches you know and only you will know like anything else but if you're aware of that razor's edge that you're walking. I think it makes the walk easier. Yeah Yeah it's gotta be hard though. Yeah I mean how do you do it? I don't know I don't know I wish I. I wish I had that kind of clarity to be able to articulate it. I think I have a tendency to get too caught up in tiny details. That don't matter and the forest for the trees recurring pattern that I'm always doing war with and I'm okay with it in the moment like right. Now I'm trying to be president but in the back of my mind I'm like Cisco and Okay GonNa ask like. Am I going to run out of question? Must feel pretty. I gotta just come back to the president because if I'm paying attention to what q us to say like we're good so that that's something that you normally go through when you're doing podcasts. Is that happen every time or I mean it depends on who you're talking to. Yeah but I go into everyone wanting it to be you know. I set a high bar for myself. I want this to be the definitive conversation of all time with right person. Right so automatically. I'm setting myself up for disappointment and failure. But you're also setting yourself up to do. The absolute is that you can't. That is the intention that I go into it with but that pressure also can get in the way. Yeah because whether or not this is a conversation that's going to be inspiring and helpful to other people is in large part a function of how much I can get out of the out of the way and allow it to be what it wants to be. But it's the same thing it's that concept we were talking about earlier. You're the vehicle the obstacle for all time at literally at all times and me too. I mean like for example. I want the same thing I wanted to be the definitive conversation with retro like one hundred percent you know but the reality is is that all I can do is show up and be myself all you can do is show up and be yourself and be prepared and do our best and then ultimately however anyone takes this. It's not my fucking. Yeah this business you know like and so I think it's the same thing with with the book or any piece of art that you create And if you try to control how someone else you know perceives you. It's a waste of energy. If you try to control how someone else takes a piece of art. It's a waste of energy and I'd rather take that energy or that anxiety or whatever. It is the uncertain nece the wanting to control and use it to work on something that can control or work on something that I can create and then in that way I think I'm at amazing that energy I'm just processing all that. It's it's it's so much easier said than done it is and I go through my own ups and downs with it. Yeah I think for me the problem. The problem is and probably always will be like ego. The EGO gets in the way because the EGO wants you to be positioned in a manner. So you will be perceived by the outside world and then if you can do that then you're going to get that affirmation that you think you want that need to be happy but in truth all you have to do is inquire within the Brigham back of definitely on my social media. Yeah I WANNA I WanNa talk about the idea. The fleeting nature of life which permeates so much of your poetry right It's a constant reminder like come back to the present and that it's the little things that matter and it's about paying attention to what is like he told the the little story earlier about the birds like trying to win the grammy's like that kind of encapsulates that idea that life is happening now and we're so distracted from ourselves and everything that's going on around us that we miss the most important things. Yeah I mean. Nature has an ego but only for survival. You know like I for example when you were talking about ego earlier. I don't think we can ever get rid of our ego because our ego is. It's what it means to be alive. You know is is to have separation in the illusion. That's what allows us to have our identity so I think egos necessary but Operating from Ego can get me in trouble and so it's unloading nat process over and over and over again in nature can be a great teacher in that way because nature has ego for the survival aspect of things but a cheated doesn't care how it's perceived when it's running You know I mean it. Elephant isn't insecure right. You know what I mean so I think In Our weirdly like the only animal that pretends to be something other than what we are in order to navigate. Always says this. I don't know where she got it but it's something along the lines of of we'RE NOT WE'RE NOT. I'm going to butcher this. But it's it's something along. The lines of like a frog isn't pissed because he's not a bird or not angry at the frog because he can't fly right. You know we but with human beings we project onto ourselves and other people this expectation that they need to be something that they're not well forsaking celebrating. What they actually are like. You need to fit into this box. And if you if you can't you know check all these boxes than you're less than right. Well what is so awesome about you? That's you know focus on that. I think that probably comes from the tribal thing you know. I mean in the Hunter Gatherer Times. I think one of the main Sources of death was like murder. She would literally see someone for another tribe. He was murdered them. You know what I mean like and these hundred person groups of people you know if you were outside of that and you had to deal with nature on survival men and so we're all walking around on this like preprogramed you know we got to fit in. I gotTa make sure everyone likes me or else but you know it's fucking boring and you were all so beautiful and so unique and I'm just much more interested in in following month. Uzi Azam to see what's next. Yeah we are hardwired for tribalism. I love your short little poem about ideas versus ideology that which is it's a trap way because we all Wanna think or believe that were about the ideas and we're not about the ideology and the minute you commit to being somebody about ideas you've had formed an ideology right exactly so that's the story. I'll just tell tell it. In the book I was coming out of my therapist office. And we have been discussing the differences between ideas and ideologies and by the way this is just a separate thing. But you know anytime. Somebody's like therapy like people talking. Shit about therapy. Like don't you want to coach for your fucking life. Man Like seriously like who the fuck is talking. Shit about there being twenty twenty. It's a it's a remnant of a bygone decade residue of a past decade that looked at frowned upon that kind of thing. If you're doing that you're damaged. Yeah I WANNA garage fucking exactly like so whatever. So we were discussing the differences between ideas and ideologies and this was his philosophy. He was saying that ideas or tools that you can use in your life that changes your truth in your experience changes but ideologies our prisons that you have to force everything in your reality into the frame of otherwise you'll lose control over that ideology and that part of your life because in ideology becomes a part of your identity so then if you're letting go of the ideology you're letting go of your identity your fucking dying and you'll do anything to not let go of your identity right so then I was like. Oh why won't we WANNA use ideas then and then that was the whole thing from now on. I'm only going to use ideas and then fuck just created a new idea right exactly. I think it's very emblematic of our current moment. when you go online and we'RE ALL SILO. D- and Virtue Signal to our respective tribes and trying to be upstanding members of whatever ideology that represents and at the same time protesting that we are partaking in a restrictive ideology. Yeah Yeah exactly that and it's really it's denigrating not just public discourse but and our institutions but I think the moral the moral and emotional fabric of everybody. Yeah and we can't even respect people who have a different opinion anymore. I mean we look online even have a conversation. No that we dehumanize each other you know and look. There are many many things that I do not agree with opinion wise. You know of different people who are out there but also you have to take into consideration the environments that they're in I mean like in this is actually a departure of what we're talking about but you know. Think about the poem that I did earlier about my dad or my mom like my mom is an incredible incredible human being. She's a schoolteacher. That raised me on her own And Yeah you know. We have a complicated relationship. But she's layered and she's deep and she's so intelligent and she has been there for me more than anyone else ever has in my whole entire life And so I have this deep respect for her. But you know in the time that you break apart in your teenage years which is necessary to form your independence. You have to judge your parents. Yeah it's a part of the process you know so experiencing it right and I'm sure you are and I'm happy that it is a necessity to them really truly allowing freedom is to look back in judge but the full circle of that is ultimately you. You realize your parents aren't God you know when you grow up your parents or your God and rightfully so they teach you every single thing about life including love what love even is you know and so you look at them like God and then when you separate you judge them and then the full circle is realizing the your parents had parents and their parents had parents. And it's this infinite line of people in a five judge anything mom. I am judging her based on the life that she gave me that I grew up in Santa Monica California that I have all the experiences that I have to look back on her life and separate from that when in reality she grew up in Nineteen Fifties Brooklyn. I have no fucking idea with that was like and I have no fucking idea what the environment of a lot of these people who have different beliefs. You know than I do right now in this moment is like and why they have different priorities but the only way to find out east actually communicate with each other and not to humanize each other. How do you square that level of compassion and understanding the sense of non judgement? You know especially if you haven't walked a mile in somebody's shoes with the more political bending poems that you've done like the I mean your your palm on gun. Violence is like super powerful. Yeah thank you I really really really WanNa retire it you do. I don't ever want to have two. That's a poem that I want to retire any of the social political stuff out. I hope that I never have to perform them again. I wish outright them but right but you have conviction about those issues and you have performed them in front of you know in in front of people and so you know that's a very. That's a very different message from the one of you know compassion. I mean it's compassion. It's directed in a different manner. I guess you know I've had people come up to me. And said that they changed their vote based on a political piece that I put out and I think that now more than ever as I said before it is a fucking responsibility for everybody to use their voice to stand up for the things that they believe in and I do think that dehumanizing other people on the process is a real mistake. It's a cataclysmic mistake. But not speaking up for what you believe in is an equal mistake and so I think we all need to be speaking our minds. Speaking Hearts Even at the risk of being wrong you know because there's a lot of pieces that I do that are more social and political that. I know I'm going to get a part of them wrong. You know that they're naive pieces. I I've done about racism for example. I don't know that experience fully myself. So it's going to be naive poem but I feel that I have a responsibility to say something that I'm passionate about and something that I believe in to be a part of the conversation because I think the more people that talk about it the more we can get to truth the poor actually not only talking but listening so I not only try to put out. I try to listen to the best of my ability and find that middle ground. How would you say that you have changed or evolved since maybe I mean? When was the last time we did a podcast? Had come in maybe three or four years ago. Yeah you know My sense of you is that you're you're you're more grounded. You're more self assured in nauseous art but in in your life and your sense of who you are but how do you think about that? Like what are the things that you've kind of faced and overcome In the in the in the years since we sat down last well once again. That's kind of my experience of you like I kind of mirror that back to you. I feel the same thing One of the things that I really liked about something. You put out recently You've been talking about How the things that you've accomplished in life kind of happened. At a later age I remember that listening. Put out and how was so? That was one of those things where it was something that allowed me to go. Wow Man I can go farther. I can go deeper. I can climb higher and it didn't make me feel discouraged accomplishments. It made me inspired by them. So I felt like you were walking the talk and talking the walk by putting stuff like that out into the world so I think that's where I'm at. Is I think at a certain point. I thought I needed to do something or get somewhere. And I was chasing something or running from something and I was always exploring being here but I wasn't really here and I mean in the past four years. I started meditating. That's been an absolute game changer. I got a bodywork coach. That kind of helped me move through some of the old unresolved trapped emotion that I had in my system and release it. I think that brought me more into the moment I'm in a great relationship. You know that really has been amazing to learn how to love and beloved unconditionally And so I think a lot of those things have helped and then also I think Having more of a sense of foundation in who I am as an artist Rather than wanting you know rather than eating yeah which is more like trusting and allowing which is the word that you used earlier Yeah all of those things. I think we're seeing that play out with Mike. Posner right now like this massive jump in his personal evolution where he's really taken a different turn and his career like divorcing himself from those extra analogies to live his wife late. Live life in a in a in a in a different kind of intentional. Way I suppose and the way that he sharing it. I think it's super inspiring but when you were when you were explaining that I was thinking of him like I'm seeing. That's that's happening in real time with him right now. I love what Mike's Doing Mike is showing his process. I mean first of all. He's one of my best friends and I absolutely love him. He's the but but I also love what he's doing because he's really showing that whole process like he's not only showing the walk. You know where I'm a hero and look at this walk. He showed the difficult moments. He showed what it took him to get through those moments. And that's something that you know. All the people who are watching and following his journey they get to mirror that back onto their own journey and find those little ways that they can overcome those obstacles in their own lives and also walking away from something that is incredibly enticing and and and you know I think for most people would be difficult to imagine like. Yeah you know the kind of life that he could be living doing what he does. What is that life though you know like well? There's what we imagined to be somebody. Who's experienced it? And and his sharing like listening all cracked up. You know it's not what you think. It is And and the fact that he was talking about how you know. It's not fulfilling in the way that you can you imagine it to be? There is never an end to more. Now they're just never an end more and so if more rich people with tons of fancy cars you know that are super unhappy. Come on yeah so I think you know he experienced that and he decided to walk in a different direction. You know In the world but also within himself And so as his friend it's been it's been really inspiring and also. Mike is a true artist. Like you know that because you've seen him in every single project that he do transform into a new moment and it almost a new identity not only in what he's talking about but stylistically because it's him following his enthusiasm in that moment you know if you have success what do you do. You want to repeat it you know but but who the fuck wants to just repeat something over and over again it's just like That's boring as well. It's like why not be surprised by your own artistic journey and yeah you might lose some fans who say oh you. You're not the person that I fell in love with. But you'll find other ones because if you're being honest and true who you are as an artist. There's always going to be someone out there. Goes that reminds me of me and where I'm at. Yes so how do you take that and use it to fuel your own kind of constant reinvention with what you do? I mean it's just once again. It's just paying attention rather than trying to strategize the inspiration right you know. I am really curious about this next stage of what it is that I'll WANNA do But right now more focused and excited on just the idea of finally giving some way earth thing this thing. Yeah I mean one more idea about Mike and we'll move odd but but I think what what really strikes me about him is that he's been able to really protect his childlike nature. Like there's a there's a purity to that guy that is very rare and I see that and I and I yearn for that in my own life like feel like it has escaped me And to the extent that we can venture back to that place and create from you know from that head space and hearts base that we all knew innately as a child and I think is is really you know a big part of what makes his expression beautiful and why it resonates. What does that look like for you? When have you experienced that in your life that you can recall and what was the feeling like I mean? It's hard to recall a specific moment. Might my memory is is is clouded back but what? I connect with emotionally. Is it or what I try to imagine. Is that sense of of just childlike. Wonder you know that that that is uncorrupted by any kind of adult impulse that is standing as a barrier between you and your vulnerability right and yeah. I mean look What do musicians do they play? You know when I am going to a show I'm playing on performing and even though it's what I do for a living and I- monetize did and I have a brand or whatever the fuck that means if I lose that sense of play than There is some sort of a gap between me and possibility. You know an imagination you know so I think that's something that I want to continue to remind myself of as well you know not to get so into the adult thing in life. You know that I kinda lose that play. Do you consciously try to protect that? I consciously tried to be a fucking goofball. Actually I really do. Try to create spaces that can be goofball and then The other thing that I try to do is try to do shit that I'm really not good at because it's very hard to be cool when you're not good at something you know. It's like whatever like if I go rock climbing or whatever I am not going to be fucking cool when I'm doing and if you're gonNA make all those people in the workshop get up and recite a poem then you gotTa God in the world and do something. That is way far afield of what? You're comfortable not totally because you can't talk that talk unless you're walking one hundred percent. Yeah I mean and so. I like doing things like that. And that's one of the reasons. Actually that I love traveling by myself. I travel often by myself and One of the reasons that I love doing that is because I get to show up in a place where no one knows who I am. The language is different. The food is different. I don't know the streets and I don't even have a friend or a partner that knows my story or my identity so it's almost like the clearest mirror that the world can give you to how you're showing up in that moment in Q. Just some fucking died. Adam was like wandering around the world and I sometimes get my best ideas from that. Because I'm in that Place a forest play And I try to bring that back to my life. You know in different activities that I do as well. Henry rollins talks about that all the time He's oriented his whole life around that very thing travelling to remote corners of the planet. Not Places. You would go on vacation but really off the beaten path places. Most people don't WanNa go. Yeah and he just shows up with a backpack and nobody knows him. He doesn't he goes alone because he wants to have an authentic experience. That's how he can connect with himself and I'm sure it informs you know his version of what you do like his art. Yeah I mean I. I love his art as well. I mean I it's the world is so much bigger than your insecurities. Yeah it's so huge man you know and being in it is what a wild fucking ride this is. You know one of the things I've noticed about you and how you live your life is is you seem to be very conscious about surrounding yourself with high people. Yeah like you've got a solid crew grey crew that you roll with. Yeah so how did you? How did you go from where you were to that place and and did that? Just these are just people who became your friends or was there a concerted effort like hey. I need to really be conscious about the vibration of the company that I keep. Well I think it's like anything else you know you're attracted to the frequency that you're putting out so I think The more that I focused on frequency you know and cleaned up Energetic field which I'm still doing you know The clear that my frequency was to attract somebody else. Who's maybe on that same path so most of the people that I spend time with our seekers. I don't give a shit about success. I mean that's cool you know but I'm certainly don't give a shit about money. I care about somebody being a good person. I care about them. Striving to be a better version of who they are on a day-to-day basis and to seek to ask questions about themselves. And the people that they spend time with and their environment and humanity as a whole Those are the things that really light me up and then when I get a chance to be around other people that are pursuing that seekers mentality through a different discipline than me. They have a different perspective to share with me Where is you know? I have amazing. Amazing poet friends that continue to enrich my life in every possible way but we do have a similar lands that we come from whereas you know when I'm talking to somebody else who does this or you know. Does that and I have really no sense of that in an experiential way they usually give me a different Tidbit and makes me walk away and have a different perspective on my own life where I can go. What is that seeking look like like what is the? What would be like a practical example of a friend of yours. Who is a seeker like what? What are the characteristics of that human being? Well we could take Mike for Example. We could take you for example. I mean It's somebody who is striving to move forward in life and to be present in life and I think that is the dichotomy of the modern monk. Whatever that even means I never said that before so I don't Don't make that. My instagram has found. We found title for this podcast. Exactly few is the motto. Jesus no but the but the but really I mean when you're sitting on a mountaintop and you have no goals you know and you just want to be present. Being president is your only goal. I mean what an amazing life of service that is. I think that's really really beautiful. It's something that I look at it and I'm like wow I really respect that and I admire it but that's not the life I'm living you know there are things that I want to accomplish and So it's basically balancing those two worlds of what I want to accomplish and also knowing that there's nothing out there You know and so I would say all of my friends who are seekers. usually are balancing one foot in one of those worlds and one foot in the other. Right it's more about the relationship to the achieving right and the difference being one that is ego fueled versus one that is sort of fueled more by a sense of service or purpose driven. Yeah right I mean that. I think that's one of the reasons that I responded to that post that you made. It's that when you get to be a certain age. You know you're supposed to do this and do that. Everything is so almost like robotic. You know you're just kind of who you are like. This is now the dust is settled. This is the way that it is but just for purposes of clarity. How are you now? I'm forty two forty two right. Well we've known each other for a while and I can promise you that the person I was at forty two thirty two. What is this? I'm coming up from the rear man so I'm I'm trying to make hay while I can. I'm very much a late bloomer in that regard so it's not like on this model example of of constant you know Reinvention so to speak. It's just that I was completely in my own way for a very long time so I didn't begin this process until much later right but two things one thing that's funny as I'm not forty two forty one for us which is exactly what the clock who cares. It's I literally got it wrong right now. You know I was getting a haircut the other day and I was looking at myself in the mirror and I was thinking. Wow I am one haircut closer to death and it was actually funny to me. It wasn't like you know because that's a weird moment of you know checking in every single time you get a haircut. If you took a picture you'd look yourself in the mirror and you'd be incremental and accumulatively but significantly older over time and yet there's so much possibility because everything that you just said it's like wow what you've accomplished up until now but what will you want to do tomorrow. I mean there. There isn't yet. The dust has settled. But in another way you're gonNA kick all the dust back up again and reinvent yourself and I'm curious who I'll be when I'm seventy. What will address like when I'm eighty years old You know like what will I be interested in? What will I be curious at that point? And there's so many people that I think feel trapped by the lives that they've created for themselves and I'm saying that as one of those people I I can relate to that but I always want to undo that so that the the things that I'm choosing to do are not obligations. You know I don't have to do anything You know I have some responsibilities based on the life that I've created but it's not that I even have to make a different choice. It's that I have to understand that I have the choice to make a different choice. Yeah I think that that it's important to understand that even if you're living a great life you can still be a prisoner of that life because we come so we become so habituated to whatever routines are comfortable to right. We perpetuate them and becomes heart will say as somebody who's fifty three and I am fifty three being honest or not that that you do become the calcification becomes harder and harder to confront and overcome right because we're creatures of habit right and when something's working you keep doing it and it's a discipline to continually confront those patterns and ask yourself like. Is this serving me or even if it is. Let's redirect and I've been doing. This show is an example. Like oh I guess podcast and I do this like I actually have a choice. This could be the very last episode that I ever do choices available to me. That's not gonNa make that choice but just to remind myself that I don't have to keep doing this. And because there's a lot of momentum behind it doesn't mean that it's a foregone conclusion you could decide that you're just never going to write a poem again. You're never gonNA perform again. I don't have to be a fucking poet. You and Mike. Just GonNa go hike mountains right. It'll just be a musician. Ex- ex- podcast. You know with the fuck where you know. I mean it's not that we have to make different choices that once. You know that you are making the choice. You're not a prisoner of it. You have the freedom to look at the reality that you're in a different way And so I I am curious I mean I know that that calcification process has happened and I know that it will happen more but I also know you know I could decide. I want to go river rafting tonight and I could just leave here and go. You know. I mean it's it's just it's more interesting to me to look at my life like that because there's more possibility right with respect to the book. We talked about how somebody's reaction to your art is none of. Your Business and you know once you kind of put it out into the world. It becomes public domain right. It's you are. You are relinquishing ownership over this piece of work right at the same time. I still imagine that you have a sense of what you want people to take away from this. So if you had to articulate that what is that look like at a friend once the Said only you will know that was like one of her mantras when I would be discussing something where she would be discussing something with someone else where they had that specific issue they will working on and you know she would talk it out with them and then at a certain point she would say only you will know and I think that's what enquire within is about so this is supposed to be a doorway for someone to connect with that in a voice within themselves and I hope that they wind up finding whatever it is that they might not have even known they were looking for and that that leads them to More fulfilling an empowered life so these are broad things that I think when someone picks up this book. I don't have anything specific because I think then I would be confining people to what I want rather than whatever it is they need. I look at it so much of what I get out of. It is is permission permission to be vulnerable permission to forgive like. I think a lot of people were were. Were were victims of these emotional loops that we run. That are playing these tapes around who we resent how we were wronged. And and and we're the ones who are suffering as a result total and here. There's there's a sense of freedom that you explore by giving yourself permission to forgive those who have wronged you by by engaging in self love right and you see this evolution from somebody who was in pain and who has been wronged in who has suffered to this freedom and this lightness that comes with gratitude and love and forgiveness and life is really fucking beautiful. Man I mean it's hard it's painful but it's beautiful and I wanna be living in that curiosity living in that beauty living in that possibility In this book has been my roadmap to getting here. I think it's a good place to put a pin in it great. I want to end with a poem but before we do that Do you I presume. You're going to go on a book tour and do the whole rigmarole with all right. Everything gets baked into that including great word. Podcasts and stuff are you GONNA be performing. Yeah we're doing a big show in La at the palace with big show in New York Big Show in San Francisco and then we'll do like DC and Seattle and a bunch of different cities. So we'll do these public shows And then I think we'll do different bookstores and things of that nature as well and we'll do a longer tour in the fall but I have a bunch of videos that are going to be coming out as well around this and You know really excited for people to experience the book and the Audio Book and Look Self Promotion has been probably the least thing that I enjoy in the least thing that I'm good at in Being a brand whatever that even means you know But I'm not uncomfortable promoting this book like it's actually been a joy because I see it as a separate thing from me and I. I know that the book wants to have a life of its own and wants to get into as many people's hands as it Ken whereas many people's ears as it can so this is a fucking exciting process for me to get out there and spread the word. Well beautiful in well-earned. Thank you man. You're you're doing the tour with conscious city guide. Yeah Yeah with Mel who actually met at the event did she's the best. She's awesome. So thank you for that. Yeah of course. She's been producing our retreats forever and what she's built with conscious city guide is really quite something so yeah. Yeah Yeah Yeah. She gets the job done for sure. Yeah it'll be cool while super excited for you Pick up the book inquirer within from independent bookstores. If you don't have one go to Amazon. All that good places go to What your website is it in dot q dot Com. It's and Dash Q in question so I am dash q dot Com and then you know all the associated stuff is in Q. Life right takes out with the poem all right. This is called learn. Fear learned fear can be overcome when you realize the voice inside. Your head is not yours. It's an imitation of the voices from before repeating on a loop inside your core receiving since you youth when your choices weren't even yours. Perceiving was the proof but reality has many doors. So why are we still fighting? Other People's Wars learned fear can be overcome. When you realize the voice inside. Your head is not yours. It's an imitation of the voices from before repeating repeating repeating on a loop inside your quiet core and you can't tell the difference because it sounds the same but trust me when I tell you. Most of what you think is from somebody else's brain they have trained shackled by imaginary chains imaginary rules for imaginary games but they don't know the reasons either so where should we place the blame and who is there any way when we're all the same. Our parents had parents and their parents had parents. Apparently it hurts to see so I'll be transparent the world is so much bigger than your insecurities and they don't speak on your behalf without your souls authority. The world is so much bigger than your culture or community and they don't speak on your behalf without your souls authority because if it's all a story the nobody else can tell it for me since I'm always transforming. I defy a category when you do the same thing. Same Way it's habit forming but nothing in this land of mortal man is mandatory. It's all just transitory. Our worlds a laboratory experimenting on Today Can Change. Tomorrow morning and since matter is mostly empty space were in a sea of consciousness where the boundaries are erased stared at my reflection until. I couldn't see my face than I picked myself and put the flowers in an empty vase. If you came for validation than you're in the wrong place the only certain satisfaction is becoming what you've chased and there's no running from the inner voice so it's important that you choose but it's more important that you know you have a choice. You have a choice. Are you living someone else's life you have a voice? Does it haunt you in the dead of night? Would you fly if you weren't convinced to be afraid of heights? And who convinced you anyway. They had no fucking right right. No one can dim your light shine within so bright that you could blind the sun from site and scare him back into the night. No one can dim your light. I said it twice because you're greater than the circumstances that surround your perfect life. You're not you're nature or nurture Europe prototype in if you hone it right eventually. You'll hack your satellite at first. It's nothing the nothing turns into a whisper. Turn the dial and it gets crisper in your transistor. Wait awhile and the whisper turns into a screen. It overwhelms you system and you won't know what it means but pump the volume up and it can tell you all your dreams to pretty soon. It's the only voiced you'll ever need now you have to do is listen when you want to lead your fear disintegrates when you decide to stop and bree it's your authentic voice no matter where you go it never leaves and that's got no matter what religion you believe. I'm starting my own religion and everyone is welcome but nobody can join if you did. You'd miss the point love you man. I love you too brother. Thank you so much. Stay true to youtube piece. Are you totally enamored? I don't blame you. What's not to love about that guy? Also kind of a beautiful break from the incessant corona virus news that we've all been perhaps overly consuming at this moment in time. Hope you guys enjoyed do me. A favor hit up on instagram and twitter at I n q life. Let him know how this one landed for you. Please check out. His Book Inquirer within it truly is a timeless work of art. And don't forget to visit the show notes on the episode PAYCHECK PATROL DOT COM to learn more about in-kyu with copious links to his work and wisdom. That will keep you occupied with high content during this time of home isolation. If you'd like to support the work we do here on the podcast. Subscribe rate and comment on it on apple podcasts. On spotify and Youtube share the show or your favorite episodes with friends or on Social Media. And you can support us on patriotic at ritual dot com forward slash donate. I want to thank everybody who I'll put on the show today. Jason Yellow for audio engineering production show notes and interstitial music. Blake Curtis and Margot Lubin for videoing. Today's podcast Jessica Miranda for graphics Alli Rogers for portraits. In addition she directed and edited the standalone poetry piece by in q that you can find youtube page a youtube dot com slash ritual decay for advertiser relationships and Georgia Whaley for copywriting and theme music by Tyler. Pyatt trapper PYATT and Harry mathes. Thanks for the love. You guys hope you're finding yourself safe with your loved ones remaining connected despite our geographic separation and we'll see back here in a couple of days with another great episode until then may you invest in your creativity and express your unique voice because we need all of you to be more of who you really are now more than ever until then peace plans.

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Ep. 2: Shel Silverstein & Adam Mansbach

Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

52:27 min | 1 year ago

Ep. 2: Shel Silverstein & Adam Mansbach

"He's. What makes a human tick? So I tell something. I know when I read little igniting. So what's conversation rather than interviewing it turns out to be that really? Hi, everybody and welcome to bughouse square with eve Ewing. This show comes to you from the W F M T radio network and has been made possible in part by a major grant from the National Endowment for the humanities, exploring the human endeavor. This is the show where we hear from studs. Terkel the legendary interviewer writer storyteller Pulitzer prize winner cigar smoker. Red checkered shirt wear Stutz had a radio show on WFAN T in Chicago for forty five years where he interviewed literally thousands of people. The archive of studs is show is like an oral history of American life from nineteen fifty two to nineteen Ninety-seven he interviewed culture makers athletes. Scientists like I said pretty much everyone and the studs terkel radio archive is sharing all of this material with the public on our website studs terkel dot org. And more importantly right here on this very podcast on our show. We will hear these voices from history, and we'll talk to some thinkers from the world today who have something important to add to the conversation. I'm your host eve Ewing. I'm a writer sociologist question asker reader, magical, black girl time traveler, and you'll hear me chiming into the conversation from the past with some thoughts on the present on this episode. We're going to hear a conversation between studs and a person who honestly, although I never really thought about it before is probably one of my earliest literary influences one of the most beloved children's writers of all time a poet in a cartoonist. That's right people. I'm talking about the one and only shel Silverstein. Odds are pretty good that you've read something by shel Silverstein, maybe as a child or maybe you've shared his work with a child in your life, the giving tree a light in the attic the missing piece where the sidewalk. Ends these are all mainstays in classrooms across America. But if you're like me, you may have never actually heard Silverstein talk and some of that is by his own design after the success of some of his first books. He began telling his publicist not to share any by graphical information about him, and he stopped doing any interviews or publicity tours. But lucky us because today, we are going to hear from nine hundred sixty one interview between studs and shel Silverstein. And by the way, let's get this out of the way right now. I'm sure half a y'all are sitting there thinking what kind of supposed- shel Silverstein fan is she she keeps mispronouncing his name. Listen, I was once like you. I have been saying shel Silverstein, my whole life turns out, we are all wrong. It is shell Silverstein. I know I will let that sink in for a moment. So you can get used to it everybody. Good. Okay. Let's continue. So another cool thing about this episode. We're going to talk to add a man's back. Who's the New York Times bestselling author? Go the fuck to sleep like shel Silverstein. Is it? It's gonna be really hard facial Silverstein. Okay. Like shel Silverstein. Adam is children's book author who uses humor and wit that appeal to many adults, and I'm very excited to bring him into the conversation. But first let's travel back to the year. Nineteen sixty one where shell and studs are kicking things off already. Time travel. Now. Many of my little friends vast old uncle Shelby, why he is written this book and why he loves children so dearly and to these I must answer that although old uncle Shelby has never been blessed with children of his own. The little ones have always had a very special place in his tired old heart. Yes, I have heard them crying late at night. And I thought about them I have heard them playing and laughing outside my window while I was trying to sleep. And I have thought about them. I have seen the pictures. They have drawn on my car, and I have thought and thought and thought about them, and so this book to help all my little friends get all things in life. They so richly deserve. This. This is a a preface to rather unusual children's book. It's cone uncle Shelby's. ABC book for children and our guest this morning, the author. How do we describe triple frontman author cartoonist travel at the moment entertainer at the gate of horn shel Silverstein whose liner notes, I've read and who unfortunately, I have not yet seen, but I've read some of his writings and seen some cartoons and of heard about for mutual friend whose opinions I respect so delighted show have you guests this morning. Well, it's really my pleasure to be his that's more than more than any other interview. I've ever had really in all honesty because I might use stuff. So very much. Why I make it clear. Thank you that you are from Chicago originally this since you started reading the preface to this book. This is talked about a great deal people this book, the ABC book for both you tell us about this book. Well, first of all it's not for children. You know, it's it's a book for children. But you better keep it away from children really it's for it's for adults for people that have children. It's. For teenagers. They seem to go forward quite a bit. It's for kids that are just maybe mole past ten years old. They probably get a big kick out of it. And the it's none of the usual form of the a is for apple B for baby stuff. You know, only. It's a little different tells kids to do real Raton crummy things, you know, tells them to eat a lot of green apples and dig a hole and bury sister in it. And it tells them to throw an egg up to the ceiling and the giant in the ceiling will reach down and catch the things like that that gentleman. Is for baby is from shells, uncle Shelby's Bs for baby picture, the baby. The baby is fat. The baby is pretty. Play baby play see the baby play play baby. Played the baby can cry baby can laugh pretty pretty baby. Mommy loves the baby more than she loves you. And they we come to Hucker all these have the little the little twist. Henry twist at the yeah. A little bit of a twist to it doesn't really tell the kids to do these things. It doesn't tell them it just sort of hints these things, and as you say this people might get the impression this falls in the category. The much overworked phrase and we've come to that phrase in a moment sick humor. To come to that friend. And like what they really mean when they say that this is not reading that. Here's the idea of some long, we've been accustomed to children's books that are patronizing in nature, and yet we know there are changes taking place. This is what all this is for adults car, but you have been writing a legitimately children. That's what I'm mostly interested in. Now. You know, I talked a little bit league children's step. I'm really fascinated with the whole idea of it. I if you I don't I don't really believe in the idea of tracing stuff back and finding trends and stuff like that. But sometimes you just can't help. But there it is. There was a time. You take little red riding, for example, the three little pigs. You know, there was a time. When I know when I read little red riding hood, she goes to the she gets the directions from the wolf, and she goes to the grandmother's house, and and the wolf's already been there. And he's already eaten up the grandmother, you know, and the now earlier edition this had the wolf he eats up the grandmother the earliest dish. And then he eats up little red riding to it was a moral story. You know, I don't know what the moral was really, but it meant something and the Heat's grandmother and then eats red riding. Well, by the time, I was reading the story. He eats the grandmother, but he doesn't quite manage to get red writing down completely because the woodsmen comes in and kills him. Then as I was older, I read the book, Ken, and what they turned it into this. Time was that he eats the grandmother. He doesn't get the red riding with the woodsmen comes in and chops open the the wolf's belly. And the grandmother pops out brand new well now, I think it is he comes and he doesn't even eat the grandmother altogether. He just scares her. She runs away. And then the hunter comes in. Well, eventually the hunter and the wolf and the grandmother all gonna sit around and play gin Rummy or something, you know, it's it's gonna lose all the punch taking all the vitality out of story and the three little pigs was the same way in the first the old three little pigs. He eats up one pig at a time until he gets to the last who you know, who does him in. But now the pigs run from house to house. Nobody gets they did. Yeah. Yeah. And they and everybody, you know, all the parents talked when people say, oh, you know, the kids get enough violence. You don't want to show the kids any violence, they react strongly to this. They shouldn't hear about giants and somebody and a wolf eating somebody up, and he wanted to let them sit in front of that TV set, you know, for twelve hours a day just to keep them quiet, and they can watch all sorts of horror and grimmer, but they watch their fairytales. All right. They do censor that. I think you raise a point here that must be discussed more and more more often shell this matter of the children that hunt that the grim. The grimm. Brothers and Hans Christian Andersen. The other fairy tale writers knew something of the child. They knew that it was mocked violence in this outlet for them say we dilute that but something else is happening. Just picked up a copy of this weeks Saturday review. There's a letter from a woman and Arbor on this very point. She's condemning the war toys the nuclear war toys that are being sold. She says what you see. Say that the fairy tales the star has had a violence that was just natural for the child for the child's fantasy. That's right. Exactly. It was it was a violence that he would never hope to approximate himself. You know, he might you know wonder giants, but he'd never be afraid really that one was gonna walk in the front door. And he might hear about these things, you know, you know, violent stories with dragons and so forth, but they were never anything that he could really accomplish that could be done to him. But when you know with. As you as you speak of the of the way, the fairy tales are disintegrating being diluted. The fantasy violence is being knocked out. We accept what can be actual violence human to another in the nuclear toys. And and the TV shows you describing now what would be your approach to children's. Now. Again, you know, it isn't the ABC book. This is for adults. Now, I've done a story about a lion. It's called the lion who shot back, and it's a lion. Who is in the jungle show tell us about. Hey, everybody. It's me eve, I'm gonna stop us there because here's shell gets into a description of this book that he was at the time in the middle of writing. It's called Lafcadio the lion who shot back. This was going to be his first children's book, and it would ultimately come out in nineteen sixty three two years after this interview. And it goes a little something like this. Lafcadio the lion who shot back by shel Silverstein. There's this line you see, and he is in the jungle and old people are he's just taking it easy. Living in nice, peaceful jungle life and he sleeps in the sun, and he chases rabbits. And he runs through the grass with the other has a good time. And then one day he hears a lot of noise and online start to run. And the, you know, he says, well, where's everybody running? This old lines is what you'd better says hunters coming and he's well, what are hunters? And he's lucky says don't ask so many questions you just run to. So he does and but he sort of likes the sound of the word hunters, you know, he's sort of curious line. So when the others leave he sort of stays in the grass hidden in the grass until one hundred comes by and he looks nice looks like a nice until the lines stands up. He says, hi and the hunters terrified he says my God. A man eating ferocious line. And, you know, grabs his gondola lines as I'm not ferocious line is what are you gonna do? So I'm going to show you and he said, well, why do you want to shoot me? Well, he says macaws because I'm shoot you and make you into a nice rug and put you in front of my fireplace and sit on you on cold, winter evenings, enrolls marshmallows and a license. Well, look is you have to do that. He says out live front of your fireplace. You know, I won't make any noise, and I won't move on. You can just sit on me all you want roast marshmallows. You want blind says I love marshmallows says. So the man that Hunterston that's ridiculous. I never heard of loving marshmallows lots. Well, he said as a matter of fact, really loved him to be honest. I never really tasted one he said, but I like side of the word marshmallow. He said, and I know if I ever did taste one hundred eleven and one hundred says, well that's enough of this talk. Never heard anything more ridiculous in my life. Is I'm gonna shoot you and says why and he says because I am that's why and he grabs up the gun and it goes click. And the line says what was that noise? He said on my shot. Then I says, well, no. Am very impressive. But I forgot my gun said now if you just wait a minute he's at port bulletin there. We'll go from here. Says nice. I don't think I always. I don't think it, right. Nice, man. Nice. Hunter said I don't think I'm gonna be your rug after all this. As a matter of fact, I think I'm gonna eat you up and says why is it because I am. That's why does and eats up the hunter and eats up the hunters red cap, which tastes sort of woolly. And then he tries to eat up one hundred gun, but it doesn't doesn't chew. So he picks up the gun. He goes back to the other lines. Well, it's not the story. He goes back, and he starts practicing what the gun until he can shoot. He's stuck his left tooth into the trigger and try to shoot it. But he couldn't then he stuck his right tooth into the trigger and tried to shoot it. But he could it. And then he tried to pick it up with his paws in shoot it with his claws, which was even sillier, and you tried to shoot it with his whiskers. And all he got out of that was tired whiskers. And then he stuck his tail into the trigger any pulled as hard as he could. And the gun went. And all the other lions jumped up in the air again in started to run away. Hey, said the young lion. Stop running. It is only me and I have shot the gun, and he becomes a very good shot and better and better shot, and he does all these fancy shooting and every time hunters come into shoot at the lines. Why this line shoots bag until there are no more hunters left. And when people come into the jungle to find out what happened to the hunters. He shoots at them and tell them around anymore to find out is level and so forth. He keeps shooting will finally a circus man comes to the jungle and he convinces this line. But come and join his circus, not as a line. But it's a trick shot and the line goes off to the city and becomes completely civilized little by little said, the lion a marshmallow at last at last marshmallow at master large mellow. You can see how nervous and excited. He was. And he picked up the. Marshmallow. It's as light as a feather. He said, and he put the marshmallow on his tongue. Oh, it's crispy on the outside. He said I need bit into it with his big teeth. Oh, it's creamy on the inside he said, and he shoot it up. Oh, he said, and he closed his eyes and smiled any swallowed it. It's delicious. He said, it's better than rabbits anytime more marshmallows, cried the lion. More more more more marshmallows. He. Yes, sir. Said the waiter any hurried off and he brought the lion. A whole platter of marshmallows. And of course, Lafcadio learned many things he had never learned before he learned to sign autographs because he was so famous that everyone wanted his autograph and everyone was especially light it with him because he would sign six autographs at once to with his front paws in two with his back paws and one with his tail and one with his teeth. And he did exercise is to stay in shape. And he went skating, and he almost learned to ride a bicycle he becomes better dressed and he learns to eat fine foods, and he spends his vacation on the beach at Khan. And he gambles Monte-Carlo only seen him cabarets with beautiful girls and he learns to make conversation at parties, and he the Phillips his taste and his wardrobe till he becomes a person. And then something happens at the end where he realizes he's a line or this sounds like one of the best children's stars have heard. Thank you stores. It's just that this. The sad thing is. Well, the sad thing is when he eventually he's very board. The line has he's done almost everything there is to do. And. You know, he's he's had almost everything there is to have. He's very wealthy in in very satisfied. Everything's up. He's just bored. He wants something new to do. He's done everything a man could possibly do. And finally one day. His magic companies will I'd have something brand new. You're never done before. He's at once. They're going hunting trip and lines is wonderful. I've never been hunting. So they go off Africa and they go line hunting. And he should be the lines. When suddenly one line come to him. And he says, hey, he says why are you shooting at us? And he's it will cost your line. That's why says says you into. The AMIS almost completely forgotten said, I guess I and so. But lines, listen, he says, why don't you just help us eat up these hunters now? And then we'll go back. We'll go back in the jungle and eat some nice, raw rabbits, you know. You know, have a good time just raw rabbits. That and the hunters company said, well, listen, you better help us. You know, shoot these ends. You know, then we'll go back and have nice MARTINI or something. Always. What did he say? We'd have a nice Bola clam chowder. And he says he's clam chowder either as a warning more parties. And so will the, you know, the hunters said, well, look, you better either help us start eating shooting these lines or else, we're going to start shooting you and the lines is really if you're a hunter. We're certainly going to eat you up. So if you're lying, but it helps us start eating these Portland. He doesn't want to eat any hunters. And he doesn't want to shoot any lines. But he doesn't belong with the hunters anymore. And he certainly doesn't belong with the lions anymore. And he doesn't know what really what to do. So he just puts down his Kennedy walks way over the hill and pretty soon he can hear the sound the shooting the lion and the lines eating the hunters. And he just goes down into the valley alone. This is such a human story. So humane to perfect for kids and for adults. What do you call this story? Let's call the lion who shot back the lion shocked by it isn't even you know, it isn't even finished yet. Available. Now, I'm just finishing up the last the drawing sign it. I I hope it'll be out. It was supposed to be out in spring. But I think it'll probably be out in the fall with Harper's. You say you finishing the drawings of. Now, we come to another aspect of show. Silverstone's talents has many facets cartoony originally. You are you're a writer, obviously, an excellent writer, and you're a live humorous done the stage. But you you were primarily a cartoon. Permanently cartoonist I've been drawing since I've been five years old know as the main thing with me, Linda nature here again that there's a threat there's a friend to your life. I think those threats just bring those threats to get the story where it's Shelby's ABC book, the preface you had with the humor or the little kick about the baby. Mommy likes paid better than the orders lions story that you just told so beautifully. Now you cartoons. As one you're tired hearing this one that's called your your your magnum opus. This is the cartoon talks about which involves what two men who are prisoners in a cell, obviously for many years having a ghost of a chance of a scaping as a little window and the caption below now, here's my plan. Yeah. They're all chained to the wall about three feet off the ground, and that's long prison. So one guy said the other night, here's my plan. You know, about their cartoon funny thing, you know, people people like to know why? And how what something really means that cartoons been talked about an is. And it's been it's been analyzed a lot and people call it a lot of people said, it was a very pessimistic cartoon, which I don't, you know, I don't think it is at all shows a lot of hope, you know, even in a hopeless situation. But people have been, you know, writing bond saying, well this cartoon Pitta misers man's basic. You know, desperation or his hope in the face of adversity or hopelessness, and they go onto it. And they asked me do you mean, this will be and they analyze it and question and really this thing's drawn to be funny. It was a funny idea in all honesty. I guess I could get, you know, give myself more prestige by saying it all follows my point of view where my outlook. And I'm trying to make a statement. And I'm not trying to make any statement anything. I'd do anything man does will reflect his thinking, and we'll be. His his his ideas. But I don't have any idea that I wanna put across my ideas change. And I've got a lot of different ideas that maybe knock heads what she said, you know. So this cartoon was done merely because it was it was a funny idea that I had I thought it would be funny to have two guys in the situation saying that strictly funny and the same thing with the children's stuff I want to do stuff that I think children lie. Be funny for them. Not to stand out as a protest against other children's books, although I will protest them. That's the verbally and probably won't really do a book that will. But that's. They're just ideas. You get what I think is a good idea. And that's the only reason it makes the stuff very much less dramatic to admit that. But it's true. It makes it more dramatic. It seems to me the very fact that you're saying you do what you do where what your artistic imposts might use that phrase. Just what you want to do what you think is good and funny yet, it does the fact that you do it, and it comes out this way does indicate the way you think. Well, that's kind of a funny passage, isn't it Silverstein says I'm not trying to make a statement in anything. I do. That's a really surprising thing to hear because both of those things he's talking about there. The political cartoon and the story of Lafcadio the lion seemed to me to be so incredibly political. It's hard to know what to make of that. If we can take him at face value there. I mean think about the story of the lion. There's so much there about power about identity about what it means to be in charge about the ways in which people who have been victims of violence can Rian scribe that violence upon other people in the tables are turned it's hard to take it as anything other than really really political, especially at the end when the lion just abandons it all together. And decides that he's going to go off and be a hermit lion away from everybody else. So yeah, I find that a little bit peculiar in maybe even contradictory. And I wonder if it's at shell Silverstein really did believe that his work wasn't political. Or if it's like, he said that there's something implicitly about his own point of view and everything he does. And maybe it just doesn't need to be parched out so much. But since I was confused on this point, we decided to ask a panel of experts. What they thought of the story. What Lafcadio is really about some parts were really really funny in some parts were not that funny. Hit his mother or father micro said because they'd be like, where's are? So newish are our lions. Those weren't really his friends basically just people relate lived with Hugh will so into the human life that he forgot that. He was lying. I think that people should help them realize what they what they used to be. I don't forget why the moral of the story. I thought was going to be like protect your friends at that moment. But after he walked away. I didn't know what the morals story would be immoral be the sometimes neither side is good. So you don't choose one or something at the end of the story. I thought he would go to lions because like truly he is alliance. Feeling that lesson was not to like kill your own. They pack of lions getting everything that you want is not always everything was don't wanna be annual use still someone. So that's what the kids we spoke to thought of the book. And I think most of them are with me on this. I don't agree with Silverstein when he says, there's no deeper message in his work. But he says something else in this interview that I do agree with about the way we should think about artistic legacy in lineage and the people who come before us. Let's hear it an artist of any sort. You know, you must not put down the man before you because it's like it's like putting down the the guy that built the ladder. You're standing without him. You're standing on the floor with him naturally, you're above him. 'cause he's holding on his shoulders in some respect, you devour his stuff you eat it up, and then you move one step higher. But and so I do it. Maybe I'll I hope, you know, laugh cartoon us out. I'll take all the originality. They've got on all their ideas and swallow him. And then I'll try to move one step further that doesn't mean that I could have done it without without their influence or their help. Because. Eventually some guy's going to be standing on my show biz and saying, you know, Silverstein he was, you know, he did that's corny horse manure, you know, corny horse manure g. Nobody wants to do that our guest today. Definitely does not right. Corny horse manure. But he does stand on the same ladder at shell Silverstein. Adam man's back is a writer of many things he's written novels screenplays humorous, cultural commentaries for salon and other outlets. He's a very astute and very inventive person. He's very funny in my personal opinion. And all of these formats, but the thing that he is perhaps best known for his New York Times bestselling picture book. Go the to sleep which has sold more than two million copies worldwide. Ataman's back. Welcome to the show. Thank you. Thanks for having me. So I was looking back at some of the press from wind go to sleep came out. You know, the number one bestselling book did amazingly. It was interesting to me how many comparisons. There were two shell Silverstein as well as Dr Seuss, and I feel like when people said that I got the sense that it was on a superficial level because they're famous authors of picture books. Right. But I think there's actually something more. That because those authors are both really subversive in a lot of ways. And I was wondering first of all if you read shel Silverstein growing up what you think of his work. And if you see a relationship between your work and his have read him a lot in the past few years too. My oldest daughter, there's a wonderful sense of play and freedom in his work. There's something always interesting to me to read writers who were also illustrators the duality of that like the way that you can play off of your words with your illustrations or vice versa to be able to do. Both those things to me as amazing. Are there things that as you're reading his work to your daughter strike, you like this is a writer lesson writing is not so different from any other form of storytelling, including something as basic as joke telling and I think a lot of his stuff is structured beautifully as jokes. You know? There's a question and an unexpected answer, and there's a reliance on a kind of wild imagination the kind of imagination that leads you to create you know, this Bestiary of. Fantastic animals. There's something so liberty about the fact that his answer too, many questions is something that didn't exist until he verbalize it or drew it onto the page. You know for me. That's the first thing that comes to mind with Silverstein is that or Silverstein or you know, whatever we're gonna call him. Is that sense that that the answer can come from like beyond the margins? You know, I'm imagining an image from some cartoon or maybe like every cartoon where you have a character who literally reaches off the screen and their hand comes back in with some something new that wasn't. Yeah. Like in the frame before you know what? I mean. Yes. Yes. That's like what I think of when I think of him for me. That's what I love about poetry is. I feel like I feel like all writing is a space for that. But poetry really provides that space, and I feel like that's such an amazing lesson when you're writing fiction, you can literally do or say anything or construct anything, and there's a rich world building that can come. From exactly the kind of imaginative work that you're talking about also during this time woman named Karen spears Zachariah as she wrote a piece for CNN where she said the book was immoral and dangerous because it portrays a hostile environment and my fair power. She interviews like the experts she's trying to get to rally behind this point. She interviews a lawyer who prosecutes child murder cases. And she was like, I'm not saying this book has anything to do with murder and neglect and child is I was like, whoa. What? Right. But that's why I got. So I'm sure you recall, this, do you know, made me think about how shell Silverstein actually had a ton of farcical violence in peril in his books. Right. So like a kid's head falls off and rolls away. Or there's one poem where a kid gets so hot that he takes his own skin off. And then the illustration is like this gruesome illustration of this kid sitting here, it was a skeleton, and there's another one where it's like if you stick your finger in your nose a snail's gonna bite your finger off. So we could go on. And like, you said the illustrations just make it, you know, there's like gruesome illustrations, and in the interview with studs terkel, he talks about the history of peril in violence in fairy tales. So understanding the fact that we know that your book is not in fact children's book, but what do you think is the narrative purpose of violence in this kind of tradition of children's literature in and why are people so averse to it, even as we also have, you know, classics like little red riding hood and the three bears that are also kind of super violent. I think you know. Stories told to children were meant first of all to instruct and sometimes terror was part of that instruction less so now, and in our culture, you know, just guessing here, but like perhaps the message of little red riding hood was like stay the fuck out of the woods rhino. Like, that's the takeaway, presumably, all of that isn't elaboration on a very basic truth, which is like look kids. Like, if you go on accompanied into the woods, you might not come out. So don't do that. You know? Right. But you know, I think childhood and the limited space of teenager hood, even that we have today these are relatively, you know, some of these are new constructions or new spins on the construction, and I think kids back in the day were surrounded by death in violence in a very different way. Right. Like, there was a very good chance. You grew up as you know, one of the surviving. Children of your parents. You know, there weren't three you like there used to be eight, you know, and like three of them died of tuberculosis. And a in big bad wolf ate the other two right? Right. So, you know, in this interview shell Silverstein also says that his stories don't have a deeper, meaning which I don't really buy at all. But I was wondering if if you buy that if you feel like they do have a deeper, meaning if so like the giving tree, for example, right? Although I think this interview actually predates that book. But do you feel like they have a deeper meaning and if so what is it? There's a kind of rollicking goofy embrace of life in its weirdness and gruesome nece and bizarreness that he seems taken with. I think that in itself is a kind of message. There is certainly a lot of love of wordplay in of cleverness, which I think is the thing that I'm like most drawn to you know, does go to sleep have a deeper meaning or is it a book about telling kids to go to sleep? I mean, I think the reason it was embraced is that at a time when that kind of honesty about the frustrations of parenthood. I was not really something that folks were permitted to talk about. It's funny. I'm saying this is if I'm talking about like a different, you know, millennium or something. Yeah. Seven years ago is when the book came out, but you know, there was a certain culture of preciousness around parenting. The mommy blogs, the, mommy blogs, the daddy blogs, like just the overall culture of parenting. You know, there's a lot of fear of saying that everything wasn't wonderful or that you felt anger toward your kids. You know, the book speaks to those things and it does. So I think with a certain kind of love and certain kinds of humor. The book is actually not about being a bad parent. It's about being a good parent who swallows all of these feeling. I mean, we could debate how healthy it is to swallow all those feelings, but I think we can agree that it's not good to like blast them at your kid because you know, none of this verbalised. This is like a parent in a room going through with a kid, and there's their internal monologue splice together with what they're actually saying or reading. I guess the deeper message would be giving a certain kind of permission for honesty about the feelings and finding the humor in it as well. I think it is really powerful. Because in all situations whenever you can d- stigmatize and normalize people talking about their struggles. Right. Whether the struggles are with parenting with mental health with physical health, whatever that creates a pathway for people to actually share resources and talk to each other. You know, what I mean totally everybody sitting around thinking like, I am truly the worst. Parents then that's really isolating and that in itself is getting to reflect badly on the kind of Perry become totally and some of the most gratifying emails, I got were from like, therapists, who told me they were giving the book out to their frazzled young parent clients to let them know that they weren't alone, or that's awesome. No, two people who were like reading this book was like opening some type of release valve, and I felt better about myself, and I felt less alone. And I realized that what I was feeling was universal in the. Parenting world that is awesome. That is so beautiful. You have written lots of different types of books for different audiences, and your most well known book could be construed as a parody of children's literature. But I also kind of see it as straddling or blurring the line between children's books and adult books. So do you feel like the boundary between children's literature in adult literature is is that a real thing is that meaningful to, you know, I look back at some of the books I read as a kid, and those were some of the most profound books I ever read they stick with me still they in some ways or more influential than anything of red since what were some of those things that you're reading a young person that's still shape the way you think about writing and reading now some Roald Dahl like Danny champion of the world was like super dope last night. In fact, I pulled out another more obscure role. Dow book called the wonderful story of Henry sugar and six more and six more. I know that one. Yeah. I can't say this about lots and lots of books, but I remember specifically the moment that I pulled that book from the. Bookshelf of my local the Logan square library, you know in Chicago. And I think it was because I was already such a fan of all Di was probably like maybe eleven and I saw this book that I had never I thought I had read all his books, and I haven't heard this one before. And I remember so clearly, you know, I probably remember that better than like whatever episode of a prestige cable drama that I saw last week. And like you're saying there's so much there. That's also about craft. And I think that, you know, I'm a big believer that young people shape, our canons because it's these early experiences of literature that shape are very understanding of who we are as readers, and and what we're looking for. And there's something I've heard Walter Mosely say in a few interviews. He's like most writers lie about who. They're early influences are if you ask them like, oh, you know, Tony Morrison or, you know, E L doctor out, and he's like all y'all your real first influences. We're like Nancy drew, you know, like that is truly truly what touchy what literature is. And it's funny. That's like we have a reticence as a culture. Her to admit that for some reason, you know, I think that's true one of my early revelations around that was realizing that every hardy boys book was exactly the same. Right. Right. Like, you master these structures. And then you're like, wait, a second the reversal always happens in chapter eight and like chapter fifteen they always realize that they're working on the same cases their father, and like chapter twenty like they're always tied up in their father and his friends always bust in and save them. Like, you could see that as trite. But like I remember reading goosebumps as a kid and every chapter is like six pages long in every chapter ends. With an outrageous cliffhanger, these are early lessons about what it means to craft a narrative, and what makes good storytelling, you know. Try it and formulate though, it may be I think there are reasons that those formulas come to exist. I mean, they don't emerge out of a vacuum. They emerged because their affective, and maybe eventually they become less effective through all of this repetition. I have a question. So you have a great voice, if you have a favorite shel Silverstein piece that you wanna Google real quick or that, you know, off the top of your head. I would love to hear you read it. And or if you want to read some of your book, I'm happy to do any of. Those things the easiest might be for me to find my book online. I have it. I can also Q it to you. And then you could well, I don't know if you haven't memorized if you kind of remind me, I think. I can read it, and you can read it back. This is this the trick. Where now I'm reading the book out loud. The cubs and the lions are snoring wrapped in a big snugly heap. How come you can do all this other shit, but you can't lie? The fuck down and sleep the seeds slumber beneath the earth now and the crops that the farmers will reap. No more questions. This interviews over. I've got two words for you kid sleep. Adam. Thank you so much for joining us, and where can the people find more of you? It's been my pleasure. Thanks for having me. I got a website. You know? I don't know. I got a couple books coming out. I got a couple TV and movie things in the work. So, you know, just keep your eye out, Google, Google me. Just go the Ataman's back M A N S B A C H. Yes. Thank you so much. Adam have a great day you to take care. Okay. Peace peace. So so far we've we've had a chance to hear shel Silverstein reflect on a couple of interesting things. Right. Most notably here. The relationship that we have to the lineage of the art. Artists that come before us. Now, I have to Mark it important transition in the remainder of the episode because as the corny horse manure comment sort of foreshadows the remainder of this interview is kinda just going to be shel Silverstein ranting about stuff, which I frankly am really into because I think there's an interesting juxtaposition between the expectations. We have for people who write for children, and the fact that they are actual three dimensional human beings. I mean, maybe that has something to do with the fact that shel Silverstein didn't want his policies doing interviews and stuff with him towards the end of his life. Maybe he ended up feeling like there was too much of a contradiction between the character. He was expected to be on the page and the actual walking talking human being that he was here. I am of course, only speculating, but anyway, let's go ahead and hear some of these fascinating critiques, but it's all good. It's good. It's all good because it's a good way of expressing a lot of different things. And in little coffee shops. You know, one of the big things get here often with a chain gang songs you hear a chain gang song. Sung by a man who's been on a chain gang or who's been in a chain gang type life. You know, what I mean close to it? And what he sings about it. It means something you you see an pimple faced eighteen year old white Protestant kid getting up there, and belting it out about a chain gang. And you wonder what it's all about. You know, you start squirming in your seat. Wishing they'd you know wish you could get you a check and get out of there. He's he's screaming for something else. Then again, obviously, you know, but but he's talking about that chain gang. And then you see some seventeen year old little blonde girl, she gets up there. And she sings songs, I told my captain early in the morning, she don't know from catton's, she don't know from chain gangs, and you know, captain shooting her her buddy dead. She doesn't know that she she she wants to sing something strong. Yeah. Good though that they sing it. Just no, I don't know. I think they should they should they should shut up. I think they should shut up and sing sing something that more fits with what they know. I think they should write more songs to nobody's writing songs. That's the thing that hurts me as far as song the songs go people wrote about their life. Now, I I respect the life. That's gone before you know, the people that live before me and that the produce living Nabet produce the buck of their work before me. But I don't think that their world was any more exciting than this thing right now. I mean, this is it we're doing we're doing things, and we're we're going along with things, and we're changing things and things are happening to us and songs can be written about our life. Not actually you don't write a song about the subway. The way you did about the old nine record the yell ninety seven or something or or you don't write a song about maybe you don't write a song about Harry Truman the way they wrote songs about Lincoln. But still in all I'm talking about the I'm talking about songs about that reflect our own emotions that we're going through and. Often you find people who sing folk songs. They get on another Peppino. Go ahead. Go ahead. They get all involved in the song gets up. The people ask me the words to a song on old song. And you know, that I might sing I sing. And they asked me they said, what was the words to that? And I tell them, and they say and that one line is it I woke up one morning I woke up in the morning. I think what the hell's the difference? You know, but they want to do it like lead belly did it? And and why don't you do it? Like, you do it. Okay. Stop the tape. Stop the day, y'all. Did you know that shel Silverstein was such a hater? Let's run that back. Yeah. Good though that they sing it. Just no, I don't know. I think they should they should they should shut up. Oh my gosh. So funny. I they they should shut up aside from the fact that this is clearly hilarious to me. A pretty interesting detail to note here is that when shel Silverstein talks about songwriting he actually knows what he's talking about. He wrote lots of songs, including the song a boy named sue which the legendary Johnny cash performed at saying Winton prison in nineteen sixty nine. Let's hear it. Well, my daddy told when I was really, and they didn't leave much the mall on me just a soul guitar to empty bottle of food. I don't blame him causing running head. But the meanest thing that he ever did was before he left. He went name me. Sue. Well, they must've opted that was quite a joke. And it got a lot of laughs from Alexa, poked seems I had to fight my whole life. Girl and get this. We're going to play you a little clip shel Silverstein and Johnny cash singing this song together and do it. This is from a nineteen seventy episode of the Johnny cash show, you'll be able to tell whose voices who's a lot of your writing a great deal to me and for one song in particular. She wrote has been largely responsible for a lot of the success. I've had lately shell road abo- named sue. Gatlinburg admit you line. I just hit town and my throat was dry. Stop and have my cell the bruise. I think there's actually something really important that shel Silverstein staying here. I mean, essentially he's talking about cultural appropriation decades before the phrase would actually be used. He's criticizing young white people in the folk music scene in the village in New York City in the early nineteen sixties for having a fascination with music that was music of struggle music of labor that had been created by people whose experiences they themselves couldn't really understand. He's also talking about the fact that rather than tell their own stories. They're totally preoccupied with telling someone else's story and not only that these folks are preoccupied with taking on somebody else's voice. He's criticizing them for affecting an accent or a mode of speech are mode of performance that isn't their own. You know, there's a poem that I wrote that was published a few years ago. It's called to the notebook kid and. It's a poem that a lot of young people get assigned to read in school. And sometimes they used to Email me and say, I'm gonna perform this poem for a contest or I'm gonna read it for my class or I've been assigned it by my teacher. Can you? Tell me the right way to say the poem, or can you send me a video or an audio? Recording of yourself, saying the poem. And it made me really sad. Because the parliament self is about young people that are writers and the importance of using your own voice. And so many high school students had somehow gotten the idea that there was one correct way to read the poem. And that it was my way. And I would always write them back and say, you know, there's no possible way, you can read the poem the way I read it. And there's no possible way that I'd be able to read the poem the way you would read it what you should do is own it, speak it in the way that seems right to you practice a lot and do your best. I'm sure that response resulted in lots of extremely disappointed high school juniors. But I think it's important for us to know that if you're going to be an artist your job is to tell the story that only you can tell that nobody else will ever be able to tell as well as you because it's your truth rather than commodifying and appropriating somebody else's story. Now, I'm starting to sound a little he myself. So I'll stop there. I have to admit to you all that at this point in this show. We were debating. Thing. Playing a clip of Taylor swift performing earth wind and fire's classic song September. Now, of course, Taylor swift a popstar who has many times been accused of picking and choosing aspects of black popular culture that she wants to use an appropriate for herself without fully understanding them or engaging with black audiences in a meaningful way. But I felt ethically. I just did not feel right about forcing you to listen to that rendition of the song. But if you're interested, you can look it up, and I think it reinforces a lot of what shell Silverstein is saying about the importance of using your own voice. I think shel Silverstein himself put it best the two ways. I think. You can either sing about something, you do know and feel and then do it in the way another man would do it. Because it's still something you feel even though you do it in his style or else, you can do something that is completely foreign peer experience, but still do it in your own way. And then it's still right because it's done the wave feel, but the do something that you don't know about in a way that isn't your own. This is phoniness. This is this is this is garbage. You heard it right here, folks. The next time Katy Perry or Taylor swift or insert Kardashian name here is adopting someone else's culture for their temporary amusement just send them this clip. This garbage. Oh, man. I'm never going to get tired of shell Silverstein saying he hates things. But alas, that's it for our show. Thanks so much for listening to this episode of bughouse square with eve Ewing. Join us next time for more from studs terkel the archive the past the present. And maybe if we're lucky the future. Bughouse square with eve Ewing is produced by the studs terkel radio archive and audio archive managed by the WF MTA radio network based at studs as longtime radio home in partnership with the Chicago history museum, which houses archive. I'm your host viewing. Our producer is Katie clocks in in our composer is I Anna woods I'd like to thank project manager, Heather macdougall archivist, Alison shine homes production and distribution manager. Stacey Gerard and multitude productions in our transcription team Aaron Glasgow Maria Cooper and Mark Poletto special. Thanks to. That's miss t ties fourth grade class at girth school, Moshe Kogyo is just say go thirty, but I guess they're more culture than the rest of us archive. Audio was digitized by our good friends at the library of congress division of recorded sound bughouse square with eve Ewing is made possible in part by a major grant from the National Endowment for the humanities exploring the human endeavour. Discover more episodes at WFAN dot com slash bughouse and explore the archive at WFAN dot com slash studs radio archive. And before we say goodbye, I'd like to remind you ad Astra per aspera and a stud said take it easy. But take it. Don't stop the tape. Yet. The podcast is not over. They have some news after we recorded this. We had a conversation with Mitch Myers. Who is Mitch Myers? You ask. He's shells nephew. He runs the shel Silverstein Silverstein archive, and he told us this shells. Parents my grandparents were Helen and Nathan Silverstein and shell was always shell Silverstein. But then we also have this tape saying, you know, Silverstein he was what is the truth? We don't know allegedly shell actually use both Silverstein and Silverstein you can decide for yourself, which you want to say, I feel like shel Silverstein totally played me. But we can all go back to saying Silverstein the stress that you felt over. The course this episode can end we don't have to feel weird about it. I think they should shut up.

uncle Shelby lions writer Adam man ABC Silverstein New York Times studs terkel Chicago eve Ewing shell Silverstein Lafcadio Pulitzer prize Katy Perry Henry sugar America Google Stutz W F M T Hans Christian Andersen
GSMC Book Review Podcast Episode 119: Interview with Brett Fleishman

GSMC Book Review Podcast

48:12 min | 1 year ago

GSMC Book Review Podcast Episode 119: Interview with Brett Fleishman

"Golden State media concepts. Bring you book review podcast by haven for bookworm of all ages and the whitest genres from mystery to memoirs romance to comedy fantasy to Sifi if you love to read this is the podcast for you. It's the Golden State media concepts book review podcast. Hello. And welcome to the GSM book review podcast. Brought to you by the GMC podcast network. I am your host, Sarah. And I am happy to be here with you again on another Tuesday episode. I know it was almost a week ago. But I just wanted to say hope he had a fabulous Halloween. However, you may have celebrated if you went trick or treating if you took trick or treaters if you greeted trick or treaters, whatever you are up to I hope it was fabulous. I love seeing all the pictures on social media and of people's kids, and of people's costumes, and I just think it's a lot of fun. And I try to avoid eating my weight and candy because the, you know, you reach a certain point in life where eating your weight and candied chest isn't good for you. It's probably every point in life. But it gets worse as you get older. So enough about my eating my weight and candy. I am happy against said to be with you. On this Tuesday for another author interview today, I am interviewing Brett Fleischmann who writes poetry collections for children, which I love when I was younger. I loved shel Silverstein I loved a light in the attic I loved where the sidewalk ends a loved his collections of poetry. And I've loved how they ran the gamut from whole areas to actually serious, and then he touched on some topics that I remember reading some of the poems and thinking, wow, you know, I think that's sometimes and somebody actually wrote a poem about that. And it got me interested in poetry before. She'll Silverstein though, my parents gave me a collection of poems, and oh, I cannot remember the title of it. It was beautifully illustrated though, and I loved that. And that also got me interested in poetry. And I even as an adult write some poetry that is very very silly kind of long. The lines of she'll Silverstein or maybe even Dr Seuss, and I love my nieces have poems about them, which I'm sure that they are horrified by so I love that Brett rights collections of poetry four children. He writes, we're going to be talking today in the interview about volume two of three separate collections. He has written of all one and thou volume two for three different age groups so ages kindergarten through second grade third through fifth and fifth through seventh and each level has different. He he puts different different ideas and different types of poetry into each level. So I love a that. He is getting kids interested that these collections of the potential to get kids interested in poetry. I think that is something that maybe maybe children do encounter. Maybe they don't I. But I love that. There is someone out there who is putting the. Effort in to write kind of in the lines of shel Silverstein. He reminds me a lot of shell Silverstein just with the humor of the poetry. And some of the cadence of his poetry. It is the the poems are funny. There are some again that have a deeper meaning to them than just being entertaining. So I appreciate that. And now, let's go ahead and get to that interview. So that you can hear in zone words. But quickly before we get to that interview. I apologize. I forgot to gauge you I'll read you just the beginning. Or the the the blurb on the back of the first book, which is toilet trouble. And it is poems for beginner readers readers K through twelve or K through K through to. I do that in the interview to poems for beginning readers K through two K through second grade, so beginner readers or readers who still like having poems stories read to them and the description of this book is. Is that is a collection of twenty humorous poems designed for beginner readers volume. Two of this series includes a reunion of the big bad wolf, and the three little pigs a surprise birthday present for a baby crocodile and inviting an uninviting hole in an ice skating rink and much much more. So let's go ahead and turn now to that interview with Brett Fleishman. Hi, Brett, welcome to the podcast. Hi, thanks for having me on. Oh, you're welcome. We are here to talk about your poetry collections for children. But before we do that I would love for my listeners to get to know you a little bit. So if you could just share something about yourself. Sure. So I. Thirty five years old, and I live just outside of Boston at work in the financial services industry time, and I spend writing poetry about four years ago. And I also love to play competitive Tennessee around. All right. Thank you for that. So you write poetry for chill. You currently have two volumes for each age group that you write for and those age groups are free beginner readers and grades K through twelve k through to excuse me for intermediate readers, and that's grades three through five and then for advanced readers, which are grades five through seven. You. You have these these three different age groups, let's start with the with the younger one. And the second volume is called toilet trouble. So talk a little bit about this collection of poems. Sure. So each collection of poems what I'm really focusing on is trying to put together poems that are procreate for a specific age group of specific reading level. So my beginner books. The first volume is called if you're round the the next value is called toilet trouble. These are homes that have typically about forty words, the vocabulary is intentionally quite simple, and they're really geared towards children. Who are either just learning? How to read it dependably or are not yet reading but into a reading with the parents, or you know, other lumping adults. Okay. Thank you. When you start a collection. Do you ever have a specific theme in mind, or is it just each poem as it comes? Yeah. It really is more each poem as it comes than I should probably provide just a little bit of background. A few years ago. I started writing poems, and I ended up writing a lot of poems and over the course of a couple of years high put together so many of them that I started to organize them by what I thought would be good reading levels. And so when I putting book book together now, it's really more going through some of the work that I've put together doing a lot of editing, and then so I think ones that I think are particularly good for a specific age group. So there is no I wouldn't say there's a team in terms of all the poems about animals or all the poems about a specific topic. It's really just intended to be poems that I think would be very appealing to the specific age group. Okay. And where do your ideas for the poems? Come come from. They come from everywhere. The. I guess overall what I'm really trying to do is is think like a kid and that, unfortunately, it's very easy for me. I I wouldn't say the most mature person on the planet. So my ability to relate to a seven year old and what they're thinking comes an incredibly naturally. So what I'm really doing? When I'm putting together any home. Really starting off by thinking one, you know, what would be a topic that I think kids would find appealing, and then Secondly, you know, what kind of been I do with that topic to make it interesting for them. So as an example toilet trouble in the name of the second volume for the beginner books. And while the book is called toilet trouble. That's one of twenty poems in the actual book. But in this particular poem in and on the cover of the book, you'll see a child and all you can see. Speaking out, and it looks like the child is lodged inside of the toilet. And essentially, it's a a poem where young boy has a sister. She keeps telling him after he goes to the bathroom that he should put the seat down. He keeps saying no why should I do that? I know you're going to do it. And at one point his sister gets annoyed and decides not to do it. And of course, when he goes to sit down he falls in the. So you know, I just went to a school in Boston. I took up this book, I was reading it to first graders. And I, you know, I guess this is a good example like potty humor because as soon as they saw this one. They said read this read this foam read this hall. Yes. And so so that's the general theme come up with something that I think would be funny for kids and try to put a spin on it. I think would be particularly appealing for them. Right. Well, as as a female, I think all women would re would relate to this particular poem up putting this down. No one wants to fall in. I know my sister would relate to them. Yes. Do you have children? I do I have I have two boys, and they are currently almost fifteen and twelve and when I started to write poems where years ago, they were the perfect audience because of the time they were eight and ten and and that's really the sweet spot certainly for the intermediate books, and I would say that if I looked at all my poems in aggregate. Maybe seventy percent of them are geared towards that sort of, you know, eight nine ten eleven year old age group. So it was a lot of fun. Not only writing the poems like getting instant, and very honest feedback from what should be a pretty accurate reflection of my target audience. Yeah, they're very very honest at that age that, you know, very not not a lot of tact broke one of my favorite things about about one of the things. I really appreciate about children is how honest they are. Yeah. You're not gonna get sort of a. Polite response if they think it's funny they're going to laugh at they don't think it's funny. They're gonna stare at you like, it makes no sense. So that that to me is actually incredibly endearing and I would I would I would say that for anything in the middle of toilet trouble. There is a a ten book poem. This is part two. So will there be ten volumes of poetry for this age group? Yes. That is definitely the intent. I have I think around seven books worth of content right now. So I will definitely do some additional writing, and I will feel quite compelled to finish the entire poem. But I thought it'd be fun cue have a poem that goes from book to book to book. I'm sure what the with the internet. Now, it won't be very hard for people to cobble it together. Even if they don't have all the books at the same time. I just thought it was just a a little bit of a different spin on putting together a poem. Okay. So moving on now to take a hike, which is for the that's your your middle group the third through fifth graders. Talk a little bit about this collection. So take a hike is intended for intermediate readers, and again sort of older elementary school. And you know, I really enjoy writing for this age group because. There. There's a lot more that I can do with my poems and one of the things that I really enjoy about writing poetry is. It's it's not even about the poetry. It's as much about challenging kids and trying to do things that are hopefully humorous, but also. Intelligent or challenging for the actual reader. And so is the intermediate book what I like to do in that regard their two things one. I enjoy including these zany word blenders as part of the collection. So these are word puzzles, essentially, their limericks and within each line of the Limerick. They have a hidden word that they have to find. And it's it's something that I enjoy doing a lot growing up. I loved doing cryptograms and were jump balls and crossword puzzle even today, I still like boggle and scrabble, and and you know, other games like that. What was really fun about jumbled is it was it was clearly intended for children, but they're hard. Really difficult, and yeah, I I wasn't. I was at Logan airport. That's the airport. Tom for you know, in Boston, and I was going on a business trip. And I was sitting there and my slight was delayed. And there were there was a a young girl sitting next with her parents, and I had my a PDF of of one of the books on my laptop. And so I said to our, you know, would you have any interest in reading a poem, or or you know, solving puzzle? And she said sure, and so the long story short is she was solving this puzzle. One of these vani word blenders, and then her she couldn't figure it out or mom started to help her. And then her mom also can figure it out. And then suddenly it was the girl her mom her dad, and they her older sister team over there all the time all these anywhere blunders together, which was. Really, really fun. And and amusing this is that it was something that both tildren and adults would find enjoyable. And I am going to jump in here. So we can take our first break of the podcast. But how cool is it that not only are there poems in these collections? But also zany word blenders and learning about puns, and idioms and all kinds of great things. So we are going to take that first break, and when we come back, we'll be talking more about the second the second book for middle grade readers and then moving onto the book for advanced readers. So stay tuned. You're listening to the GS MC book review podcast, and I'll be right back. Choosing an energy company raises many questions you can make by Tristan natural gas works smarter. Where can I find a company that's easy to do business with? We knows the market best has options to fit my needs to millions of homes and businesses. There's one answer constellation decades of marketing and proven solutions trustee energy energy, efficient, simple, inciteful inflexible. That's what makes pasta Lieshan America's energy choice. Learn more customization dot com slash. Energy. Want to know the latest and hottest music hidden the airwaves, Jill be left out listened to the Golden State media concepts music podcasts g keeps you on everything you need to. Rock hiphop Ambit top forty and we'll throw in news of your favorite artists, concert and tour dates and so much more. Listen, no further because this is the gold standard in music cash. Welcome back to the GMC book review podcast. I'm speaking today with Brett Fleischmann about his collection of poems for children. We were talking before the break about the zany word blenders, which appear in both the intermediate volumes and the volumes for advanced readers since we are at a break. I would also tell you a or give you the description of the second volume of intermediate poetry this book is called take a hike, and it is a collection of thirty humorous poems. Designed for intermediate readers crates three five volume two of the series includes a store that sells human body parts. A girl who controls the moon with her nose, a whitewater rafting trip with an unexpected ending and much much more. So let's go ahead and get back to that interview with Brett Fleischmann, and we are talking about those, Amy word blenders. Now, I'm looking at the first one in this book and in its zany word blunder number one. And in prince says, tennis, no the poem itself is not about tennis. But tennis gives you the clue for the ords that you're looking for. So for instance, on the on the third line. I was trying to figure out what word it was. And it could have been dad. But of course, that has nothing to do with tennis. So. It's health and for me, at least I'll say thank you for giving. The clues. Yeah. And in the in the back of the book, I have an answer t for each of the three right? They were under. So you're absolutely right. It's not that that that particular one is not about tennis. But each of the five lines there's an answer that is specifically about ten right? So that has to be a lot of fun. Maybe a bit of a challenge to come up with those. Yeah. I I would say of all the poems that I've written those are without question the hardest because you're you're not only, you know, as the writer of the poem. You know, not only might trying to make sure that it it. It's into the the right scheme of Limerick. But I'm also trying to write words that I go. Can take the ends of one part of word the beginning of the next part of a word informing new word and all those are within the same theme. So it's it's a challenge. But it's it's fun to create. Yeah. And you also you you say in the beginning of the book that you use a lot of word play that you enjoy puns and idioms. I might even say there are some there's some dad jokes. In the pun. Yeah. And I like that you use us say in the intro. And then you say if it's something that you you're not sure about you don't understand there's an appendix so talk a little bit about your decision to use word play. And you don't you know, you don't dumb it down. You just you put the word play out there. And then there's but in the back. There is an explanation should kids need a little more and a little more explanation for the word play that they might not understand. Yes. So for I guess, the Genesis of this when I think back to. One of my favorite books. Growing up. I'd say one of my favorite books of all time was a book called the phantom tollbooth. It's a children's fantasy novel author's name was Norton juster and. Without going through the you know, the whole book, it's it's essentially about a young boy his name is Milo and he gets a this magic toll booth and end up driving his toy car through it. And then suddenly hands up himself in this foreign land where he's traveling by car. He's got his dog talk. I think is the name of the dog, and he's trying to say these princesses who will take an captive. So that's the Genesis of the that's the story itself. The reason why that story was so inspirational date is because throughout that book juster consistently weaved in these word plays. He would take idioms and puns. And then use them in, you know, multiple ways throughout the book. And I just thought it fascinating. It was so smartly done just really really intelligent humor. And I've always. It's been you know, attracted to that sort of very quick, or, you know, I guess multiplicity in terms of of words and how they can be used. So in in the books that I've created for the intermediate and advanced readers there, always lots of puns in idioms. And so I start off as you mentioned to saying this is what's in the books. If you see a P at the end of a poem. You know, it has a pun in it. If you see an I you know, it has an idiom in it. And you know, some of those are going to be too difficult for the younger readers to understand some of them. They will understand for those who don't understand. I wanna make sure that they can understand it. And and don't read the poem and sort of get it, but not quite get it. So in the back of the book have an appendix section at the beginning of the appendix sex, and I review. What is upon? What is the Hominum? What is an idiom? I try to do in a way that is the painful possible, it's a lesson. But hopefully, it's, you know, reasonably short and hopefully funny lesson once I explain those I then go through each of the poems that have puns in them. And then each of the poems that idioms them, and I described for each one what was meant. And I think that my goal is for this to become a self contained lesson plan, but a fun lesson plan. And it's one of the reasons why as I think about sort of the audience, and and sort of my target audience. I think educators school systems, you know, English classes would be one that would would certainly find it appealing appropriate for the curriculum. The other thing that I liked about this book is. Is that also at the end after the appendix you have a list of poetry contest winners. So talk a little bit about those poetry contests. So I've been fortunate to to go to number of different elements schools, and when I've gone to these schools, I typically have done large group presentations, three of them, they're geared toward different age groups. So there's a lesson about rhyming with his for kindergarteners and first graders. There's one about pun, which is more for for third and second and third grade and idioms with his four fourth and fifth grade. And after doing these very large presentations, I'm I'm lucky to be able to reach a large audience all at one. And so at the end of the presentations after explaining to them, you know, what puns are how. Is my palm. I've I've offered to have a poetry contest where everyone who participates in the poetry contest will be eligible to have their their poem published. And so what I've done for a handful of students in a few different districts is select winning poems. And then essentially take the poems of the authors and ask my illustrator to create illustrations for their specific poems. And I just think it's a really cool thing. You know to have someone is, you know, eight years old ten years old eleven years old be able to say to their friends and family. Hey, did you normally published author? You know, that's something that seems to be very inspirational for them when I mentioned it in the presentation. That's awesome. And do you choose the winners or how does that work? Yes. I have I have chosen the winners. There have been times where I've narrowed it down and then asked others for vice including some the teachers from the schools, but I I like I like being able to review them on my own, I guess because this clearly no bias, I don't know any of the students, and you know, I'm afraid if the teachers are too involved, you know, they could perhaps have certain preferences. So from my perspective having a clean slate and just reviewing all it takes a little bit more time. I bought my my son helped me in in selecting the winners. So it's it's me. But it's really me and my two boys as well. Thank you. And then finally we have the advanced readers fifth through seventh grades and this one is called bedtime story. So talk a little bit about this one. Sure. So that time story, and my Vance books are in many ways in terms of just pure content. Similar to the intermediate books. So like the book bedtime story has the anywhere blunders, and like the intermediate book bedtime story has lots of puns idioms with the appendix sex in set up in a very similar way, the differences between the advanced book and intermediate book are I guess there. Couple of differences one is I use a completely different illustrator for the beginner intermediate books us one hour straighter. He's fantastic. His 'lustration. Are I would say more cartoony is how would describe it? And they're, and they're athlete fantastic. Ethic. I feel like as as a book is designed for older children, so fifth grade sixth grade, you're talking about the end of element your school, even the beginning of middle school. Those cartoonist rations are sometimes extremely appealing still and other times, they might be considered, you know, almost two babyish, you know, that that's what my younger brother would look at. I'd rather look at something, you know, older. Right. And so I have a different spin advanced book. He's he's outstanding as well. Just a very different type of stray Shen does these sort of messy watercolors, you know, I describe it as art that you could you know, you could frame and put in your home. In fact, I've I've put a lot of his restrictions on campus in my home. I like the artistic look of the meal stray shins. The other difference between the intermediate and the advances in intermediate book, the typical poem is, you know, eighty one hundred words in the advanced book, it's typically more than two hundred words, and then the the level of difficulty of the vocabulary is is notably more challenging and some of the advanced poems as well. Thank you. And there is another poetry contest. At the end of this one just with one one poll. No. So is there a difference in the the advanced readers the whole tree contests for the advanced readers? I would just say it was more function of the schools that I went to than anything else. So most of my school visits so far been two elementary schools that particular winter was a school that I did. To middle school. And so I was intentionally targeting an older audience. And and that's why only one was for that particular one. Let's go ahead and take this opportunity to take our second break of the podcast. And when we come back, we'll be concluding the interview with Brett, so stay tuned. You're listening to the GMC Booker view podcast, and I'll be right back. Tired of searching, the vast jungle of podcasts. Now, listen close. And here this out. There's a podcast network that covers just about everything that you've been searching the Golden State media concepts podcast. There were his here thing less than podcast bliss with endless hours of podcast covered from news sports, music fashion, looking entertainment fantasy football and so much more. So stop blurted around and go straight out to the Golden State media concepts podcast network. Jaren t to fill the podcast. Whatever it may be visit us at WWW dot GS MC podcast dot com. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter and download us on I to sell cloud and Google play. Welcome back to the GMC Booker view podcast. And we're about to get the inclusion of my interview with Brett Fleischmann about his collection of children's poetry. I do wanna give you the description of the third and final book that we talked about today. And that is the one designated for advanced readers in grades five through seven it's called bedtime story. And it is a collection of twenty five humorous poems designed for advanced readers volume two of the series includes a poorly planned treasure hunt. A rather chaotic manure machine a very competitive laundry shooting game and much much more. So let's get back to that interview. The conclusion of that interview with Brett Fleishman. So volume three is is next. Are you working on that? Currently. So the answer is no. So I probably the first three books, I guess between you know, August and September of two thousand seventeen and then the next three books are being officially released this week this upcoming week. So six books in a little bit more than a year has been a lot of fun and rewarding to do, but it's also been incredibly exhausting. So I I think for next year, I'm planning to to publish one book, and it's going to be a bit different. So in everyone of my books, so far it's been a collection of poems. It's range from about twenty for the beginner level to you know, thirty or more than thirty four the other books. I have a few poems that I've written that are much longer. Their fifteen hundred words or eighteen hundred were and one of them that I wrote and have had mostly illustrated as one called chasing Santa Claus. And so that is one that I am hoping to publish at some point in two thousand nineteen as a standalone poll that has it was that accompany each of the versus it sounds like there's a lot of work. I mean, just, you know, writing a novel is kind of one cohesive story. This is in some ways, you know, there there's smaller, but you have to come up with a lot more ideas for each book. Yeah. I I actually love writing the Paul. I love spending time with the children breed them going to schools, but the actual publishing of the books and the not worth it goes into it is it's a lot. And I work I work fulltime in a in a in another job. And it's yeah. The for those who are dedicated full-time to writing and and able to make that their career I so much respect for how much work is involved in being a published author. I wish I could dedicate one hundred percent of my time to it. But it's it's. It's incredibly rewarding to finally get through the entire process. It is a culmination of of quite a bit of time. But I think it's definitely worth it in the end you mentioned before that you started writing poetry about four years ago was was being a published author something that you always wanted to do. No, it wasn't actually to be honest. I this is this came out of absolutely nowhere. My background is definitely more of a MAC person more of a finance person. And the reality is that I did love actually love shell Silverstein. And when I was younger I used to read stuff constantly, I'm where the okay the light. The attic those were books that I just read basically nonstop high also. Always I was really really liked. We're weird. Al yankovic. He's the guy guy that writes, all the toothy source spoofs taking famous songs and just rewriting them. With silly words. So so I've always liked poetry. I've always liked rhyming and the silliness of it, but until four years ago, I I never poem, and I really had never focused on writing specifically. And I think the reality is I, you know, at the time I was going through a pretty stressful personal situation and. You know, as I look back on it. I'm pretty confident that my need to find some sort of an outlet something to just take my mind off of a stressful situation is really what became the catalyst for writing that first poem. And you know, after I wrote it I showed it to my boys. And I said, what do you think? And they said this is pretty good. You should keep doing it. And I didn't I I really didn't know if it was that good or not. But it was fun. And it was a diversion, and it it proved to be, you know, a really wonderful outlet. And so I just kept writing writing, right? And after a couple of years, I you know, I said, okay. Yeah. Written quite a bit. Now. Maybe I should try to start publishing these. And so it's it's one of the thing. I love about the story is I know idea that this was something. I could do. And when I go to schools and visit home EFI school students. Whenever there's a Q and A I always try to weave this in. If if it makes sense in the context of their questions because I you know, I think it's just an important lesson there. There's so many kids that you know, antidotes that feel like, you know, I'm not really that. Good say, and you know, all these other people that are really good at something. But I I just don't feel like I've any good at and the reality is, you know, if someone said to me five years ago, do you think you're good at writing poetry out of said, no, you know, I don't write poetry. But the fact that I was able to find, you know, an interest that I had no idea existed, and then create, you know, a completely new hobby from it and something I've found to be really entertaining. When warding fulfilling thing, I think is is great because I tell the. Kids. You know, you may not think you have a unique skill. But maybe you just haven't found to get like who's to say you don't have that skill. You just don't know where it is. You're trying to find it still. And I've seen kids kinda light up when I said that because the reality is I believe that you know, you might not know it now. But that doesn't mean you won't discover it later. That's that's wonderful. Thank you so much for that. You mentioned shell Silverstein who is one of my favorites. And I was thinking a lot about show Silverstein steam as I read your poems. Do you have favorite authors? John Russia's for when you read now, I would say that when I have time to read I definitely have a preference for fiction over non I love novel that have really rich character development. I've I've always liked. Sort of the complex interesting characters. There's a. Author that I read quite a bit of in the past. And and I I feel like I should re read his books is name is Richard Rousseau. And he's written. Actually, I think you wanna Pulitzer prize for his novel empire falls. And then he's had a number of books that have ended up turning into movies. And so something that's fictional something. That's light. There's enough intense. Stressful stuff that happens in everyday life. So when I read I like to sort of put myself in some something, I think is, you know, interesting relaxing, and and as far away from reality as possible. Yeah. I understand that. Do you have a website, and where can people find you on social media? So for my website. It's quite simple. It's just WWW dot my name with his B R E T T S L E. I S H M A N dot com. So WWW dot rep Fleischmann dot com. And then I am present on social media mostly on Instagram and Facebook, and if if you type in funny bone tickling poetry that should get you to to be a sites pretty quickly. Thank you for that. Is there anything that? We haven't talked about in terms of writing or poetry or your books that you that. We haven't covered that you'd like to talk about. I think the maybe the one thing that we haven't touched on is for every one of my book. I I always include a learning lesson in the buck. So, you know, my first goal is for the poem to be funny and make the kids laugh and my second call particularly for the intermediate and advanced books is not only make them laugh, but also to make them think. But I like the idea of having something in the books that are that is, you know, more of a learning lesson. And so as I think about bedtime stories. So this is the the second volume, it's the, you know advanced book, there's a poem at the end of the book. It's called famous people bay, and essentially, you know, a teacher says to our students, you know, I'm going to ask you a question. And and you know, just give me your answer you can't pass. And she says, you know, let's start off with painters. You know, who's who someone famous that, you know, and then this person raises their hand. And and they end up saying Van Gogh and the teacher says, it's a great choice. You know, your answers, really smart. But when he was alive, you know, he he's barely. So as art. And so as it turns out Van Gogh fans really sold virtually nothing when he was living, which is truly amazing. And then they talk about authors, and, you know, someone after Dr Seuss and she says, oh, that's yeah. Did you know that his first book was turned down twenty seven times? And of course, everyone surprised by that. And finally, they talked about athlete. Michael, jordan. And of course, he ended up being cut from his either Varsha your JV basketball team in high school and so. The way the poem ends is the teacher, basically says, you know, their famous, you know, indeed. And then just those who aren't afraid to fail those who do succeed, and you know, so I try to have something in each book that will be appreciated by the children reading it. But also, hopefully, if the parents are reading with them something that they would be sort of proud to convey to their kids as well. Okay. Thank you so much for that. And I wanna thank you for taking the time out of your weekend to talk to me about your your poetry collections. Really? There's so much fun. And as I said, they reminded me of shel Silverstein. So thank you so much for coming on the podcast and talking to me. Thank you very much. I really appreciate your time and have a great rest of the weekend. Thanks you too. As always I want to once again. Thank my guest, author Brett Fleischmann who took the time to come and talk to me about his poetry collections of again. I love that. He writes poetry for various age groups to try to get them interested to get them interested in puns and idioms and word play hitting clues. The the word puzzles zany word, blenders, which I just think it's a lot of fun and the books of provide a great opportunity for children to become acquainted with poetry, if they aren't already and as he said in the interview, he works with elementary age groups, elementary classes and teaches them about puns in idioms, and rhyming and all those wonderful things. So I just I think that's wonderful for you. My wonderful listeners who I want to as always as always thank for joining me. We do have a giveaway opportunity. I have a copy of each of the books that we talk. About today. So each of those age groups toilet trouble, take a hike and bedtime story. So if you are interested in winning a copy of one of those books, all you have to do is go to our social media, Facebook, Twitter or Instagram and comment on the post episode one nineteen interview with Brett Fleischmann. That's it simple. As that. If you have a child in your life who you would like to introduce poetry or who already loves poetry, someone maybe who loves shel Silverstein, and you want to continue to encourage that or you like to read poetry with them. These books are great. And as I said, I have one of each age group, so gore social media and enter to win a copy of bedtime story. You can enter until Sunday November eleventh. And then I'll announce the winners on Monday November twelfth thank you so much for joining me. Thanks again to Brett for joining me for the interview. I hope you're having a wonderful week. And hope you'll join me again on Thursday. In the meantime, go out there and get yourself lost in a good book. Thanks, you've been listening to the Golden State media concepts book review podcast, part of the Golden State media concepts cast network, you can find this show and others like it at WWW GS MC podcast dot com. Download our podcast on itunes, Stitcher. Soundcloud and Google play just type in MC to find all the shows for the Golden State media concepts podcast network from movies to music from sports, entertainment, and even reared news. You can also follow us on Twitter and on Facebook. Thank you. And we hope you enjoyed today's program.

Brett Fleischmann shel Silverstein Brett Boston Facebook tennis Brett Fleishman shell Silverstein Limerick GMC Silverstein Dr Seuss Twitter Google Sifi Sarah
How Do I Respond To "How Do I Get Promoted?" - Part 1

Manager Tools

20:40 min | 1 year ago

How Do I Respond To "How Do I Get Promoted?" - Part 1

"Welcome to manage tools. How do I respond to how do I get promoted part one? This cast answers these questions. What do I tell my Rex when they want to get promoted, what are the key criteria in helping director promoted, but we want to answer these questions and more heap. Listen, here we go. It's that time of the year again, we're bringing our manager and effective communicator conferences to Denver. It's kind of like Christmas in July because we only come once a year when we're there it's fun and jam packed couple of days. We bring gifts the gift of knowledge that is, and then we leave again for a full year. Don't miss your chance to join US July twenty third and twenty fourth registered today at manager dash tools dot com forward slash training. More experienced that directs often much work quickly than we expect are going to ask. How do you promote it? And in my experience, most managers include myself can get frustrated with that question. Yeah. In fact, it was part of the rap against millennial millennials has been for quite a while that, you know, they're here for year and settled there wanting to get promoted, don't the stand. Now you have to earn your. Earn your stripes, you know, we can't just promote you because you wanted to be promoted and blah, blah, blah, first of all, the press on it suggesting that this is new is joke. People have been asking this question for decades. Okay. You asked I asked it. We're definitely not millennials there. Some people who knew that they could wait. And it didn't do any good to ask depends on the boss and so on. But the idea that this is a relatively new phenomenon is ludicrous as we said before many times we have seen newspaper clippings from delayed eighteen hundreds, which says this new crop of young men, feel entitled and summer from the fact that this is not a new thing and separate from the fact that managers all own our response to it. What it tells you is people don't now. People who ask you how to get promoted don't now now look, if somebody says to you how you promoted around here. Well, that may not be a legitimate question and you may need to ask are you just complaining or do you want to sit down and have a substantive conversation about how things work around here? But when somebody asks, they don't now and probably, you didn't know when you were an individual contributor and you may not even really have known when you first became a manager, having gone through the process yourself in some fashion, most people, don't know, and most companies don't publicize it might do you ever? Remember seeing a document that said, this is how we promote people around here. Yes. About one hundred fifty pages. Full details with exact list of things you had to do with, with measurable 's and metrics are. Yeah. No. Yeah. No. That didn't see that. Yeah. So people don't know. And who would be the one to tell them it'd be used a manager. So here's our guidance. First of all, we're gonna make the case that this is a fair. And even a good question for people to ask, and we'll prove that we'll take you through an answer. In detail, the first thing you say is I'm glad you asked because if it's a good question you want to be glad that they asked. Second point the big point you're gonna make your answer is getting promoted starts with significant results. Then you're gonna talk about building great relationships. And then you're probably going to explain the process results in relationships are what's within the control of the direct, but the direct also wants to know. Okay, what's this process? I'm going to go through, and you definitely want to start with results in relationships as opposed to the process, because if what you talked about, is the process people want to game the system. They want to say, okay, we'll if that the process that I need to do this, and you don't want your people doing that. You want them going with meat and potatoes. Career success rather than hadn't get promoted here because I know the system better than anybody else. That's our outline. Okay. I guess your first point, which is the fair, even a good question comes from the common response, we here for managers that somehow this question is negative, and it's not right. Yeah. You know, and I get it to some degree that there's some resentment they take it as an attack. I think some cases like if you're ready to get promoted, I would have promoted you already. Right. So, so why are you asking me? Of course, it's stupid for a manager to say if you're ready to applauded, Ida promoted you because managers can't promote their direct that's not where the power resides. Right. And there's some disappointment to right? Don't you know how hard this is, you know, you're not ready? It reminds me I've quoted it. I'm sure many times before here, the famous children's poem God's wheel by shel Silverstein, where a kid comes across God with the steering wheel stuck into the earth. And he says, what's that God says that's the wheel? I steer the world with you wanna give it a try kids. Sure where do I sit how much do I get wins lunch? When can I quit? God says coming back, my wheel. Oh, you're not ready. Yet, in other words, it's not about you, and just because you wanna promotion, you'll have to be mature enough to be worthy of the promotion. But look, again, all of this takes a negative view of the situation. This is a fair question. People who join an organization, and assume they're going to have a long career all things being equal. Let's assume for moment that they have made an assumption that the company won't treat them poorly on purpose and all things being equal. There are barriers to exit, you know, going through another job search. It's not to say that it's wrong or evil to leave a company, but there's an assumption that people would like to stay all things being equal K. So if they're going to stay having a discussion having talking about promotions reasonable, it's a fair question because nobody gets a class on how promotions work. Nobody knows again. I don't think most managers know the process until they go through it from a chair on the other side of the process. But here's the thing that I, I think it's a really good question to here. Think about it, who among anybody on your team is most likely to get promoted the answer's simple, the best they're nearly the best promote performers. Why would we not want everyone on our team to try to become our best or nearly our best performer if the downside of that is that we have the challenge of leading, some of them know that they won't get promoted in terms of the overall and the day to day effort of getting the best out of people, that's a trivial negative that, you know, to have to say to somebody eating promoted, or, you know sorry and then have them leave because three or four of your people became top performers that their names could be in the hat for promotion. It may be a tough conversation. But their performance will over over the period of time between the time they asked and the time, they don't get it will have more than made up for that conversation. Your life will be immensely easier as a manager. If you have people trying to get promoted now, I think that many folks have negative approach because the direct who asks, who's not a great performer, maybe saying you need to tell me how to game the system. Well, okay. But they don't know any better Kate. They don't. Maybe that's actually the case, and we're going to walk through an answer in detail, which will be really obvious that a poor performer will say, oh, I get it. But you give the same answer essentially the same answer to a top performer, and about him performer. We think to a smart manager a discussion about it promotion is basically a discussion about improving performance, at least in the near term. The payoff pitch later is an organizational process that we don't control. Okay, let's not. Price stupid below the baby out with the bathwater. Let's not be offered. The Ferrari of I would really like to improve my performance, and then complain that we already have a small car. Right. It's like yeah. It's like, yeah, I don't I don't like that shiny new thing. It's not to my taste. It's the wrong color, something. Let's not complain about the weight of gold bars. Somebody hands us, you know, in the movies when they make robberies in action movies. And they're stealing gold bars. There's always a bit where the goal bar is heavy gold is dense and it's heavy. So I think I don't know. I don't know how much they weigh, but they're not light. But somebody starts handing you go bars. Don't complain. If you're a C, suite exac, who has layers of management below you is there a common managerial practice that you all follow? Well, we all know successful organizations have processes in place for most everything we often learn that when it comes to management, not so much. If you believe most of your managerial compliment is not following a common set of behavior to drive results in retention. Then you may want to consider bringing manager tools onsite to deliver are effective manager training. It's affordable at fifteen thousand dollars for a full day of training and roadmap licensing will work with up to thirty folks. Contact Maggie at manager dash tools dot com or visit our website. For more information. Look something else. Nobody is ever told. But folks, it wouldn't be unreasonable for a brand new professional to assume they might be told you're going to get a promotion, if you do these things they want it to be a clockwork orange. They want it to be dot your i's cross your T's seventeen steps in this order, and you can get promoted, and who wouldn't now as a manager or senior manager director, you're a little more jaded. You know that's not how it works. You know, there are politics, you know, they're all kinds of things which were going to get into. And yes, it's true that when they assume there are seventeen staps that is a selfish thing to assume, you know, I want the company to make it easy for me. But it's also a naive thing to assume that it. May just be gosh. This is a big company and people get promoted the Amine. There's not a handbook that you follow. I mean, there's a lot of rules about other stuff L the rules about cleaning up the microwave in the break room. There's rules about which candy company can bring us snacks into the vending machine. But look, our direct legitimately do not know how to get promoted, they don't know the system and they don't know what to do, and it's been ARC's peri- working with thousands tens of, thousand of, I guess, over the last thirty years, is that there are two things that contribute to that. The first one we've already alluded to is promotion processes are undocumented. I mean, nobody's going to argue with that, right. To Rex who ask are wondering legitimately, how that will thing works nothing wrong with that. Now what they probably don't know is what Mike and I joked about a minute ago is that no organization ever lays out a clear measurable way to a promotion. Just don't do it. There's value in the process, not being published because publish process is generally, when there are rewards involved, a more rigid process and more rigid means less flexible and less able to be massaged based on all kinds of situation. And further think about a standard promotion process that you could write down for every role in the organization, different roles car different criteria and the criteria would be ever changing based on, who that person's bosses what the mission of the division is what's most viable in the marketplace. Right. You know as the saying goes when the railroad station manager. Was asked whether a train was due to be on time. He said, well, that depends and then he was asked, what is it pinned on? He says, well, that depends, there are too many factors that go into the director or senior director making a decision to promote ex wires the based on, again so many factors that you couldn't write it all down. Even if somebody performs exceptionally, and I think most people would agree. That's the biggest factor. And by the way, a direct who argues with you will. That's it's all politics. You just need to dissuade him with that. It's not all politics and we'll talk about politics and a bit. Look, even if somebody does great if organizational performance in the marketplace is lagging promotions are less likely. How are you going to write that into a measurable process? That's not easy. Something else. While promotions are obvious vehicle for growth in most long careers in an organization. Promotions are only part of how the organization sees it structure promotions sort of look differently from the standpoint of the individual where there are wards to be achieved versus from the organization side. It's only a part of the soup around how fluid the organization is corporate structures are much more fluid than most of us realize senior exact have great latitude in reshaping their organization to maximize effectiveness and productivity and therefore ultimately profitability. So it could be normal for things to be going great. And for there to be over a period of a couple of three years, notable growth in the marketplace, where the executive says, you know, we were. Poorly structured and bloated. And I think the growth is going to put us right in terms of number of employees. And even though it's true that a rising tide lifts all boats. And we'll talk about that it may be that the boats get lifted just that you're span of control grows because there are some organizations that think everybody should only manage five people, and that is not true. And it's expensive, so there are so many factors in criteria that you couldn't write it all down. Look, I'll say differently even if your top performer ever changing market conditions mean an ever changing changing internal promotion marketplace. Even if a manager leaves the organization doesn't reflexively fill that role with promotion. That somebody else there may be a reason to restructure even that doesn't mean that someone wasn't ready even if the people who don't get through emotion. Take it that way. Oh, look, they don't think we're ready. It's not that at all you're looking at the opportunity for promotion and disappointed. You didn't get what you wanted. The organization is simply saying, can we got we got twenty five factors here things have changed, and different people. We've said it before that when it comes to organizational structure, the rule is you start with a line and blocked chart without people in it, and the line, and blocked heart is weighted and structured based on what the customer needs and what the mission of the organization is maybe your customer service, heavy, maybe your engine nearing heavy, maybe your design, heavy whatever maybe your service and support, heavy, maybe you don't care about services support. So you build lying block chart, then starting at the top, you put a name a person in. Each block, and the moment, you put a name in that block all of the blocks that report to now not that role, but that person, get relooked you say, okay. Well, she's now, standing manager, she can handle more than five people should we give her eight or ten and you ripple through the entire organization doing that as you staff the organization. Well, if Mike my boss and Mike gets promoted and Mike's a great manager, and he has ten people working for him, when he gets the promotion to the next level, all of us are thinking one of us will take his job, but in fact, someone else gonna take his job that's been in the wings somewhere else across the division. And when he takes her she takes his job, and she's not an experienced manager. Some of us may actually get re purposed or even in a way demoted because she can only hand five Durant handle five racks. Now, most directs don't want to hear this, but we're going to tell them okay, the second factor is that most the wrecks are getting far too little performance communications from us, their managers, forget, even about whether or not you're using the manager tools feedback model. Overall performance calms including our feedback model are one of the core weaknesses of every organization from a managerial perspective, we've ever seen even or consider famous for direct candid performance discussions communications zone are nowhere near the limit of what most direct want. And it's unfortunate that it's often made more difficult because organizations who pride themselves on radical or brutal performance calms spend so little time making a case for building a trusting relationship with your directs that when they actually deliver the candor it comes across as brutal. It's way more than candidate are there. People who can take. Yes. Will that organization tend to recruit people who can take that kind of thing? Yeah. But don't make a mistake for second that those people are all superstars in the making because for many of them, they're just maladjusted and don't care about anybody. Thanks, everyone. That's it for this week. We'll continue on this topic next week. In the meantime, have a great one. So.

Mike director senior manager director Denver shel Silverstein ARC Ida Durant Kate exac Maggie Rex executive senior director fifteen thousand dollars thirty years three years
Episode 13 - Neurodivergent ADHD with Anjie Furian

The I've Been Wrong Before Podcast

39:17 min | 7 months ago

Episode 13 - Neurodivergent ADHD with Anjie Furian

"I've been wrong for PODCASTS. About tackling the intersection of disagreement treatment and relationships few conversation. Sometimes sometimes my guest is either way we talk to each other. My guest shares their passion for our topic. I story about being wrong if you've ever been wrong if you've ever disagreed with somebody the I've been wrong before podcast for you. You can find us at our website. WWW DOT wrong before dot com that's www dot wrong before dot com or subscribe to the. I've been wrong before podcasts. On Apple All podcast or whatever streaming service you get your podcast from subscribe seal. Never miss an episode. Now let's get started. And she fury in welcome to more than Dreaming Studios. That's I know it's a long commute from you. All the way from mm over there on the other side account so ladies gentlemen. This is our sound engineer. Hello she's the one who makes me sound better than I have a right to sound She has saved at least four. or five of the recordings that I made aid that sucked but and was able to bring something out of them that was that was actually listenable. They did not suck but they did not the WHO wants to put so far. Maybe so the reason that we're here today talking to you was one. We screwed up the very first. I recording I ever made with you. Yeah that was great it. Yeah so we learned that. Did we did learn. But what we're here today to talk about is the misconceptions that people have about a it's an add and I say ADHD Attention deficit hyper activity disorder. Correct that's the current label for it the label and the DSM A we love table's not okay so you're my wife and I know a lot about you but our audience does not so I'm GonNa be asking you some questions to get that going. Of course how old are you. I am forty three K.. And yes I have to think about it now you forty three when were you diagnosed with. ADHD when I was forty two a year ago at the end of this month. Wow So. How'd that happen well? I don't have just. ADHD I also have PTSD from childhood trauma. I was going to counseling therapy for these things because they were being brought back up from my job because I work with children. Would that also have a lot of trauma ads. I was dealing with a lot of that stuff as always talking to my therapist. She paused looked at me. Copter head and said have you ever been tested for. Add or ADHD and. I said no and she asked me if I'd thought about it and it's not really so she. You suggested that I talked to my doctor. My primary doctor and I was able to set up an appointment with a psychologist took a test and came out most definitely. Adhd and she welcomed me to the trip she congratulated related me so you had never been diagnosed as ADHD prior to this right or add or Lazy Child Syndrome. I'm or any of those things that they have called it in the past you. May you made it through all school and college and The tickets you got for your teaching degree you may through all of that being ADHD and no one noticed until the psychologist right wall you must not have a very bad case of ADHD. Then that's not true okay. ADHD is a spectrum like a lot of brain disorders which is what Adhd is a brain disorder. It affects prefrontal CORTEX. I think and executive function Shen. Okay see someone with my kind of rain. The the brain is slightly smaller than a narrow typical person K.. Bureau typical being being people like me maybe more or less probably the only time. I've been called typical but my particular flavor of ADHD is a mix of hyperactive and inattentive. But I show more of the inattentive than I do. The hyperactive because may hyperactivity is more inside my brain versus outside of my body part of that is because I learned ways to groping is yes coping mechanisms to keep myself from being outwardly. Hyper his right now. What what our audience? I can't see you have a little squishy ball and you are squashing. The life out of the squishy balls so I'm nervous because you behind the Mike Mike. I have in front of the Mike instead of being behind the Mike Right now is. I'm a little nervous okay. Well don't need to be nervous. Does he know you. You know me I know you. We just don't know all these other people who are listening. That's an who cares as new despite yesterday's might be six people just San might be only the people we know. Our numbers are saying differently though. Yes our numbers are just Taylor gentleman. Sorry right for the interruption but this is our very first paid advertisement and will this is how we keep the lights on and the podcast flowing blueberry podcasting services which is the hosting service that I use get thirty days. A- blueberry podcasting free this includes hosting resting in stats and a wordpress site if you need one. Publishing is a simple as create upload and publish use Promo Code B. L. U. Zero one three to get started today the blueberry way of podcasting. Were you own your own brand. Ip and control your podcast feed is the reason that blueberry podcasters the longest live shows and podcasting space. So folks just remember if you want to get thirty days free of Blueberry podcasting all you have to do is use our Promo Promo Code B. L. U. Zero one three B. L. U.. Two zero one. Three thanks and now back to the show. So this diagnosis. How'd you feel because you never thought you were? ADHD NO so. How'd you feel when you were told? Hey go check this out. I did a lot of processing the feelings. Were not a Doug clearly identifiable for me when I was like yeah okay. Sure I'll go check it out. Whatever there's a lot of background processing going on 'cause I I thought maybe because okay? I had difficulty in school i. What kind the difficulty are we talking about Reading comprehension math or academically. Actually my best subject until until I made it to high school was math prior to middle school. My best subject was reading. I was even tag program when I was in grade. School and the tag program is talented and Gifted Bird Oregon. You're also you're also native Oregonian right yes I am. Not many people can claim that we're GONNA WE'RE GONNA be proud native Oregonians. Oh you're so the talented gifted program as a kid so I believe that a lot of people when you say somebody is. Adhd they think of somebody who's not doing well in school and you were the talented gifted program so nobody had you know you are doing well to a point mhm part of that is because I really wanted to be at school because I didn't want to be at home so if I could be doing something for school. I was a little bit happier but when I hit middle school and I had to be responsible for all Manshat and be in seven different classes with seven different teachers in seven different sets of kids that I had to interact with I. I barely remember middle school. It was so stressful very much a blur essentially when I hit seventh grade. I lost the ability to do well in school. That had you mean. I thought I had talked topped out. I thought that was as smart as I was going to get the seventh grade level. Sixth grade sixth grade level because in sixth grade. I I was reading ahead of my grade level then I got into middle school and then getting CS and ds in all my classes and except a third except art art. I did well now. This is a a tell of. ADHD is the fact that the child can focus. Well can do well if it interests them. Yes but if it's not a true interest than it's not it's harder for them to retain the information they receive. Yes when it's not something you're interested in because okay so I I got diagnosed and then I wanted to know all about it. So I've done some reading articles and the sheer and watching of of videos and things like that to to learn more about why I. AM The way I am so when somebody with ADHD tries to focus in on something that they're not interested the harder they try the more their brain wants to shut down Suits it's like literally putting up blocks in front of being able to do it. Yes yes. Let's sell rough and you didn't know you had adhd no and nobody else knew you had ADHD plus you had the childhood trauma on top with that. Yes I have the advantage. I remember last year when you were getting Going into be diagnosed I was scared. I know that but I went with you to be your your outside person. They asked everybody to being diagnosed to also have somebody who knows them. Well come with them. Correct yes while I went with you and they basically gave us the same test. You answered the questions for yourself and I answered the questions questions. The exact same questions as an observer of you. Yes but for the psychologist graded your test. She she had she had talked to us about stuff and she said that your your childhood trauma. PTSD PTSD can present like ADHD. Yes so she's she was saying. Don't be surprised if you don't have. ADHD because the childhood trauma creating PTSD may have have created same symptoms and it would require a different treatment right than Adhd. They're not exactly the same symptoms but they do fall in the same category similar categories you. They do overlap. Things like inattentiveness urgency being unable to concentrate. Yes memory memory emory problems. Yes so we're sitting there and I remember sitting with psychologist. My memory of this is is she very carefully led us to believe that you probably really did not have adhd right and then she graded the tests took about twenty minutes for her to grade. Radim assessments assessments. Came back to US sat down and said welcome to the tribe as you have. ADHD and it was another. Now I I. I'm a numbers person. It's like okay. What's the score the Angie needed to have? It was what you needed to have a forty. I don't remember exactly with the numbers were but I know that I was well. Above you were twenty points higher than the war there. There's by believe if the floor whenever there was no question rush. Yeah if the floors forty you were a sixty and right you know. There's only a little bit. There's there's only like another twenty points above that right. So you're in the tribe. What did you have wrong about what? ADHD was when because this is this is something you hadn't considered that you had and suddenly they're telling you you you have it. What were the misconceptions? You have that you were like Crap basically the societal misconceptions of ADHD. Because when when I was growing up eighty it was. Add at that point I would not have been recognized because I wasn't isn't out of control. I wasn't hyper. I wasn't throwing things blurting out and and doing all these things that are associated with hyperactivity. But what I was doing is spacing out and not paying attention and doodling all the time and and bouncing my leg playing may fingers and chewing on pens and little things things that helped keep my body in check because I was called wiggly worm when I was little because I could never sit still so to keep from getting in trouble being constantly told us it's still I found whatever little ways I could move move. That wouldn't bother anybody. I I have to say living with you. You're not one to be still doing just one one thing at a time unless it's something you're totally focused on that. And that's what that's called hyper focus right. Yes when you hyper focusing on something that's it and that's where you're at in your whole body goes down to that one point and eight hours later you get me back Yeah we definitely use that to our advantage when it comes to editing The the sound the episodes. That's that's I'm just GONNA go. That's a feature not about but things like it is a little frustrating for me living with you When I want to sit down and watch a movie and for me at my focus is on the movie of hang out? That's what I'm GonNa do and you you need to be doing something else. Also while watching the movie legs move in your coloring your plan on your phone. You're still watching the movie. You're still giving it attention. It's just just you. It's like you have multiple channels. He gets what it feels like. And you do something to take one of those channels so that you can receive on the others others. That's one of the things that got me through. College was listening to music. I did my homework to keep myself but it had to be music that I was familiar with so that it wouldn't pull my attention away from what I was trying to do. So because you are music aficionado new music would would drag your brain rain away from whatever. You're trying to learn to this new thing that you were you wanted to learn yes Maghreb IRT LE headphone time. A lot of music playing in the house and stuff. When you're studying yes and it took me? It took me about five years to get US hits degree but in getting my associates associates degree. I was able to combine some of the classes and some credits to be able to get two certificates also in things that I wanted wanted to learn about. Make it work for you. Yes and this. This is all before you knew. Four U. S. schools colleges have accommodations for ADHD. Yes but you must have diagnosis. Not a self. Because I've heard a lot of people who do self diagnose and they say things like everybody's a little idiot everybody's laid it things like that. I mean that's that's something they will be all. We're all of the Ladies Aso so so they don't take so some people don't take. ADHD very seriously now but with an actual diagnosis from the psychologist. Who's WHO's like? Yeah you're in the tribe. You can take that. Diagnosis is an get accommodations at school. Yes I can also get accommodations with my employers. Okay what kind of accommodations would you need with your employers. Don't know that's that's just something that's something I just came across and I haven't had a chance to look into it. Oh okay well. That's something I'm sure people can look. I think this big lie to the ADA. Yes Americans with Disabilities Act with the people who are playing the a home game so that you have diagnosis. Are you you taking medication for this diagnosis I am would you take. I am taking adderall. which is a stimulant medication? You're taking a stimulant to calm down. Yes okay how's that work. My brain doesn't produce all the right chemicals. The stimulant helps my brain to produce the chemicals and adds to it to make my brain be at more of a narrow typical level. That's on top of needing eating depression medication which a lot of people with ADHD end up with depression as well an okay. I'm used the slang for that because nobody understands them in their sad because they aren't getting long. Yeah that's it. Yeah that must be at the. Those are the those who don't know that was very very sarcastic so cathy that's it. You have a non-euro typical brain. Your brain produce the chemicals properly. So it's very likely that it's also also not producing the Serotonin or something we your brains funky. You're saying you are gonNA funky break. My brain is not narrow typical. It's not needed. Take my brain is busy. Busy sometimes feels crowded the thoughts. I don't have extra people in my head. Sometimes with all the thoughts it does I feel like it but some okay once she got this diagnosis. And you're taking the medication which is helping. Yes yes how long did it take to get the right dosage. I got really lucky. Actually the first medication I tried worked. It took me a couple of months. I think to figure out with help from my doctor. What dosage to take and What Hind Hind to take? I would say though that it took probably six months to really get a good rhythm with my medication. Meaning okay so. I'm taking medication. Location for depression. I had to figure out what worked best for me so that it didn't wear off and make it harder to get up in the morning and then with. Adhd D. meds. Because I start my day at seven thirty I was finding that this is where the key for civil for school for work. Yes I I start my day at seven thirty and by three o'clock I was running out of mental steam. I still had enough enough energy to get through my day but my focus was not great. And when you're working with kids you you do better with focus is a better with focus. And what is it. Ninety six kindergarteners ninety ninety six kindergarteners. Currently will I serve breakfast in the morning so it helps to another names. Hell take your medication to kick in. Who will take the extended release which is supposed to draw it out throughout the day That takes probably about an hour to kick in K.. and talking to my doctor telling her that it felt like it was wearing off before my day was done. So she provided me with a very small dosage of the immediate release to help me through the rest of my day and then not have the effects of not being being able to go to sleep at night because the immediate release wears off. Faster your experience where your doctor receives your your diagnosis from the a psychologist. And you show up and you say hey I want to work out getting these pills your experience. It's more typical now but at this would not have been terribly typical for some people that your doctor was helpful. I'm not even sure it's more typical now. No I'm part of a facebook group. Yes that is like a peer support workgroup for adults with ADHD. Do you want to give its name. We can put it in the show notes. I don't I don't know what the name of it is off hand but I think it's just adult. ADHD St Okay that a large majority of the people that are on that group are having difficulties with their doctors. Because they move. You've and they need to get a new doctor and this doctor doesn't believe. Adhd exists even though you. They've got a solid diagnosis from from US professional psychologists. Yes and it's a well researched a it's the word disorder it's so well-researched disorder since the early nineteen hundreds and there's cases that have been talked about in mental health history going back to the seventeen hundreds. Well I mean it has various names but it's all the same thing it's been around a long time and like I said it's the DSM but yeah. There's there psychologists there's doctors who still don't believe it exists even though there's physical proof by by way of brain scans and and things like that their scientific data yes that this exists and it's been proven it's not just anecdotal. It's been studied studied with good research and yet there are doctors and psychologists. Say you're lying your your drug seeking yet because let's let's be clear. adderall is a stimulant her and it's very similar if not it is not the same. It's not exactly who the same. It's very similar to meth rate. Or is that or that is a myth. That's a myth excellence. Let let's cook. I was wrong committing it okay here. I intermediate let's correct that myth. Then what the myth is it. It's it's the same or similar to math. It is similar in structure. Because it's an and a lot of its in the name there's methamphetamines which is a street. Drug and amphetamine salts. which is the prescription now? Aw the prescription can be abused yet. Just as many other prescriptions can be. But it's not the same. It's taking a molecule from one side signed putting it on on the other side and it doesn't sound that different but it changes the molecular structure and of how it works. Okay the one molecule you'll thank people say oh one molecule doesn't change it that much guys the difference between h two O and O to huge different. You can breathe one. You can't breathe the other not less your fish. So one molecule makes a huge. Yes okay I don't know exactly where differences are but it is a different molecular structure. Okay so you're what you are taking. It can be abused and it has been abused yet specifically by college students who are claiming I have. Add and they use it for to stay up all night studying in and partying and whatever and now you had A. You had an interesting experience. I remember when you first started taking this Because you are not a heavy drinker no but you did occasionally have something to drink and you're not adverse to alcohol you you like it right you like the good stuff I knew and and then you're like well. I think my medications worn off. Because you're not supposed to do alcohol and this medication I think specifically did not take my second dose because I knew I was going to be going out with friends from work and that might want to have a drink. Adriatic so you have this drink. And I'm with you at this point. Thank goodness and you had one drink and this. We're talking a shot of Whiskey. I think it was yeah. I don't know whiskey sour or something like that. It's seriously it has the effects of Whiskey sour. Actually I wouldn't say that it seriously enhanced the effects I hadn't drank for a while so because says I don't drink very often I can have one or two shots and beef super happy but I did not feel good. Oh I felt like I had an instant hangover. Oh how horrible. That's because the the the thing that people don't like about drinking is the hangover. Yeah and combining the two of those together totally just brought it right on. Yeah and I haven't had a drink since had one at one so now one of the things is I know this from having experienced you. Don't get to do what I do with my normal. Hey you have high cholesterol. Drop your prescription off with the doctor. When you need to refill it they just call and it gets refilled every month and no big deal? I don't have to wear I. Just tell them to refill it. It's no big deal. Oh and I can pick it up for you and you you pick it up from. Yes yes now. There's no way for me to pick it up for you know. Pick up your prescription view you. You have to have a separate paper prescription Shen every month and what's happening this month. I am running a little bit short on my medication because I was unable to get into the doctor. They have to go in every three months and check in with my doctor to make sure that the the medications that I'm on are doing well for me kick kit and that you're not yeah. They're not seeing any strange behavior from me when I go in and see them. Okay I am at that mark. I was unable to get a doctor's appointment prior to when I would be running out of my prescription so had taken begins off and we get off the medication for the medication which some people do anyways. But I like being able to focus at home and at work I so yeah. It's it's it's a little uncomfortable after because my medicines GONNA run out before I can refill it because I have to go in. I have to get a paper prescription. I have to pick it up from the doctor's office. Take it to the pharmacy. I have to make sure that they have the brandon stock. That works for me Then have them fill it and then I had to show my ad. When I pick it up now? And I and I get a kind of a sideways glance from one of the pharmacists us. Who Works at my local pharmacy? Every time to be clear you're a a kindergarten instructional assistant so you're para educator Yes yes you work with ninety six years you are married you have a son you have a job. Never been arrested never arrested. You have no criminal record no record of drug abuse and you barely drake. Yes in fact when I messed up my back and asked the doctor for muscle relaxers to help it get better. Yeah I asked for five for five and I take half a pill and the S.. And she was when she wanted to give you thirty of them have yes you said No. I only need five. They'll go bad so you don't get. You can't just have the doctor call in a prescription to the pharmacy and say just do this right. Whereas I believe I can just about anything else I can do that? That's the problem you and just for any other drugs to you pretty much. But it's adderall a it's considered a controlled substances. EA every time. I go get my medication to help me feel like I can live a better life. I get scrutinized be treated like a net. Yeah so that's something we didn't cover you got diagnosed. You got your medication. You out the dosage but what happened the first time you took your pill I had no idea my brain could be so quiet It's like the difference between A storm on the ocean versus aecom Lake. I would often say that had noisy brain when I couldn't go to sleep at night and all the thoughts were just bombarding me and not not just your normal thoughts from the day that you're trying to process but oh oh remember that thing that happened twenty years ago when that that person you wanted to be your friend you made a complete fool of yourself and and and so they didn't give you a chance yet. Don't forget about or ooh remember that thing. You lost ten years ago. Oh I think I might know where it's at you can't find it there because your stuff's not there anymore. But very unhelped very unhelpful. Yes and taking the pill I can go into a room and and clean house in that one room and then take something to another the room and not get completely distracted from what I was doing to begin with which is not my usual motive action. I Yeah I remember I love you. I'm gonNA tell a story. I love you too tune you can tell the story all right. We have a deal when we're cleaning house. That will start at one end of the House and we'll just go from room to room putting everything into the room that it's supposed to belong in we don't WanNA clean anything yet. It's just the first thing we do is. We're picking up whatever's in that room. That shouldn't be there putting it in the room. It's supposed to Vian coming back to the rumor working on and we'll work our way from one out of the House of the other. That is not working for you when you don't have your medication no new. It was because if you leave the room you're in and go to another room you're distracted by the twenty things along the way and in the room that you arrive at. I've seen you take something from one. Room take twenty minutes to make it to the other end of the house. Come back to the room that we're cleaning in with the item you're going to put away. Yep I love you dearly but that would make nuts when that happened because i. I have a neuro typical brain. I expect you to be able to walk to the other end and do that and come back. It doesn't work that way with ADHD. Sometimes it doesn't because everything everything is important. It's all the same level of importance. Yes but and this is the great thing when you have your medication you can tell what's important it's easier it's easier so there is a a youtube channel Yes called how to how to. ADHD and the person on their Jessica she always greets people at the beginning of the of the youtube channel and says hello brains. It's and it's a very adorable I think but she's greeting people with. ADHD screening her tribe and. She calls the people who love their ADHD burgers. She called them hearts. I have to say that it's something that we've picked up in our house Helo brain hello heart because one of the things we have to remember about somebody with. ADHD is they're not lazy. They're not stupid. They're not intentionally distracted. Did or frigging things. Your your normal for you and your medication helps you to be a little more on the neuro typical line. Yeah have something that goes through my head especially especially when maybe. I forgot to take my medication that morning and I haven't refilled my pills and I don't have that backup in office anymore. Yes I have a poem that goes through my brain Shel Silverstein. He's been one of my favorite poets for ever over. He came to my grade school when I was little and I lose everything I I lose my water bottle constantly. I lose my paperwork that I need to have me at my clipboard. My I get to a point where I feel like I would lose my head if it wasn't fast and dawn and there goes the poem running through my head again. Oh And it's it's one that I've had memorized because it's so fits me do do you. Can I read it. Yeah go ahead read it as people no I I shall is my favorite poet even though I am a little About poetry. He's kind of the exception to my rule so go ahead. I'm GonNa read it because I I think I know what my heart but I probably mix stuff up and I wanna do it the right way. It's called the loser. which has its own connotations? You know I mean I. I got called a loser a lot when I was younger so I held onto this for a long time. That MOM said I'd lose my head if it wasn't fastened down today. I guess it wasn't because while playing with my cousin. It fell off enrolled away and now it's gone can't look for it 'cause my eyes were in it and I can't call to it because my mouth is on it. Couldn't hear me anyways because mayors are on. It can't even think about it because my brain is in it so I guess we'll just sit down on this rockin rest for a minute and the picture with it is his. He's sitting on his head. The Rock is his head yes head and I feel like that poem has always describe. Drive me because where's my phone. Where's my phone and I have it in my hand or I'm telling somebody as I'm talking to them on the phone that I can't find my phone on? Its but when I take medication. It's it happens a lot less. I love you and I'm really glad that you agreed to do this interview and I hope that people take back from it. The what I've taken my seeing you discover what. ADHD is and how all it affects your life that it's not it's not you being lazy is not you being lazy or dumb. It's a neuro disorder neurological disorder logical disorder. That affects ex- your life and how you operate in the world. Yes so a little bit of grace to our friends and maybe a little understanding ending that If they're looking to get their their medication maybe we could just trust the third dolts. Who Need it anything you WanNa tell the audience specifically about? ADHD people bullets ADHD are not intentionally mean. They don't want to hurt your feelings by interrupting you. They don't want you to feel like you're not not being listened to you. We're not lazy. We try really hard and it's not that we can't can't do something. It's just that we have to find the way that works for us and that's not going to be the same as you. They keep it all right. Everyone thank you for listening. I really appreciate your time. This is your host Aaron fearing for the I've been wrong before podcast. I hope will give us a five star review on itunes or every get your podcast from this podcast. Production of more than dreaming studios produced by Aaron Fury in an anti-syrian sound engineered engineered by Angie fear in the music. You here in. This episode is seven floor Tango by silent partner which can be found in the Youtube Free Library.

ADHD adderall. US PTSD depression stimulant Dreaming Studios Apple Child Syndrome engineer middle school neurological disorder Shel Silverstein Mike Mike Oregon facebook executive Doug Hind Hind
Episode 23: Morning Time Morning Time

Layers of Learning Podcast

31:47 min | 6 months ago

Episode 23: Morning Time Morning Time

"I'm Karen Michelle were sisters and Homeschool MOMS. Welcome to the layers of learning podcast. Where where we talk about family style? Home Schooling Hi. This is shell here with Karen. Hello we are going to talk with you today about morning time morning. Time is a trend in home schooling. Where people just their family gathers together and they do some things together that maybe they don't fit into other categories of their home school day so they put them in morning time? I think often it's kind of a gathering at the beginning of the day like okay. Let's start our day and not not really different than when in elementary school. You had kind of calendar time and everybody would meet on the rug and things like that. I think it's become a way for families to signal the start of the day. Yeah and it's a nice routine to put in place so that everyone gets into the mental mindset of school but it's usually not the a tough things it'll be a little bit easing into the day. It's a gentler. Start to your home school day. Sometimes people call it morning meeting or morning basket or all kinds of things. It's all all the same thing. It's just that little gathering time in preschool. They call it circle time. But it's just that time where everybody gathers together and you get to spend a little bit of time gently starting your day and there's not an exact thing that you need to do for morning time today. We just want to give you a lot of fun ideas of things that you can incorporate into to your morning time and you can include whatever you want. You're going to come up with things that we haven't come up with and you definitely should not include everything that we mentioned. It should be a few things that you do every morning. And it's a fine for these to change over time. What you do for morning time today might not be what you do tomorrow or next month or next year? It should always be an evolving thing. That changes as your home. School needs change as your interests. Change as you see something different that your children need to focus on whatever for it is is working for you at the moment. I've seen people that get ideas for morning time and just keep adding and adding an adding to their morning time and then they get burned out both by the intense planning that it's involving and also it's ending up taking a huge chunk out of their school day and they go. Wow I don't actually have time to do all of these things and the problem is that they're trying to do all the things every day and that's not really the idea that I take in our morning time what do you i. I actually don't really plan morning time at all and we spend maybe ten minutes and like I said we we do different things at different times so sometimes we have done memorization during morning time and other times. We don't do that. You know it it just depends on what we need at the moment so it can change. I don't like like I said I don't plan mine very much. I don't plan mine either. I have a lot of ideas in my pocket and I actually have a a little basket. It's got some poetry autry books and it has some art books a few things so that if I need to grab something I can just grab it out and we can do it but usually it's much more spur of the moment for me too to and it's not super involved. It's not super long. It doesn't take away from our day. It's just a good signal as the start of our day so you might spend ten minutes. I mean people spend up to two hours or even longer. I actually think one of the reasons they do. That is because it's a family time and they're enjoying having their family all of their children together learning at the same time we're layers learning home school. We do that. That's our normal. We do that all day for every subject. Almost we don't do that for math but for almost every subject we're all learning together as a family anyway so the odd part is when they're on their own and most of it. We have very much a family school. So yeah are morning time. We don't need to extend into huge long stretches of time because our entire day is very family based I also think there are. There's so many little things that would be fun to add into your home school and they can all sound like. Oh I want to do that and I want to do that but if you realize I can do poetry I can focus on that for a little a while and then I can switch to doing this other thing. You don't need to do them all at once right. You don't have to say oh. We have to do a poem every day and we need to look at a painting every day and I want my kids to see a scientist of the week and I want to have you know you start adding in too much and all of a sudden your morning. Time isn't the gentle. Start to the day that you're looking for in the first place. It's just a planning burden and everybody goes. Wow this is a lot. That's not really the goal that you're going for so you might plan Dan more than we do but don't over plant it. I also enjoy change. I find that when we start a new little thing. It kind of re energizes all of us and if you can do that throughout the year like switch it up throughout the year then that will give it a little spark the spark that you need and kids get excited to start something new but not if it's Oh we have to start something new and still do everything that we had before we just have more and instead you can say okay. We're going to do this for a little while and this for a little while and some things we don't even do in an extended way at all. I'll just say hey today we're GonNa do a painting tomorrow. We're going WANNA discuss a really interesting quote. ooh something interesting happened as a headline in the news. So we're going to talk about it and you don't have to decide we'll every Monday. We're going to do a painting every Tuesday we're going to do. It doesn't need to be that organized. Even it's fine to just do it on the fly and if you only did one painting that year great I mean it. It's fine fine. These are extras. They're not requiring extras. They're just interesting little fun things to add into your if you think of is just Oh. I'm just going to pick out things that caught. What my attention and keep a few things on hand so that you're never come up with nothing? I have a folder of famous paintings things. And it's just this little file folder and their paintings that I have gathered over the years that are kind of the ones that I love and so I pull out one of the pictures and I talked to my kids about what they see. In the worker we'd learn a little bit about the artist. We point out some of the techniques that they used or the country they came from and we discuss thus things that wasn't planned that spur of the moment. But what I did do is stick into my basket. This file folder of paintings so it wasn't a mental hardship for me to go. What are we GONNA do for morning time available some things and then I could just grab one out so you might have a book of poetry? Maybe an anthology of Children's poems that you just keep keep in your basket. We have this Shel Silverstein where the sidewalk ends book in ours. And so if I sense that my kids are having kind of a grouchy she morning almost always also fixes it right up. We're all laughing in a few minutes as we read one of his poems. Now if I had planned that we we might have enjoyed a shel Silverstein poem but instead I just gauged. My kids are a little grouchy and I used one and then it actually benefited us in a lot of ways as you know and it wasn't planned but it was available. So how many things Karen do you think that you keep on hand kind of as your backup for if you don't have something that sparked your interest that you went. Oh Hey I want to make make sure I want to. You know you come up with nothing that morning if you keep what are you. Keep on hand so I have about probably ten or fifteen little books that are poetry we have one. That's Bible stories because we are religious. I also have my little art folder. I also have some little children's magazines. They keep on hand that just have science articles and things like that that are interesting and so when our subscription comes I just stick that in our basket and so that's always changing. Well that's great and yeah I like that. Yeah so it's not one specific solid thing that we have and then I also have actually made this a few years ago. I have a folder of songs that I just took the lyrics to like Anna Maniac songs and little their school ish type songs but the silly ones like there's one that it helps us memorize the planet and different things like that and so we pull out our little song book and we'll choose a little song to sing sometimes. We don't sing every day. But that's what's there in the basket so if that's what we choose to do that day there. We also have a folder. That has poems that we've memorized so we'll sometimes pull that out and we actually do quite a bit of memory work in in our morning time because my kids love to memorize poems and so we'll flip through and review some of the poems that we've memorized. Learn a new one. So so you actually you collect elect some of your own like you make your own anthology. Essentially I do. I have some poetry books and things like that that are just things that I purchased but also as we do things this is my kids particularly enjoy them in particular I will so you just want to sign up. Put it in a folder out and it's there yeah it's just. They're sitting in our folder. I'd say Oh that would be really fun to do again or we're just to read again and they remember. Yeah so I just have a little basket and I keep all those things. I also have some a few flash cards in there which we don't frequently do but we have some animal flash cards and they like to read the fun facts on the back of the flash cards so sometimes I'll say hey Isabel. Do you want to share an animal today and that will be our morning thing that we do that day. So they're just sitting there and we can grab whatever we feel like so one thing that I like to keep on. Hand is Games Games and Educational Games. We love the professor Noggin Games. They're like little trivia but their school subject so it'll be like animals of North America or it'll be countries of the world things like that and we'll play those games and the kids love those. It doesn't feel like school at all which I don't feel like morning times should feel like no. It's kind of fun. One shouldn't be fun a little bit life. Sometimes I just grab a bookshelf and share a funny story or you know just a a picture book especially during holidays if it's a holiday or Seasonal time. Oh it's the start of fall. I might grab a book from our shelf. I have one shelf in our office library. That's all for holidays isn't seasons and so when it comes around to that time I just grab some of those books so another another game that we enjoy. We have several math games like nick multiplication war or things like that that we place. We'll do those There's there's lots of stuff like that. That's really fun. We have the board game version of. Are you smarter than a fifth grader. My kids love playing that for our morning time they would they would say hey. Can we just keep going and we won't do school today now. We're still. This is just the morning you know what who else would be great for morning. Time is the big book of Knowledge. Oh yeah every Friday. Yeah that's a big book of knowledge is a layers of learning thing. Karen came up with a bit. So basically as you're going through your school day if you when you come across facts about whatever you're learning about so you're learning about something in history you just keep track aca the facts on a piece of paper you just write it down and we put it in your book of knowledge and then later you use that to quiz the kids on and you do the quizzes in a game. kind of format map right. They basically I asked the question. And my kids have these little buzzers buzzing and then they answer the question they get house points for it. We've got little jars with house points joints. My Big Book of knowledge is just basically blank card stock. That's three hole punched and then has the big ring in it and then as we learn things we just jot them down. It's also not super preplanned. No and sometimes people ask me. Oh do you have. Do you have questions for every single unit. I don't always sometimes. Sometimes we really enjoyed a unit. But we didn't really add anything that made it to the big pretty often. It involves most of the subjects but especially like art. We don't necessarily add a lot of art concepts to our big book of knowledge. It's a very loose game but it's just a fun way to review what we're always doing so we always always do that on Fridays. Look forward to it. That's a great thing to add into morning time So memorization for sure. And there's all kinds of things you can memorize that you could do in morning time so nope some people. Memory scriptures or poems quotes things like the order of the planets or the multiplication tables. Those could be memorization. Things and those are all things that it doesn't matter. What age is your kids are they can all just practice memory work and you can make it really fun to to do it? I actually taught my kids last week. We were doing head shoulders knees and toes and other languages so they were memorizing Tech Day. Palsy new on all of the different rent like a few different languages and they love that. They're like we WANNA do that every morning. If we actually did it every morning it would get boring. So it's just something that you know. We just throw things is in. That are fun and layers of learning has memorization station sidebars. So those are ideas of things that you could put into your morning time memorization instead of doing it during layers. Here's of learning time. You could move that to morning time. Yeah and if you're like me and you want to keep a basket for your morning plans. All that it takes is just writing down. That thing that you're working on memorizing on a piece of paper you can type it and print it or you can just grab a sharpie and write it down and then you stick it in a folder and and then it's right there for you. The memory work has therefore you don't have to dig through the layers of learning books and everything once you've done it you just remember it and if your kids do it every couple of months. Even they'll remember those memorization station things forever. Yeah it just gets in your mind recently. One of our memorizing things that we were doing during morning time was the countries of South America. We've been learning about South America and I wanted them to know where all the countries were a map so they had to not only know the countries but you know where where they belonged on the map and so I actually wrote up on her. I used a wet erase marker and I wrote on her sliding door are glass door so I drew freehand drew the map of South America on glass door and then they had to name them as I pointed to the different countries. So you were in different order. And they'd have to say yeah and when I started out by putting the first letter of each country in in its spot on the map so there's a clue A. B. for Brazil and and so they had to they started with that and then erased them and they were able to still do it. So you are racist like one by one you a race to country and then they like race the B. Yeah and then soon they can do it and they could they they know them all no so to them. It's a game it's fun see. We learned the song to the South American countries when we did it. There's a song long you can. It's on Youtube. If I found a song and we played it didn't resonate with the boys depends on your kid. Depends on your kid. I actually learned that song in Spanish Ernest class in junior high. And I know I still knew it. Yeah that's how I know the South American countries because I learned the song so you know it doesn't matter how you learn it as long as you repeat it often enough enough that it stays in that brain and morning time is really great for things like that you just want to review. Yeah you can do. Things like memorizing passages from plays like Shakespeare my kids their first introduction to Shakespeare was actually memorizing part of Soliloquy from from Hamlet. Kate that it was the first thing that they did and they got so into it. They absolutely love Shakespeare now because they memorized that passage. They're very into. I think Garrett can still say the whole thing really good I don't think I can. Let's not test me well. That's one of the Nice things about morning time. It doesn't feel like you're taking a test or there's not a lot of pressure involved in this part of your home school day so kids can really just enjoy it and they actually learn a lot. We go over a lot of things and talk about a lot of things but not in any sort of this. Is the curriculum type of way. It's just it's very casual casually learning about things as a family which is fun and you can just bring in whatever you as the parent teacher are feeling like your kids could use right then whether it's all we need a little bit of light hearted herded fund. So we're GONNA do some silly poetry or maybe you need to memorize things right now or maybe you really need to work on character development and so times tables table on my Gosh Josh. That takes a decent amount of out of out of morning time to master those times tables. Another thing I love to do with my kids. Altogether is reading being allowed. We we almost always have a novel going if we don't is because we've taken a short break and we'll get one going again soon so I read it aloud to my kids now. I don't always do it during morning time because I have like. I'll do it during lunch or I always have one book that all all of my kids including my college kids will come and listen to in the evening and so that one. We don't do in in time because they would miss it. Yeah we usually read are read aloud around lunchtime to. That's just kind of our family thing we've just always done but often I will grab a book that I read aloud to them during morning time. That's just like a picture book or something sometimes something that we picked up from the library. Sometimes it's one of the things that we're learning about in our are layers of learning topics. It's just an interesting thing but it's usually a little bit more lighthearted fun Book Sharing Fun Book. Yeah like I remember the first time I m I read my kids rikki tikki Tembo no so Rambo. Have you ever read that book. I don't think how it's such a huge book. It's it's this story about this boy who has such a long name that when he falls down the well his brother's trying to tell their mom rikki tikki Tembo no so Rambo Chari by route she pinball Oh has fallen down the well wow that was good he has to say it so many times in his name is so long that it's hard to tell that this tragedy tragedy has happened and so anyway it goes into this whole story and talking about why the Chinese name one syllable names. Oh that's why it's just a cute fund story but I remember the first time I read that to my kids. It was during morning time and by the end of the story. They're all reciting it with me. RIKKI TIKKI Tembo no Seremban. Everybody was repeating chant and the bear wants more when you read that book by the end of the book. Everybody's is saying saying it so we just do fun stories like that and that's that's a good morning time thing so something that we're doing that I just started is current events and they can be interest. I don't have any really small children. I wouldn't do this with you know six year. Old Seven year olds. I would only do it with middle grades UP PROBABLY BUT WE'RE WATCHING CHING CNN ten everyday. It's it's really good. It's a news to ten minute news thing and it's geared towards kids so they don't put things on there that are graphic thinker terribly disturbing but they put some real news events on there so this is online not like TV. Yes online so just search for C. N. N.. Ten Okay and and you can find it. The other day they had a story about how Turkey is invading Syria so they do have some real news things on there but then they'll also talk about. I don't know some something about legos or it's geared to kids but it's not they still do have real news things so it's a chance for you to talk to your kids about what's going on high interest. Yeah and they keep it heard it in funny. Kind of the the the newscaster at the end. He always does all all these puns. And I'm just sitting there kind of like I just died a little bit inside because that was bad jokes. Dad The kids like it. It's it's Q.. Oh that's a good idea for holidays. We often will do a little special something for the holiday. Like I might tell my kids where the holiday came from or we. He might read a book or do a song or a poem or something that has to do with the holiday that were on so. That's one of the fun things a really good idea. 'cause I'm always kind of trying to figure out how to fit. Holidays is in to our home school and I don't Wanna spend an entire day. Do you remember when you were in school and the whole day would be kind of a party day. Yeah and the math would be halloween. Wean themed in the. You'd have this party and it kind of ruined the whole day. I mean it from the teacher from my from the perspective of the child it was fun but it's kind of a wasted today and I don't really have time in my life to spend wasted days on homeschool and honestly with just your family. It's not like you're GONNA go okay. Let's have an assembly with a costume assume parade and I mean you might do a few things like maybe a Halloween art project or something. But you're not actually going to spend the whole day or if you do that required a lot of planning. Yeah that's it's a lot of work but you can just throw in a few things in morning time and then yeah. They can color a picture in morning time. And it's not a waste because it was morning earning time you can throw whatever you want in there. Yeah it's really flexible. I also like to character training with my kids during morning time. Sometimes yeah and that could be. It depends pinched depending on your philosophy could be Gospel or scripture type. Things a lot of people like to have their children memorize scriptures. Or they'll put they'll just read them together. I also really liked the book virtues. It has. It's just a collection of stories that all teach some kind of a moral lesson but it's not religious adjust per se it's just virtues and then I really love this book too. It's called philosophy for kids. It's by David a white and he's a PhD. He's a philosopher sopher and he wrote this book for kids and what you do is as the parent you read it and has these questions to ask kids and it gets them into the deep stuff and you could just take this and ask one question and have a family discussion. I really fun. Yeah along with the Children's book of virtues that same series has others to we have one. That's the Children's book of Heroes. was that we really like so. That's actually over in my morning basket right now but anything that you want to put in you just have it ready and you can grab it out without planning and spur of the moment. Have a little delightful morning time. I think character training. That's a really really good thing to throw in your kids. Kids don't want to be lectured to constantly about that stuff but you do want to teach them those things in really thoughtful ways and sometimes sometimes I think we only teach honesty when our kids lie and it's better if we can teach honesty in a separate setting with the story or something like that not just when they've done something wrong we're teaching them the virtue but instead just talk about it all the time in a natural way so morning times really good for those kinds of discussions another thing that we like to do in our home school is I just notice if there's an important thing that I want to talk about but it's just kind of a one time deal that goes in morning time. It doesn't really make it into my formal plans like this isn't a holiday per se but on nine eleven Kevin. I had an incredible discussion with my kids. It occurred to me I was talking to them about nine eleven and yeah they were aware of it. They knew because we've had this other for years. But when I talked about the planes crashing into the towers my kids became really curious and they were like they really like crashed. What happened when they crashed and they were asking me questions about the physical part of what was going down and in occurred to me? They weren't alive then. I saw it. I watched it but they I had never actually seen that and so we pulled up some videos on youtube and we watched what happened and talked about how devastating that was and the loss that occurred after and then I described how in America we really came together for a long time after that. You remember how there were flags everywhere cars they pull talking about politics and started talking about people. Yeah and so anyway we just got into some interesting discussions about that. And that's not the kind of thing that I would say. We need to halt homeschool Alan and say on this or putting your lesson plans. Yeah but fits perfectly and morning time. We had a little morning time on that and it was really really good and I. I think that's one of the reasons I don't pre plan everything because I wouldn't preplanned meticulously enough to go with the flow of what will happen in our home school so I would rather just have have things available and then let it flow from that day so if you just gathered start by just gathering a couple of resources that you can just kind of stick in your basket or on on your shelf that you know you can grab and then over time you can gather a few more here in there and start keeping a list of things. Maybe that you could pull out for morning time. I am a big fan of Pinterest so keep a pinterest board. That has ideas I might want to include in morning time I enjoy doing that so if I just coming across something and and my feet will go. Oh that will be fun for morning time and I can stick it in my pinterest so you have kind of an idea bank. Yeah that works well but I do really really love that. I don't don't have everything meticulously planned. Because then I just get to fit it to our family. It just feels like an organic part of what we do. Oh instead of something that if I don't get to it's a stress to me it just gets to be a really fun part of our day. That's relaxed. It's relaxed for me to not just my kids kids. I didn't stress over it. I just enjoyed it right so do you. Do you have any regular routines Karen or do you just always changed up and well we have of a routine but okay. Here's our routine I do. We always start with a prayer because we are religious family so we do a prayer and then a song and then a scripture and then the pledge of allegiance. And that's not going to be everybody's routine that's just kind of what our family has fallen into. And so my kids actually kind of take turns leading at one kid will pray and then one kid will lead the song and so we just kind of rotate around. It's not organized. It's just hey we're going to do this little thing and really. The only reason we do that is that it's a signal to the start of our day if not everyone is instantly there. It's okay gives us this little it. It gives them all the time to mentally prepare for school right but then is the part that is actually kind of what I consider our morning time after that we do one one thing so I'll grab something out of the basket and that's when I might share a poem or we might do a memorization or you know it. That's where the variety comes in and so the first part is just kind of the signal. Whatever your signal is to the start of your day and then we do our little morning here? I really like that. You're just doing one thing because you can choose. Well we really want to get into this philosophy for kids book and I want to do it for for a little while but then when we get tired of of it or if the kids sort of fizzle out on it I can just change it up or if you're if you're doing it but then it's the first day of fall you might stop and say let's do something for the first day of fall and then we'll go back to the book tomorrow tomorrow. Yeah and just to leave it like just pick one thing today that keeps it under control and I think it keeps it from becoming a burden. It doesn't intrude too much into your regular school day and you don't have to start planning these big elaborate morning times. I look at it kind of like. I used to look at field trips when I was a young homeschool mom. I felt like I had to plan a lot of field trips because that was my responsibility to take my kids to to do these field trips and I still very much value field trips. But I don't feel like we have to have field trip Friday and go every single week and I must pre plan meticulously all the things that we do. I'm always is watching for opportunities. And yes absolutely we take field trips. That's a big part of our home. School is that we go out in the world and experience things but I don't stress stress over the field trips like I did when I was younger and I see them. If something's becoming a source of stress in your home school you need to step back and look at it and say how can can we adjust this. It was a stress because I thought that I had to do it. Every Friday field trip Friday was I have to do it and I ran out of places to go when I didn't know what to do and I was stressed that I was failing and morning. Time should not be a source of stress. This should be and you don't you don't have to do morning time. It's a trend in home. homeschooling and it can be fun and it can be rewarding. But if it's not for you you don't have to do it. Yeah I hear MOMS say my kids are not morning people. If I tried to start that that would be a revolt. First of all it doesn't have to be in the morning at lunchtime or in the evening. It's just gathering ties gathering time and you can give it a different name. We were actually trying Ryan to come up with a good name. Didn't so if you guys have any ideas we'd love to hear. We want brilliant gathering time. Nee something that sounds cool and not homer schoolmarmish we something cool that our kids with. We weren't brilliant ideas. We were trying to come up with a Harry Potter based one because we love having Harry Potter in our home schools. But we couldn't do it. I guess we need to reread the books with that intention homework but and it really should be just a gentle start to your day or even end to your day. If that's going to be the end of your home school day. I like that it starts us out because we all start kind of on on the same page. Yeah it's it's a way to start your day it. Does it does help. Get your kids in that mental mood for school but I can see it also working really well in the evening. Yeah well in in bed. I've talked to MOMS who they say. I have one kid. That's a morning kid and one kid who came up before ten he's GonNa be he's GonNa ruin the rest of our day and so they do school like they do the math and hard things with their one kid who is a morning person and that's kind of that kids individual time and I would not destroy that if I had a dynamic like that going I wouldn't say drag the kid out of bed having morning time and yeah if that doesn't work then that doesn't work it's not going to serve anyone so it might be at dinnertime or bedtime emmer lunchtime but it is fun to just kind of a rotating little moment of learning one of the reasons I like. It is because you can throw in those little things that feel random. They don't feel like they fit into any of your normal subjects. Yeah like philosophy for kids that is not going to become a major subject in my school. I keep bringing back to that but anyway it's it's not going to become a major subject. I'm not going to set aside an entire semester. To just do this book it's not going on a transcript. Yeah it's it's just something extra. I think it'd be fun to throw in. I came across the book a few years ago. I bought it. I've never really used it but now I'm gonNA stick it in my morning basket and I'll just have to pull out when when I am inspired two. Yeah that's that's how I have found that it works best for us is to not over plan not over think. Just have some things available so that this is just a source of joy not stress in your home school. Thank you so much for joining us. We appreciate you listening to us. And don't forget to share if you can subscribe to the layers of learning podcasts. That would be awesome and let other people know that we're here and let them share in a two. Thanks so much bye bye. I thank you for joining us today. Come and visit us at layers learning dot com and on our facebook group. Make sure the tune in next month for our new podcast. In the meantime we wish you happiness in your home. School have found learning yeah.

Karen Michelle Youtube South America Shel Silverstein Shakespeare rikki tikki Tembo Pinterest autry North America Harry Potter CNN facebook scientist Dan Anna Maniac Isabel professor Nee emmer
267. GGACP LIVE Singalong and Trivia Show

Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast

1:30:18 hr | 1 year ago

267. GGACP LIVE Singalong and Trivia Show

"Hi, this is Nick wider, and this is an Campbell and we love video games. We love him so much. So why we decided to punish ourselves way playing the worst in weirdest games ever made to answer this, fundamental question. How did this get played if you ever experienced the agony disappointment of playing a terrible video game? This is the podcast. You've been waiting for. We've ruined games for ourselves. How did this get played is out now? Listen in Stitcher, apple podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts. Hi, this is Gilbert, God brunette. And if you wanna personal Lij video from me, hey, personal life shout out. And who would, you know just anything like high birthday happy anniversary? Congratulations. Or I hate you. And I never wanted to talk to you again. Go do cameo dot com slash Gilbert. Godfrey. I know a lot of you would like to I slide Gilbert Godfrey, cameo dot Cobb for a personalized video breeding Brum me. Hi, I'm Beverley D Angela when you're listening to Gilbert Godfrey. It's amazing colossal podcast. All right. Welcome to a special episode of Gobert, Godfrey amazing colossal podcast. Goltz request. Chelsea New York City. I'm Joe beginning piano for the evening, and please welcome. Your host Frank Santo Padre, and the goldenvoice himself. The goldenvoice. Welcome welcome, everybody. Wow. What we haven't been hearing awhile, shall we talk about what happened the less than we were here Gilbert, we did. I think three shows here and whatnot today at the end of the night, we said, you know, these are great, these are terrip. Sometimes you get that fit, you know. Each one hit. And third Orosa are raced it wasn't. Stop sticking. Right. Wasn't even working. That doesn't excuse. So we're here. What Joe McGinty at fabulous goals? Be updating the listening audience as we go sit goals request from Hilbert's. Turn me about five minutes and go what's the name of this? What's the name of this? You've been here shameful and and, and to show you what a Guinea Frank. I don't even know what he was referring to turn to me and whispered. Rabbi splice people, right? I cho-. Yeah. So it's going to be useful. This rabbi in the house David David Komarovski is here, which we're thrilled. A rabbi this podcast. That sounds like I show that appeals Jews and blacks rabbi in the house. So we're going to do something different than the lost episodes. The law will bring those back but for the people who were here for that we thought we do something new. We did one hit wonders of the nineteen seventies, the last time the great show, the great. I wish you would've hurt you. It was it was special. We're going to do something different from the podcast guys. Listen to the show, we're going to do story songs. Yes. Lament the loss of the story song where you gotta sit there for like three hours. The tires so songs like, Harry Chepe taxi and Billie Joe, which is when you like. Classic wasn't. That's like a mini series. Allison dress shorts miniseries. Yeah, I'm partial to the wreck of the Edmund FitzGerald. I'm wondering. I'm wondering. Yes, one time on this show. I called it the Rick of the Barry fixture totally difference. If you know who Barry FitzGerald is you should be here. So we're going to do story songs, Joe is going to have some fun facts and song facts that he's going to offer. This is fun to Gilbert, does not know what we're gonna sing. So these are I purposely stayed away. I didn't ask. I'm going to see what happens in the first three shows, I was guessing aren't you pretty much guessing every week. No, no no preparation on my. We also have we also have some trivia questions that we're going to ask and my wife lovely Genevieve will be handing out prizes. So, but we don't we don't have lights or pleasures. So don't please don't shout out the answer. If you know it just shoot your hand up and the first hand, I see the first winning answer. Correct answer. We'll get the valuable priceless. Five dollar orange, Ben. Shall we? Start. I'm going to give a little bit of an insurer to this when this is a song written by Nashville songwriter, named Don schlitz. We're gonna tell a little bit of the stories behind the story songs Don schlitz did not play poker. Can probably guess what song. It is also you Lear sheets on your tables, and that should be giving it away. It's not really a song about a card game. It's a metaphorical song about h my year dish, that's it. What I found impressive. Did you find this in your notes? He was all of twenty three when he wrote this song. It's, it's a heady song philosophical song to be written by twenty three year old. He shopped it at the urging of shell Silverstein. The writer shell Silverstein who will come up again later. Oh about him. Yeah. Chit time Johnny cash recorded it, but he did not have a hit with it. Mister Kenny Rogers had a mega hit with it. I think you guys can figure out what we're talking about. And we will do the trivia right after the song. But I thought this was fun. It was a number one country, hit it crossed into the billboard charts, which a lot of songs country songs don't usually do. And this guy, the writer was working a computer programmer. So when the song went big, and spawn five, five TV movies five, gambler, movies, the guy was actually able to quit his day job and become a fulltime songwriter. So I kind of liked that story, we're going to give this shot, shel Silverstein stead is you knees that yeah. Yes. Or we would have had. He was the time of, like, when playboy club was really the playboy mansion. Yeah. And also wrote a very famous story song that we're not gonna do a boy named sue. Yes. Yes. And one of my favorites. Well, we'll get to that. Let's start with this one and see how we do shall we? You guys have your lyrics sheets. Want to give it a shot Joe? It's been practicing right? So I'm gonna count you guys in because I know we don't have abounding ball or anything. School calculated. One two three on a wall. Trai. We took turns staring the win. Dr. He make his. Of. Jar the way way all their. Mine. I changed. Is time taste always gay cow. Gave you, John. And so I ended bottle. Ain't drying doubt lights. The. Right. And as being four lines. God. To play the game gonna loon the play. No way. Right. You. When the deal, it's done. Kate change hill. Three now every game. Nineteen way. No. How? Hanes waiting there. Shower. Who is to? Your sleep. So. Speaking. Priced out of these. Gambler. As the night. That he. Why? Gene. Maybe. Down. Journal money. Was he? Gilbert is on a seven second delay. He spent a lot of time working in radio. Wow. Wow. That was energetic energy is good. What, what are you got on the gambler Joe? Well, basely repeat, what you said, but there were several TV movies there is Kenny Rogers as the gambler Kenny Rogers as the gambler the adventure continues. Kenny Rogers as the gambler part, three the legend continues. The gambler returns luck of the draw and the Campbell at five playing for keeps Gilbert, seeing them all. Now they was very strange Kenny Rogers. Well, that one Beck shown another story shown where a girl gets you rate, our the county. Yeah. We didn't pick that one for that reason. Thanks for bringing it up. They made it into a TV movie editor here and that see. And this the part in the song where he locks the doors and he's going to get his revenge. And then it turns into like this fun filled Barbro. And it's like you know that cracking the chairs over each other's Hades. Cottle's crag. And it's loads of fun. I'm going do they know this had to do with a girl being rate? You know, it was you gotta see this movie Haindl in a way, they made out of coward of the county. It is. Ten there were Benji is looks like all the most fun wish you. Tester, okay. We're going do our first trivia question and the lovely Genevieve will hand out a price. Speaking of the Kenny Rogers, gambler movie, the first one, what actor played Billy Montana, the young gambler, who has mentored by Rogers character who radio guy in hand right in the back, sir. You are correct. Lightner. Got a ringer. Now Bruce Spock slide. There is not a Jew. Yeah. Identify yourself who got that, right? Hookah that Christian right? Brown. Nice work. Wants it. He had three orange pinzel already. Bush, bruce. Lightner Bruce box. Yeah. Was he the Russian price fighter in rocky movie, which was the was dolph Lundgren doubts Lund, granted they're often confused? Yes. It's ron. He was in Toronto and scarecrow and MRs king with. K remembers that Kate Jackson was offered Kramer versus Kramer. I. Let her out of her contract with Charlie's angel killer. And, and then she has to not only see Meryl Streep get the part but Meryl Streep win the Academy Award it hurt. That's like Tom Selleck nothing out of the yes, Indiana Jones. So I anticipate it. I know Gilbert very well. We've had a lot of musical episode. Tonight antiquated, he might be a little off tempo. So we're going to do a slower. This. This is a story song. Joe knows this one. Well, because they did at losers lounge. We just did an ABA who lose loan show, my wife, and I are kicking shelves for missing that this was originally recorded by opposite free. Delinked stod recorded on her solo album and Bjorn put English lyrics on it. It was originally called Tango, and Apas limo driver. Boy, I hope these facts are accurate Otto's limited a limo driver suggested changing the title of the song to or Nando. And also changed the meaning of the song Gilbert, you're hanging on every word. Yes, he made it. He envisioned it the song being about to freedom fighters in the Mexican American war, which. Did do with this show nothing to do with the song at all. But that explains Andy Garcia showing up in the movie in the second album movie, topped the charts in thirteen countries, sold ten million records, one of his biggest songs we will not talk about the share version or the Gilbert version to come. So let's give this one to try. I think you all know it if you don't you have your lyric sheets. To canoe, Hugh, the drums. I love it. I remember long ago and other story. Hey flyer alive. To yourself and softly, strumming your guitar. Hear the distant Trump's that sounds view all coming from. Wanted to their closer now for. Came minutes seem to last attorney. I was so afraid for. And live life. And none of us prepare to. And I'm not ashamed to say the roar of consonant cannon almost cried Gill. Hey. Me. And I thought that we. My friend. If I do. My friend. Here. The flu. Now we're crave from them. Since many years, I haven't seen a rifle in your hands. The drums. You still recall thankful night. We lost the real friend. I can see arise health round of five full of have. Maybe he'll. Me. Recr- sega. Seth. If I had to. My fray. Dad guide. Cried. Let us Syrian. Did you? Gene. Never thought that we could news as nobody Kratz. My friend. My friend. I know. I think when they get to the sequel to that will that will be nice mon- habits here. That was beautiful. Okay, what do you got on that one Joe? Well, you know, I do have some of the original lyric, sibits tidbits it's, you know, before the Lert originally buy stick Anderson. Stig Anderson Lee songwriter as well. But the lyrics were the sorrow can be hard to bear. But the fact that friends let us down. It's something we all have to cope with very good. And then the course is long live. Love our best friend for Nando raise your glass, propose, a toast, to love for Nando play the melody and sing a song of happiness long live love for Nando. Abba, was getting together to record two songs you guys know about this new songs coming, and December for the hologram again, but the hologram tour, they are not reuniting, but they did go into the studio to record songs tidbit is they got their start writing music for a porn movie called the seduction of Inga. I knew that. It's worth checking out if that's the music that some Gilbert specific trivia, right there. Now. Illegitimate children. I guess. End they found out that one of ace to base was like. Was a Nazi. He wasn't. He wasn't old enough to be a real mad. She was one of these Mudan date. Not you. But he said he's ashamed of it. So dzhokay. Okay. Right. Bye. Brand's I stayed there. Hey stew Bates. Shame on they're not. Two songs in we've had a sexual assault reference in the Nazi room. It's a party, okay trail. Which two we're gonna look for hands Gil eagle-eyed okay, which to nineties films. Both Australian comedies featured this song. I'll need to. I need a hand. Only raise your hand, if you know both this lady in the middle. Give that lady. The adventures of Priscilla Queen of the desert, a movie I like a lot and you reels wedding on one of my wife's favorites. Did you know those guilt I was just about to say you work for she Cassie jump ship? Oh my gosh. So now we're gonna do something fun. His godfried. What do you think? Lyric sheet? This story attached to this, that I heard when I got here that I didn't know about you wanna tell it, this is kind of how we all got to know each other terror came in one time, and her friends signed her up with her last name. And I said, oh, you related to you said. Oh yeah, I'm white, and it's just so happened that my friend. Mike McFadden was coming into town. Shout out to Mike. He does all the social media stuff and you guys came back the next night. So it was like an instant small world connection is very. And this is the song that's started at all. Can I do a little warning? I, I really can't sing in almost as bad as Gilbert, six people. Please sing loud. But this is the one song that I love singing. I'm just going to give them a little bit of history about it before we start it was a top ten country hit in nineteen seventy two for Tanya Tucker. You guys know where we're going with this. Written by the songwriters was Alex Hornby in the song was about his mother. Which is interesting. It's a song about of woman obsessed with an old suitor and his mother was infected hairdresser from Brownsville. So it's auto biographical. Helen Reddy went to number one with it in nineteen seventy three. Uber. His mother of this mother, eventually committed suicide that would be of interest to you. Yeah. Der, you will love this. It was almost released as a single by Bette midler Hughes, the first to record it. And what happened capitol records Reddy's version on capitol records beat bed bidders version on Atlantic records by two days, they put it out, the jumped her and put it out today's earlier. L. I think I know the song was what's it from the divine miss? So here we go. Deragon freed on lead stand. John. Days. Was today to take. This. Shoots crazy. Casey. Mysterious. Called her channel two. Ever. Teaching. You. He wants to meet you. Two. Are you? The new. Thank you. Guilty on. I love when you did that Sonny and Cher. You were on the same Mike. Okay. Now we're gonna pick a different person than the people who won previously. But here's the trivia question about delta, dawn, what character what character on the show, friends show. Friends sang this in a karaoke bar piano, bar, and he hands. You got six six chances. Someone one right there in the back. That is incorrect. It is not Phoebe. We have another. Guess who sang delta, dawn rough wrong? Invariably correct. Oh, these people was this gentleman and the champion shared. Not chandler. Down to free shown them glasses, Courtney Cox. Correct Monica descending give that man and Orangemen. So many great did when you guessed it, we had named the entire cash. We were down the ugly make we wouldn't. We wouldn't name me people from Seinfeld. Derek great job on Hilton dawn, Derek for your mouth. Okay. We're gonna let Gilbert run the show on this one. Oh. This is one of your favorites Gilbert, and it's come up on the podcast. We did discuss the great shel Silverstein everybody in here. No. Shel Silverstein was. Yeah. Should one of my favorites, and he wrote a song, I adore for Dr hook and the medicine show called cover the Rolling Stone. Not a story. Wait wait, where we're. Okay. This is very well prepared there in order. I don't know how you got. Great comes after two, then four. This isn't Godfried favorite from the guest. I have Ferdinando. Okay. Dawn. I have the gambler okay. Here we go. All written by shel Silverstein. The genius Silva shel Silverstein who two hits Dr hook in nineteen seventy two. One of them was the aforementioned cover the Rolling Stone. This one somehow sold a million coffees, I don't know how Joe laughed at me. When I when I suggested it. It's autobiographical. It's about. Ingest sent sewn Tillis, it's a sad song, shell Silverstein. The writer was in love with a woman named this was deep research now, folks, a woman named Sylvia pen doll fee. And he realized he found out. She was engaged to another man, actually a bull fighter slash painter and his name was for non. Call. So he made a phone. Call desperate to reunite with this woman. This this explain plane he called. Her mother Louisa? You can find this information on the interwebs, and she told him the relationship was over. He did. In fact, call from a payphone. So this is a song that is no longer topical timely. This is this is a song that is instantly dated, and she told him that the relationship was over, and that she had moved on of with the bullfighter. The song was covered by Bobby bare the country singer and also Jovi, you know, that, that I did not know that either it sounds like Bs. Gill. This is a favorite of yours. So we're going to do it on K. Some of you may know this. Change, syllabi busy, too. Busy gone, too. It's Monday say sale the trying just new fun. Joe by no, Julie. Forty cents more day surgery. Aloen par. Please just one Taylor. Good. To assist. The change Shelby. She on me. Leave. Mondays as seal. Marion. Down. Way better. Still the change lead. Don't say nothing to say crying. Way series forty cents more than three. Joensuu are alone league. Species. Ten. Good. Sale punish as Sylvia's hurrying to patch. Sales via essays today. Or grill. Thank you. Shar shoot. Say's forty cents more five nex three minutes. Plead. Jones to our. Hello. I just want to go. Good. Good. Mother. So sad. So said, yeah, I find this to be very. Shield Silvis the Noah's route fund stuff. A boy named sue gets a little dark. Yeah. Right. Weird. I also love frigging at the free. That's a classic another great one show. So he's told me a good shel Silverstein lay it on me real. Well, you know, they used to hang out at the playboy club like you guys were saying, and she'll Silverstein was only a writer at that time, and he came up to we Hazel. I wanna write songs. They said, teach you four chords into keys. And that's all you need to write songs while and it kind of like his songs are kinda like that. Usually just two or three chords. I love cover the Rolling Stone, don't you? There's some great YouTube clips and the rabbi we'll be interested to know that Chilver Steen was you ju- really. Guessing Sylvia was Jewish. Why did she wanted to call back again? That's no. Does Lee white make center fleece. Won't you call back and get all the information seems like stop calling in his pocket, too, for those increase since psych, if you call again, I'm going to notify the police have. We like songs of heartbreak on the podcast. We did an episode called death songs of the nineteen seventies. And you, you got into that. Yes, they wish they would snake great song with the blind man in the linemen in the bleachers. If you guys don't know this one go home and Google the blind man in the bleachers and kill yourself afterwards. Scary and depression, I like those area depressing sad songs. I'm a sucker for things like seasons in the sun. So what do I know? Okay. So that was written. It was beloved by a serial killer. Correct. Correct. That's true. Okay. So the trivia ranges from easy to hard. The friends question was rather on the easy side. This one is super tough Gilbert. I know you know, the answer to this shouted out, Dr hook and the medicine show, they later just became doctor hook, there's a whole interesting story, but have the band got its name, which we won't go into, but they appeared in an obscure, nineteen seventy-one, Dustin Hoffman movie with the rather unwieldy title over by ain't no, this one Ed. I have somebody right here. Chris. And why is terrible? Yes. Yes. Now. That's a guy that earned an orange wedge. Now, now, Brazil blood, who was that other actor, I don't know. He was a Harris was in it. I think this check warden. Yeah. But they will shut another actor it who plead his friend will if we weren't doing a live show. I look it up. Faulk. Could anyone on their own to see the case of voice? Harry Kellerman in Weiss. He saying those terrible thing. See that movie. No one, nobody of this gentleman, meeting able, so who is Harry Kellerman. And why is he saying this terrible things about me, which I think that person who played his friend may have been a bowel report, yet, one. Oh, it was. It was game del. Yes. Oh fuck. The and MRs del or the two people who know that the answer that we did an episode about movies, with goofy long titles, remember that? Yeah. Slyke gone. I know I'm. Don't one with Anthony Perkins not with yet. Ed to me, newly and Joan Joan Collins Joan Collins, which is the one with voice, her Rohn will Harania smirking marry mercy humping and find true happiness. Right. We also did dad. Oh, dad mama's hung you in the closet and feeling so Sachs, which was actual movie title. We did an episode Lucy could funded minute mini episode on that silly shit. Okay. Oh and Anthony. Newley. Yes. Joop. Rabbi keeping score. What's that? Also of the Jewish persuasion. Fast on his feet Antony newly used to always come on those variety shows. As is a joke in the pack as. Call today. Tainted food old on his bag. Everyone's. Peres. Funding. The game bug tease funny. Misstating. One team. Just the same thing Jones, E. He's though the all. You guys came here tonight hoping for Anthony. Hopes were. Handsomely rewarded. Sent to the thought shoots amazing crew podcasts right to. These messages. I'm gonna ask this question of both of you because Paul's here. Do you remember the days when you're always ready to go? I don't mean you had your hat and your keys. You're on time there. What I mean you don't have in the morning will mean that yeah, you can increase your performance boys with that extra confidence in bed. Get that little extra confidence in bed with blue shoe dot com. A product perhaps, you've heard of show, I can mash debate with more confident you can't yet. Blue shoe brings you the first Bill Gilbert with the same FDA approved ingredients found inviting GRA and see Alice, you know with the couple in the seen it you you in Darah. You do that, right? You get you get an old fashioned iron. Yeah. Together. Too much when you're in two separate set for cheap maid. She. Assisted on separate. These pills anytime day or night, because they're Joel debit. They work twice as fast as a pill. What do you think of that? Well, if I ever needed if. It's a simpler, speculating blue CHU is prescribed online and ships. Great DR door in discrete, hacking, no in person, doctors visits, no waiting at the pharmacy, and no more. Awkwardness blue Jew ish made in the USA and cinch it, and since it for pairs and ship straight cheaper than a pharmacy, 'cause you read that's lower. Head. Jewish, mainly USA engine for payers ship strect, h cheaper, then apartment see visit blue Jude dot com and get your first Shiffman three when you use promo special code. Just pay five dollars shipping that flew the L U E chew gum grow code Gilbert, do dry it free. Still hangs up phasing. Now Shadley we return to Gilbert, Godfrey amazing colossal podcasts. Okay. We're gonna go from the downbeat nature of Sylvia's mother, how many people by the way show of hands had even heard of that song, or knew it. Five. Wow. And will you be buying it? Now, will you be going out and buying the, the K tale collection? We're gonna do something up being, and we wanna hear everybody on this one from nineteen seventy three. One of the one of the most popular songwriters story songs is the late great, Jim crow cheek. Rapid ROY that stock car boy, do miss around with you. Don't mess around with Jim whistle would happen bed bound Brown ran into Jim that would have been a good secret. What be would be? Now both the stories say. Both the story song, guys both died in car crashes with those big well wouldn't that be Harry Chepe in the car crash? Jim crow Chee thanks for bringing the show up. Jim crow. She died in a plane crash playing. Sorry. That's okay. Shar SE so wasn't so sad. Moving right along. It's a story about a character from Chicago, south side, Chicago wins in the room any, mid westerners. None. Good. What would the chances of fifty seven people? Yeah, it's it's it was actually followed it followed us on with similar story, which was you don't mess around with Jim, which, which you pointed out this song was inspired by guy that crow CI surf with at fort Dix. Did you know any of this? This is good stuff here, pal. There were rumors, though, that it was about a guy named Don Dedrick Roby, who was a muscle guy who worked for ABC for the label who used to. Commit violence to control musicians who were on the label. So on confirmed the true story behind bad badly. Roy brown. And LeRoy burn his little trivia, right? Brown himself was credited as a background vocalist on coachie hit called. I got a name and I'm bringing that up. Jim crow Chee Jewish. Offi damn. I can't we? Gee. Win one grab by stand up. Take. He converted. It doesn't count. Sammy davis. Maryland. I'm ru. Yes. She not really wrong. Thank you. Hannah Manian guy not a joke by birth. I bring up the name because it was written by Charlie FOX. It was on a recent episode, great Charles FOX, you will be hearing from him, soon as we put that episode up. So we're gonna take a shot at this one, and then I got a fun, trivia question. So shall we? Everybody knows this. Here we go. One two. Tiny town. Be wear on the. See sans about six four. No. Me. He's. Any sees? Coast, then. On the phone. Issue. Around. Friday about a week getting go the shooting. Time jump on. Goes shuli. Labor. Why? To, to pull them off. Jason. Way, hispanic. Leroy brown. Whole. He was bad. John kelly. Uniform. No one. I just thought of now I wonder if the guys who wrote trading day with ten shell Washington. We're listening to this song. When Denzel Washington has a line. King Kong gain cut shit on me. Interesting. Trenton psyche over. Hey. That could be true. Anybody know? Nobody's from Chicago. If McMahon we're here because they was another ten show washy tin. Movie, and Malcolm X where he says that. Pill. We didn't pilgrim Brock hill rock plane did on. Year. Speed both cold border had that as a leading into. You know. Anything goes, he sings that works for us. Yeah. That pill hill rock landed on nice. I remember the movie. Go off on tangents. Sometimes perhaps you've noticed one little trivia. Wants to orange wedge pin. The song was covered by the likes of Frank Sinatra. Not well, I might add, Dolly Parton, Jerry Lewis killer, I'd love to hear that version. What's comedian, what comedic actor frequently discussed on this very podcast? I already see a hand going up performed this song on a sandy Duncan. Tell TV special in nineteen seventy four gentlemen, in the white shirt. Correct. Lynn. Very good. And and rabbi pulling hated choose. He used to get drunk and go out those. Tonight. I'm have. That's one of your greatest hits. Your. Encore performance. He didn't hear it. I have sprouting. Race. I wish your daughter wasn't recording that for the internet, he substituted the line water pistol in his shoe. Apparently, the, the NBC censors at the time. We're not thrilled with the idea of a razor show. I wonder if they made coachee change it when he's saying, what do you think band, Bailey, ROY Brown's Vince version sounded like ill? Hi. Lordy. Barber Floyd the barber singing singing, badly hit Brown. He's fad. Brass. He's, he's, he's vannice. In, in the whole there. Groucho on cabinet. Here's a bonus. They're yelling out requests. Well, it is said, Goltz request. Yelling. John macgyver. Doing bad, bad, LeRoy Brown. Brown. Call. Speed. Joke. Okay. Last one all route show doing bad badly. Roy brown. And LeRoy name. Started with hell. Were name. If someone was named LeRoy, you start the name. And then the dollar. An inch which LeRoy if you would hole or. No. Why? Extra bonus content. Own special edition. DVD. Okay. We're going to bring one back. We're coming down the homestretch. How many people were drunk? Still with us. This is a callback to the fateful night, the last time we were here. What shall we refer to that night as the night the night, the episode died? Included. The song we were doing one hit wonders of the seventies, as I said, last time, we had a malfunction not Frankford. Orosa. Let's, let's keep Frank's professional reputation in pack. We, we had, we had a malfunction we lost all three episodes. We decided to bring one back because it covers re categories that we'd like to do on the podcast kill one. It's a story song, obviously, it is a one hit wonder because there are other hit chart in the UK so it doesn't count, and it's a deck song of the nineteenth. It's got everything. So we're going to bring it back. You guys have your lyrics sheets. Some of you were here for the last time. Starts talking right. One to two tatty was the cabin. Signed god. Back in, you say back. In the heat of the time. Why? Joan. Gary. Fired. Rian upsetting. And the sound of the bad. Through the streets of the lease. Hawaii those on. Benji. Three. Hundred cast heard. We heard. I heard my mom cry. I heard pre. Yes, the. Is new. Dog? His face. Ninety journal. The meeting. Want to be in. Nice. Yes, the unforgettable band paper lace, right, and who could forget them. That's right. They also with Billy don't be a hero in England, K body. Donaldson Hayward's, how to go Donald today, which we did them on songs of the seventies. I'll just keep plugging old episodes of the podcast. We did it the night, Chicago died. Now a trivia question. And this one should be pretty easy. Guys listening. Cody atas every year. Never year buddy. What is factually? Inaccurate about this song. I see a hand way in the back, but this person did you win already are you? Sure, let's hear it. There is no east side of Chicago. That is correct. Give that man a pin. Michigan. Oh. Second Chicago reference. Yes. Yes. I thought we'd have Chicago in the house. Good job. What are these people, you can't stop them? We're going to move onto something else. We're gonna do a couple, of course. We're, we're gonna change femur slightly, we're gonna move away from story songs here, and we're going to do three songs that are dedicated to previous podcast guest because I'm shameless plugging this show over and over again. So you've got your your lyrics sheets. This may puzzle you because this gentleman has not been on the podcast as of yet. And who is it Darah who's coming? You want to tell them meals, sadaqa. Yes. You'll be with us next week on the twenty fifth live with the Jew. When the. Bash the place up. When you're such a rowdy bunch. So who knows when will post this one and what the actual chronology our timeline is meal will probably have run by then. Yes. But we're, we're thrilled to have them, and it's, it's I'm going to geek out during that show. So this is a song, he wrote did not have a hit with obviously that was the captain into Neil. But everybody knows this one so no excuses. We want to hear from everybody in the room. Nancy, you're into this one. I know. Let's let it rip. To pay for that. Came again. Eight you're saying. Be strong. You. I mean. State. That comes later. Tom. Down here in your heart. On the air. Of you. Say. The bridge. Sunday. Turn you all who's. D say. Now. Us. Really? I. My. Lyrics. We got a chorus one more. You bet. View. View in my. Ever. Jack. Great safe. You'll see that. You play that beautifully. I'm big fan of the captain. Captain trag. He was a beach boy that, yes, I understand that captain coins. Maybe bullshit to coined the term yacht rock could be the happens. So do you know the movie sextet, I'm afraid I do. Because, you know, may west they changed the lyric in the bridge. He says you're looks will never be gone instead of someday looks will be gone, which is kind of cruel line. I think oh yeah. You wouldn't want to say that to me west now. Tom Selleck, one of the boys in there. Thinking of seeing sex tit is the one that sings to her, he sinks to think you're thinking of my Rebecca ridge, all, maybe it's that I know he's in one of them. I can't be sure he's like the young guy written by who, who wrote the screenplay for that. Oh gory. Fidel. No. He wrote the book. No. Okay. Her email? Correct. Keep until gay. John me day. I'm John sweet. Gain guy. Taking a knee. You'll got dad don't beat song. Tying views stop. I've been teeing gain. No, you know, Kane my heart that Nate. Gate keepers? Oh, lord. That was the biggest song of nineteen seventy five. You believe that you find that we should get Tony to kneel on the podcast. Oh. Yes. That she'd be a wonderful, wonderful interview. Yes. Frank points out. She's available. What Joe was referencing sadaqa is back. If you go home and you listen to that song as they're doing the I guess it's the Altro tro. She's you can hear her say said, Dacca is back, which was a name of his album is come back. L sedan has been very sneaky little tribute and there's was the third version of it. The second version was MAC and Katie Choson de mall. Well, yes cheating Turkey, chirpy, cheap, cheap is one of my standards. Let me tell you some pal. This is the only podcast in the world that talked about chirpy chirpy chief. Found each other why it's, it's, it's Kismat Joe. It's, you know that referenced God help you. Okay, we're gonna let Gilbert, go little bit. We're gonna let him run. This one. And we try or actually Frank tried to get the actual songwriter here to sing this. But he knew enough to stay away. Surely. Yes, maybe he was in town. We took a we took a stab. We'll have them back on the show for sure. I think you guys all know this one again, this is a tribute to not a story song, but a tribute to former podcast, a previous podcast guests I should say one of our favorite guests great. Paul Williams was also a friend of sets and we love him to death. So we're going to do this one, it's been covered by Judy Collins, it's been covered by always from forty year old movie we'll be turned forty this here. The muppet movie, by the way. God, forty years, we wanna feel old covered by Judy Collins, by Kenny Loggins by Willie Nelson by the Dixie chicks, and tonight, most importantly, like over. Gilbert Gottfried poll with you. Here we go. The next best thing, I've been pulled. Two three why? Tree shun me. Shy of Asia. But. Illusion in green who's have not to. Hsun. We been toward two. I know they're Rome cheese. Show them, easy would've. The raid could. Dreamers. Gave would be. Should in free stone, Neum move on stone. Shown key to ensure. Gene head kimes starred gauge sheen aim. What do we think we might see? Show. Very good news. Who's stowed dream? Old show. Noon with that. Hugh hind first-name an have you heard toys? Sees food coding mine. Sweet shown that goes Stig homes. The voice to be ruled news. No. It's something. To be. Who didn't find rainbow. Dream. How just Gilbert? Nerdy spin. We knew. Grow. And Kenny Ascher. Always love you at anybody sends this video to you. We adore you. And we wish you were here. We really do. Also, not in the great Kenny Ascher, who did some wonderful work that was touching. One more. What do you say? Very housing on time. The good ship lollipop. Frankie we good. Moving on. Don't listen to that one. This is this is a song that is fifty years old. And this is really going to make people feel old, especially me and I mean is fifty years old like two weeks ago. And this is. A podcast guest. Before I do that. I'm going to do one. Quick trivia question. We got any pens, left, Honey, one. Quick trivia question about the muppet movie LIAM's is in it. He has a cameo quick seen what other Gilbert Godfrey amazing colossal podcast. Forgot the number of show amazing colossal podcast, guest appears in the muppet movie for an orange pin Genevieve knows you. Can't guess anybody. Handwrite there, Michael. Not to Kevin, he should have been. Way, way in the u one already. It is not Alan Alda in any other guesses. This gentleman and the beard, Austin Pendleton. Excellent. Give that man opin. I have to say this is a pretty impressive group. So this song is I say is fifty years old. It was the number one song of nineteen sixty nine and it was sung. You know where I'm going with this. I yet cheated and look ahead and you're now it was sung. Well by an animated character. Archie Andrews put foist actually sung by our friend, Ron, Dante great, Ron, Dante who was on one of our favorite episode. Think that run Dante didn't they use his voice for, like Betty, and Veronica cold. So I don't know that, that was Tony wine. She's saying she's saying that the but Ron how to civil Teini hit around that time with Tracy by the coupling. And then he went to produce Barry Manilow. Ron Dante Mehta of small fortune producing records, one hit after the other. I mean if you look at them I mean, from Mandy to New York City rhythm and ready to take a chance again. And even now when we can New England all produced by Ron Dante can't smile without you a whole whole list. What else about this song, really quickly? It was written by Jeff Barry. Jeff Barry tons of leader of the pack for one and other CBI. The history river deep mountain high and the theme from the Harlem Globetrotters animated. Good call and somebody, we want to get on the show, also Indy. Kim wrote a co wrote this who had a hit with rock meat gently. Anybody remember that one from the seventies, he did a remake of baby. I love you. That was also really good. Both of them are alive, and we should track them down. And the song, I saw the song performance, this very room by U, N, Toni one and the great Tony one. So we'll go out on it produced by the legendary Don Kirshner. Yes. So you wanna take a wack at this one? Everybody knows this. The core. Kickoff summer. Teeth. Should happen. Candy. You got me. Can you? Sure. Hugh. Can he? You gotta be. News at salsa. I just. Hugh. I just came believe is true. I believe this fan too. I believe it's true. Shudder. And you. I should. Hugh on my cane. And you're gonna be ten you. Way issue their new. Today case, let's hear Mabel come up. China, china. Me. Shoot. Rabbi. Tony's. I'm gonna make you Jones. Sweet. Sugar. Joe? Shooter. Sure. Hugh. Joseph. Now I miss you're gonna miss sure. Next to the rabbi. Why didn't we do that? Well now was this song that they were had lined up for the monkeys. I don't know that they were so that was lined up for the monkey, yet it and get back to you right before they quit right before they gave Sean became a monster. Hit, let me thank everybody who was involved with this show, Frankfort. Arrose our engine here. Offered talk for David Simon right here. Sets-all spends a musician, who contributes to the show. Mary. Oh, can't tell show John Foti Addis, pro many, many themes for the show. Paul Raeburn is in the house where all your Ray bone. Harry is. We gotta thank the four Johns who contribute to this show. Our webmaster John seals, John Fodio said, John beach, and John Murray, who also does music for the show. Our web people Mike McFadden ingrate pair who are great. Krista rose was helped with research, shanty Slater at here. We'll everybody Stitcher. Who am? I forgetting we wanna thank the staff here at said goals. Thank you on. So much. Thanks, everybody else who came out Mike on figley. Oh, Mike Weber for moral support, of course, the great chino, Saleh bone. Whose name. More to Gilbert. And of course, the lovely Genevieve my wife my long suffering wife. And our gift, our gift girl for the evening and Darah. Of course, we have to we have to think. Last, but not least. And what did you wanna say? They are actually two days one recent and the other last month. Dares on may eighteen my son max max. Happy birthday. Accu max. Shy. And he was matches. My father's name. He was born on my father's birthday perfect about that. One of the person if I were member h on June twelfth, and I remember this course June. It's the six month and she and just birthday too. Yeah. She was sick. She was spun six pounds and twelve ounces. So on June twelve lily Gottfried. Happy birthday to lily. Do. Say to you. Anything else you wanna say Mr. jam now we can't get sued for happy? Cushion you every movie used to be hard. He said jolly good. I always took me right after the movie. Thank you, guys, so much queue. This so much that you came out. Okay. Any any any minute now. All right. Gil, thank you hang. Thanks coming. Guys comes to kernel. We have you want to do some more singing, live karaoke been Gilbert Godfrey, Jim Asian collage podcast with my co-host Frank Chantel, if you didn't know that. Thank you all. Dot singers. We got golden fingers and Bill. Here we go. S outside which thing about beauty and was sing about ten thousand dollars show. Right. Can't appeals to the solid kind of feels but. Never know the thrill advocates you get on the cover of the role in stone Romans lowest see Mafeking. Stone. The Ronin stone. Got a freaky old lady name code team Katie who in bro, whose own genes got my pool grey-haired day, derive in my limos. And now all of this. The pill that get you get kin shore pitcher on the cover of the role in stone and receive. Phase. Of the Rolling Stone. Donald. Group is two lane. With say. Jinyu. In Vano way. All the fans that want to get back. So we're never have to be. Keep getting richer, but we can't get out get your own the of the road in snow. Stonewaller seamount. Sima days. Tone in stone. See thing John yellow. Show on the seeing now. Front smiling man. Oh pure. Gilly. Yeah. Did you know you can get extra confidence in bed with blue dot com? Well, not that I needed the first shoe lable with the same FDA approved active ingredients as biogra- and Seattle. You may have heard of them nor fight blue is for any guy who wants to enhance their performance, and it ships straight to your door in a discreet package. Your favorite kind. Visit blue q dot com and get your first shipment free. When you use our special Brown, though, code, you just pay five dollars shipping. That's blue B, L, U E shoe dot com, promo code Gilbert, to try it free to discreet package for your discreet package. I wouldn't know about it. A comedy fans. We have some exciting news. If you've been loving the Conan, O'Brien needs a friend podcast, and, you know, how Larry Dana Carvey was on the show. Well Conan had so much from with Dana he decided to bring him back for a six episode deep dive Conan, and Dana will further explore their friendship to very funny, guys. Gill and devolve into comedy madness along the way I heard John l'an and pull mccart name will be making a special appearance to pray heard that to being Lixion too old, six episodes, jump deep. Dive with Dana Carvey plush snuff. Full archive of my show, only on Stitcher premium for a free month premium Goto stick, your premium dot com and use promo code Gilbert. Hi, this is Nick Weicker. And this is Heather Anne Campbell and we love video games. We love him so much. So why we decided to punish ourselves. We playing the worst and weirdest games ever made to answer this, fundamental question. This. Get played each week will sit down with our funniest Princeton place in the worst video games, imaginable. We're talking the worst of the worst, folks, superman sixty four in Suncoast six. 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310: While Loops Dressed up for Halloween

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1:12:14 hr | 9 months ago

310: While Loops Dressed up for Halloween

"Welcome to embed it. I am Eliseo. I'm here here with Christopher White. Have you ever dreamed of putting paws on your engineering career and becoming a children's book author ideal. I admit it amy the cdoe you did do it not just dream about it for. Hey thanks for joining us. Hi I'm so excited to be here. Thanks for having me. Could you tell us about yourself. Yeah so my name is Amy Lucido. I was working as a software engineer in Silicon Valley for about six six years The entire time that I was working as a software engineer I was also kind of in my nights and weekends pursuing a career Children's book author and I was doing this Just kind of as a hobby but I also kind of harbored a secret desire not so secret desire to get published I was so I I sort of continue to make progress on it but I never quite Got To where I wanted to be until I got my. MFA was getting my MFA. I started to write above. That speaks to the sort of dual side of me. This tech side of me but also this literature literary artistic side of me And that's what birthed the book Emmy in the Cave Code which I'm talking about today. I mean the Cave Code is the story of a twelve year old girl named Emmy. Who is the daughter of two musicians and she loves music and she? She thinks in music but she feels like she's not actually a good musician and so when she moved to San Francisco for her dad's job as a piano player for the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra. She decides anonymous. I'm not good at music. I am just going to take a computer science class instead and not only does she ended up loving computer science but she actually Shirley ends up reconnecting her love of music through her love of Code And so the story is told in verse but the idea is as she learns. Learn to code the poetry in the book starts to incorporate if statements while loops of the Coating Java sorta mimic her thought process Ossis but also in the hopes that kid reading it sort of accidentally learn a little bit of code along the way well that covers the show. Actually no we have so many more questions for you but we want to do lightning round where we ask you short questions and we want short answers and for behavior selves won't ask how and why are you sure. Are you ready okay. Ready what music do you listen to when you code. I can't listen to these with words. I need anything without words. So typically classical or one song on repeat pancer cancer or plotter. I have goalposts. Sort of like pillars. That keep up the plot and then pants between the pillars. What were some of your favorite young adult authors? As a kid I adored Matilda so the author Roald Dahl I guess although I know. He's problematic at this point. But I did love until the and I still really really loved the Golden Compass in anything that Philip pullman rights do you have a preference between across across or down as a direction wiser as a as a crossword puzzles word bossy. Yes okay I solve downs better. I think that crosses so downs When you're in elementary school what did you want to be when you grew up? I had like a million things I wanted to B.. I wanted to be a painter which is funny because campaigns I wanted to be a singer and a dancer. I wanted to be an author for a long time. I wanted to be a teacher. I wanted to be an astronaut for a period of time I like I like I was a kid. I want to be eight million things. I still want to be million things. I totally agree with that. If you could teach college course what would you want to teach. I would want to teach reading as a writer Because I think you can learn so much for a about writing just by reading books and thinking critically about them all right then let us get to the questions all right. You were software engineer. We started with that. Yes what did you work now So I worked facebook for two years and then I went to Uber for about three and a half years and when I was at facebook most of my time was spent on the Messenger APP and I worked on Android so if you have an android APP and you use Facebook Messenger. You're probably using features that I wrote And that was really great because I I got to work on something. Ah Used so fiber founded bug or ever wanted to feature I could just build it Then I went to Uber and I worked on the driver out for about two years ears and we were trying to focus on humanizing drivers to riders. I think sometimes there's a bit of a barrier between the the writer in the driver and so a lot of our job was trying to make sure that the writers there's word that the person in the car with them isn't other person And then and then I switched over to Uber. Eats which sort of like messenger in that. It was something that a used all the time I and so I got to build things that I actually like wanted to use on a daily basis and it was an uber that you started getting a degree at night. Yes well technically yeah. I was still at facebook but it was just the very tail end of being at facebook. I started going. It wasn't quite at it wasn't quite nice school. It was so I went to get a a low residency Z.. Masters of Fine Arts And so is that a program called Hamlin University which is one of the like to. Maybe there's three programs programs that give you an MFA specifically in writing for children and young adults and it doesn't make you re locate to get it so it's a low residency program. Which means you go there for ten days at a time and you basically do like author camp so you have workshop them running and then you go to readings and then you have lectures and panels and you know an agent will come and talk about about what it means to be an agent and you do that for ten days? And at the very end they assigned you in advisor and the advisor so these very prominent authors in the kid'll world and those are your mentors for the rest of the semester and so you're right and use them you're right and then they give you feedback And I did that for two years at the very tail end of when I was at facebook most of it once when I was at Uber. How much of your homework over? The semester consisted of stories of of your daytime coworkers. Acting like children probably not a ton although I I it it's not a no I 'cause I'm writing for kids specifically I feel like I write a lot about things that I went through as a kid that I still so having gotten over as an adult As like but those emotions that you have a kid they never really go away and so every time you're in a group of co-workers and you know you you feel excluded or something like that that's going back to a feeling you had as a twelve year old and so I wrote about it from the perspective of a twelve year old but you know the kind of snide comments or the comments that are like compliments but aren't really comments those definitely come from more sources than just you know the the mean girl back in back in middle school Whoever it was you gave an introduction to emi in Kiev code the bookie road and I have I have to say it was super annoying because it was a book that I just wish I'd written it was just it was so I identified with it and I felt very much like this was this was what people should read my? Gosh thank you so much for saying that. That means a lot. Well I think you I sat down to read it yesterday and I thought well you know how peruse it for a bit so have enough to talk about and then I just sat there for two hours in the whole thing recovery screen Q.. Oh yeah that's that's the benefit of it being written in verse is it. Has fewer words like your average prose novels that you really can read it into our or his. But when I found out it was written in pro in free verse I was just like Oh no no no no no 'cause I never read poetry. It's too hard. It's too dense. But you made it like could code. Thank you oh my gosh thank you so much. That's like the best compliment. Yeah it's funny you say that you'd never read version. I never I didn't really either like the first time I read so as a kid. I Love Shel Silverstein so yeah read poetry but you know that's a very that's a very specific kind of poetry. But when I think about as an adult I think of a certain kind of poetry And it wasn't until I started reading novels in verse that I was like. Oh we poetry's can be really really cool. It can mean. Musical can be understandable. It doesn't have to be like intentionally To Serb scare and it's funny because one of the first time I read a novel in verse didn't realize that it was a single story. I thought it was a book of poetry like a Shell Silverstein overseen book of Poetry. And it wasn't until I was maybe a quarter of the way through it that I was like wait wire characters coming back over and over like having to go back to the beginning and and reread it realizing it was a single story. I mean there are books in verse. I didn't know so so the first one of the first ones that I read it was actually a book called the crossover which has written by someone named qualm Alexander. Who if you haven't read this book you absolutely must? It's it's one of the first Middle Grade novels in verse in existence. It won the newbery and it's also written by the Guy who is now my publisher And so what I. What when I was writing eating my minnows trading emmy I I was sort of using the crossover as a mentor taxed Because you know so. His Book Combined Brian Basketball and music. And I was combining code in music. which are all things that people don't think of as the same but when it's presented in a book it somehow make accents so I highly highly highly recommend that one as like like if I mean has a wet your what your palate for for novels in verse? That is definitely want to check out. Is it the rise of hip hop in rap. Th It allows her more free verse to happen so I have a theory. My theory is that there is a. There's a a lack of books for like blooming readers That are that are high interest so that that are interesting stories but not like overly complicated text or like. The words aren't complicated so the same way that like graphic novels are drying in younger readers. Or maybe more reluctant readers. I think novels in verse have the same power because from the outside these books look just like any other about. They look like they are thick. They look like they have chapters they look like therefore teenagers as opposed to like little kids. But because there's so much white space you can move through it really quickly and feel like a really confident reader even if you're not So I think that the reason that fest three so I think verse. Novels are kind of experiencing a bit of a renaissance right now. I also do think there's probably something about how exposed we are to music doc. These days in a way that like I I might not have been as a kid I mean I guess. I had the radio which I listened to as a kid but even that it wasn't so much like I'd my parents drove me to school and we could turn the radio on or off but here but as I've gotten older I feel like I'm like more and more exposed to music and I think that because music is take the kids are listening to so much music and gives kids are probably way more up to date on current music is then maybe some adults or myself definitely I do think that there is that music cut. It becomes a doorway into into verse especially with things like like Hamilton which I think kids in particular have really taken a shine to. I like. I Adore Hamilton up. That are so text heavy. And I I you know I still videos of kids like wrapping Hamilton and that makes me so happy because what is Hamilton. But Shakespeare I mean it's it's literally literally Shakespeare or Gosh who the there was a rapper. That just one like like a Pulitzer Prize or some really big prize can Kendrick Lamar Kendrick. Lamar his lyrics are They're absolutely genius. And so I think if ah that's the kind of brilliant music that kids are listening to then. I think that absolute Louis isn't entryway into poetry and I can totally see that the verse novel sort of the The bridge I guess between music and poetry and literature. Okay so I do you see that bridge. What about the overlap between poetry and coat? Yeah so I've always had these two sides to me this this technical side that That you know that loves puzzles. It not loves that loves code and loves to kind of dive deep into technical problem and not not emerge until I've solved it but I've also always had this love of language in this love of words and and everyone would hear these. You know whatever ever I would say that. I was a software engineer but that was writing a book. People will be like. Oh those are such opposites and even in college when I say double majored in Computer Science and Literary Arts and people would say like thank God like those are absolute opposites and I see why people say that but to me they never seemed like opposites. I think because code to me was never math. It was always a language and I think when people think of co they think of ones and Zeros and like you know like the crash output you get when you have an error in Microsoft if word and unlike calling comcast like everything is scary and terrible and and confusing and I think there's elements of of coating that do get down into the weeds and like deal with binary and deal with like wires and circuits in like the. But that's just that's not what I've done in my career and so when I think of code I don't think of that at all. All I think of a literally think of words like Java is all language I think of like documentation and I think like a well-designed variable name as as silly as that sounds but to me coating was all about language and I thought that people whose work I most admired were the ones who are a good communicators and so I was reading a book called the Red Pencil. which by Andrea Davis Pinkney and it has nothing? Get all to do with code. But it's written in verse and for some reason when I was reading it the way that she used colons and do lions and tabs and spaces reminded me at the coding language Python and it struck me all at once. How similar the two are because both poetry code are things where we ascribe meaning to punctuation or to white space or Or to a single word and then we like use that word over and over again at every time we use it we're reminded of that original meaning and and I I used to. I get these emails from recruiters. Believe it or not that would be like if you dot are looking for a job you apply to and it's like it. It gets so ridiculous but also I like you know like a recruiter. Not necessarily a technical person but that they understood. The coding syntax acts and stuff to write this ridiculous e mail and it kind of struck me that how how human readable it can be and And I and I thought no one had ever had ever consciously done that before or at least not to my knowledge. I figured if anyone was capable of telling a story through the language of code it would probably be somebody who like was a good writer and also a good soffer engineers like well. Why can't I tell that story? And so I decided added to give it a try and I and I think I think it was pretty successful And so hopefully through the course of the book people sort of realized that these things that seem like opposites assists. Don't actually have to be. I totally agree with that. They don't have to be an I do. Tend to think good coach should be story like yeah absolutely. It's funny. I was reading it because I was trying to relate to my experiences. A kit learning computers tonight. I started with computers way in most kids offer for better for worse. Probably slightly worse but I was probably five or six when I started playing around with basic and stuff and emmys sixth grader. You're in the book. So she started a little later and she makes these connections with music and stuff and I don't remember making connection with anything it just was this thing that Oh okay. This is the thing that I'm learning and I kind of felt jealous that she had this connection that I didn't seem to make until until later years this kind of thinking about this sort of stuff I just found that really cool shoes inspired. Generally you know now that I think about it. I don't know how much of a connection I was making learning to code either if anything I was just it felt like a logic puzzle and the logic puzzles. Don't always always activate the While I was going to say good variable name part of your brain but the the linguistic arts part of your brain or there is some separation of though if you can do both. It's far better right. Yeah and I. It's interesting because I look back at my very old old code like when I I was learning and it doesn't make sense. I like the logic. Is there a works. But it's hard to read and I think that's something that you actually acquire. Why her as you get older and as you develop your communication skills? I mean we've all worked with somebody who writes you know brilliant code that works perfectly the next person who has no idea what it's what it means or what it does. Has Your writing influenced your coating. I think thanks so. I think I've put a lot more effort into things like documentation or like I think I'm pretty good at coming up with variable names for example or method names because I mean like really the hardest part of computer science or cashing in variable names. So I got fifty percent of that for my MFA. I think I should have had paid for for by companies I I I do think that I also think something that I was Kinda surprised prize. Vyas I started like entering. The workforce is how much of my job is like presentations or Or writing emails. Or like just convincing people that my my ways the right way or whatever it is and those are things that I definitely got from my MFA or for my literary Arts degree more than like my computer science class. What about the other way? How much has coaching influenced your writing? I I wrote a whole book. It's funny I did like people were saying for years. They were telling me to write a book about girls. Coding and I'm and I was like yeah. Okay fine because most of the books that I've read about girls. Coding were either like nonfiction so they were about specific woman Kotor or they were not accurate about it and that or is this all read those books that are like that are like you know. Here's an Evil Evil Tech Company and everyone's really really sexist and and like in like. Oh this poor girl like this is why she leaves the Tech Industry and like that was like I. Obviously I've experienced some sexism but that was not the overarching like emotion for my time there And so I I was always like okay. Finally coming to write a book about girls coding. Like what second be like like a like another biography of grace hopper like great I Adore biographies of Grace Hopper for no no shade there but I was like I don't like that just is something that I want to do but I think that's sort of why the idea of Emmy jumped out at me and became something that I really. He wanted to write about. Because it's not about coating it's about just like a girl who's trying to figure out what she loves to do in about friendships and about like teachers and mentors tors and family and coding. Just like a tool and I. I think I was trying to figure out what to do for a second book and I was like well. I have to do something else with stem through something stem stem. And I'm not like my second book is nothing at all to do with stem but I but I think I felt like I needed to because that was like my brand or whatever with his first book as if like you have a brand and after one book. But that's sort of what I felt like I had to do but but I think the reason that that that doesn't ever felt right to me is the same reason than it never felt right to write books about girls and stem in the first place because that like that wasn't what drew me to the idea that because I was going to say when I was reading it I was. I didn't feel like it was a girls in Code Book and this is designed specifically to inspire young girls to get into coding. I mean it can do that. But I was connecting with the musical aspects and the story as a whole and the code was there and it was cool and interesting but it was just a hook as part of a you know a necessary part that story and how those friendships developed and stuff. So yeah I didn't feel like it was like a preachy code. Great everyone should do it kind of thing thinking you're saying that that's definitely it's nice when like ear intention sort of comes through in the book because that that's definitely what that was definitely my intention like the code was not there like it. Can Dan Teach Code. But it's it was there because that's how she thinks was. Did it cross your mind. I just don't want to write about women in Stem mm-hmm because Oh my God there's so many people talking about it and it's such a fraught subject in my life and I just don't care anymore I don't want to. That's speaking from experience. I knew I absolutely and I think that's why I was like oh girls in summer so hot right now like you should should absolutely a book about that. It'll sell like gangbusters. I was Kinda rolling my eyes I was like it's my life like it's not like I could write something sensationalist I guess and like maybe we sell books but like you can't predict the market like that and even if I tried. I don't think I could spend years working on that because it just doesn't it just doesn't strike me as interesting lake. Like how could I get myself up in the morning every day to write that it just has to be something that you believe in so strongly and I didn't have lately. It's like I was doing that every day. Like why would I wanNA write a book about that again and I think actually like looking at at any that the part that it was probably the hardest to write or the most part that I like kind of push back against myself with the most was writing about the character Francis because he's the character who is the we could call him the sexist and in the book but I don't see him that way because I do think that he just has been given some bad had ideas. He's a kid. He learned things the wrong way and I think he's like by the end of the book I think he's trying to be better But even without I was like really struggling I was like do I even want to include. This is this something that I want kids to like. This could deter kids from from wanting to code this. I mean but at the same time. I don't think you can really tell a book story about Out about girls in stem without at least like addressing that. That's the thing they're going to experience but I think that was probably the part where I was kind of. Oh do I really want to do this. You know I think it was the right decision because it certainly feels real. I mean even the sexiest part aside. I remember birth. Those kind of kids. And Yeah scourged from doing anything quote unquote smart as a kid right right and the feeling that. They're only discouraging origin. You when in fact they're just discouraging everyone else. Yeah Yeah yeah totally. So we're giving spoiler spoiler should it. I mean it isn't it isn't really spoiling. I don't think because it's the book is about the character and ask questions. That are definite details. Okay we will ask that okay so all of that aside. Did you mean to write an introduction to Java programmer. was that a goal where it was that was actually a goal from in the beginning because Part of the reason I so I think I think I've gotten the best better at as I've as I've been writing more than in publishing more is I think I've gotten better at At identifying a hook when the hook hits me Because I think for a long time I was writing because I was like. Oh that's interest exciting for me but but like I think oh gotten better identifying when something is going to be interesting to publishers and I am in no way an expert on that but I've gotten better at it and so one of the things that I sort of thought as I I I had the idea was if I can teach if I teach a little bit of coating if I can make this like a real like something that that a teacher could teach like in conjunction with a computer science class. That is a hook And so that was actually a part of the original and actually one of the very first things that I did was sort out of decided that I was going to have her understand. All of the words in public Saddik void mainstream bric-a-brac archives by the end and I think what's I gave myself that backbone. It was like this is the curriculum. She needs to learn all these words. I'M NOT GONNA. I'M NOT GONNA branch too far outside of this curriculum. Because there's only so much space in the book but if I give myself those boundaries and I make the goal that at the very least I have a framework so that what that was an initial goal of it was to teach a little bit of coding. Did you have a particular person in mind as an audience as you wrote a niece nephew. Hugh son daughter forty five year old white male. I think I think I write for my twelve year old self like I was like a pretty happy and well adjusted kid like I don't want to you know. Paint this picture of me as like a like some kind of lonely sad sack but I do think that I was like loneliness was like a very strong emotion for me as a child And I and like I just remember feeling that way so strongly and so I think like there are still these things that I'm dealing with now is like a twenty nine year old woman that I was dealing with and I was twelve and I think that I wrote the book the way of sort of phrases in the passes. I write the books that I need to write in hopes that someone else else needs to read them. And I think that I'm like working through my own. Like not like traumas but just my own like you know those insecurities you have as a kid. The same things is that you were dealing with when you're twelve. You're dealing with now and I write. I write that because that's what I'm thinking about. And that's what what what I could have have used when I was twelve and I hope that there is still a twelve year old in the world. Who reads this book like feels like they needed it like? That's that's what I hope. Alan is the book banana just about a month and a half it came out September. Twenty four th okay and you went on book tour. I I did actual book tour across the country. Yeah it was pretty fine. We went. We went to cities we went to Minnesota or Minneapolis. The Apple Saint Paul Chicago. Boston New York Sarasota Florida and Seattle. And we did that in ten days. It was a lot of traveling. How did you I mean this is an? You've got a fair amount of of press in and publicity. How did your publisher decide? How did you get into invest so much money in promoting your? I mean. That's a great question. Well the main thing is that I have a wonderful Agent Orange Amos Kathleen Russell like this is a an advertisement for her. She's amazing she works at Jesus agent for the Injury Brown Literary Agency which I also highly recommend. They're like a great agency support system and I'm like I would. I believe strongly in an agent that works at injury around So so part of the reason that I think they are supporting the book and the way that they are like without getting too much in the weeds of like publishing details is too so that the book went to auction which which is which is basically when like multiple houses want to buy it which is really really lovely as author who had been like trying to yeah. I know it's like you. You try so hard to get published for so many years and like all of a sudden like you go from having like seventy five rejections on I seventy five agent rejections. Before I started getting offers on my book and this was like the novel the fourth the fourth novel I went out with and I also went out with a picture book at one point so like I had my fair share of rejection. But it's pretty funny to go from eight years of that to suddenly having like like people fighting over your book doc and I think when it when it gets to that point. It's not that it's like a guarantee of anything but it it means that there's that there's demand and like multiple people think it's a good idea a- and so I think when when you have that kind of validation you you may be trust a little more that they're going that like the book has market has a demand Dan and so there may be more willing to put more money into it I think also like I really don't know the answer this is I think that I do have. I have a theory here where because the the imprint that I'm at is so small it's brand new. They're really pushing the books in a way that Oh think a big a big publishing house or a big import would do because like every book like. There's only this is this. This is the sixth book that this imprint has put out over over the span of a year. Because that's all that's a whole life span of imprint has been less than a year you went with. The publisher will not a sort of publisher so okay so the way that the publishing industry sort of works is you have these like big house publishers. And they're like the really big ones like scholastic and Harper and And seven issue stir in his and then you have ones that are like still large and still reputable but are not like the huge ones is Houghton Mifflin which I think falls until like like gay larger mid size category. I don't really know because I I've only met like my team. So I'm at Houghton Mifflin which is like a large publisher But it's but it's the versa fi imprint and so versus by his brand new. But it's it's it's attached to Kwame Alexander's name. Who is like one of my literary Heroes Heroes in his house like a very successful career and so even though it's cut a startup imprint? It's backed by a very large house. And it has the like the cachet of of qualms name plus I really trust him as like an editor as I love love his work so much and also his editor for the crossover is my editor for Emmy and I really trust her so we did go with like kind of a startup but also also there's like there's two sides to that there's like this I were it's unproven but there's also the side where they really want to succeed and your success is their success. They're really invested in your success. So that's part of the reason that we that we went with them was because of that I think another reason that it is that they they they put some thought behind. It is is because I've been putting on spot and like I've made it very clear that I am going to go and market market the heck out of this thing and like I am going to pull every string I have. I'm going to be tweeting about it all the time. I'm going to put my own money into it too. Like I do print stickers. I like a lot of the tour was funded by by us to and so. We're we're willing to do that that they are willing to put more put more energy into us as well so I think I think there's there's a lot of factors that play into like like what publishers decide to push what they don't and like I by no means have this they have like all the secrets I'm just theorizing here but I think there's probably some truth to it did get in. MFA A make this possible. I mean could you have done this out. I probably could have gotten published without it. I so so the reason let me go back a little bit the reason I decided to get an. MFA is because I had sort of reached like what I felt like was like a dead end in my attempts publishing so I had written a full length novel like a Dystopia. And why a you know not a trilogy but like like it was basically kind of everyone's first attempt at a novel which just like it's going to be the next the hunger games because it's I mean it's exactly the hunger games every like lethal is the same way that when you're like an early budding artist I like a painter. You'll you'll You'll copy existing art works as an author. You D basically the same thing. I think we're your you when you're first starting out you're just copying the stuff that you've read and so I was doing that so I wrote this book. I thought it was amazing. I tried to get it published. I got like a bunch of people very nicely saying no And I was like okay. Maybe it's book wasn't as good as I thought I'M GONNA write another book and I wrote another book and this is a book that I actually still go back to thinking that it has merit and that one day all returned to an and actually get it published but And I started to make some more some more progress and had more success with that second book and had some people saying like this is really interesting but or people were saying like Semimar pages or some people were saying like if you do this this and this then I will consider signing you and I but like that point I had probably amassed seventy rejections actions are doing it for like four or five years and I was like. I don't know how to do these changes. I don't know how to do what they're asking. And so I at the same time I was starting to feel like I was burnt out of software engineering. I was at facebook at this time and I had just had like a bad review or like a bad day or something and I was like. Oh maybe I should just quit like like I should just become a writer full time but I was. I was still single. I didn't really have the funds to do that and this was like okay. Like think rationally if you were to quit today. What's the first thing you would do and what I decided was? I was going to intern for a literary literary agent. And so I did that and I really liked it. And at the end The agent was like so you could try to become like an agent if you wanted but yeah I think what your strength is is in writing. And so if that's something you WanNa pursue you might WANNA consider getting a low residency. MFA because they'll help you get to the next level and you don't have to quit your job. You can do it from where you are as I did that. And it was probably the best decision I ever made like. Not only did they teach me how to write but they taught me how to read. They taught me what to read. They taught me lake like how to think about literature as part of the political conversation. It kind of reminded me why it matters to write books for kids. Plus I met so many wonderful talented authors who I consider my friends now And like a lot of the people that I talk to like on a daily basis are people from this program not to mention the fact that before the program. I never read a novel in verse before like I would never have even thought to the right one because I didn't I didn't know they existed and so And so the MFA is like really the reason. I was able to write emmy now that being things said it's expensive to get an FA it's really time consuming. Not everyone can take on more debt or like has tech job to subsidize is a writing career so like I don't want to say that every that like an MFA is critical because there's so many people in the world who publish beautiful beautiful books without getting MFA but for me it was. It was invaluable. I if I if I I probably could have gotten published without it but I don't think it would be as quickly and I don't think he would be with a book that I'm as proud of when I wrote the introduction for this show I asked if people whatever whatever thought of giving up on their engineering CR- to become an author and you corrected me because you didn't want to be thought of as giving up on engineering. Sorry how do you think you would go back. See so I did correct you because I think I've I've been struggling a bit with this decision to pause software engineering partly because I still think of myself as a software engineer. I still love coating. I don't ever want that not to be a part of me And I don't ever want to remove the option from the table of of going back if I wanted to like if the financial need ever arose or if I just like fell an if there was ever a startup company that I just really believed in I would maybe want to go do that and also just I just never want to say never like I don't want the plan my life out too far in advance so so I just I just I sort of just mentally cognitively. I'm trying to just not not think of it as like a closed door I that being said I don't see myself going back anytime soon. I I WANNA have kids I want to be able to I. I don't want to be a stay at home mom but I want to be like maybe like a part time. Stay at home. Mom I WANNA be. I want my reading to be like something. I'm very serious about for a long time time and but I but I totally see myself like fly fast forward like fifteen years if I do have kids and they're like in school and and I you know I have multiple books out and I'm just feeling like I need to change like maybe I would go back to like a startup or something. I also use coding in my regular life because I I may crossword puzzles and I spend whenever I'm coming up with the theme that is particularly challenging. I will usually code some Way of like scraping dictionary and Like checking which words have certain properties like make like advanced rejects kind of things for my crossword puzzles. And so I'm using that on a regular basis I also have like coated various peace various like like various things for emi promotion. I- would also at some point be interested in like making youtube videos teaching various coating aspects through through through the language of the book or like the characters of the book or something like that. So I I I totally see myself like incorporating like. I've always thought of coding as a tool the same way I think of writing as a tool and it's always gonna be a tool in my tool belt and so if there's something to create one day that requires code then. I have that that I can use that until like if one day you know if if someone ever approaches me with like a startup idea they need they need someone to code for in the idea really really really speaks to me then I could totally see myself going back into it but probably not for like at least a decade. I WanNa like have my kids I and and kind of do that part of my life And then and then we'll see what happens or was it scary to quit. Did you already have the book published. I mean did you were you. It was quitting was very scary. I to the point where I did part time I like I. I went down onto about Twenty one hours. We did Earth something that I did. Three to twenty four hours a week. I did three days a week for about three or four months before I quit full-time I I had sold the book back in May of twenty seventeen. He knows that true twenty eighteen may twenty eighteen. And it wasn't until I don't like about six months later that decided to go part time and it wasn't until four months after that I decided to quit and and the main reason that I quit with I quit that I didn't that didn't just keep doing part time. A little longer was because of my travel schedule more than anything I I had my honeymoon coming up. I had my husband's family is Greek and so we had a bunch of weddings in Greece. Unlike back weekends right after our honeymoon so between just my honeymoon honeymoon in Greece I was going to be gone for six weeks. And then on top of that I had my tour coming up. I had like if I was lucky. I will be invited to conferences and school visits visits. And all this stuff which I which has happened and so like I don't think I could have even held down a part time job even with even with With the amount of travel doing just like it wouldn't have been possible I would've gone fired and then on top of that even when I was doing part time I had another reason that I was able to make this work. I had just gotten hired onto the staff of Crossword Puzzle Writers for The New Yorker which is a really lovely lovely gig because it's consistent. It's like a monthly thing. It also pays pretty well. And so that the amount of time that I was spending on those puzzles roles. Plus all my promotion and revisions and stuff for EMI was basically taking up all my like the extra two days a week. I had from working part-time hard time plus my weekend so I was still working days. A week An addition to my three days a week of my of my tech job and it was an and that was that was without even writing my next text books so I was. I was totally at full capacity plus weekends and I wasn't even writing and so I was as I was getting really frustrated by this wasn't I felt like I wasn't making progress in my in my goals And I was like stressing about all this. Upcoming travel is accounting to make this work and then like a couple of other kinds of financial things happen in my husband and I sat down. And we're like look. I think I need to do this. I it. Worst case scenario I hate it and I go back to work like in a year but I wanNA take a year to just do it. The other thing is because we wanNA have kids soon. It's like this is. I've always said I wanted to to write full time for a year before I had kids. So it's like this is basically the only only chance I have I have. I have the best circumstances that it's possible supposed to have. I will be the only reason not to do. It is because it's scary and that's not a good reason. Yeah exactly exactly and so we I just do it. Are you ready now. Do you have the time or are you just so full of publicity and some some weeks are pretty busy. Full publicity But I have managed to do a a pretty major revision of my second book in the last about a month and a half in between like right before the tour a little bit during the tour right after the tour I'm pretty good at working on planes to so I'm I do a fair a bit of work on planes so I've told my editor I'M GONNA get back to her in about a week and it's at this. I'm feeling pretty much done with it. I just like a couple of Recipes and my second book and so being thing I have to do is Is is like fixed the recipes but those are sort of those kind of stands separate from the book so the book itself itself is in pretty good shape. I think so. I owe to her in like a week so I have a week to get this thing finished so I I am writing. Are you writing. Used to be something you did outside work and so it was a passionate fulfilling amazing. I want to call it a hobby. Because it's too little but vocation that it you had to carve out time for Are you worried that it will become a job you hate because you just have to do it all. Yeah No I. I absolutely we do think about that. And actually one of the things that a lot of writers have said is like when writing becomes your career. You need a new hobby and I've actually started taking on. I played piano for ten years years as a kid. And I quit I like wrote a whole essay on like wia quitting all the stuff and and it was just so plugged for my newsletter. Post host things about like piano so if you want to sign up for my newsletter you'll get thoughts like that But that's what I recently started picking up piano again and so that sort of become Mike. The only thing I do this on verbal everything I do is like all about words but piano is like just sound and so it's it's that sort of thing I do you kind of like unwind when when my career becomes too overwhelming But I I do worry about like what happens if I I don't worry there's so much about hating it. I worry about Lake like the anxiety of like when you have two things you care about. If things going badly than you lease you have the other thing but when but when you have one thing that's getting all your focus and like all of your time is spent thinking about books it's like when when books like like if something bad happens happens in the book world. Then that's your whole life And like I know I I was going through this period of time like maybe like a month and a half before the book came out where you know like debut authors get. I mean every author but I think debuts because it's their first one maybe a little more intense they get so in their head about like like am I getting enough attention to people like the book enough and somebody very wise said. No one's going to praise your book for as long as it took you to right. Yeah but I was getting really in my head about this. I was like Oh this blatant like like and like I couldn't even say that they hated. Hey did I say he will don't like it enough and so I was giving but and and that that sort of what worries worries me when I don't have the tech job it's like I I get so anxious. I spiral about stuff like that so I don't necessarily worry that I'm going to hate it but a worry that I'm just going to. It's going to make me crazy. I can see that I was thinking more of the blink page problem of every day I have to right. Yeah four well I you know code and in the back doc of my brain I would be thinking about what I was writing and then when I actually got to the blank page it will spill out. Because that's what I've been doing all day. Graf in the backwards. Yeah Yeah I think. I think that there's definitely some element of truth to that. I think that the way of an at least so far working around it as I have enough enough projects going on that are not just the writing I can. Yeah because there's promotion for EMI. There's travel for the book There's crossword puzzles souls. I also I play piano a cook like I. You know I run with my husband so there's enough other things that I'm doing that like if if I can't bring myself myself to write on a certain day I'll do something else and then I'll come back to the writing. I also think there's I have a lot of projects happening at once and I think that for me. That's that's that's really good for me. I like you know if I'm if I'm getting frustrated with one project to another one and the other one might be a picture book. It might be an adult romance. It might be it might be like like a like a chapter book series like whatever whatever it is if I'm I can switch and they're different. Burn enough that they don't feel like it's the same thing even though it's still the blank page I have a question from one of the folks in my writing. Group silly mentioned that young adult novels have a reputation for passionate and sometimes times rabid in not so nice away fans what has been your experience. And how do you do a fence. Well I am not famous famous enough to have a ton of fans yet. Hopefully one day I think also so technically my book Middle Grade So young adult tends to be like fifteen to eighteen and middle. Great ten of you like eight to twelve. You may notice that. There's a bit of a gap between twelve and fifteen and that's actually like an opinion. A problem with the kit space is that there's not a whole lot of books written for ages twelve to fifteen but that is a separate podcast but because my my quote unquote fans are like younger. They're they're on twitter they're they're not like if I get if someone reaches out to me. It's it's usually like Super Super Super Nice. I have yet to have anybody. Saudi say anything like negative about the book like I think the most negative thing anyone has said even in like my like worst Amazon Review. Someone called it like Anti Trans Humanist or something and I was like I don't even know what that means I think he was commenting on. There's like one one kind of throwaway line in the book about souls and how if you download your brain into a thumb drive. It could be you basically be a soul on a computer. And some this atheists remain. I was like okay. That's fair Um Lake. I guess I am easiest and therefore probably came out in my book and a very subtle way So that's probably like the most or maybe one person's commenting on like commented. I'm pacing acing at one point so it's like when that's the most negative thing people are saying at least like like to your face and like in reviews. It's like like you really can't complain you know it's been it's been really people super super nice but I also think that the more famous you get the more book she put out the mortgage the more open you become too Too angry greet fans are rabid fans or and I think especially if you're writing a series and your and you have books exist that people love and then your landed do exactly exactly. I think that becomes like very high pressure. Don't right or at least so far. I have have not written anything. Well actually. I shouldn't even say that. Nothing that I have sold is meant to be a series so I do have things that I would like to be serious. They are unsold as of yet. But but I think I think once you once you're tasked with the idea of making more content with pre existing characters I that's when people can get angry or or just like sad because 'cause I it's a good problem to have right because they love they love your character so much. There are so real to them that they have all these opinions on. What should happen to them? I think that's kind of beautiful but it just like it hasn't happened to be at maybe one day. Hopefully one day. You mentioned reading the Amazon reviews and I saw on twitter. You're looking at good rates. Yeah I it's crazy easy. You cannot do that. Oh you reviewed it yourself which I thought was too. You'd it like the moment that I knew I had a page. I was like review. My own at this point is like kind of embarrassing Richard. Probably take it out loud. I do check I feel like I actually have a pretty thick skin when it comes to review so because I I think also 'cause I've made I think crosswords for so long and those get reviewed and I always read those like and I put so many out that like some are going. We're not gonNA get good reviews and that's fine and I think that I think also I've been lucky enough that the reviews have been good and so like if something starts something does let's get negative. Then it's like well that's one person's opinion. I think it'd be very different if lake. I put a book out and people just like really didn't like it like that would really hurt but I do check partly just because checking makes me less anxious than not checking but I but I do limit myself in terms of how many times I can check so I don't limit yourself check more than once a day. I check only the first thing morning. It's like I know I know I sound. I'm pretty I'm pretty. I also like I mean this is definitely like my. OCD acting. Like I also like wake up in the middle of the night and check that the ovens off select but like it's not it is definitely not a problem right now and so until until it becomes a problem I will continue scratching that h that I relate highly compartmentalizing. Yeah that's great. Yeah yes cash. I try not to read interview and happens like once a year. Okay so question from Thomas. Are there differences in the structures and in ways you thought about coding that differed from your non writing co workers and same question the other way at school where there are differences in the ways always you processed and thought about writing that were different from your non-coding writers. I do I think so. I think with coding. I I really emphasize readability. I emphasized because I think I have some. I have some coating friends. That emphasize like brevity And so their goal is to make the code as short as possible and so they'll they'll like every time there's a new function that his job is doing some like kind of functional language stuff as as the increase in I'm as the versions increase But I I always really struggle using functional original programming because it doesn't feel as human readable to me and so I would. I would do the more like verbose thing Just because I felt it was easier to read As I get into arguments about that where we would just like debate. Whether you know brevity was better if it was the same mm-hmm efficiency Less readable so we will get into base about that. I also think that I approach writing from a fairly technical standpoint standpoint like I I think that I I. I don't know how to how to describe this but I think like I am pretty good at pulling out. Don't like craft elements like I'll be reading vocabulary. Oh interesting they started. They started the book with this with this type of sentence. And now they're ending it with the same type of sentence or like here is a line that POPs up four times in a day. You know this works because the first two shoe times or setting the pattern. The third time you are heightening the pattern and the fourth time you're breaking the pattern or things like that like I feel like I I feel like I think this is also also does something I got from my. MFA was like a an ability to analyze writing and kind of think about it from a technical standpoint. And I think the books that I a love are the ones that are technically intricate. And so I I do that comes from my tech background it also. We just could come from Miami my MFA were we are taught to read analytically. I think another thing that I'm that kind of maybe bridges. The gap between the two is. Because I have these two sides I I think I'm pretty good at drawing connections between things so like every time I learn a new word like another language for example Mike. Oh it's just like this word English and this word in Spanish or whatever and I think the same thing happens with with like writing or coating lake anytime I I see. I learned something new in like coding context or a writing context. I will like consciously make the connection to like the other thing and I don't have any examples of this so wisconsin very vague But but that's something that I do think I do that. That like that. That like not a lot of writers who don't code or quarters don't right do while Christopher you had split their questions it's sorta spoiler so so let's see there. There are few passages. I just wanted to maybe for you to tell us how you were inspired to write it or what was on your mind and you can totally tell me to go away but I had a few questions so I walk inside like accord. Resolving that was was just an amazing little for instance wondering how you feel I think this is sort of goes back to what I was saying about how. How because I have these two things? I'm constantly making connections between them and so like metaphors like that came fairly fairly easily to be and sometimes I really liked one and I would like save it. I'd be like I have to use his somewhere. I don't know where I think I'd originally that one had originally been like I'm a compass in it's magnetic north which I still like as a metaphor but it just didn't fit for the character and interesting because I'm writing the second book now now which which combines food and Judaism which is like a very very different from me but also not too different and one of the things that my editor has saddest have too many metaphors and I think partly because I did so many an emmy but they worked at Emi because I legitimately do think in music it is i. I played piano for so many years. But I don't have the food background that I would need in order to think in food the same way and so I think the ones Somme and my second book are forced right now. Hopefully they will not be when the book becomes published but right now they are But I was glad you like that phrase because I also really like the metaphor next I liked was sometimes the best dungeons are the ones that look like palaces and that's where miscellaneous describing. I think think it's it's a part of where she's describing or it's a description of her experience with working in a startup straight from yesterday's from that. Yes yes yeah. It's funny because that same negative Amazon view. It's a it says that the book is like this Tech Utopia book which I think is really funny because I think that I particularly. It's not because busy if anybody is like like like a you know an author insert in the book. It's probably Miss Delaney because what she's going through is very similar to what I was going through as I was writing it with this desire to like leave this in tech industry history world and and do something with with with a similar same skills that just like has little meaning to her and so that. But it's funny because that that fairytale was like a pretty late insert I remember writing it and finding it tough to write because I felt like I was being so mean to tack because I do love loved I do love tack and like I love and I loved working intact like but I I had these very complicated feelings about it at the very least putting in this form of the first of a fairytale and kind of using these very gentle metaphors about like dungeons in palaces. What was at the very least like at the very least? It gave me a little bit of distance to talk about it. Yeah yeah no that resonated would be pretty. Well I'm really glad the last one that was really cool to say anything about is just I wanted to have it out. Four loops are just wild. Wild loops dressed up for Halloween. The tactic sugar. I couldn't facing tactics buddy at is one question I had and I think this is it for me is the dad in the book is working working up a song or a piece for For the Symphony Orchestra and the through line through the book is him struggling with practicing that and that really connected with me because I struggled a lot but was there a particular thing you had. You didn't mention which he was working on. I think was there something you had in mind. Because Emmy describes it as very angular and and sort of dissonant to start with that she starts as she listened to it more she starts parts to to engage with it but was particular piece and you had minder was just kind of like. There's lots out there like this. There's no particular piece but it was sort like like I was in this one music theory class and a high school that I really did not connect with it was. I don't know I. It might have been like a theory class on atonal music and I really struggled with hearing any song that was atonal. I just couldn't pick out the through line and I felt this way with like Anything by like Bela Bartok thing. There's this one flew piece. I can't remember specifically the name but it's called like its name is the density of platinum or is it's called like density one twenty one point five or something it's like but as the density of this of this particular flute. Some of this particular lake flu played on it was made like a different kind of metal But we we listen to it over and over again and I the first like five times. uh-huh listening I was like this is the worst song I've ever heard. And then like the sixth time it I would star to hear little little things. I thought were interesting or I mean. Just every it's like there's those are the pieces that were kind of the forefront of my mind although those are not symphony pieces those are solo pieces more often than not but every time I would like agenda learn a new piece honestly especially if it was like not not one of like Haydn. Beethoven Bach Mozart especially they got into more contemporary composers like debussy or or list or who are not contemporary tubbies fairly contemporary. Oh Yeah I just want Shostakovich Song. I played the piano. That was like really but I loved it by the end but it took me a really long time to understand what was going on and a lot of jazz feels that way to me were like I don't get it when I first hear it. It takes longtime for me to get up but once I get I love it so there was no specific piece but a lot of idol of voice like voices in my ears as I was like like songs and eight years but there is no there was one particular. You did have a lot of songs in the book and one of the things that I found difficult difficult was that I didn't know many of them not having as much experience with classical music as Chris and so I asked on. You're twitter if there was a list and I was happy that you replied and said that there was a google play list but since I don't have Google play spotify. Yeah that's probably a better most people. I don't know why I got Google play thirteen and I just never got rid of it. How many how many of these songs did you choose as themselves? And how many things did you change later like did you were these the songs from the beginning or today get like your recipes are doing now. Did they get massaged a little later they definitely got massaged an and they got massage in different ways. Like stevie wonder song that kind of comes up throughout that title is sort of based on that was a pretty late edition and actually the title came first. Because we were. We were talking about songs in the key of Code. And and someone's like oh just like songs in the key of life and I was like what's that I looked it up. I was like oh I I know this. I know I love this album. I just didn't have the title of the album. And so that's why that particular Song Sergyuk came into play so that was a late edition and then once I kind of another thing is that until my agent was actually the first person to suggest that EMI had her own relationship to music because originally it was just that her dad played the piano. Her mom didn't even have a relationship to music that came about like pretty close to the end. Actually but it was one of those things. Were once it happened. It was like Oh my God how does not been there the entire time. This is the heart of the book. And it's funny that that happens a lot with writing is like you're you're dancing around on something and you don't get it and then once you get like this is what the book spent about the whole time So the songs came up at more as emmys relationship wishes shipped to music evolved And then and so what you said about knowing all the songs I actually don't really know all of them either like like there's some that I chose more for their titles than anything And there's some that I chose because of their theme and there's some that I chose because I I just wanted to show that emi had like a very diverse musical tastes. Yes I ever like musical tastes basically my musical tastes. I listen to listen to everything so what I I wanted to show that. And so it's I think it's totally okay if people don't and this is this is Kinda feel about books in general like I mean with the music jokes in the book and with the Coding Jokes in the book. I don't think anyone should have to understand any of it. I think the story should work for anybody buddy even if you know nothing it was only like but like as a kid. I loved books that I love books that had like Easter eggs that I could find later on. I'm like as I read the book over and over again things things that I just like got as I I read it more as I matured as a reader and I think that I like what I hope is that there are. There's like a kid out there who like who feels really proud of themselves because they got like the joke about the diminished fifth. And they're like I take music theory class and like I got at that Or they're like I know what this song is like. I know I know why you chose song like there's the reference this is John Cage the forty four minutes thirty three seconds that POPs up and in Song titles. It's never the the name is ever mentioned. But the titles of poems are called for thirty three in reference to the song. Like if there's one kid who who knows the song and gets it like like they're gonNa feel so proud of themselves but no one's going to not get it and then like feel like they missed out on the book you know all do multi layered it was I could. I could totally see that. I got a few of the music jokes but I knew some were going over my head head and and I was trying to decide if I was researching them or going on to the next page and Mostly going on to the next page. Yeah and that's totally fine and I think and that's what I love about poetry too. Is that you you can read it really quickly. You can read it like two hours like the AUDIOBOOK IS I. Think three and a half hours short but if like a class word to study it and you know kids were to like write an essay on a poem they could and they could actually find that That's kind of like a puzzle solver and puzzle maker like that's what I like. I like those kind of hidden elements and so as a writer. I do that just kind of amuse myself. But it's also something that I hope that there's kids who like appreciate ashamed that to even as they get older and they go back and reread it. I'm like oh I get this now. I didn't get that as a twelve year old on your book tour. I assume you've been doing some readings. Yes what do you like to read. It's funny that you ask that question. My part that I read my husband always says is not what I should be reading because I read the parts that I think are fun to read aloud which which is often the poems that are rhyming or are like more musical or rhythmic so like the wine. The Beatles the monkeys the turtles cars Madonna Riana Adele Bruno. Mars I like reading that one allowed. I like reading aloud. The part like anything worship Russia where I get to sing public static. Roy Mainstream racquet ARCS. I like doing that because it's you know you wouldn't. You wouldn't hear the rhythm that I hear by just reading it so I do those but my husband says that I should be but those are not indicative of what the book is so he says I should read ones. That are more like story based so I've tried reading. Was the number story base the problem I always run into early. Said I just feel when I'm reading those as I feel like for those you don't always Cassisi why its inverse when I just read those and so I always like struggle with our. I'm like you would get so much more out of seeing this. It's like why am I reading aloud enough. We have. I believe kept you for a little bit longer than we told you we would so I should probably close up the the show to you have any thought to leave us with the main thought that I would like to leave you with is and this is just sort of me like the thing. That's on my mind now and that's something that people are talking about a lot in like especially in the the kid lit space in particular. Is this notion of Like letting kids choose the books that they wanna read like if our goal is to create readers than we need to kind of let those readers grow on their own terms. And so you know if if a kid is being drawn to the same book over and over again if a kid is being drawn to just graphic novels if a kid is being drawn to just picture books like that's amazing that's beautiful and like that creates readers. That's all I guess has been amy author of Emmy in the Kief Code and the upcoming recipe for disaster. You can find them in your bookstore or you can ask your bookstore to order them for you or you can purchase them online. That'd be links in the shouts. Thanks amy thank you so so much thank you to Christopher for producing an coasting. Thank you to my writing group and are embedded. FM Slack Patriarch Group for adding a few questions. And of course thank you for listening you can always contact us at show at embedded DOT FM or hit the contact link on embedded FM and. Now a quote leave you with one of my favorite pieces from Emi in the key code. I don't raise my hand and ask what about the inbetween. And what about the things that are not so bullying. What about the things that don't feel true but also don't feel false? I don't ask about them because in Java those things don't matter emitted is an independently. Produced Radio show that focuses on the many aspects specs of engineering it is a production of logical elegance and embedded software consulting company in California if there are advertisements in the show we you did not put them there and do not receive money from them at this time. Our sponsors are logical elegance and listeners like you.

MFA writer publisher software engineer facebook Emmy editor Kwame Alexander EMI Philip pullman San Francisco San Francisco Symphony Orchest Amy Lucido Christopher White Ossis Hamilton Shel Silverstein Greece
Quarantine With Silverstein

The Daily Beans

1:01:08 hr | 5 months ago

Quarantine With Silverstein

"Hello and welcome to the daily beans for Wednesday march. Eighteenth Two Thousand Twenty Today Day. One of the. Cdc Corona virus guidelines are in effect. Super Tuesday three but no voting Ohio prosecutors dropped the Concord Management Muller case McConnell asks his Democratic opponents to pull her ads in Kentucky a stimulus plan takes shape. Nunez walks back his idiot comments on going to restaurants and bars and the VA quietly changes. Its mission. I'm your host gene with me today as Amanda Reader Lou. How are you you know hoping? Yeah doing okay Jordan. His home again. She's got a little bit of a sore throat. She just wanted to make sure that you know everything is chill and clear before she returns but she says hello and she loves you all and Thanks where patrons for allowing us to you know because of your support where we're able to offer sick leave paid sick leave not just sick leave and I don't require a positive cry test for that to happen as some companies are doing We'll talk about that in a little bit but I did want to give everybody a little bit of an incentive to join Patriot. If you haven't already I'm going to start reading Shel Silverstein poems and we're going to put a little royalty free music behind him. Maybe some some of our musical friends who you may or may not have heard of what will help with a little bit of music. It's really nice and you can listen to that yourself that you can play it for your family's at Shell Silverstein so it's family friendly. Yeah and I'm calling it quarantine Silverstein. It's really cute. So you'll only be able to get those on our patron which is Patriot dot com slash the daily beans and any level will get you access to those a poetry readings and also Then that will start to probably tonight or tomorrow cool and then also you still get like at the daily means ad free you get at the night before it comes out in our group. Which if you're quarantine. Maybe you need some friends yet because it's a really great place to network and I the there's just a lot of really great benefits that come with it so to be a premium. Subscribers only starts at three bucks a month. I think you know might be worth and like I said Helps us out a lot Especially during these times if you can. I know a lot of people can't so thank you again to everyone does. And if not thank you for listening because just that act alone really really like gets me through the day And I I can't I just can't thank you enough so thank you for subscribing and and listening it means the world so That aside you were telling me before. We went on air that Some announcements were made in Canada. What's going on Yeah As far as I know and I want to. I'm going to clarify this right now. This is just from phone. Call with my mom. The Canadian government is calling home expatriates expats people who live abroad. Which is a big step for them to take and Yeah my mom's a nurse as I've mentioned many times on the show and My my sibling is A medical assistant Who Works with nurses and they're both going to be on the front lines of what's happening in the coming weeks. So and we've been getting actually a lot of emails and a lot of tweets and stuff from people who work in healthcare seeing that their extra grateful for us right now because they're going to be some of the hardest. I mean we're all going to be extremely hard hit. But they're going to have to go through witnessed some pretty awful stuff so yeah we have to think them from from the bottom of our hearts because they don't get to hug their kids they don't get to spend time with their families. There are out helping us And that's incredibly heroic and amazing and to all the first responders and everybody on the front lines and everybody behind the lines. I mean there's just so hard when you you know when you have to either shelter in place which I think might be happening in New York. We'll cover that and a little bit. Yeah what's already happening in San Francisco? Most places right now are pretty much. Battening down the hatches. Were all sort of self quarantining and and staying in Ho a staying at home and and and not being out there but to be apart from your family like that. It's just really hard. He is really hard so I just looked up some confirmation from my earlier statement and this is from the Toronto Sun. And it says you're a snowbird which is what Canadians called their citizens who who winter in America Migrate South. Yes he migrates out a foreign student in another country or an expat somewhere else. Prime Minister said it's time to come home. Let me be clear if you're abroad. It's time for you to come home so trudeau so that Couple of days ago actually so Yeah and You know I'm sure. This is the case for so many people I know so. Many people are having to make arrangements to to isolate from certain family members or their lives are being affected but yeah if my heart particularly goes out to people whose family members work in frontline health care. I know that it's a really extremely scary nerve wracking time for all of us As it is for me as well so well thank them for me and thank them for us and we do have a lot of news to get to today. And it's not all corona virus and it's not all we have election sounding in as Rachel maddow's put it last night on earth to we have elections so I think the way she word stuff sometimes awesome to that and I think my my last favorite best thing she ever said was when she was talking about those SARS reports from the Treasury at just up and disappearing and she said they had gone walkies. And now I just use that all the time. She's just fabulous all right. We do have some news to get to the notes pot. Notes all right. So let's talk about this stimulus package That they announced today which did shore up at least four today the stock market it ended over a thousand points up Although it did take a little bit when Mnuchin was talking. So he's doesn't sparked much confidence the ballpark for this as a trillion dollars that is going to be the cost. According to to a couple of sources mnuchin is meeting with Republican senators about that huge number. Because they're not gonna lay kits especially like rand. Paul and Deficit Hawks who are only deficit hawks when Democrats are president but apparently they are again. Now it was earlier. Thought to be eight hundred fifty billion but it's going to be more like a trillion two hundred and fifty billion of that is just in checks to Americans and they still don't know the amount or when those are going to get sent out. I'll go over a little bit about what Mitch. Mcconnell said in his press conference today which I watched for you so you didn't have to you're welcome And although I'm sure you did. You guys are pretty plugged in. It's just hard to watch him talk Some of this is aid to airlines on the hotel industry and and some incentives to small business I know. Afc came out and said we shouldn't give a dime to the airlines and massive corporations unless it comes with a requirement that they have to raise their minimum wage. They have to pay their employees. They have to give them sick leave. And they can't use this money to buy back stock because that's all they've been doing for the last three years. So this is just the opening pitch. This is just the the first go round. You do need sixty votes and you need the house to pass it and currently a house bill in the Senate. There is one to pay for testing and treatment and sick-leave Which still hasn't been voted on? And of course like I said this rallied the stock market today. Which is about a thousand points. The Fed has grease the wheels of the credit market invoking emergency powers to give a safety net to businesses and action. They haven't taken since the great recession which was two thousand eight two thousand nine Businesses still have bills to pay and they're facing cash squeezes so they get short term loans and that was kind of frozen up so the Fed freed. The paper is what they call it announced measures to loosen up those funds. And that's a huge relief to Wall Street now a trillion dollars Would be easiest for us to swallow easier for us to swallow if we had not had that idiotic tax cut for the rich which already put our deficit's into shame spirals and for the rich and they hoarded it all just like. I said they didn't take that tax cut and and it didn't trickle down trickle down. Economics doesn't work. They just bought back stock with it and now all of those gains are gone in a matter of two weeks Karma So all of those gains erased but A lot of people that who I tend to side with some of these economic advisors and experts and I tend to agree with those two trillion is not going to be enough. Next year's deficit will be a trillion or so and the most recent budget is four trillion so nickel and diming this to the point that it's not effective would take us from a recession into a depression. Think of it of like in homeward bound the incredible journey when When they're cheese trying to climb out of the muddy hole and he gets halfway up and then he's our slides back down back down is if you don't give enough of a boost to the economy. You're just going to slide back down and deeper so you see. It's not like you'll stay where you were It at that's that literal well in the movie. It was a literal slippery slope here. It's figurative So there were two peaks today in the Stock Market. One was at eleven. Am and that was when the Fed agreed to buy commercial paper to free up the paper And that's when it peaked. Then then it dropped in the afternoon which indicates the fragility of any recovery we might see but then it was up to nine hundred after the MNUCHIN and announcement. Steve announced the stimulus. But then it dropped again as McConnell was talking and after Steve made an additional announcement but then ended up back in one thousand. So there's just no reason to buy the market right now until we have more certainty which we simply don't have at this point because they're going to squabble about the monetary details of the stimulus. We have to spend it now and figure it out later and we have to go bigger or like. I said we were sliding back down the hill into depression level markets now recession level markets. So if this stimulus stimulus is in at least one point five trillion and I would say closer to two trillion. I don't think it's going to do the trick. the question becomes then. We'll Republicans be willing to give that much to the middle class. At the cost to the deficit I doubt it and I think Democrats are going to ask for that. And then they'll start getting blamed by Mitch McConnell for slowing up the process by by wanting it to be a bigger stimulus And the arguments about it That will ensue between the dams and the GOP are just GonNa hurt markets more. Because the longer we wait the longer we drag out the uncertainty and the longer we'll be until we have a viable market again and the longer than it will be before real voting Americans feel relief and just to be clear all my beans by the way that's all theoretical economic shit that My degree's in health administration but financial beans. These are my money. Beans many beans I wish we had magical beans turn into money right now for all of our listeners. We don't we do not know all poems aren't GonNa just be magical beings that turned into money. I mean maybe there'll be an anxiety reducer enough that someone comes up with a brilliant idea to sell something online and make millions because they're more relaxed listening to shell Silverstein Silverstein. Perfect sense Yeah so just to be clear again. I'm disclaimer thirty years old. Not Agree in economics only lived in this country for two years. This would be the first economic depression since one of the nineteen twenties correct. It's only been recession since then. Yeah right yes not good shit. Some might argue that the two thousand eight two thousand nine downturn was depression if you look at it numerically and you put strict numeric lines in it. It was not. It was a recession. They called it the great recession so that was bigger than other recessions. It wasn't quite depression level and I don't actually know what Those lines are like because there's eight hundred million variables and certain. Economists draw their lines different point. Different models The Great Depression at at the end when it was all said and done the first day of it we dropped. We lost twelve point. Eight two percent of the stock market. We lost over thirteen percent this past Monday. But over an eight month period it was down eighty to ninety percent From its high so to see those kind of levels and I think it's got something to do with quarter over quarter you have to have at least two Depressed quarters for it to be a recession and then there's other markers that economists Straw but If you were going to have a recession as probably the way that they're looking at it definitely a recession and the only way to keep it in out of depression Area is to really spend now. Shoot now ask questions later So here's the numbers now for Hundred we just reached one hundred number of people who have died in the United States and we are fast approaching six thousand cases. Were up over a thousand from yesterday so people have died in the US so far. Yeah so it's still aunts exponential rise and Dr brought up a good point as we put these CDC guidelines into place as we shelter in place as we self quarantine as we stopped going to bars and restaurants and all that other stuff. It's GonNa keep going up before it goes down. So don't think like we'll this isn't working. There's a fourteen day delay on symptoms sometimes And then of course we know what's going on with testing in the United States so He's saying don't lose. Pope if you see that number continues to rise pretty dramatically over the next week or so because there's GonNa be a delay and we aren't going to see the successes and the fruits of our Labor Labor being staying home and doing nothing Until quite maybe three weeks from now. Yes delete gratification. Which we're not so good at as a site anymore. We aren't at all flooding. The curve is is not instant gratification. No numbers drop. We're going to see them. Go way up before they start to go down. That's why some questioned my sanity when I started a muller investigation which take years in a podcast about the message. Really we'RE NOT GONNA get Ukraine. Should happen everyday. Bang Bang Bang. We were getting stuff because it wasn't all under a tight lipped special counsel operation so that People were way more into The Ukraine scandal. Because of that sort of exactly instant news gratification. They don't WanNa Wayne. No we don't you know and and that's not a good thing or a bad thing. It's just differ from how we used to be. We taken sixteen hundred times more data than in a day than we did just twenty years ago. It's just the way that we operate. Now exactly So two hundred nurses are on furlough in Connecticut where the first case showed up in Connecticut and that they are out of already out of ICU. Beds and they had to furlough two hundred nurses so things are getting weird and this is. We're going to start seeing you know if we don't stay the FA- comb hashtags day the com- yes. We're GONNA start seeing immense pressure put on our Healthcare system yet that That Italy is is now facing where you have to make Sophie's choice you know about who gets a bad and who who lives in who dies and so that's why it's very important to do. We should have been doing this for two months ago. But finally trump got around to it. he'll blame us but that's very important that we follow these guidelines. It's really important Macktaz if you already act as if you have the virus yeah stay home. Mcconnell says the Senate will not leave. So here's McConnell's little press conference. We won't leave until the bills are figured out and passed He has no details on the bills. This is when the stock market started going back down again. I don't have any details. They're working on another bill. And then the house bill to stimulate the economy He says if we can't get on top of the healthcare concerns and bend the curve If we won't be able to limit how long this lasts and we still are very uncertain about that. He just had a lot of uncertainty to deliver in that really affect negatively impacted. The Wall Street folks He said he would take up the house bill as soon as the Senate gives him permission to do it Doesn't he do that isn't he. The leader okay Then they'll all sit down with them and try to hash out the stimulus but he has no details Sounds like he's gearing up to blame the Democrats said because the Democrats will likely ask for more than the GOP is willing to give but he says we aren't leaving town until both bills are passed. New Gosh thanks He although he just got back from four days vacation first step He says is for the GOP to to agree amongst each other how much this should be. Then they'll go to the dams and then they'll stay there until they can get sixty votes to pass it because they will need sixty votes to pass it in the Senate and then as soon as they can do that and clear the procedural hurdles. Which I don't know why we even have those. But regarding the cash payments to Americans he says nothing can be done until legislation is passed so this goes against Mnuchin. Who got up there? And we're GONNA do it fast now like in a week and now McConnell stand up when we go to until we can legislate it. So he's seeming to say that the cash payments are reliant on the congress being able to get sixty votes. Good luck He was asked if he'll recess the Senate after the bills passed. He said he can't answer that now. And he cannot. Give a timeline on the bills And he's like I said here I'm I'm I'm writing my notes. Speaking the Dow lost half its gains for the day. It was down to five hundred by the end of his speech. So and then of course They bring Mnuchin backout and who is going to be fast and great a lot of money money money money and then of course poon went back so it it just seems like trump is sending people out based on what the stock market says so that is the first part of this cronin buyers update. We have some more coming up after the break again. If you want these episodes ad free and you WANNA get quarantined with Silverstein sign up Patriots Dot Com Cher. Little Meditation or two. Yeah I could do that word. Yes all right. We'll be right back. Stay with us. Messages will be everybody that's ag in today's episode of daily beans is brought to you by American Home Shield when something goes wrong in my house like it always does the Frigel die or the motor will go out. Our Dryer stops working. I like to have a plan I'm like Elizabeth Warren plans. I know exactly who to call. I like that how much it's going to cost and how long it will take. And that's why I like American Home Shield. I've had him for years. There are huge help when stuff breaks down And it does it will American home. Shield helps cover the cost to take care of repairs when something breaks down and if they can't fix it they'll replace it. I one time. They replaced my entire wall heater. Or they'll find another solution and as the nation's largest provider they've paid more in home warranty claims than any other company that's added up to more than two billion dollars in the past five years with America's most preferred home warranty to have one more than one point eight million customers A. H. S. offers coverage for up to twenty one home systems and appliances and unlimited electronics coverage for tablets and flat screens and. Tv's more it just has a nationwide network of about fifteen thousand licensed professional contractors. They're all super great super nice. Incredible customer service. They can find the right pro in your area to fix your problem. No inspections are needed. 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See Plan for details all right so Welcome back after turtle. Dick Mitch got up and talked and tank. The Dow five hundred points Schumer got up and gave a little press conference. They didn't air the whole thing though but I did get the first little parts of it. He asked for the government and banks to stop foreclosing on homes and he said anything. That's federally backed. Like federally backed mortgages federally backed student loans and small business loans. That he's calling for a six month forbearance meaning. You don't have to pay for six months. But that's what he's going to offer in this bill. That's not necessarily what Mitch McConnell's GonNa give him. And you gotta remember. Mitch is GonNa say if you don't hurry up and pass this you're going to be killing Americans while you dawdle so just watch for that. They love that kind of PR. Yeah because the ice the dams are going to try to get you more. The Republicans are going to refuse. And then they're gonNA blame the dumps for holding up the process for trying to get more for you and less for big giant corporations finally Schumer says we have to mobilize the National Guard. Who will feed Help Watch the children of medical professionals who will deliver food to the elderly. Who make sure kids who aren't in school? Get Food And so he says we need to employ people to do that but we also need to employ the National Guard to do that. That is what they're therefore there are currently fifteen hundred National Guard members Helping in twenty two states many more are on alert. Ready to go And then Nunez. Oh Devon A so. He walked back his idiotic comments on Fox News just yesterday or the day before where he told everyone. I think it was Sunday. Go out to bars. Go out to restaurants you know. We got a patronize these places. Because you know they need our money so keep going out keep keep hanging out and keep doing that stuff and then he walked those comments back today saying what he meant was drive through and do grab and go. Don't actually go inside and eat. Just drive through so drive-thru bars CUCO. I would be you know what I was thinking about today. Matt Gaetz is into drive-thru bars. By the way I'm so I'm so desperate for comfort in for leadership right now that I would be. I would be much more willing to give leeway to those who. I have disagreed vehemently on so many issues. They admit their faults and have some humility. That's what's part so frustrating about this is so many of the men who are in charge of the highest levels of our government cannot apologize cannot correct their past mistakes cannot grow. Do not have you know the style of communication and the empathy required to admit fault. And it's just it's just really frustrating. I it's it's I almost listening to trump on the way over today hearing the way that he's talked about his response to this is it's it's so unbelievably gas lighting. Yeah Yeah did you hear the One? I've always called it a pandemic. I've always thought that exactly exactly. And also the way he continues to say at every step of the way the people around. He's finally I think to some extent letting go of some control and letting the people around him make decisions on this because he knows that he's clueless but the way that he keeps saying well. This has been done before it's ever been done before it's ever been done before. I just wish at any point over the last two weeks he could have said you know what it was wrong of me to cut the budget. I'm doing the best I can. George Bush was a pilot shit but he was never like this Katrina thing. It's never happened before or with nine. Eleven he's like this has never been done before lake right. Exactly you're fucking job. Yeah Anyway just. That's a total tangent. But at Ju just it's is so frustrating that people cannot speak authentically about these things. If you want to feel better I highly urge you to look at the transcript of George Washington's farewell address when he left office. You'll feel better okay now. I wish it wasn't two hundred and something years ago but check that out okay And this just in New York City Mayor Bill de Blasios contemplating a shelter in place order. Just like the one. That's in San Francisco in effect in San Francisco right now de. Blasio announces that the call for a shelter in place initiative is likely coming within the next forty eight hours so for our listeners in New York Be Be prepared for that. You are likely to end up with a shelter in place order Uber and lift have cancelled the pool option. I'm I'm happy about that. Regardless but uber eats is still going. Uber is offering two weeks paid. Leave for drivers that test. Positive Corona virus. But how do you get a test? This pisses me off. They try to sound like they're awesome like we're going to give two weeks paid leave to anybody who test positive for the krona virus. But you can't get a test so if anyone knows any employers that are making that a requirement let us know out daily Pod and muller she wrote because we want to put them on blast because that's bullshit to require. A positive test is lack of testing. Here there's no testing can't get a test. The only I was reading about what what shelter. You're endangering your other employees right yeah. I was reading about what children place means for San Francisco and probably what will be followed pretty closely around the country. Actually what are the Well guidelines there You basically I mean you can go outside exercise as long as you stay far away from other people. They don't want you having even like gatherings at your home of more than a few people like no dinner parties or anything. People are actually saying no gatherings at your home. Yeah Yeah Yeah Yeah you can go to the grocery store you can get gas. You can go to the pharmacy. And the only people who are supposed to be going to work are people who are performing a central functions. So people who do work at grocery banks can stay open for a central banking needs Grocery stores pharmacies people who work in media because we have to find out what's happening a frontline frontline medical workers. Emt's nurses all that. Yep Yep exactly and some some food establishment places but not all right. Because I think they're calling for the fast food places to leave their drive throughs open right so you are allowed to leave your house a little bit and some people can still go to work but if you do if you are working In a central a kind of job if you are someone who works at a grocery store or a bank or pharmacy or whatever. Thank you to you as well. Not just to the nurses and doctors but anybody who is having to go out into the public right. Now keep cities functioning. Thank you as well I I know I have some friends who who work either. In grocery retailer work at banks. We're really anxious right now as well and so. I can imagine if you don't have the ability to work from home that stressful one hundred percent were being sent home and you don't have any income coming in because you can't work from home anyway. It's it's a lot to deal with. It is all at once but we can fix it. We can change our future and we can do that by voting. Today is Super Tuesday round. Three Ohio except Ohio. They have suspended voting. Today there was a bit of a fight between Governor Dwayne and the Courts Governor Divine Dewine back a lawsuit to postpone the elections and the courts ultimately decided no but dewine came out anyhow and announced he was postponing the Democratic primary That's pretty confusing. I hope the rest of the states figure out how to do mail in voting quickly But Ohio you're not supposed to vote today. Well there was tons of long lines for early voting over the weekend in Ohio. I'm not sure how they're going to. I guess they'll get everybody else's votes at a later date from my understanding. Although I don't have the details on that new polls are out post-debate in these four states or three states that are being decided today and in Ohio Biden Leads Sanders. Sixty six to twenty four in Florida. He leads sanders. Sixty four to twenty five in Illinois Biden leads sixty three to twenty eight and in Arizona. He's ahead fifty three to twenty nine. I'm not telling you what Gabbard God it's not worth it and Sim Sanders aide. Said today he's not planning on leaving the race And we had predicted this based on his we had said. I think I told you yesterday. He he opened offices in Pennsylvania and was staffing up there. They don't vote till April twenty eighth so according to the daily beast even though the chances of Sanders winning the nomination are likely to shrink further after today and fivethirtyeight putting zero now. Some of Bernie's. Aides said he has no plans to drop out. According to Politico Sanders told his aides. He will not quit the race and staff in places for states that vote as late as April twenty eighth including Pennsylvania Newark. Hey look came true. I imagine New York will be Bernie's last stand He could do well there as he did in California but even if he wins it it'll be a close split of delegates same as California probably not enough to make up the deficit according to his campaign ads aides. Excuse me the goal is to rack up. And here's why he's doing it for everybody who's like fuck that guy out of the race. Here's why he's doing it. And you can agree with this reasoning or not. But here's why. According to his campaign's goals rack up as many delegates as possible. Because the more delegates you have the broader influence you have on the eventual democratic platform. And he can use those delegates as leverage to push biden to the left. And that's the way for him to to not abandon his voters. I just hope the elongated contest doesn't further. Divide the party But it seems in in more recent polling that Bernie supporters are likely to vote for whoever the nominee is even. If it's Joe Biden so we'll see it was always the case though. I think there's only a very small number of Bernier bus people out there. I I feel like when we get those messages. Or we see it on social media and it's more what's the word I okay yeah. That's one way to put it. That's what you know what I mean. I'm sorry like no offense to my fellow Bernie supporters. I know that there's people who are so angry about certain things and I really understand but but let me be clear. If you're not planning on voting for Joe Biden you suck you know thank you. Yeah I really think that those are more just one offs. But here's hoping and I'm not going to say whether or not I agree with him Staying in the race in order to earn more delegates to get more leverage I'm not gonNa tell you how I feel about that. Yeah you can guess and Mitch. Mcconnell is calling on former marine pilot amy McGrath to stop running her political ads during the corona virus. Pandemic saying quote Amy McGrath's decision to blanket the Airways with deceitful ads during the virus outbreak is tasteless and shameful as Kentucky inns adjust to their daily lives and And Trying to help stem the outbreak. The last thing they need to see on. Tv negative political advertising. I'm sorry but the Truth About Mitch I think is the first thing they need to see. A spokesman for McGrath responded saying and. This is exactly what I would say if I were spokesperson for McGrath. Amy is well aware of the stress. Corona virus epidemic is causing Kentuckians and our nation. The only person who doesn't seem to understand that senator McConnell he has a thirty five year failed track record on issues like healthcare and jobs in Kentucky and now during a health crisis he took a long weekend instead of doing his job and working to pass a relief package immediately. The Kentucky Primary by the way was set for May nineteenth but governor Andy Bashir Yay Andy He's pushed it back to June twenty third. So we'll see what happens because I don't know if we're going to be in any better position June and we are in May or than we are right now but we'll see we'll know more in three weeks I think that's why they did I I would have preferred a twenty one day instead a fifteen day yet. But we'll we'll we'll know more because in fifteen days the number still going to be going up for sure but in twenty one days. We might have a little bit better idea if we're flattening the curve. Yes especially based on by then. We'll have a lot more data to Comparis- other countries and how they fared. Yep flattening the curves someday thinking we've seen anybody who is a musically talented in some way. Send us your songs about flooding the curve. I would like to see her. Comedic STYLE and clarity have one. It's the SA- dukes of hazzard theme song straightening he'll still flattening. The hills straightening curves dammit got some day in the mountain. Magude Bill O.`Neil okay. I always had to be daisy duke when we play Dukes of Hazzard and I wanted to be both Dr generally and then I figured out what the confederate flag was and I said all right. I'll T- I'll drive the Dixie but then it's called Dixie. Faulk everything's racist okay. We have some more news from under the radar including one of Muller's Russia cases being dismissed and the Department of Veterans Affairs. Changing their mission. Right after a quick word stay with us. Hey everybody it's ag in this. Portion daily beans is brought to you by ship station. When you're selling online getting your orders out can be real pain. However ship station has really helped us out with that. Because it's hard to keep track of like who gets what when they got it which shipping carrier you use. Are you getting the best rates? I really recommend trying ship station. It's the fastest easiest and most affordable way demanding ship. Your orders it. I think if I remember correctly it was just like two clicks and everything was inputted. I was printing labels and sending stuff out getting product out to our customers keeping them happy to our patrons and it was just so much easier. It was like a huge headache was lifted. They make it really easy. I just started using ship station right when we became a podcast. A few years ago in their services stellar. I rated them five stars. 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You'll ship more and less time with the best rates available and now dailies listeners. Can Try ship station for free for sixty days when you use offer code daily beans. Absolutely no risk. You can start your free trial without even entering a credit card number so just visit ship. Station DOT COM. Click on the microphone at the top of the homepage and type in daily beans ship station. Dot Com. Makeshift happen. All right everybody welcome back. It seems as though somebody very clever and various Stewart had noticed a change in the VA's website department of veteran affairs last Friday They made this change. Didn't tell anybody normally. Va has four missions and all of a sudden fourth mission had gone walkies. I can use that to turn of phrase. The fourth mission is assisting the public in times of health crises but that fourth mission was mysteriously removed from their website. Last week with no fanfare. No press release now governor Cuomo in New York or asking their local. Va medical centers to make their additional beds available to the public and keep that fourth promise Just could be tricky though. There are many older veterans And it is the law by the way. This is the law then the. Va assist veterans ahead of non veterans. So I imagine that will be a complex process to implement however it is the mission of the. Va to do so. But what happens when the beds are full? Veteran like if the beds are all full in the in the Va and then a veteran get sick and needs an ICU bed. They can't just kick a non veteran out right. So how how do they work? That system They're they're going to have to have staggered beds and some free beds to make that decision You know and that could get ugly. I hope they're able to write a policy to make those determinations especially since so many great genius. Competent administrators have left the VA under trump because of shady practices or have been pushed out for political disloyalty. I don't know anyone like that. And speaking of the Va. Paul Rychkov is tweeted that the conducted only one hundred tests for corona virus for nine million veterans. And we only serve. I'm sorry the VA only serves nine million veterans. That's a third of all veterans. Know half it's about half and half of those nine veterans are over sixty-five there are now forty reported cases within the. Va One death. Due to corona virus. The lack of testing and the response to testing in comparison to other countries is really what has what is so staggering about this situation right. Now I mean I know people around me who had some who are like. Yeah I probably should get a cova tests like us are can't get one for another week. You know and check joy Reid twitter. She has been tweeting proof that he was offered. Trump was offered these tests from the World Health Organization and turn them down. Do send over I don't know the exact number. I think it's a million tests Jack Ma Chinese billionaire. Yeah yeah he sent over one point nine million tests or somebody in the plane. Just put him on your go. You Go America who thank you MA. Yeah yeah no it's true. It's a huge crisis than you would think that you would think that The VA will be rolling. These out faster. Tha that spit clearly. Not Yeah you think. That's what happens when you when you push out the talented folks for being politically disloyal. All right everyone's kind of freaking out about this concord management case. Let's talk about this Afghani progression right. He's the he's the guy ahead of Putin's chef head of concord management. If you remember that we've talked about this case a lot. The they've hired American lawyers. Because Mueller indicted thirteen Russians including concord management and promotion. And they they hire American lawyers and they're trying to fight this in court and we had We've told you on several occasions. Well not on the daily beans but on muller she wrote that the judge was getting really tired of these American lawyers representing concord management. First of all we had learned that they concord management was just using the American court system to try to get their hands on Muller materials methods and methods of investigation and sources. They were doing this through discovery. They asked if you remember. I know you guys remember this. 'cause y'all you're very smart. They were like we need to have every single document from Muller's archives and the F. B. I. N. their investigatory practices Going back to one thousand nine hundred seventy two or something like that and the government was like no you can't have any of that and then later It turns out who the that these lawyers who had gotten their hands on whatever. Small amounts of you know discovery that were relevant to the case or not classified or handed over to them then they falsified those And put out fake documents and said that they had successfully hacked to the Muller Operation And nobody believed that either and then in a lot of these court filings that were being made by these American lawyers representing promotion and Concord Management. They were dropping F bombs. They were quoting animal house. They were quoting tweety bird and Silvester and the judge. Judge Friedrich said you have to knock it off. You're not doing yourself any favors. This is all stupid. And so that's what's been going on the Concord Management Case. It hasn't been going anywhere and even if it does like 'cause when we indicted these Russians. We figured they're not going to extradite. We don't have an extradition treaty. There were even if we did or not gonNA were. These people are never going to see jail. No but these were speaking indictments that Muller together to say. Here's what happened and Here you go in their public now and so it appears that the prosecutors in the concord management case. We're like can we dismiss this case? It's they're using us to try to get discovery. They won't hand over what we need them to hand over. It's not going anywhere. It's not going anywhere and their total giant pieces of shit and it's useless and there was some sort of a re classification of some things in this case everyone was like. Oh what's that? Is that bar reclassifying things. I honestly think it's them reclassifying documents so that the Russians couldn't get them in discovery because they would have just been sent straight to the Kremlin great so they put the prosecutors put a thing into dismissed. The case and Judge Friedrich dismissed the case. So I do not think that this is nefarious. Got As people think and I do have a quote. I don't think it's bad at all and I do have a quote from our Buddy Glen Kirshner who thirty your prosecutor Federal Prosecutor in the US Attorney's office in DC? If I'm not mistaken and he says you're going to like this. That caught my attention as well. He says because I said what do you make the change in classification because that was the only thing that was standing out as odd he said that caught my attention as well. I'm loathe to give bar the benefit of the doubt but the most plausible interpretation is that the prosecutors wanted to use certain evidence at trial but couldn't because of its classification but there are other possibilities including some that could be nefarious like bogus classification of evidence that works in in concord favor but he said concord was not submitting to the jurisdiction of the court but through US Council. He says I'm the first to he was. They were taking advantage of the rules of discovery to get information that could have compromised our investigative sources and methods. I'm the first one to call out bar if I think. He's putting his big fat corrupt thumb on the scale to F- with justice but based on what I've seen I think this is a legitimate prosecutorial. Call so have fear. This doesn't change the Mueller investigation. And all it was like let's cut this off. They're just here to fuck with US and more dangerously. They're here to try to get Documents for methods and sources through discovery to send to the Kremlin. So they said we're not GONNA get a jail sentence out of this. We'RE WE'RE WASTING TAX DOLLARS Cup. Shut them down so I just wanted to explain that to you all. I'm going to go into it a little more depth. Yeah In Miller. She wrote this weekend because this is more of a molar story but I wanted. Y'All everybody seem pretty conservative. Yeah we definitely had some tweets about this so so. I'm happy that you addressed it and like you said if people want to hear more indepth details they can tune into mellish right on Sunday. Yes because that's where I do these stories most. I don't know why did that was like a pseudo Russian accent. Ideal not know what would be. That's that's not. That's not good. Actually I do not know all right anyway We will be back in the one minute Again if you want these ad free patriotic and Silverstein Corentin Silverstein. I'm really excited about this. I don't know I'm nerd so I'm actually thinking I've been really really interesting. Meditations lately to Kelly can show together and and I am going to record a couple Austin. Share those two on on our On our patron nice. Yeah really cool all right. We'll be right back. Stay with us. We have got good news on the other side of this break. And you're gonNA WANNA hear it so hang around. Everybody that's ag in this third helping daily beans is brought to you by third love. 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Fifteen percents off your first order. Go to third dot com slash daily beans now to find your perfect fitting Bra and get fifteen percent off your first purchase. That's third love dot com slash daily beans for fifteen percent off today. All right everybody. Welcome back and today with the good news. Don't don't is merely router you know what actually gathering this good news made me feel a little better so thank you for sending it in So I'm going to start off with a listener. Who was a nurse? Her name is Carolyn. We've got a really lovely email from her. She said Hey. Beans team longtime listener. Time writer. Beans team means team. There's no beans team though talking though I compose at least a partial message in my head. Almost every episode. Y'All are really helping me cope with the corona virus crisis mini honors Honestly sometimes I'm terrified. I'm in the middle of the country Kentucky and it's like watching a slow moving tsunami coming toward you while you're up to your knees and quicksand. Luckily our new governor is being level headed but the scarcity of testing kits has been horrendous. I am ninety nine percent sure that we have sent patients back out into our community without isolation's instructions. The good news is helpful. Thank you and the meditation snippets. Today were particularly helpful. That's the full entity listed show yesterday. Oh awesome yeah. I got a lot of really nice tweets about that. Yes so did I Thank you for sharing that yesterday. And then she said something that's happening in my city and others which is great support. Those higher risk is grocery stores Opening earlier to Specifically for the elderly and for the Immuno compromised and she says this is awesome. That ten percent happier meditation. App is offering six months free talkers which is which is. Awesome Nice. Yeah so Yeah ten percent happier there And then she says one more thing and it's kind of a long email by one and to include it. I can't help myself since I'm a nurse. I recommend to all your listeners to prepare not just food unusual supplies but also prepare to have a bad flu like illness. It will be good to have a fever. Reducers cough cold medicine of choice. Ideally something that cough suppressant electrolyte drinks powders etcetera etcetera. So she has to do that A. B. Well stay safe. Thank you for everything awesome. That's awesome next one This one is from KRISTA. I love hearing the good news block. Especially how communities are coming together right now with that in mind. I wanted to share what my neighborhood is doing. I live in Houston Texas and despite a stub assumptions. I actually live in a very blue bubble. Not all of Texas read. My neighborhood has approximately four hundred homes in it. With a mix of original homeowners from the fifties and sixties in lots of younger families are sick club. Just set up a new facebook group of Neighbors helping neighbors. And in addition to a Google Doc Setup to match request with volunteers These are all volunteers. All of this up and I couldn't be more proud of my neighborhood. Also during Hurricane Harvey. We came together helping each other Tear out flooded flooring and walls and assuring everyone had proper equipment and safety then she gave a really nice quote from Lord of the Rings. Oh good yes. I wish it need not happen. I wish it need not have happened in my time at photo. So do I said Gandalf and so do all of and so do so? Do all who live to see such times but that is not for them to decide. All we have to decide is what to do at the time that is given us Yup. Good one yes. Can I give you one real quick? Yeah I got one from Libby. She's ladies lots of misinformation out there. Latest I heard was a handful of patients on grand princess of tested positive. My father and stepmother are to Their friends on the cruise ship sent to Travis. Air Force Base in Miramar asked if they wanted to be tested or if they wanted to just self quarantine remind listeners. You may not have any cases in your county because no one can test in your county so seriously Until the Fed's got test to San Diego. They weren't even testing. They were taken off the ship. My folks are in their eighties. It's been a cluster. Fuck in the midst of all this. I had to reach out for help from their to their congressmen. Maybe you've heard of him. Eric swallow idea him via twitter and he responded back in ten minutes. He had staff contact me and without their intervention. I seriously believe there could have been loss of life while well is what government aims to be. He restores my faith in the American government. He's a hero. Thanks Wall saw. This is from Patricia. Granny. She says good news. There is a group of folks At Open Open Air DOT. Org that is creating open source ventilators. And they're looking for helpful engineers. Give them a boost please. Our lives could depend on it and the website is project open air dot org excellent logic to open air dot org hell. Yeah this is from Alexis Meena. She says I'm really heartened by the people and organizations creating free online content for children home from school right now. I have a three year old and the seven year old. And this morning we watch singalong videos from our favorite local children's musician And drying videos from Moe Williams Williams is a is a children's author. I shared that on facebook. I was doing that. Look out for our quarantine with Silverstein. Yeah love that I was feeling really for Clement. At how lovely it is that. So many people are using their time to entertain engage. Educator Kiddos Just from Veronica wilder she said Sephora is paying all employees for all six weeks that we are closed. Awesome Fuck Ya. I'm glad I shop there I'm currently at my last shift. This companies also been an ally to the LGBT community. Big Time Oh yeah ECHINACEA. Heather Chandler said Guinness has pledged a million pounds to help bartenders through this crisis. Well Kennesaw I know right. Okay I'M GONNA drunkenness. And where my Sephora Vodka from Michelle Spencer the good news for those that do bartend for their livelihood? There's also a grant for emergency assistance for bartenders and you can find that. Usb G FOUNDATION DOT ORG SLASH B. E. A. P. couple more quick ones. This is from twitter. This woman named Mary Moritz and she says I'm in confinement in France but my neighbor and I can still sit in our old stone walls across the street from each other and chat out loud. Like tool biddies when we want. And we're going to do it every day. Oh you should keep doing it. Even after this is all over. Isn't that sweet I love this. This poor user 'em Branchburg and they said I've trained some fellow breastfeeding counselors on using online video meetings to keep supporting our local communities but from receive distance and they've already had successful sessions. How mazing this is the. This is just everywhere you know when you were just telling about the talk about that story in France and I'm like that's and but this is in France and and I feel like you know when nine eleven happened. It was here in America. We felt the solidarity from around the world but they weren't really dealing with it on the same level and everyone is now dealing with them the same level. And I'm hoping and we've talked about this so many times on the show and people have been bright bringing this up for years. Now that the that the global togetherness and the unity in the United States that was felt after the terrible terrible tragedy of nine eleven. It was squandered Pretty quickly And and I'm. I'm hoping that after this that this global community is not and that is why. It's really important that we get trump out here. Because he will squander we can build upon this. You know this spirit energy that were he'd get forward with us. Yeah yeah seriously. I mean we're having to rely on each other in a way we haven't in a really long time and be kind to each other and think about our neighbors Our neighbors in France and our neighbors in our building neighbors. Yeah and I just feel so close to the world right now. It must be like when you know when that photographer took that. First shot from the moon of the earth and sent it back and everyone was just. Their breath was taken away. By how humbling that is. I think I feel like we can have that moment and we are having that moment and we should. We should not waste it. Yeah and trump's not the one creating the spirit much when you gotta get rid of him exactly more ones. I mean from voting. Yeah of course just to be clear that out there. Come knocking on my door. Jessica says chef Jose Andres of him turning his fine dining restaurants to soup kitchens. He's Tito he so amazing. This is from Twitter user peg bolts and she linked to a tweet from the major league baseball team and the MLB teams are donating a total of thirty million dollars. One million each to assist the ballpark employees affected by the delete. Start to the twenty twenty season. Good job fucking. Love that and This one from So many debbie she said the New York State Liquor Authority Revised Policies Today for bars breweries wineries and restaurants so that they can remain open to sell beer wine and spirits for takeout and delivery. Yet you can still Drink York I WANNA here's a personal one that I received To me which I wanted to read out which was Was Really special to me. We just pull it up here. Of course I got a message from someone named Suzy and She said my daughter whose twelve came out came out of the lesbian to me. She's loud and proud and doesn't take no shit. I have always supported her and what she isn't what she does. It helps to hear great stories that a girl like you can grow up get married and live happily ever after man. That is so great. Yeah 'cause I forget sometimes that not. Everyone has a gay friend. Not everyone knows a gay person right. It depends on where you live. In the country we tend to congregate the coast for safety. Moin Khan goes totally. I mean just in San Diego I know so many people in the mid west who are like I left my red town for you know Somewhere in California New York so that was really special to me so So thank you for sharing not and It's a really scary thing to be so vulnerable and to share your personal life in your political commentary with hundreds of thousands of people so Thank you so much for sharing that with me and I hope that you have a wonderful type of pride with her. Yes yeah we'll see what when this whole thing clears up yet. I have one last bit of really really good news for everybody. You can just have a little bit of a celebratory moment. Yeah time for some Schadenfreude today shot Freud comes to us from the Associated Press reports that ex California Republican US Congressional Representative Duncan Hunter Not Hunter. Biden Duncan Hunter has been sentenced to eleven months in prison after pleading guilty to spend in campaign funds on personal outings including five mistresses. He cheated on his wife with hunters. Attorneys asked if he could serve the term on home arrest because he's an ex marine and he served his country and Congress Those pleas fell on deaf ears and the judge said given the amount of public money. He used to get his Dick Sweat. Home confinement is not an option. I'm paraphrasing a broke in debt. Saddled Hunter Cavalierly spent campaign money on small things such as a tin of chewing tobacco. A copy of the book why we suck a feel good guide to staying fat loud lazy and stupid and of course taking all of his mistress's out to bowling This is according to prosecutors. I'm glad they put that book in there why we suck feel good guide to staying fat loudly stupid. Just GonNA throw that in there. Just want you to know. He read that book. That's his literature. And after he was caught he ran for reelection and tried to convince voters in the district of e. Sandiego right here in our backyard as a staunch supporter of trump. He was the victim of a political witch hunt by left leaning prosecutors trying to drive him out of office in Blue California prosecutors asked for fourteen months and he got eleven and they were happy with that. It says here that Dunkin's mom wrote a letter to the judge asking for no jail time because he's such a good boy But the judge didn't buy it again. Hunters ordered to report to prison on. May Twenty ninth. He will spend eleven Munson. Lockup you are welcome happy Tuesday dash it also I. It's so frustrating to me that I was just thinking about how you know the difference in in media coverage for white men and black men in the case of white men. It's like but he was so nice and he was. He's such a good father and he did this. And he went to this school and like when it comes to stories about Black men they they choose the worst possible photo. They can. Yeah they did. They don't highlight any of the nice things got worse. And Yeah exactly so Is that the reason I thought that was because he said his mom wrote a letter like me he really is a good boy with Republicans in their MOMS. That's ABSU warlike Jacob walls mom. Yeah let whatever give him the benefit of the doubt no. That's not how the legal system works and I'd also like to say I am three years older than Duncan Hunter and way cuter so I would not date that dude anyway but he he took you know having to go to bed with lobbyists quite literally so he can. He can enjoy his eleven months in prison. It's not that long pickup. And you learn to knit. He's going to probably have to get like a consultant like Harvey Weinstein did to help him navigate. How terrible prisons going to be for a rich old white dude? You know. He's not old but you know maybe he can hire the same Consultant Martha Stewart used Yeah she's about though she didn't have anything to complain about. She was enough time. Yup bitches hardest fucking best friends with snoop Dogg more prison than snoop can love it. I just love their dynamic. 'cause she's like when? I was in lockup Blah Blah Blah. And he's like I never been in Lucca fucking great to watch that show. You don't get a chance you should watch it. I can't remember what it's called it's pretty. It's snoop Dogg and Martha Stewart cooking together and it is. It's really pretty adorable Alright that is our show. Do you have any final thoughts No final thoughts from the moment. Thank you guys for sending in your good news. Please keep doing so you can. You can tweet them at us. You can send them through our website. You email them to be in. Amanda MOLLY DOT COM And I'm getting continue to put out calls and the facebook group and I'm patriotic for your good news but yeah keeps it in your good news Or or things you think we should cover during the corona virus for real. Yeah anything even if it's bad news. Good News we love we love. We Love WE WANNA PHILLIP. Are Good News Block. But if there's something really important you think that we should be talking about Senate to us and we might cover it. You know. It's hard to keep track of everything happening right now. So quite we generally do a pretty good job. But is there something that's missing? Just let us know totally. Yeah something some evening which amplify yeah. That's always good too. Yeah exactly. That's what I meant a hundred percent all right. Thank you My only final thought is again. Thank you so much for being out there in in just listening And please take care of yourself curve each other. Take care of the planet and take care of your mental health. I've been a jeep but Amanda reader and beans. Wash your hands. The daily beans is executive produced and directed by AG Jordan Coburn and engineered edited by Mackenzie Mozelle and starbucks. Industries Are Marketing Manager. Executive Assistant Production Social Media Direction is Amanda Reader Fact Checking Research by AG Jordan Coburn and Amanda Reader. Our music is written and performed by. They might be giants. Are Web design and branding or by Joel reader with moxy designed studios and our website is daily beans pod com.

senator McConnell Muller Va Kentucky New York Dick Mitch Ohio America United States Senate San Francisco Amy McGrath Silverstein GOP Nunez Shel Silverstein
Sylvia's Mother by Dr. Hook & The Medicine Show

The Story Song Podcast

1:14:30 hr | 1 year ago

Sylvia's Mother by Dr. Hook & The Medicine Show

"The caller you're trying to reach has moved on with their lives this week on the story. Song podcast Everybody welcome back to the story podcast. I'm Dan mcenery. I'm Rachel OAKES. Michael Zell each and every episode. We walk through a story song and this week. We have a great story song. But I gotTa Tell Ya Rab at the top. No it's not by the band from the muppet show. I understand. You might get confused by that is a completely different band. Janice is not involved the now sadly now animals not on drums. Although this ban looks like they could could be my. That's my at the time. He was a pretty big session drummer. Yeah so he might have been on this just not credited and he played with a lot of people a lot of people. Yeah surprising. Yeah I think he's on thriller actually his Solo in the last waltz spectacular. Take that I mean come on so this week. We're doing Sylvia's mother by Dr Hook and the medicine show and this is. This is an interesting kind of story song. which is that? It's basically a monologue right. Yeah so it's somebody who's literally well I would almost well. I guess they are telling us the the story. They're telling you the listener. The story of what happened. Yeah and yeah. They're replaying to you what happened to them right. They're telling you what happened but the majority of the story is our narrator telling you what other people said. Yeah that's like it's like this person said this and then this person said that and that's most of it Real Gossiping and then and then in and what seems like real time first person. He's telling he's not telling you he's saying what he says he's going to bring what they say for telling you what they say. Okay and then you're in it like it's it's very at the whole thing is a telephone conversation. I guess it's a question of whether or not this is. This has happened in the past. And he's telling you or it's because the tents is like I don't know present. Perfect English class was way too long ago from me. He's like so and so yeah then. This other person says right. They're telling you it's happening in real time and yet I mean I don't know maybe they're like a reporter who's like tell you and then this avenue and then this and it's also interesting to note there are four characters Three of them talk. Yeah well Michaeline you give us certain little quick summary of what the heck this actual story is thank you know. I think what's just talk around it for a while. So Sylvia's mother is a song about a man who calls his ex girlfriend The he's trying to restart their relationship but her mother answers. Here's the phone and won't let him talk to her because she's moved on with her life. She's happy now and she's getting married to someone else. Yeah and it's important to note that he calls on the day of her wedding. Yeah so we'll get there but yes that's so interesting timing on this phone call but yeah he calls. The mother won't WanNa talk to her and then the operator because supposedly Air Presumably he's on a payphone keeps chiming in wanting more money. I gotta pay. Sylvie uh-huh mother says Sylvia's busy too busy to come to the phone. Sylvia Sylvia's Chind fellow room. mm-hmm mother Cindy happy. So why don't you relieve Alana on your sales four cents more Nex it just off. Aw I had a couple of questions because the the timing of all of this when they were dating how long they were dating thing how long it's how long it's been since he's spoken to Sylvia I. It feels like it's all over the place because of the way Sylvia's mother starts. She's busy too busy to come to the phone. Well I think that is underplaying. Right right where she's like she's she's busy basically trying to like. Take the hit dude. Uh before before I really start digging here take the hint. She's busy too busy to come to the phone. Hang up and walk away from the situation but of course he doesn't know of course not so. Has he been calling. Do we think continuously since they broke up. I I don't think so but Michael That'd be interested to hear your theory on that if he's been calling since they broke up. y'All is a constant thing. I don't know that's interesting. Maybe maybe I can't see it could go two ways like this could either be like a constant thing where like Sylvia's mother is like. Oh He's calling again or it could it'd be just like really bad timing or like he just found out that she's getting married guy friend of a friend of a friend. I can't can't let them get away again. That's a good point now that that's a that's a good point because of like in the chorus when he's like I just want to tell her goodbye just I just WanNa talk to her only keep her awhile awhile which by the way a wild could be a long time. If I'm like I just WanNa talk to you for a while. That's too long. I'll talk to you for a minute. Right one SEC. If he was he said I've just got to talk to her. I WANNA keep our back. Just one SEC ONE SEC. That's what's also interesting. This thing about the verse of the Song is you. Don't hear his side you only hear his side of it in the chorus. So you hear Sylvia's mother say A. She's busy she's trying to start a new life you don't you don't hear his responses Rasa happening either. He's cutting out the responses and you don't you hear him say like please let me talk to her or she's just like escalating this really fast. She's too busy. I mean she's happy lost. I think check this is sort of. This is almost like a pulp fiction like the the chronology is almost cut up a little bit because I think what he's saying is pleased Mrs Avery I just gotTa talk to her. And she's like Sylvia's busy and he's like I only keep her a while she's trying to start a new life you know. I just want to tell her goodbye. Sylvia's happy so why a unit is the curve is mixed in with the verse yet. I mean I don't know exactly like one to one but I I think like he's basically saying the same things over and over again and she shutting them down. I just WANNA say real quick before we move on the way I've always interpreted the song is is real negative on this on the dude. Okay because and this is assume now lick Sylvia's mom could be like a psycho bitch right right but let's assume that she's like a nice normal lady. Here's what I imagine. This guy says life yep breaks her heart. Yeah this is a disappears. Assure ghosts if I can use the terminology of the day comes back into her life like she like figures it out he comes. Goes back in. Does it again breaks her heart disappears. Guess what third time the day she get married. Oh I just want to tour. Yeah Oh come on like he found out she's getting married and this guy's just messing with her head whether he's doing like intentionally or he's just like such a scumbag like this is just the only way you can look interests Ernie Ernie ball but like because I think I think that's what it is like and also Sylvia like she's got it hard for this guy you know what I mean like. Yeah like if she gets on the phone she's GonNa Start Crying and she can she Yeah he's the guy from Galveston way right so so let me. Just mother knows. She's just gotta get her over this line and then that's it. Yeah on the train. Everything will be fine. Just get on the train. Well I think you're right. I mean she because the first three are she's busy. She's trying to start a new life. She's happy just leave her alone. She's if you really cared about Her then you would leave her alone because she's happy right now. One of my other favorite things about someone said no get rid of them or something. Go go tell them go awake and if they come back do you really want them pretty pathetic it is. I can't believe I can dirty. This is just GonNa be cyclical what we're doing here and I don't know if maybe he's not like doc a terrible person who's just sort of coming in and out of her life. Maybe this is one thousand nine hundred seventy two. Maybe he's like I can't settle down man man like that. I mean yeah I mean. I think they're just bad for each other. Like right if you WANNA be if you want to be more charitable him. I think there's bad for each other. And he should probably just let this go. But he's he's they're basically a doomed romance and this guy from Galveston Way and we have gone there yet but the guy that she's marrying he's probably a stick in the mud accounting radio. He's able. It's good yeah he's stable he's stable. These two are going to be like Sydney Nancy. It left to their own devices trying to like share that she you know someone who releases going to take care of. Yeah you know one of my favorite things about this song. Is that in the in the verse. He says Sylvia's mother over against Sylvia's mother Sylvia's mother and then when he's speaking. It's please Mrs Avery so you can picture. He's being polite when he's on the phone with with the Sylvia's mother but when he's talking to his friend and stuff he's like Sylvia's mother unbelievable what she said Sylvia's mother I'm not going to say her name Sylvia's Mother did this week before woman before moving. Raff this verse. Yeah we're talking about two things one and this will actually talk about three things that one. There's two things here that the kids are today could not possibly I understand Won The getting past the mother right right adult only the one phone. Call the house right and you. You have to go through that barrier of like whoever picked up the phone like Sylvia could answer. The phone in. This story goes very differently true true but the my mom probably the my release how this common even the Song Sylvia's me. Oh Mom saw coming in. She was she does a phone oversee standing by that phone. Just waiting. Oh Oh she was just waiting for this. She's like no Sylvia. You go pack. I'm staying by the phone. Do not pick up that phone. Do not pick up the extension in your room. Yeah don't worry I got it I got you got you got thanks to do. I'll take your other phone calls. Yeah number two and nobody try and get on the Internet waiting phone. Call number to the operator. Freighter saying forty cents more again. You had to like keep you know and you would talk to the operator on the phone that I mean that is all like that even predates us like I can't I don't I think I ever talked to the operator on no never never because it was even when you had to get a get a collect call get home from the mall. It was it was a robot. Does nobody in the seventies own a phone. There are so many songs like this where they are hanging out. And it's there's always a payphone throws at a payphone. What the the caller ID great device but there's like it's like this caller ID and you have to call from unlisted number but there's always this operator other songs as well that I can't think of L. But it is operator yeah pay? Phones are a big thing people. These are also a big thing in you know in movies during that time as well because you get to the pay phone right have money for the payphone right and I think Taylor raining is probably the phone booth is your only shelter. Well it is raining. It's starting to rain but we'll get to that later right and but it also like there's the device of like this is someone you can talk to right. WHO's like a stranger right? We were talking about the song operator by Jim Croce. We won't go into it because we'll probably Allie do someday. But he's talking to the operator in that song obviously and basically pouring his heart out during the the unnamed operator operators and then also that tension of like Oh you only get a certain amount of time like he's like in theory he's running out of money trying to get Sylvia on the phone and some point he'll have run out of money and then that's it right. You know I mean I think that that only adds to his scum bum bona fides that he's calling from a payphone from the house like is he is he had a bar. Oh where is he. Why is he not as his three shots uneasily? She the phone batteries George if he is in the age of iphones and he found a pay a phone but I'd be more power to them that man I found. That's amazing. So what's interesting. I think to get back to the operator operator part. Yeah what's interesting about that. I think is the first time I heard this on like that. That line just sort of sticks out it's kind of weird It doesn't rhyme with anything. The more I listened to it over time the more I kinda like that Because because it's it's somebody who's not part of the conversation right. Yes either also. I guess that I had almost counts as a mini bridge right. Because because it's not it's it's like each time it's a bridge so that's I mean that kind of lyric or at least like the way the song recording it's recording the song feels it doesn't. I never thought that was weird. That that line doesn't rhyme with any other line because it just feels separate from like the verse and the chorus so it's like either bridge or previous whatever you wanna in but the other thing I was going to say which is funny. It's like that probably is like what a phone call cost at the time. If you were listening to the song you couldn't you couldn't say like fifty cents for like something that Ryan because people at home it'd be but that's not what it costs three minutes. We know he's I like that part. Because there's something he has such desperation and he's really trying to get through Sylvia and it's it's feels like maybe he's trying to make his case or whatever but it it keeps on getting cut off by the operator and so there's this halt in. Oh yeah in in the Urgency Reality Stick Reality League rears. Its ugly head that actually I had not thought. Oh that's a really good point right because maybe you could imagine like the mothers starting to soften a little bit like or and then all of a sudden it's like forty cents and start all over again because now now the mother's gone just talking to the operator he was like pumping money in. Yeah and and like you know I mean what is the mom. Just hang up. I mean maybe she does. Why isn't I closed the door enjoying torturing this it just hang up the last three times? I think there's a reason and we'll get we'll get to it later but I don't think she's so heartless and I don't think she doesn't care for the the caller I think it's just a matter of the E. Can't do this to my daughter anymore. She's she's moving on. We're we've almost got her on the train. Maybe maybe to like if she keeps him on the line he can't compaq can't answer exactly that's true too so he's take one last thing I want to say before I move on. I've complained in the past about songs where we don't know the girl's name. Yeah guys we got a first and last name so Avery Sylvia Avery Dr Hook Smoker and the end and I must say most of the medicine show not all of them at you and you know who you are just about the operator was just. I've always felt it was kind of awkward. But it's intentionally awkward right Oh Yeah yeah definitely. And it's it's like to your point about the the story being interrupted by this person but the operator comes back like three times. Yeah Yeah Yeah So. This phone call is lasting at least twelve minutes. Yeah suggestion thing like. He's he's desperately trying to get through and like you know that's where you feel. The tension of this is going on and on and on and he's presumed again. Presumably running out of money. Right even back then you only at a certain amount of coins on you. At any given moment I also I. I like to think that as it goes on the operators like Oh my God can we get this moving four. Every time she she breaks in the caller is just like. Can you. Just keep the line in open. You have the ability to do that. Can I pay you later. This you're listening in on my conversation I can tell operator. Just keep it open for crying out loud. Well well that was the thing like the like back in the day they can do whatever what would they would listen. They're not literally be like on the line listening to like your. You know your private David Conversation. A lot of times also think the operators probably listening and just like this is no good the operator just times in another forty cents also. It seems like she's really not into you. Just got I just want to say. It feels like she's over. You asked do you want this to be your mother in law. She clearly does not like you. The seriously forty cents. Yeah the thing with the forty cents. I don't know where he was calling from. Because telephone calls. Were not that expensive back then Uh that expensive well. Maybe it's a long long distance. Is he like really far away. Well that's what I'm wondering According to a December Fourteenth Nineteen eighty-one Washington Post article recall payphone costs. Nineteen seventy two would have been twenty cents or less depending on where he's coming from. Jeez I don't know all right I have no idea then. I don't know how much a phone call contract and it just seems like it's a weird number right forty cents for for three minutes. It seems so specific that I wanted to just thought. aww That's what cost but I don't know according to post article in the ASS. Seventy th I mean maybe the operators pumping up the price of the phone. And she's GonNa pay anybody's going Gosh Other people look. She's clearly not going to put her on the phone. This let it go in the early seventies the bell system Tried to get the cost of a phone. Call Up to the twenty cents. Prior to that it was from the early fifties through the early seventies. It was ten cents. Yeah but how long of a phone call. That's the question. It's three more minutes. So maybe maybe it was. I don't know what am I the operator I don't know but that's the thing I mean it might be. It might be dime with like a minute minute. Yeah actually I might know another reason. An Wyatt's forty cents but we'll get to that in the next segment so okay. That's fine. I remember that because I probably won't. Well it's the only thing I wanted to say real quick. Is that this. The song does the thing that I love. It's such a such cheap heat but it gets me. Every time is the like the end of the sentence word is then also the start of the next thing. So it's the the operator says forty cents more for the next three minutes please Mrs Eve like so. It's both the operator saying please. Yeah and he's saying Slip up I understand. It's such. It's such a simple trick but man every time it gets me. I love that. I'll tell you what it did not get me and you. They did not figure that out. It'll get you. I thought he was just pleading with Mrs Avery right but he has ever saying no. Please please yeah. You're making the you'll make an operator polite. I was not okay and when you get to the chorus. What's great about that is it does have that a much more rushed sound because right after the forty cents more? It's it feels more urgent than the verse. Yes I'll I say say. Yeah but he's about to be cut off and he's got a gay right message. Yea Yeah he's he's almost like the operator talking and he's like please please just put it on the phone. Please please please before before I got cut off and then like it's not even at that point at the end of the chorus. He's not even like I wanNA talk to her. I just want to tell her goodbye he just needs to speak to her. Mother sailed Sylvia's packing. She's gone a Today Sylvia's mother says Sylvia's married of L.. Down but still mother says. Please don't say nope put too many start crying and stay and the says forty forty cents more again she softening right all right. I'll put on the floor. Don't make don't say anything that's going to ruin this. Oh yeah I I don't think she's going to put her on the phone. We'll let her. Ah Yeah Telegram. First of all I like that. She's getting more specific i. She's just like Oh she's busy. She can't phone she's you can't see what you're going to start a new life now. It's like all right fine. You want the details the details. She's literally packing to start her new life with this guy from Galveston. I also. I don't think she's getting married today. You guys know either. Go Get your wedding day. She's leaving on a train to meet up in Galveston right with that guy now. Why the whole family isn't going to go to the wedding? I don't know but well I mean she's she's eloping but she told us yeah. I mean things were different back then you would just go train to Galveston or whatever and how was it. The train to Galveston Galveston works bathing. What's cool about this versus this versus this story? So like yes is. This is sort of the the crux of it and it's not clear And tell me what you guys think like. Is this new information to him. Did he call because she knew he she was he knew she was getting married. Read or did he call to talk but try and get things started and then he finds out in the middle of the call as his heart physically breaks because only because he says I just want to tell her goodbye before this right and admittedly I think their chronologies a little messed up. So it's hard to now but only because I think he probably knows something. Okay probably knows part of that. He probably he probably found out. Sylvia's leaving right or she's getting married or whatever ever and he's just like this is also. Here's the other thing Sylvia's GonNa go to Galveston right. He will never be able to to contact her again right right unless like unless somehow Sylvia's mother breaks down and gives them the phone number short. That's the other thing about like this. Time has ever anybody before like nine hundred ninety nine or whatever once like if he didn't know the phone number how would he ever find her right so this is his last chance to say goodbye. I do want to say for wasn't working right. Yeah the singer for Dr Hook and the medicine show is not great. Ever GonNa get to that later however he he no but he does a good acting job because you can feel him like almost starting to break down into his emotions. Yeah you're gonNA miss his voice like slightly cracks all right right. Some of these lines are as just like this is it. I really lost her like she's going to go marry some other dude. Yeah and it's all my fault. I mean I think going back to the good buys it. It could be a build. Where in the first? He's he's the mother is really saying she doesn't like you anymore. Just you got to move on. He's like I all under his say goodbye and then it is is new information that she's leaving that she's going to get married and he's like well. Now all I WANNA do is say goodbye. Goodbye takes on more urgency as opposed to before where it's just like I'll I'll never talks Oxford again. I just WANNA say one last goodbye as opposed to this where it's like. Oh it's literally goodbye. Oh okay I guess I will now. I Really WanNa talk to her. You're not helping the situation But yeah she I mean the the. Don't say nothing to make her start crying and stay giving him a lot of power Sylvia's mother. I think they've been down this road before I think. Gotcha I think that's true. Sylvia's mother has spent a lot of nights sitting up with a hysterical over. This fricken gang. Yeah you know what I'm saying this is this is not the first time this is not. This is not mother's first Rodeo when it comes to this guy she's like is this about Dr Hook again. I can't I can't do it anymore. Sylvia can't do it anymore Galveston. I can't do this anymore. Look if you want to marry a muppet I'm not gonNA okay. But the GALVESTON boy. He's got a good practice. Get yourself a nice boy from the medicine show there's a lovely little marionette in Galveston. You can marry a muppet Sylvia's she's shot clock trade. It will shake your call. Sale too Sylvie you call so call again. You said this this is this is awesome like high level. You gotta think about what's really happening. Yeah Sylvia's mother says Sylvia's hurrying hurrying. She's catching the nine o'clock train so she's actually walking out the door like Silica Sylvia's hurrying which again is weird to get out the door to get on the train right. Soviets mothers narrating Sylvia's every action. Still just walking down the stairs. Okay here she tom and left foot right foot foot right. Sylvia's mother says take your umbrella CASILDA. It's starting to rain so she's talking to Soviet so now this guy's she's there she's room here the room's right in the rare she so close and this guy knows that she's literally walking out the door she's GonNa take that umbrella as you literally walk out the door and are gone forever. An knows and it's like this is heartbreaking right. He knows then was the last line. Sylvia's mother says thank you for calling and Sir. Won't you call back again. See what a weird line right. What what is what the hell? There's so many ways to take that first of all when I first heard this I thought the Sylvia's hurrying she's catching the nine o'clock train rain. Yeah take your umbrella. Sylvia starting to rain. She's giving a lot of information to this guy. So part of me was thinking. Oh is she giving him a way a two. Oh you can meet her at the train station. Okay at the end she says. Thank you for calling Sir Sir. Won't you call back again. So she's hanging up the phone with him okay. Well she's saying. Sylvia is about to leave for the nine o'clock train. There's nothing I can do new. She's marrying this boy in Galveston. She's getting on a train. At nine o'clock you can catch her if you want. You know what I mean to train station. Yes so that you can take that way or you could take it that she is just cold as ice. Well but here's the thing. Okay so first of all that is genius. That's call call it. No because I think that is I interpreted and I've always heard the song the exact opposite way but but that actually that's that's legit aged because that actually make sense. If you want to think about the only thing I would i. We don't know where he is so it's possible that right he there's no way he could get to wherever she's GonNa GonNa be short short but if he is possible I was going the complete opposite way. where she is I mean she was just talking to Sylvia and so he he can hear that? She's he's leaving right. So and then Sylvia presumably is like not necessary not saying it but might be wondering. Hey who's on the phone right then. She pretends it's some telemarketer. Who's like oh well thank you for the call that he end? She's kind of big. In fact I like Oh Ooh oh my gosh I like that now. I don't know what you're talking to take. Your part is definitely like her with her hand over the receiver achiever right right to Sylvie and and I and I do think like damn what you said is that that's the way I interpreted. It is like she's he's hiding Sylvia. Who's on the phone and I think she's hanging up because Sylvia's leaving so she's going to say goodbye daughter before that was my the other question is she's like take your umbrella? I'm GonNa say on the phone but you head out for forever right. I mean maybe I mean maybe Sylvia's going to Galveston to like it kind of gets things set up like a wedding and then the winning will be like a month. I don't. I'm not saying you know that crazy but yeah I mean that's the way. Ah He and the mother like basically gets she's gotTa Jordan up. Those elements to some ways is not going to Jordan themselves. Do we know by the way do we know we're Galveston is Texas Texas. I don't know for some reason. Galveston it sounded like England to to me. That sounds like a town in England. Oh that's the Duke of Louis. Hold on you can't take a train to already know. I know I thought maybe meaningless inning later. Whatever was going to say though was that I don't know we already know? I'm terrible at Texas San Antonio San Antonio Search help if we call the GALVESTON okay Yeah so I think and interpreted that she she first of all all was smartly from her point of view keeping him on the phone right to like keep him distracted while Silvia left the House and was gone and then be also so the Swat Team Swat team could trace the call. They don't tell you that the the guy in the bad suit with the reel to reel tape recorders gave him on the phone. The three men and we almost got it. There's there's a team of people with headphones early on like a really old like seventy technology specific the big board with flights. That don't do anything but yeah so yeah. And then she. She's like odds just some random call. That's we call back again. Hang up the phone which uh-huh using because it's both like tragic and cruel so you don't get that a lot in one verse right and then so then it says please Xavi. I just WanNa talk to her bub-bubba I just WanNa tell her goodbye now. Once again another same words but a put a possibly meaning and I just want to tell her goodbye then he says tell her goodbye. Please freight tyler goodbye. So just if I can't talk to her. Just tell her that I called and say that I was thinking that it was so i. I know that this story has some closure right right. And what's great about that in the song long and this sort of threw me when I first heard it and then you know over time thought about it. The song fades which usually out drives drives me nuts but it fades as he saying that those are important lines right. It's it's almost more tragic that it's fading not necessarily early like at the time if you heard it on the radio because then it would like fade into another song. But as it's fading out like is that Mrs Avery hanging up the phone is what he's still hung up on this and he's being hung up on right and if it's like thank you. If it's like a movie you can also imagine him at the payphone rate outside the bar or whatever and like he's like please tell you by any cameras just pulling back and his voice is getting quieter and quieter her. Yeah it was like the sounds of the city. Come in because that's it. It's over whatever. Hope he had mo fading away that he can never talk again each sure. And that's it. I still. I'm still I'm GonNa Savory side though I think even if this guy has the best of intentions I think these are just. They're just not good for each other because it seems like there's a lot of history here. Yes sometimes you gotta make the stable choice you know or just move on but you got to move on and I. I think I think Soviets might just see. This is going to be a constant cycle with these two. Yeah of like Super Hot and heavy and then a nasty break up and this is gonNA go round around. She's going to break the cycle right with Galveston boy all old white bread Galveston. You know. This guy's just like yeah. What is that a Bolo Tie? Good for you well you got three dealerships now. Really you can call anytime collects absolutely. We'll definitely pay for the charge and all right well before we go. We're going to bring back a A much beloved magnet at all times that we did it we yeah we loved it the work for every song but when it does jump on it But this is the story Song Expanded Universe so the thought here is every story. Song Connect series every other stories song in sort of an expanded universe So Michael They had some thoughts on On the expanding universe here for his mother I do the song in a weird way kind of reminded minded me another song that we did. Mrs Brown you've got a lovely daughter. I don't think in a weird way. I think in a very typical way. I'm wondering if this maybe it's the same guy. Maybe he just like breaks up Hangs out with their parents wouldn't fit a pattern on and on. Yeah he went to Mrs Brown's House that didn't work out. He's like you know what before I go to the house. Yeah let me just give a call under. Thank you call and see if I can go over. I wonder what Sylvia's doing right now. How old Sylvia? Mrs You've got a lovely daughter. Are you doing today except that one works. I don't I and that's going to be weird but I'm GonNa be honest with you. I mostly dating you. Just get to your mother love with other people's MOMS it's great. She smokes Virginia Slims. Seems like a really nice in a move here from England because I went through all the moms and I got another Herman's hermits song all the moms turn the MOMS AETNA another person. This could be day and this is sort of a more recent song. We've reviewed Maybe it's Jack Cash from Folsom Prison Blues Possible. I mean like forty percents in those days was a lot for a phone call so and he's using a payphone. He's not calling from home or from his mobile right doesn't exist like maybe this is his one on call Sylvia's mother I'm calling from inside a prison costs more but I mean I think thank you think you'd get a dime. I think it would give you a dime but the interesting thing is i. Don't think they give you more than one thing at this point if he's asking over and over if if the operator has asked over and over again for forty cents three minutes at that point he's getting beat up by the other person waiting for the phone. I think you can over. I use the phone in a prison. It gets its currency here just shoving tobacco into the phone recall thing that's for when you were arrested. I think it's already in prison. I think you're allowed to make phone calls. I mean they're carefully monitored in theory but now they are allowed to I I think back then they were. I also think it depends on the kind of prison well. Yeah I'm saying FOLSOM prison. Hence the sunlight in A. That's like just Chit Chat on the phone a lot of phones. And maybe that's why Sylvia's mother doesn't want him to talk to her while shark that'd be like into your Gadjah Deaf then then I'm definitely on the outside. I mean this dude showman Reno just to watch him die no go marry the guy who but how boring he is. But I'll say this about Sylvia's mother stop giving so much information about her location fans in prison for shooting they don't give out that she's in Galveston. I'm San Antonio do you really. Isn't that big of a city train that goes in hop on a train. It's right outside the window now my window. I don't have a window. Change your phone number. Take a quick break when we come back and talk about the history of this song with sorry about in the story. Have you ever wonder what was he. Dad's really appropriate. Ones would tell you if you ask them questions like where's my kids custody. Having special cuddles Oakwood title or is it. I can't afford McCullough ellipoid games on my phone. Better Bay maybe. You want to hear our unique reviews movies views video games etcetera cabinet some cheese mega spring sure Summary that tickles your fancy. Then check out the dads out on the network. What's up? What do you do right now? Taveres story behind the story. We talk about the history of this song So Michael This week kicks off here. So let me give you a brief history of Dr Dr Hook and the medicine show I will talk about Dr Hook. Then I'm going to talk about the medicine show thank you. This is not a WHO'd in the blue situation is very much. Who Do you? Oh there it is. I thought there. So there's no one named Dr Hook. No there is releasing hardly nickname in the band so Dr Hook and the medicine show is the the name of the band not a program in the band. So the band was founded in nineteen sixty eight in union city. New Jersey By Ray Sawyer. Dennis Lacordaire Billy Francis and George Cummings They took the name Doctor. Hook and the medicine show from Ray Sawyer ben member. Founding member suffered suffered an eye injury in one thousand nine sixty seven car accident years before the band was formed and he had to wear an eye patch which they made him look like Captain Hook. Okay that's that's cool. I always assume that that was Dr Hook because he and for anyone who doesn't know why would you. But if you want to look up on the Internet but these guys look like the. There's one guy in the band who has a ugi patch whereas like this crazy rhinestone cowboy hat at all times right so I mean if anyone one was going to be named Dr Hook it would definitely be this right right. Well what was that I personally damage. He always had to wear the eye patch or was that just like a temporary prairie. Well he I mean he lost the eye so permanent. You're saying that's too bad that's rough but hey I mean it was ah led to a great band name name. Though we're putting together we put together a band. Can we make fun of your eye patch. You're you're okay with that right. I guess it's recent well the other thing that this is like a super weary band because all these guys look like there's a do with an eye patch and like I said a rhinestone cowboy hat. The rest of the band is like pretty scuzzy looking. And I'm saying that like objectively I think that's the look they were going for their sixties seventies Wendy's. That's just yet but then this proto like heavy metal band right. That's that's what they like. That's what they look like when you see photos of them because as the guy with the ipads there's a guy with long hair and a beard and they drove the sort of like I look at them more like an like Alabama or that kind of that group Sorta rock but not quite frankly right right right however everything outside of this song is basically like soft off rock like yacht rock like loggins and Messina could see the later stuff. Yeah yeah and it's just crazy when you're like you know you hear a song like only sixteen which is one of their heads or there's another one that I'm thinking of but like sexy is which is a super like soft rock flake again. You know like red on my side. But also Larry's everybody looked like it was. The seventies was in listener. Look up a picture of Dr and the medicine show because it's great. Yeah so anyway. It's just it's just weird that that they're you know this also stands out because they never did anything like this again. I don't think I mean they also were weird a little bit like well. Other sons are also kind of like not funny but like we're like kind of witty. I guess sort of interesting. They bring that up. Because I think Dr Hook as a band was sort of known as being kind of I wanNA say Sardonically Reverend. Yeah they. So they're there was sort of that feel to their work into their songs and I think at the time a lot of people were or unsure if this song was meant to be funny and it's not right but I mean it can be because like if you like the operator part can read sorta funny but it's I mean it's not meant to be sure sure I know I mean. I don't think it's a laugh riot. I think it can be maybe seen as darkly funny. Yeah it's it's just that it's almost like like a curb your enthusiasm. Almost like he's trying. He's on the phone he's trying to get through in the operator keeps being like three men. You know forty cents more. It's like Oh my God like it's almost that kind of feeling of like you know that sort of comedy bid. Yeah it's like the person who doesn't understand how important this is right right that sort of thing. There's things I want to say but I don't want to steal your thunder so let's talk then. It's all of our thunder after again. This is a very brief history of the band. But after their initial success in the early seventies They had a few years of hard times. They had lineup changes. They declared bankruptcy Typical early seventies rock band kind of stuff dentist courier said if we were in the black when we finished a tour we'd party into to the red wave go doctor Hook and the medicine show. I mean it was a seven rock and roll. That's what if the seventies had a a tagline it would be that party. Yeah party into the red So in one thousand nine hundred five they shorten the band's name to you just Dr Hook And they signed with a new record label which was capital The first album on that this goes back to the SARDONIC irreverence. It's their first. Their first album on Capitol was called bankrupt guys and included a cover of Sam Cooke only sixteen which you just which went to number six in the. US number three in Canada number eight in Australia. I wish it had only gone to sixteen and too bad. They should've tried. Or if only they promoted it. uh-huh so around that time from like the mid seventies to the early eighties they had Several letter hits a little bit more. Nineteen seventy six when to number eleven in the US number two in the UK number four in Canada number ten in Australia. Yeah sharing the night together and sharing the night together right. That's like you. You would think that was like air supply right if you heard it. I mean it's a very sort of yeah it's got that rock yacht rocky kind of sharing. I'm great song. Sharon Shannon added that went to number six in the US forty-three in the UK. Three in Canada ten in Australia the UK did not like that Song Long. No they were not feeling it. They like to just fine but they like all their others saw their other songs. Were like through the roof in you in the UK. Yeah they weren't sharing the night together. Oh they're they're very much on being alone. Yeah yeah they're like we need our space. Their their their favorite song is pushed the beds. You know what it was. There was Underlying theme that Song about the American Revolution. They were not having yeah They also another hit. Nineteen seventy nine. When you're in love with a beautiful woman? I went to number six in the. US number one in the UK number four in Canada number number twenty in Australia Sexy is in nineteen eighty Number five in the US number four in the UK number eight in Canada number forty one Austrailia Australia. Australia was not big on sexy is but also great song and some of these probably songs that will do in the future by nineteen ninety-five they broke up and the members. The band recorded and toured individually a little bit about Sylvia's mother Soviets so so all this is you mentioned came after this was seventy two. Yeah these as were sort of their later hits on a new labels as there was this their first head. Yeah this was. This was their second single so this was their first big hit okay. It was released in March nineteen seventy-two it went to number five in the US number two in the UK number two in Canada number one in Australia and number one New Zealand island it debuted on the billboard hot one hundred the week of April First Nineteen seventy-two At Number One hundred it actually debuted reviewed on the hot one hundred. And if you're wondering number one song that week was a horse with no name by America Just to give you a little context of the time sure and love that song rocks and birds and trees and things my favorite line. Hey guys what's the fourth thing in the desert. You know what forget it things. There's no way there's won't be hit. It won't be played a million times people it's fine it's certainly not down again. Don't even give the name. Why bother when the Pie So it peaked. At number five the week of June third nineteen seventy two after ten weeks on the chart and it was behind. The following. Number four was The candyman by Sammy Davis Junior Sammy. number three was is the first time ever I saw your face by. Roberta flack number two was oh girl by the showlights and number one was take you there by the staple singers mant. Dan Does so. It's a good week really say I say I think Sammy Davis Junior version of the candyman was weird even for the seventies the man collect the candy did Will you walk in the chocolate factory. Come out I think it was around then. Then that's why I would imagine that it would you know be a hit then. Yeah I think it was Kinda right before it. Mainly Yeah I mean back then though it was just like Sammy Davis Junior saw the movie. It was like oh I like that song and then like recorded it probably soon. After in the beginning I hit this was back before like movies understood synergy and make sure they have the remix ready to go like you're just independently was like. Oh I like that song. Yeah I'M GONNA sing it and then it became like a huge hit so yeah that's wondering if it was a hit just because Sammy Davis junior or because the movie came out it was a hit. The the movie was a hit which I don't know and then Sammy Davis Road on the coat tails I don't know I don't I don't think it was a CO promote. I think it was very much a heart light situation association. That's not explained that I really funny turn down and go back to nineteen seventy-one one. Oh there you go so yeah so the next year and at the time I think radio listeners. Were just like this is weird. Let's listen to a song about a phone call. So Sylvia's mother was was written by Shel Silverstein So yes that Shel Silverstein because he also wrote a boy named Sue yes so he wrote a hero cup. Listen well I mean. I think you're right. The whatever they write the actual song. Sorry just read the lyrics. 'cause I think he just wrote the lyrics but I will. I'll say this I'm pretty sure Shel Silverstein himself has always albums. Oh that's true yeah. I think he's credited as the sole songwriter. Okay so a brief history of Shel Silverstein He was born September nineteen thirty. He was an author. A Song writer cartoonist poet playwright. This guy did everything and though no he was known for his children. Book Children's books and poems including the giving tree where the sidewalk ends in a light in the attic you as a cartoonist for playboy from nineteen fifty seven until the mid seventies these He wrote more than one hundred one. Act Plays Co wrote the film things change with David Mamat. I'm guessing there's more swearing in that than there is in the giving tree He won a Grammy Award in. Nineteen seventy for writing the johnny cash song boy named Sue. He was nominated for an Academy Award and a Golden Globe for for the song. I'm checking out from the nineteen ninety film postcards from the edge. Now let me tell you at the Shell Silverstein. Amazing I mean what an incredible career I remember even one of his as a kid reading the book. I'm pretty sure it was where the sidewalk ends. And you guys will probably remember this and then you open up the dust cover and you see a picture of him and as a kid. You're like Oh my God. This wrote lease because he I'm sure he was a wonderful man. An amazing person. He was terrifying looking man he he had sharp features. He was bald with a big bushy beard. And like this kind of I'm GonNa say Evil Grin and he wrote some of the best poems ever I mean I love love Shel Silverstein stuff. What's funny you're not shel? Silverstein is that he is most famous for his books of Children's right which is great. You should be most famous for that. Everything outside side of that is super weird and like filthy. Filthy Filthy Filthy Phil I mean. He's a cartoonist. For Playboy right like and unlike some of his teamer stuff never gone off the path like the straight and narrow path which he'll serve and be like. Oh let me see this other thing that he wrote. And you're just like Oh my God. This is like this. You know this is like X.. Rated stuff it's crazy it's crazy also and then that's then then that goes back on fine once you know that then you then you go back to the more famous stuff and you're just like and giving tree is real weird I don't know if I I don't know about this story. Ori Like not a bad way but just like the actual like moral of it and like the story is like I don't know it's weird. It's weird there's a bit of darkness to like you know anyway. That's all children's seems weird guy but like when you when you find out that he wrote Sylvia's mother and then you think about his poetry is like Oh this sort of make sense because there is that yeah. That's SORTA dark humor. Yeah there. There's something really like just slightly off about it. That makes it funny but a little bit sad and yeah yeah and also like this could have been like a boring song right about a guy trying to get back together with his girlfriend but the idea of of putting it in the context of the phone call the eye of the operator. Keep coming in each time like that. That's just that subtle genius. That really you know makes like this pop songs are simple bowl you know and so just like one little element like that can make such a huge difference. It's such a smart thing to do is is to have it be an and again like the only the only person we ever hear is the narrator who keeps telling you what other people are doing and saying which like makes it so personal all to him Larry Cinematic about the song right. So it's like a radio play right and it's not an it's not removed because you're only hearing it from his perspective so so it's like a lesser songs and then Sylvia's mother talk the Sylvian and kept him on the phone and like cover the phone so you wouldn't hear you know whatever like this is like thank you all. You have to like. Imagine what's happening because it's all from one person's perspective who is on the phone and can't see what's happening right right at the house. Right which makes it all the more heartbreaking heartbreaking because they they. They know something's happening but they don't know exactly what. Yeah and as the listener you don't either like your left to interpret this same way that he is in nineteen seventy the Ron Half kind was the musical director on the film. Who is Harry Kellerman? And why is he saying those terrible things about me. KLOM starring starring. Dustin Hoffman Char which I believe is the longest title of any Academy Award nominated film? No yeah that's that's a little trivia. So they needed a band for the film and its soundtrack and having heard Dr Hook perform live I believe Have kind recommended recommended them for the movie. The song writer for the film was Shel Silverstein. And that's where their collaboration began So run half kind. Would become the band's it's producer and manager and Shell Silverstein wrote a lot of their songs. The band actually recorded two albums of Shel Silverstein songs in nineteen seventy-one on the album called Doctor Hook and in nineteen seventy two. The album called sloppy seconds. Saying I'm talking about you know man it gets real gross. So let's get. That's that's what's after where the sidewalk ends like. Really dirty jokes. The two biggest hits from from their collaboration with Shel Silverstein were Sylvia's mother and a song called the cover of rolling stone was also released in nineteen seventy two went to number six in the. US number two in in Canada. A number thirty two in Australia. Interestingly the cover of rolling stone that's the title Song. didn't short in the UK because the BBC's rule at the time I'm was not to play any songs with trademark names in it because they didn't want it to seem like they were promoting another brand which is the same reason? Why in nineteen seventy the? Yeah you hearing. Yeah The Lyric Coca Cola to Cherry Cola in Lola. Yeah that's one of my favorite Trivia facts is that so the kinks in nineteen seventy. I wrote a song about a man falling in love with the transvestite aid. Yes it was banned from the BBC. Because they said Coca Oh Cole. Once they change the Cherry Cola they were fine to play it on the air because they said cut coca cola anyway so according to Dennis the Corriere. Their lyric was changed from rolling stone to Radio Times by altering the original recording. He said a bunch of BBC disc Jackie's went into the studio and shouted Radio Times over our original chorus. The song did not chart radio-types. That's after the single was released. Three this is Kinda funny. Three of the seven-member the song is all about like. Yeah I was GONNA say so. The the song is literally basically than begging rolling stone to put them on the cover. That's just a rock band being over super cool rockstars all. He wants to be on the cover of rolling stone right right. It's like we have everything that we need. The one thing we don't have is that we've never been on the cover of Rolling Stone Hint hint that the entire side so in one thousand nine hundred seventy three three three of the seven band members of Dr Hook appeared as caricatures on a cover of Rolling Stone magazine and the headline line was. What's their names? Make the cover I love it. It's pretty funny. I love it so a little more about Sylvia's mother it's based on a true story Happened to Shel Silverstein around nineteen sixty four in nineteen seventy two rolling stone interview. He said I just changed the last name not to protect the innocent isn't but because it didn't fit which is amazing. It happened about eight years ago and was pretty much. The way it wasn't a song I called Sylvia and her mother said she can't talk not I said why not. Our mother said she was packing that she was leaving to get married. which was a big surprise to me? The Guy was in Mexico and he was a bullfighter and a painter at the time. I thought that was like being a combination brain surgeon. Encyclopedia's Uh her mother. Finally let me talk to her but her last words were Shell. Don't spoil it for about ten seconds. I had this ego charge as if I could have spoiled it. I couldn't have spoiled it with a sledgehammer. That's amazing I love that. Oh my Gosh I love this song even more now right there been a couple of interesting interesting cover versions of the song At the same time the doctor Hook the doctor Hook version was released country singer Bobby. Bare released a recording. which we've talked about before? This was a time where like everyone would just record a song. Yeah and everyone would release it as a single and whatever happened happened The Bobby Bare version went went to number twelve on the country charts in October nineteen seventy-two so within the same year. You had a pop hit and you had a country. Country hit two different artists same song. Yeah it's crazy so the real Sylvia wanted to stay anonymous but years later Dutch TV show found her and her mother and Dan interview the two of them and they kind of their their side of the story because it has subtitles. So if you ever wanted to hear the lyrics we're not lyrics were I love that The somebody Some Dutch person thought that this was one of the burning questions of our time what happened to Sylvia and Sylvia's mother a needed to find out that was journalism. I'd like to visit as a favor to us. It does like specifically stories on podcast. Yeah Yeah Yeah it'd be nice. Yeah thank you thank you very much. It's probably the same guy who tried to figure out what day with the exact date. Yeah Yeah it's true it's true. Yeah in this interview. Sorry say he just keeps on going editor an his editors like you. You gotTA think bigger guy. I don't know what to tell you. Have you heard the song. It's really good at it. Got Cut from where the sidewalk ends. I thought Oh God I know I was just GONNA say I. I was hoping that interview. The MOM would be like wasn't GonNa let Sylvia Mary you take it. Looks like nukes for Rati God. He scares dogs but we have several of his children's book. He's great. We love what what was interesting about the interview. Is I mean Sylvia's mother seems perfectly Nice And she says that she thinks that in the song she came across as being a little short with him And she's said. I don't think I want this and they do confirm that like Soviet did we had actually talked to him They interviewed Sylvia and she said that a lot of the relationship was through letters At the time he was traveling traveling around the world he was working for playboy Just for the articles So she she was showing like a bunch of letters that he wrote. And what was interesting to me. Is that This song is so like firmly embedded in nineteen seventy you too. You don't really think this happened years before so like the letters. Were from like nineteen fifty-eight. Wow Wow you know and they were like you know. Did you see the latest Lucy. Desi comedy hour about that new. Dick Van Dyke Show Mary. Tyler Moore is going to be a star like that. It's there's like nine hundred sixty two. This is what people talk about So yeah I that was kind of interesting to me and back to the phone call thing. If fit was forty cents more he could have been somewhere around the world. That's true data point. Yeah he couldn't another country. Oh that makes sense yet. She had she had letters from parents. And right other some international places. It's cool because like you do see what of the song was. FICTIONALIZED IS D- right. Not A lot. Have you the perspective. I think it was a little bit fictionalized and heightened for dramatic purposes. But Oh sure it's always funny to in like a normal person is like you know something can happen to them or whatever they are involved in like a thing that slater dramatize they're always like well. It didn't quite half of that way and it's like yeah. I mean it's like he took. This is like a kernel of something right. Earned it into a story you know. I always think about the line. Where have you gone Joe Dimaggio and then like apparently Joe Dimaggio don't they understand can't play anymore and he's like we don't literally want you to come back and play baseball? Joe Dimaggio like Harvey understands your person but you represent a an older age of America literally like. Yeah why you can't hit the ball anymore. I can't play baseball anymore. I got a contract with Mister Coffee. We now Joe. It's fine it's fine. Don't worry about an Paul Simon anything else. No this is. This is a good song. That's all I got well. Speaking of good time we'll take a quick break when we come back much about the lesson. Listen we learned from this good song with lessons learned feeling antisocial. You can follow the story. Song podcast on social media like us on facebook follow us on. Twitter story underscores song and on Instagram. At story-song podcast if you're still feeling antisocial after that you should probably see a doctor before you hurt someone all right. We're back in time for lessons. Learned but before we do that we just want to briefly Fli read a review. We ask you guys to write us. Reviews I serve us on Apple podcasts and when we When we get a new one we like to read it as a thank you to the person who wrote it and remember if you'd like us to read your review right one cast Kinda loud? It's pretty easy simple. Read some right so yeah so this one is from Akram Graham. The headline is strong podcast. Hey that's us to the point. I like it And it says a lot of this podcast I listened to my car. Makes my travel time hysterical escalation point as we feel feel like I'm in the room with a group of my friends. Thank you cram Graham fivestarsoap focus while you're driving hysterical makes it seem like your eyes are closed CONNEC so please be careful out there on the roads you know it's but then that just shows people like listen wherever you want. Listen your car listen sure we can make your commute mute. Better just keep your eyes on the road. It's true. Listen in a phone booth there not being used for anything else now and you'll have a podcast booths all right. Listen our commute and a lot of random music trivia that you can. I know your coworkers with right. Speak Perfect that's what we're here for you BETCHA call the action remember. Please leave gave a five star review podcast because it helps other people find the show which we want to grow the showing to make this community You the the the more kind of things we can do. That makes it better for you. So if you can leave review we'd appreciate it lessons learned and let's start with Start the three till listen. Learn from Sylvia's mother Here's what I learned if you're GONNA call an ex Use a calling card. Okay get get a prepaid calling card prepaid phone card because then you could just give that information to the operator and she won't chime in every three minutes with forty forty cents please. She could be like. Listen it's it's prepaid it means you can just keep using it. It's fine it's fine. Can I call ten ten to one on health with the long distance. It's not a to do. It was look before cell phones. Calling cards were big and they would have these ridiculous numbers that you would call him and tried to make jingles out of them and it never worked right now. I don't think I never. I never fully understood what you were supposed to do. Call Call that number I I guess I call in there. Then it's your your calling card and then from there you call the number all right. Well this this is good for anyone who I don't know uh-huh somehow it goes back in time to. What was your cell phone? Sure you find the one payphone own. Yeah in the world right and you can make phone calls all. It'd be perfect. You call you. Call Ten ten whatever a two six whatever it was and then there's a guy on the phone and goes hello. No one's called the separate seventy years. Please please I'm trapped in this building. They shut down the company. Let me Out I've been waiting for your call. I will say in relation to that. I'll say the lesson I learned is if you are an operator. Sure in the like from the fifties to like the you know mid seventies Wait until you someone calls who clearly is like a hard luck case and desperately needs to talk to his girlfriend or boyfriend or whatever right because then you can make a lot of extra cash. Oh sure Kazan and we'll be like oh you want you WanNa talk to let me ask you. A question was worth. Yeah because the operator guy get a little taste of that Cheddar ooh I always say it's what are we say. Two thousand dollars for the next three minutes does that. She's she's leaving she living in. She's leaving today. Talk to her. You know and guess what. Somebody's gotTa Plug. This line in. My wrist is getting real real real tired so you gotta make it worth it like this line here on the phone. This is going to put itself in the wall. I'm sure I'm sure in the seventies they were not pulling out lines but still on. The phone didn't know that now that's good learnt valuable lesson about extortion. Exactly right to the West. I always learned needling sort of the opposite if not couple if Felix I'm the feeling there's no way. Dan's the feel of that is that is actually quite so that all right I'll take. Yeah what Dan Literally looks like Jack. Klugman love it. Yeah anyway it's okay. I'm dusting while I was makes all this check so I mean Matthau gene in the couple. The first person ever wear a baseball cap backwards. Because I feel that right. He really started the next forty the next four four decades with that because he does. He didn't know much to watermelon. Oh yeah definitely yeah. They call it math owing Michael go ahead. There's all episodes. Just been me derailing you they tell you episodes tell your life. Let's get the heck out of

Sylvia Sylvia Galveston Captain Hook Avery Sylvia Avery Dr Hook Smo Mrs Avery Sylvia Sammy Davis Sylvie Dan mcenery Shel Silverstein Folsom Michael Zell Rachel OAKES Janice Larry Cinematic Alana George Cummings Washington Post
You Are Not Alone

The Attention Collection

15:14 min | 7 months ago

You Are Not Alone

"There's a song that's been floating around in my subconscious for the last decade or so and occasionally it bubbles up to the surface and that's when I started humming it and when I do that it's only a matter of time before I start singing it and when that happens it's all over. Best Song is lodged in my head for at least the rest of the day if not into the next and it's called there is a mountain. There's a good chance you've never heard of it but when you do I bet you'll find yourself for playing the melody over and over and over in your head whether you like it or not. This episode is a reminder that you are not alone but you may have to go I there is a is no mound and then there is there is a mouse and then there is no mountain is there is a mountain then there is no mountain then there is fast there is a mountain. What if I told you that your life right now is worth noticing? This is the attention collections. I'm Anthony Garcia I. There is a mountain then. There is no mountain than there is. Are you tracking with that? Someone actually wrote that Song Down. And then get this. They recorded it. They performed it in front of actual human beings. I love that I brought this up in a conversation not too long ago which is not uncommon for me and the two friends I was talking to. Of course they'd never heard the song so I had to play them a snippet and afterwards we started talking about how even though this is a bizarre obscure song. It's probably someone's favorite song. It's their classic. It's their Goto. It brought them through a rough time in their life. You know the story and it reveals something significant to me. No matter what you're into regardless of how odd you fear it may be someone else out there. Loves IT TO. My thesis was confirmed today when I read the comments underneath a live concert. Recording of there is a mountain sure there were comments. Like what does this even mean or that audience shirt looks thrilled to be there but there were others like Donovan is singing about the Buddhist concept of embodiment or the chorus of this song. I there is a mountain. Then there is no mountain then there is may sound incomprehensible or silly but the lines are zen saying Donovan borrowed and which have a meaning the lines are intended to succinctly describe three stages of Zan. The comment continues. But I'll stop there this song. Believe it or not even pops up in Stephen King's time travel novel. Eleven twenty to sixty three. Here's the line because there was no step a snatch of some old pop song drifted through my head. I there is a mountain then. There is no mountain than there is. If you don't believe me it's on page. Forty one of that book. Check it out now. Listen I'm not convinced. This song has some deep spiritual meaning for all. I know it may be the result of one too many mushrooms but it doesn't really matter does it. In fact is there a difference between deep spiritual meaning in one too many mushrooms? That's for another podcasts. Here's the truth. There are people out there mining this song for gold when Donovan went out on a limb and put this song out there in nineteen sixty seven. It didn't melt the charts it didn't blast them to superstardom but there's a small group of people enjoying it even to this day. I don't know perhaps you are one now if you ever feel like. You're living on the fringes Mike. You're out there somewhere. Relax because that's exactly the right place. Succeed earned in one thousand nine hundred sixty nine just two years. After Donovan released your new favorite song six social outcasts essentially strangers sat around a kitchen table and dreamed up a gathering for people like them. Sifi enthusiasts and comic book Geeks and what started as a fringe event for teenage misfits became arguably one of the most influential annual events in the country. These days comic con hosts around three hundred thousand raving fans a year. It has shaped the entertainment industry in incredible ways. It's a pop culture bellwether and that's not too bad for a bunch of people running around dressed like superheroes and goblins. Sometimes I think all of us struggle with this feeling of being alone. We think we're the only ones who think a certain way or feel a certain way we think even subtly but no one really understands we worry most days that if people saw the real us they wouldn't stick around and maybe this feeling isn't on the surface at all times but it shows up in the ways that we hide it shows up in the comments that we leave out. It shows up in the jokes that we laugh at that. We really don't think are funny and it shows up when we don't laugh when we think something is funny. The truth is though we aren't alone. The trouble is we may have to go I. We may have to put ourselves out there and risk being judged or Miss Understood San Diego. Comic con didn't just burst on the scene as a cultural explosion is started as a fringe group of teenagers. Saying to one another. Hey I see you and now go ahead. Google SANDIEGO COMIC CON and try to get a ticket to the event this year. They're celebrating five decades as an organization fifty years. I mean what a year to go. Unfortunately you won't be able to get in because the tickets are sold out in. The convention isn't even until July but the truth is most of those tickets were probably sold at last year's convention it started on the fringes with people laughing at these strangely dressed overly passionate fans and now there's probably still people laughing but they have to do so from outside looking in because sold out. We believe this the questions shifts from am I alone to. Where are the others? A Seth Godin likes to say and here is where the Internet can actually be particularly helpful place because that Google search bar knows us arguably better than anyone else but search bar knows our concerns and what scares us knows. What interests does it knows. What EXCITES US? And it knows what terrifies us. In fact you just start to type in. It will read your mind. And I experimented with this. I wanted to take what popped up in. My head is the most obscure thing to search for at the moment. And I don't know where it came from but I landed on belly. Button lint sculptures so I typed in belly button lint and with just the s of the word sculptures. Google finished it for me and I was blown away. Simultaneously expected that to happen and so I clicked on belly. Button lint sculptures as the search option and an amazing amount of things popped up and so I followed a link to a blog in this blog features an artist who makes things out of human fingernails and toenails and yes you guessed it belly button lint. This is what this artist has to say about her work. My work tends to shock. Most people now get all sorts of comments positive and negative. Initially a lot of people are frightened. Or grossed out by my work nine out of ten people walk away in disbelief a few minutes later after it all sets in the same people will return dragging friends and family behind them saying. Look at this woman's crazy art. I figured that although everyone has their opinion about my work unusual innovative interesting gross disgusting it's Cetera. We can all agree on one thing. It is a little crazy so not only was I. Not the only one who's ever searched belly button lint sculpture. There's actually a human being and probably more didn't take the time to thoroughly research. Who's out there? Making belly. Button lint bears and she put the images online and there's these little jars and jars of suspended these cute little bears made entirely out of her boyfriend's belly button lint. I'M NOT SAYING YOU'RE A belly button lint enthusiasts nor should you be but if you were someone else there for you this woman Rachel Betty case has received hate mail. She's been called a Weirdo. She's had people walk up and say your art is disgusting and you are disgusting. But because she put herself out there she's also been featured in magazines. She's been on television. She's been on articles and now she's on the attention collection podcast and it strikes me that this real life example of putting yourself out there also ties into a metaphor think about belly button lint for a moment if you will. It's something that most if not all of us deal with and yet we never talk about something. We dispose of something. That probably even repulses us. Even though it came from us and yet this woman takes this thing and puts it on full display. And not only does she put it on full display. She embellishes it. She elevates it she turns it into a kind of performance art in you can actually purchase it and put it on your shelf and I think on some level that's what life should be about. Yes we can hide away our quirks and flaws in our unique interests in the things that fire us up in the things that make us sad. We can talk those things away but when we do so we rob of their people getting to know the real us because we're all unique and yet we're more similar than we are different. Why do we hide back when we stop hiding that? We have an opportunity though. It may take time to find the others. I'm reminded of a poem from the late. Shel Silverstein called masks goes like this. She had blue skin and so did he. He kept it hid and so did she. They searched for blue their whole life through then passed right by and never knew the stuff underneath the mask. They were so busy hiding. That's the stuff that's the essence of what makes us amazing when we hide that we make it impossible to truly connect with other people and connection is what human beings long for. It's just as important to our well being as food and water and the truth of the matter is your imperfect often contradictory and yet incredibly. Beautiful Life is worth noticing. So don't hold it back from others as risky as that proposition. All paying attention and speaking of obscure things. If you enjoyed this podcast share it with someone. Don't hide it and leave a five star raving review on Apple podcast because it helps other people find it find the others. Were on social media. If you WANNA connect. There were on instagram on facebook. I would love to continue this conversation until next.

Donovan Google San Diego Anthony Garcia US Stephen King Seth Godin Shel Silverstein Sifi instagram Apple Rachel Betty facebook five decades fifty years two years
Creannotators #1: Ice Cream Man Deep Dive with writer W. Maxwell Prince

Best Comics Ever

57:15 min | 2 months ago

Creannotators #1: Ice Cream Man Deep Dive with writer W. Maxwell Prince

"Thank you. I'm joined today by Will Maxwell Prince W Maxwell Prince as you may know him the writer of Ice Cream Man. One of my favorite comics of the last couple of years on the best of twenty twenty so far podcast that we recently recorded. I called ice cream on my favorite ongoing comic book. So I'm extremely excited to have you here today. Will and to talk to you about this series in-depth let me kick off. Yeah Yeah Lemme kick off with question. What inspired ice cream as a work kind of? How did you arrive at this project? Sure well before cream man. I've read this graphic Novella On image called one week in the library And that was Seven chapters of these short stories. That didn't have any set. Sort of page count And I won't bore you or anyone else of what we can are was about but I did that project after Doing a fair amount of of what you would call serial comics storytelling. You know gone from issue to issue China. Tell one story across five issues six issues. Whatever and I found after doing that. That project short stories that I I figured my I realized that my strengths as a storyteller any of that and storyteller I think probably spend a lifetime trying to figure out what it is. They're really good at A. My personal strengths were in telling compressed short stories And so I knew after the library project that I wanted to do Basically a book of one shots. Yeah where each you know. Each story had done characters. And its own sort of folk in it and oh it got it and got out really quickly While still being you know kind of leaving an impression on the reader even those kind of ephemeral nature So I had all these story ideas no real justification for putting them together in the same And then I'm pretty big fan of the. Hbo Show High Maintenance of ever seen it. Now it is. It started actually a web series that HBO both riots and there have been. I think four seasons so far and there. It's basically these episodes half hour episodes of short stories of these little zoo. Men's on the lives of people that live in New York And the The thing that connects all of that is that they all buy weed from the same dealer named The guy that's his name in the show and so the guy kind of leaves in and out of all these stories sometimes. He plays a part in these little short story. Sometimes you just kinda deliver some weed and gets out of the door and you're just watching you know these these people's lives Kind of unfold Sad thought that that structure was really appealing So I figured you know I thought who who could be my we dealer Right with all of these weird stories that I have and you know after kind of a lot of sinking and drifting off I landed on this character of the ice cream man. And once you kind of decide on these things and other parts of your stories kind of start to transform into shape so for whatever reason I don't know how I kinda landed on the ice cream man this guy that would kind of connect everything and from there all of these little stories that I have been working on started to take on kind of different meaning and I found ways to make them fit together. around this concept of the ice cream man. That's awesome. Yeah I was GONNA to ask because ice cream and is nearly one hundred percent self contained. How how you stumbled upon that approach which I think you definitely just answered quite quite thoroughly. I was GONNA ask about influences. Well it's interesting that it would be outside of comics. I think is so often the case you know other media that is kind of influencing the direction there. I did want to ask. You just said you don't know why but I am curious if maybe there's a little more to it in terms of why in ice cream man one one thing that sort of sticks out to me as the series has progressed is in ice cream and there's sort of a a fifties ideal American wholesomeness to that to that character to that you know dressed in all white giving ice cream to the kids and obviously the the version of the ice cream man that we know in this series is horrific and sort of manifest in all the bad things that are happening are at least tangentially tied to this individual Is there is there something to like that visual of an ice cream to you that sort of spoke to like it? I Dunno twisting the the wholesomeness that image or was it just kind of a convenient narrative device you know it's An ice cream man. especially you know after the fashion of these guys from the fifties and Kind of Soda pop shop Guys out what they were called Soda Jerks these guys. Where the white hats and slim your your milkshake across the counter Yeah there's a kind of Akin to clowns there's this nostalgia and this Kind of childlike wonder that we hold for these ideas. You know you you love on. The ice cream man comes around When you hear the the truck music At least as a kid most of us were if someone had a birthday clown yeah. I don't think most kids ended up being too scared of clowns. Got Pretty excited. Or if you like Jerky little middle schooler. He made fun of the class But Yeah answer these these figures in my head in my life. I'm kind of hold this dual status where there's all of this nostalgia and and and love really especially when you were a child for these figures as you started to become adults Especially if you have your own kids you start to think of the proposition of some of these. Some of these characters And they've become a little strange. You know you're You teach your kids to never accept food from someone that they don't know right And he had yesterday if the extra man like offered your kids like a Free Cohen. Something like Oh sure And so we put a lot of trust in these guys. Even though you know they're they can be a little strange. So you know there's nothing in particular necessarily that attracted me to and ice cream and that that Figure Sort of emerged through lots of daydreaming. And thinking of you know who who would be driving around this suburban town kind of in touch with everybody but Yeah but in the back of my mind there these. He's couple of of occupations That as you become older starts to creep you out a little bit and take on a different meaning than they had. When you'RE A kid. Sure sure no that totally makes sense. So you're getting back a little bit to the sort of the open ended structure of the book. I would say this is the most exciting aspect to me or it's definitely become that kind of the what what. Approach what structural craft changes each new issue going to take. It's a genuine thrill I think month in month out and really works in in a monthly storytelling medium. Yeah absolutely I think in the span of last five issues you know. We've seen everything from like Pailin. Jerome cocked crossword puzzle comic to a satire Slash send-up of Morrison quite lease all star Superman How do you determine which elements of craft in which structure to take on an issue by issue basis? What does that process like? It is not as exact northland as one might think it you know. I have what I often call storytelling. Add Which is kind of another reason. Why this format works for me I get really bored. Kind of trudging through plot and staying in the same genre over neighbor again And so I found that Especially a where. Structural Puzzles are concerned that that presenting myself as a writer with a structural challenge kind of forced his brings out certain qualities in writing and pushes me. Pass Certain Habits of Procrastination and of Laziness Basically just gets me excited about trying to figure out how to present twenty four pages of comic in a novel way And it becomes kind of addictive right like you you We put out early on Like silence issue Issue six of Ice Cream and that was told it was merely silent but it was told across three different tiers. It was kind of three different. What if version of this one guy life And they were all colored to match the flavors of Neapolitan ice cream Tommy what the word triptych means and You know it's kind of our sliding doors of Connex and You know people really responded to that and the kind of structural play as NGO. So you know what? What else can I do I'm a big A big I I've studied and have always been fond of language so Linguistic puzzles are especially appealing to me so in Pailin issue once it kind of occurs. Light well once. The question was posed in my own head. Is it possible to write story? That can be the same backwards and forwards which I think you know the the the first blush answer would be no You start to say well if if I were to try to do that. How in the heck would I do it as you know I wrote? I think a page that where THE TAX Just kind of taking notes on the notes I phone where the texts worked but forwards and backwards and I was like. Oh I could just kind of treat. I could solve this problem page by page and all I have to do is You know figure out I basically just have to figure out how to go one way and as long as each page can be read Napster Direction. It's you know. It's it's it's even though. The final product is a two way piece of Art The problem solving only occurs in one direction. That's all to say that You know little challenges like that Propel by my writing forward and gives me the energy and the interest to work through an issue and and keep You know Keeping Project at the top of my mind And also satisfies that that storytelling. Add than I mentioned because it's Every time you go back to the drawing board. It's something completely new and completely. Yeah Yeah I would say is definitely resonating. It's it's become a like I was saying a recurring thing that I look forward to Especially in that. Yeah Yeah of course as we're at that time where comic are coming back? Essentially it's you know. I think ice cream will continue to be one of the ones most for two months in a month out One of the issues. That really got my attention. Recently was issue seventeen. I'm a huge superhero comics. Fan Of what I talked about right about and discuss over on Compo Carol and honestly we probably could have spent this whole time just talking about all the all star Superman connections because it's obviously that's got iconic status in in Superhero comics landscapes actually went back and reread it before. We talk just to just to refresh my mind Exactly what happens in make some of those connections to the issue that you wrote? I guess I did want to ask. Let's let's start here. Why why all star Superman as the you know because I commend has not touched a superhero language Superheroes is a visual medium. You know it is very much outside that yet seventeen. It goes to a reality where you know. The ice cream man is world superman and it's clearly Begins with that. You know that four panel structure but from the perspective where it's now you know. It's all star Lois in this world. Y. Y that comic of all the Superhero media that you could have started with the shirt so I mean I guess it would be useful to say I. I don't read a ton of Superhero Comics. That haven't been written by Grant Morrison When I was younger I would go to the shop every week. And whoever was writing I I didn't really have necessarily an an affinity for any particular right or when I was sixteen seventeen. Eighteen even college Oh no things certain. Change College but I would you know if no matter who wrote a grant Morrison. Geoff Johns Tha Mossy Paul Levitz Then like lower to your guys. Judd winnick Christmas off these people and it didn't really matter to me I was just. I love the characters and I would mama this character stories but then as I got an appreciation for as I as my appreciation for good writing and good structure eight them especially in Superhero Comics That started to grow I I quickly came to the conclusion that you know. Sort of. No one does it. Like Grant Morrison Since since about the time that I've been a college and that's we're talking about Seventeen years since then I'm I'm not sure that math checks out. I'm thirty five so whatever the math whatever three five minutes nineteen is Thereabouts who works? Sixteen years I I just let a yeah. I've I've gone back and I've read all of grant Morrison's seeker work his whole Corpus there Than of course all of is like independent where it is ready to go work. And that's all star Superman. I think rightly is considered by people to be best. Superman story ever told But what's really great about Ulcer All Star? Superman is that Which I don't think it's talked about enough. Is that there. One shots there is. There is indeed a through line But it comes and goes but for the most part. It's really you know each issue Can stand alone as its own. Thing is its own little superman story And so when I kind of made the decision to and I reread. I should say Ultra Superman probably twice. You know. I'll I'll tell I'll take a weekends. Maybe in the winter than again in the summer and just burnt through it Just because it's it's lovely to revisit these things that have moved you and inspired you I once decided to do an ice cream and superhero story. I thought well what else is there. That's you know kind of a one shot and follow g style superhero book And I started to kind of think of my favorite twelve issue. Superhero book is sort of its own little anthology of one shots So then it was a matter of you know which I I knew. I wanted to pay homage to one of the issues And then through a reread. It occurred to me that issue to was structured is kind of harse story. Lois is high on space. Drugs entrapped trapped in the focus of solitude and she is convinced that Superman has gone crazy. And it's GonNa Sector and a perform weird surgeries on her. Maybe impregnate her all this horrible And so when I realized that it was in fact You know a a horror story. All these weird things during the fall in place into my head The cover for the book Obviously he would be holding ice. Cream truck We paid homage Pastiche to Action Comics. Number One You know the shot of Superman holding the car over his head. Yeah it's that that obviously obviously suggested on its own that you know the car should be replaced with an ice cream truck and all these kind of things started to fall into place where I realized that it was the perfect issue to To kind of eight but then somewhere along the line I also I think just because my own personal politics My three year old daughter who I'm trying to a constantly teach about constantly remind her of her own self worth than her value to this world I Yeah I thought Lois perhaps needed More attention And so yeah it. Kind of through all of these different strands of thought. All-star Lois kind of Fell into my lap And it would be. It would be like that all star Superman issue where she's looking at superman thinking maybe he's horrific and more whereas in all star superman she turns out to be wrong I thought the Nice Twist our book would be that she turns out to be right. Yeah Yeah I think it's very effective. I definitely when I read the all-star issue recently I had that same thought of this is definitely concerning for lowest but because you know Morrison and quietly are playing in the you know Superman is is the embodiment of hope playground. And they're playing with sort of silver age goofiness to some degree you know and obviously having read it before you know everything's going to turn out okay and that actually she's reacting to these weird superman drugs that he's gotten his fortress solitude whereas in ice cream man it's like yeah that would be really creepy to be taken to an ice palace with the world's strongest man who is increasingly revealing. How how little he may or may not care about lowest his own safety so I think it totally works. Another thing that I liked about that issue is it's one of the first word Donna me. How heavily it was calling back to the history of ice cream and actually A lot of times in text but a lot of times through a Morozov fantastic art which I absolutely or throughout his entire run. But there's a bunch of references to characters concepts ideas throughout ice cream in was that in intentional reflection of like superhero continuity and those elements being a big part of that fiction or. Is that just something that you were moving towards anyway? Mom Mentally you open on the head so the idea that we're going to do if our book is wine where continuity doesn't matter and we're going to go play in the world of superheroes that we have to kind of honor that we have to do the full pastiche and say all right well here's our continuity And the That was issue seventy right. That's right And issued swell of ice cream man Is this what if a feature story where this astronaut After the Earth has died is trying to find a planet suitable to to restart life and he winds up on this weird abandoned moon where the ice cream managed just been hanging out in the future And he eventually not to spoil anything ever when he is asking Somehow gets his hands on the astronaut ship and flies off the planet on so in even though it's never Never explicitly Suggested or or even really into that totally in my head. The idea was that ice cream. Ma'am in the future Was able flew back through time through into a separate dimension where he could set up shop and because he you know has been in all of these issues brought all of his this kind of a personal story with him interesting. Yeah and I. The was Superman's robot. In that is the Bob Devices. That a ice creams I should say That's pulled from that space issue right exactly so okay. He brings the robot with him and those robots again. A lot of this stuff you know. It seems clever and planned. But it's it's through the editing process through sitting and thinking. Well how can I? How can I hit all the notes I WANNA hit? How can I pay respectful? What I like. How can I play with it? Critique it and and Kinda Fun added as well So yeah all sorts of mounds who've been has his robots There's there's Bob as our Superman bought our history bother should say isolation palace so yeah. It's it's one of those things where you just you you start with idea and you follow the threads and you hope that all the pieces fall into play. Sometimes they don't waste time you know if you're if you're lucky and take enough time It all kind of did you. Did you anticipate when you started the series that there would be more recurring threads? I think the example I look at is in the first issue is the introduction of these Cops who seem like they're kind of going to be the the framing device for the story and I think they pop back up in in a couple issues here and there But then as it progressed everything. It became very clear by new. Probably issue four that everything was really going to stand on its own two feet Did you have thoughts to kind of have more of a recurring framework? Is that just sort of as the ball rolling those characters just happen to pop back up a little bit of both really You know at the end of issue for we kind of introduced this foil to the ice cream man and I basically I wasn't like a personally and a super great place while writing Issue for I was pretty sick with like this. Weird gastritis and a salvage. Itis thing where like I was getting proved down the throat constantly because I had all of this like acid. Basically throw that was made me unable to talk Just kept losing. My voice just got fixed like I wasn't feeling really good and I had written. Yeah three issues of comics. That were pretty dark. And I'm I can't be a pretty dark guy but I'm also like a pretty goofy happy guy so I was like I need to. I need to present some sort of light in all of this and so the foil characters and was Kayla for ice cream kind of came into being there as I started to Kind of we've Caleb into more stories somehow Almost he can just imagine the holding a needle like I would like go to leave or go to so and I would like kind of grab something from another issue and it would sort of come along and part of that is also that at least the first eight issues for the most part take place in the same suburb so it would only make sense. That At least in my New Jersey suburb solid saint people tie eating down So yes these people have started to come along for the ride and started to become fun to see how you could make little call backs to previous issues to create a larger continuity for a book that prides itself on not having any continuity right right. It's still fun. How how collaborative is that process of the callback? Is that you scripting out. Call backs or or Martin Adding them in or in. I'm kind of guessing a little bit of both. Yeah winds up being a little bit of both. You know so for issue six silent issue There are There's this one page where I'm main character is sitting on a park bench in three And you see three different versions of him sitting on a park bench and the people behind him in each different version are different that kind of playing in the grass behind him and those people are like I wrote scripts martines please You know to make the people in the top panel be Characterised from issue one to make people in the middle panel characters Issue four than to make characters in the last panel the characters from another issue So there those there. Those kind of concrete directions like that and Nice examples that recently in a shooting nineteen which comes out And is told in the form of a talking about structural still in the form of instruction. Manual step-by-step directions I was going through his INC pages on realize that Jolly oh the the Detective was just in a supermarket idol. in in one of the pages and I kinda called out of my team to I forgot to tell you which which was great because that That issue also has an index of all the things that appear in the pages of the instruction manual so I was able to put an old character into the index of of our book. So yeah so sometimes you know. I'm trying to place characters than other times Martinez just having a bunch of fun. And and him and Chris O'halloran our color You know kind of sprinkle these things as it were Throughout the the backgrounds and the the the kind of Lincoln Annals Nice. That's really cool. I think along those same lines as far as collaboration Un in Martine together previously on the electric sublime and in our together on ice cream. When you when you're sort of pitching him on like Hey. This issue is going to be kind of a crossword puzzle. How much how much do you have to sell it? And how much him like. Just immediately creatively responding to sort of the the wild inventiveness of a new structure. Say It's the you mentioned the alleged sublime it's Kinda good enough be started with that so that that project You know I I knew I wanted to do like an art. History Story And I knew I wanted to again this is me sort of challenging myself to try to push my own storytelling powered and wanted to recreate the interior world. Famous pieces of art. You know so if you were magically able to step inside them at least what would that look like able to step into cubist painting what was that world so I needed a a an artist that could that would basically commit An agreed to You know doing up list Sequence you know in the middle of the bunch of normal pages or doing a You know an abstract expressionist sequence in the middle of the Is and I. I appreciate three different artists And it was a pretty hard sell you know saying. Hey I need you to draw in your style and also could you draw it. Cosco artist I think could you recreate Van? Gogh real quick on a monthly basis so It was a tall order. But Martin like the next day You totally got it. And he was like I can do this. I love the idea so in that book. He really did a lot of that. He he did like a two page Sequence where our main characters inside of Guerin Ika and it looks just like wearing helped out a lot by on that back Matt Lopez was on colors but yeah so. We started off. Kind of tackling impossible challenges. So I think we're you know we as this happens with any sort of creative team Overtime you just kind of start to speak the same language So Martine now. I think almost disappointed at this point if I don't sent him something really difficult to make. Yeah so like issued twenty which we're kind of working on now is a recreation of all these famous children's books like the ones that I read my daughter. Basically with like little twists will not actually pretty big twists on them And you know so Martine is Basically drying in the style of goodnight moon for three pages. Drying in the style Shel Silverstein The giving tree for like Ages and then doing like a Dr seuss thing for six pages so yeah he's I think he's. This is kind of a long way around to the answer but he. He's always now pretty psyched to try something new And I think I I'd like to believe that These challenges have started to work kind of in the same way for him. As they work for me which is that they You know propel you forward and start to bring out things in your art and aircraft that may not be immediately obvious to you So yeah so it's It's been really fun and both Martine and Chris has been Very patients with me And Very Generous with their patients Every time I come up with one of these new silly ideas excellent yeah. I'm super excited for she. Twenty now I have a three year old as well so called all those books. You mentioned are our regulars in the nighttime reading selection. So I'm confident we'll get the reference. Yeah just own. Don't don't read it to your kid. I've had don't share this particular issue. Yeah I was on. Had the tablet up on the counter and I was like no this one's when I was reading ice cream man. I'm like I'll turn this one away so you can't see exactly what's happening here. My Dad were where they loves. Ice Cream man Jeff that was going on but we have so many copies around the house all the time. It's kind of hard at a high them from her sure And says she's like constantly like hoping up to some page of some guy dripping blood or something and she'll be like oh like the funny man. I have to try to get around us now. Yeah yeah well. It's good to have a fan in the house would think that's fun. I was GONNA ask at. Its core the battle between Rick to the ice cream man and caleb that that cowboy and black. It's it's kind of a battle between fragmentation and this recurring philosophy that you've quoted a number of times everything is one thing. Can you talk a little bit about what that means to you? And why it's such an important current phrase. It definitely seems to be the center of what this book is. All about right. Well I thank you for for even recognizing that is that has to do a lot of work. The writer to try to present these ideas have kind of abstract and You know a little a little cerebral or something but But yeah that that is exactly awesome. Yeah I find So this might all sound Pretty Kiki so if I if I go too far off the rails please feel free to stop me and let me know that I've done south but Nor is we're yes so the I mean you know the dark stop in Ice Cream. Man is always you know the That voice in the back of your head. That's telling you the things terrible things aren't gonNA work out You know so USC when we're talking During Pretty much the strangest thing ever happened in any of our lifetimes. And it's kind of really hard right now to turn that voice off and and I find that that perspective which is you know One of PESSIMISM WANNA selfishness a cynicism Comes from a fragmented. Thinking comes from this. Not being centered. a lot is occupied by the kind of Internet age that we live to that we live in everything moves really fast. It's hard to spend any time with one thing or one thought one piece of media And I know my thought process. has become completely destroyed edge over the past Probably six or seven years of constantly being on my phone and reading the news and writing and being a parent and I have a day job. Full Time Job Doing my job and You know trying to say healthy and cook and balance all this information that you got about what is good for you good view. What is the right way to offer it? What isn't the way to offer it all sorts of stuff like that and I find that that the the more cynical side of my brain is fed the more fragmented. My thinking is And that's where you know. Meditation comes in and I think they Goal of meditation is to come to a center is to slow down the thought process and if not turned off completely And so if if I'm not focusing on the way in which All of these various disparate what seemingly disparate parts of my life and my thought process far and facts if I'm focusing on the way in which they are actually all connected They're all part of the same sort of human experience. My personal life experience You know that's the thing that flash across my screen over the course of the day should be carried elsewhere whether it's you kind of share with my daughter or teach my daughter something about the way the world should or shouldn't work If I'm not folks saying on on the things that I'm just miserable so ice cream man versus Kahlo has had has come for me to represent those to silence. Which is the you know. The fast the cynical thinking that is fed by fragmentation by being unable to focus and come to a center and then the kind of transcendental transcended thinking Which comes from you know. Realizing the ways in which people are connected. The ways in which our bodies are connected to the world outside of US The ways in which we are connected to the digital world you know I. It's it's almost a Buddhist thinking really So yeah those two characters have come to represent those two different thought processes processes and. It's a pretty good gauge. The Pentagon the tone of basically the last three pages of ice cream issue You could pretty much exactly gases so where my mind was during that month of writing. I was going to ask you about that because some issues and very hopefully I noted issue fourteen in issue eighteen. Actually two examples. It's so the crossword puzzle than the Memory Comic. A both end surprisingly for the series hopeful. We're both characters sort of. It's almost like they defeat as existential dread am I. Am I reading that right? That those come across some a little differently them a lot of the rest of the issues. Yeah and it's like you know so in fourteen. The you know the husband and wife were able to kind of get out of their own. Interior Worlds The husband's being you know kind of distracted himself rift crossword puzzles. Which is something that are do that. Unfortunately do one or two of them a day and at the white being kind of Getting caught up in suburban pettiness paranoia. And all this stuff Now they are able to escape that at the end of that. And there's this one note where the contractor is that were at their house kind of who had previously the wife had possibly elucidative transforming into demon characters They very quickly for one panel transform back to two demons. And that's You know I hate to admit it but it's really just like a pure telegraph of Psychology. Where I I finished writing and I was feeling good and then maybe you know something bad happened at work or something bad you got to fight at home or something and I like. I change this one path to kind of go against the happy ending. I have a yellow then issue eighteen I was feeling really good And same with issue nineteen which which has a Komo yet. There's a kind of. It's still pretty dark but there was also I think. Sort of button of hopefulness at the end As on there ain't much of that in issue twenty which is being written right now. That's all of this this craziness Say It's like a a direct translation of my personal psychology over the course of like you know the Cheetah three weeks that I write these issues. That's that's really interesting and and makes a lot of sense art. I've two two more questions I want to tackle. And just being cognizant of your time the so right now you are you launched quarantine comics Yom. It came right out after you know. Basically kind of I think Dimon announced they were stopping publications. And you've been releasing digitally throughout the pandemic I believe weekly issues or four-page short stories with with the credit monitoring right smart Morozov and Chris o'halloran on colors on decisions or superfund for pages. At a time I particularly loved the as a Superhero nerd the return of Pinky ring and the the inverted Green Lantern Origin Story. That was excellent and I think to your point about you know the art team jumping on doing a new style. It's visually very much in that sort of silver age Superhero style. So that's that's been super fun. How has the experience for you in a self publishing digitally? It's I as far as I know it's something that you've do you're doing for the first time. I'm kind of curious about the the behind the scenes in if you think it's something you'll continue. Yes I mean. It's definitely my first time doing it. it was born in a kind of helplessness. As got the news. That diamond was shut him down. The industry and large was shut. Down for a while You found yourself. I think a lot of us found ourselves thinking you know what can I do? to help or what can I do even to survive and Yeah I you know this is gonNA sound so Lane but I've always wanted to do an issue As a sonics an incumbent vice command comics on the Senate is only fourteen lines and to sustain that over the course of a full issue of comics. Yeah I could never figure out As far as that you know sort. Instructional challenge goes How I could make that work across a full twenty two twenty four cases of comics so I never really Pulled it off in ever tried all that hard but I I was outside with my family and we were at the. We live in Brooklyn Borough Prospect Park and I like very quickly. And you know had deleting all this stuff about how like. Oh It's you know you're in quarantine you should take advantage of it and right that amazing thing that you that you've been waiting to ride because hey like Shakespeare wrote king lear during the plague And like my my first blush reaction to that was no fuck you right. Like Shakespeare didn't have like a three year olds and another job and a phone and Netflix on Fox would have been a very different very different collected right. Yeah so So I kind of quickly wrote this sonnet about you know have this lack of productivity During the for stuff leaks of quarantine And of as I wrote it Why don't I just make make it as long as needs to be? Which is short You know kind of Basically pacing the couplets across panels The ends yeah and So somehow in that park A legal all one. I have Martine and Chris draw this and then I'll just release it online and ask Eric Stevenson. If it's okay we do that because if if it's going to be this creative team it should be an ice cream. Handbook right now And as I was kind of filtering all this through my mind I was like. Oh you know We do a bunch of these and looking been asking myself that question. How can I help? What can I do And it became clear that what I could do is continue what I've been doing which is making ice cream and comex with My two collaborators We just decided You know they are amazing for working so fast they basically. Yeah you know. Created a fully realized and four-page comics in about five and a half days and like and cut no corners which is really amazing So we at one point. It just became clear that we should do a bunch of them. And Eric Evenson and Cat Salazar and image were actually really excited by You know because it was New content that they could promote during the shutdown. That's been kind of the the of all of this is that there is no new content So yes we we got the go ahead and decided to make a small little business event and we were able to and then the goal was you know we don't want we did. We know how sensitive comic shops are to a digital product. Because they've always been they don't WANNA lose. Spent one a train. Reader is to in new habits that don't include their shop. You know So it made sense to do these digital books with the idea that could help with physical shops So decided to donate fifty percent of the ever all the money that we made to be. Inc thank Which is the Charity Fund? That helps independent bookstores. Them they during the Corinthian created There with the see their own comic specific thumbs Which is what we ended up doing it in our money to And Yeah we were able to have our cake and eat it too. We have created new material. We were able to keep our fans interested. We were able to raise a good amount of money for comic shops. And we were able to. You know over the course of six weeks create twenty five twenty six pages of of content He got got we now. May or may not be releasing in September as a physical book. We we are needs. Play coy on that really good. Yeah thanks yeah. I've done the same thing. We'll be so not only will the sloppy come at you know benefits. The store is by being in the stores. But we're also going to donate half the proceeds again to bank for that. So yeah it was. It was like a small project that you're into something more wonderful than we really kind of anticipated. So does that mean you're done with sex? Now that you're back in the throes of getting getting out monthly. Yes right now. Yesterday we launched The guest series and so basically. We've invited some other creators to do little ice cream on shorts So yesterday we released stories one by written and drawn by Declan Chevy midnight and savage down on then a a good friend of mine up and coming writer named Dennis Camps at who wrote this book. Maxwell's the image for comics and ARC Who's a a friend of emphasis to do this? Really sweet little four. Page story We they got to play in the sandbox and released their stories yesterday. We've been another one coming. This coming Thursday is final. Final One the Thursday after that very cool so two more to come. Yeah can you announce who the artists are on that Yeah I guess. I don't know that so the Christopher can't well Who wrote she could fly? Any does work at He Russia can burger over the course and is doing some marvel step. He's during next weeks short and The week after is Mister al-jabah which would be really fun thing. Yeah Marvel's Dr Jim Writer and then the immortal Hulk writer for going out going out with a Marble Bang. Yes that's awesome. I am really looking forward to this. Final question for you. What would a satisfying run the to you on ice cream man in terms of both length but also just in terms of what you want to accomplish at the end of this? What is what is Kinda at the end of the day? You say all right. We're hang in an on ice cream. Man What are you what do you WanNa look back and see here. I mean this the sound kind of cheesy but in a lot of ways we already have accomplished. What more than I hope we accomplished on. Yeah Yeah we got really lucky. List is not a straightforward book but We're one of the currently Longest running image books. That's on shelves right. Now you know in terms of issue number And that's because a lot of their gigabytes of have recently undergone stuff that Yeah I mean we. You know the response that we've gotten to this book and on what it's the people that have gotten in touch you know Ways in which. It's made them thinker or or moved them in some way been super amazing on unexpected For a book. That's not really down down the middle in any way You know The fact that A book that has an issue that is a just a pal andrew. You know that is. It's mildly challenging. And that is you know. That is a structural play. I with like an emotional hook. Second even though both both are important to the Power of that particular The that kind of can be cited as someone's favourite collared book. I just didn't really think was going to be the case So yeah we are. I mean just really happy. With the the way this has all turned out and the way that it's affected all of our careers and and giving us work to do My you know things. Over the next months they're going to be pretty hard even for the like ours An numbers are going to be very different On the way we're son images of these books have to You know basically hey the artists of the Patriot in the end for. It's a really be worth it to So we're definitely then go to issue twenty. I think even no matter what happens we will look to go to twenty four and and possibly ended there. I don't want to overstay my welcome and I don't ever want to the second that I have an idea that seems like something similar to something. We've already done. I think that's the minute I each hit the eject button Because then like the the whole conceit the book and what makes the Book Special Is kind of gone So yeah so I'm I don't hold me to that because I could get twenty four the idea for four more Yeah I think the idea right now is is to get twenty four And then maybe start over again or start something new. I'm not sure sure okay. That's interesting yeah I mean definitely definitely coming up on that not a not too far off. Does that mean you know? Essentially the the outline or the content of the final issue already It Not You know I I never know until I write the full scripts that I have or even before issues. Twenty one fill electrodes one cigarette out but even before issues. Twenty two twenty three. I kind of know twenty four is GonNa be. Yeah Gotcha okay all right. I'm really looking forward to seeing how it continues to play as as much as I have loved it and look for it to continue is as long as you all want it to. I think that's the final part of that is the crucial element that you that you want it to keep coming out Because I think your instinct. There is probably the right one in terms of the the long-term sort of success and in how people are looking at it so That is that's cool. I really appreciate you taking the time to talk through all this with me. It's a book I have have loved for. A you know a few years now and has been lot to me so get to talk to you about it is a pretty big thrill and I appreciate how how much thought you know you in. The creative team are putting into this book. Because it's again like it really stands out the way that these stories are told and again just the inventiveness with comex kind of I don't know it's I don't WANNA overstate it. But it really gives you thoughts as to how the medium can be used differently. was very very exciting. Because it you know. It's not doesn't just apply to this series. It's it's something I look now for other craters are they measuring up to what. They're trying an ice cream right. Like that's Kinda Kinda setting the bar in some ways And that's our biggest match. That so nice I mean. That's you know that's why we're doing. It has to hope that people feel that way and You know I think every writer wants to be told that they're doing something special and unique but You know when you hear it often enough you start to believe it yourself so You know we're super happy that people think that our book our readers like you who not only enjoy it like Enjoy it in the way of the although the way that we hope people enjoy actually doesn't matter at all The fact that there are people that are picking up. Exactly what we're putting down and enjoying doing exactly the way that we see it in our minds That is Even more gratifying thank you.

Lois kind writer Grant Morrison Martine Superman Chris O'halloran Hbo Maxwell Prince W Maxwell Princ Martin Pailin Caleb New York gastritis Napster New Jersey Geoff Johns Shel Silverstein
Ode to Pets!

Nerdette

15:28 min | 4 months ago

Ode to Pets!

"Did I tell you? I don't think I did well. Of course they didn't but I'm so excited I'm GonNa make a chocolate cake for one in a Mug in the microwave tonight and I am so stoked about from WBZ Chicago. This is nerd. It Good Morning I'm Greta Jonsson. It is Tuesday march thirty first and I am on the floor of my bedroom closet which means this must be another edition of nuts. Introverts guide to the good life. So today we're GonNa talk all about pets because I don't know about y'all but as a person who lives alone. I am so grateful for the company of my Corgi Scout and my cats even though Mike Catt. Seth is extremely aggressive. So somebody WHO's taking pet appreciation to the next level is my buddy. John Hodgman regret. How're you John Hodgman? How's IT Goin'? You know that's exactly what it is. It's a weird time. John is the guy from those Mac versus. Pc ADDS back in the early outs. He was also on the daily show for a while and he played the Bucci public radio host from Buji Eagleton on parks and REC. Welcome to thought for your thoughts. I'm your pony in host dairy mobile and I'm your Eagle Tony in host August clemen died. Yes if you have not heard our programming awhile thought for your thoughts now has a co host. Thanks to the Pony Eagleton merger. I believe that is the Eagleton Ponti merger NASA and now John is hosting a show that you're gonNA love. It's called. Get your pets and it's on instagram. Live so I called John. Up on the old escapes to talk about it as you said today on. Get your pets. You talked about how you are one of the first celebrities to do instagram livestock. Because you've been doing this for like months. Now let's put. Let's put quotation marks around everything. I probably not true celebrity. Really not true but it's true. It's true that it's there. A couple of things that are true one is that I saw that. I could go live on instagram and as I was talking live on instagram because like instagram celebrities have been doing this all the time. Right and some real. And that's where that's where I WANNA be. I just want to remain relevant to the people so I started going on instagram and I was like I. I don't know what to say. And then I saw a little thing where I could press a button and I saw this list of people who had requested to join my feet and I didn't know any of them and I. I pressed one of their names just to see what would happen. And all of a sudden they bought this screen split and we were talking to each other and this was terrifying and suddenly. We're having I was having this facetime with a total stranger. Now my my fans people know about me and my projects Judge John. Hodgman get Ipod get your pets. Whatever it is. I do my books. Medallions DAD's medication land. They're all nice people so I didn't have a problem with that but then I saw. This person had a dog in the background. I'm like forget about you. Tell me about your dog. And that began a every now and then mid-afternoon. Instagram Talk Show where I interviewed people's pets and kind of ramped up when I was for obvious reasons when I was promoting my book medallion status but as soon as schools were cancelled and stuff started shutting down I realized we all need some therapy dog. And Cat and bird and tarantula whatever in our lives why don't. I do get your pets as often as possible and so I've been doing it every weekday now. This is the second. Hey everybody it's me van. It's four of four gus. He's very flat right now. What is your name given being? I'm Peter Peter where he was a world. I'm in Michigan your beautiful hot dog the dog just a just a long queue tube. Corgi that I've ever met. Let's let's get a real. Let's go from. Can you just do camera from those detail? That's laid out. Do you think people are getting like ex drug good benefit out of these days just because it is you know. I think it just seems to me like people are turning to so many different ways of figuring out how to interact with each other while in social isolation. Do you find that people are extra responding now. Well I realized when I started. Get your pets sometime. In the previous calendar year back when society existed and we could all meet and get together I still I realized even then it was probably the most important work I could ever do because it was so clear the happiness that brought to everyone who tuned in. I mean just looking at people's pets. There's a reason why they're so popular on the Internet. These cats and dogs is like pure Serotonin and that's why it was equally clear once everyone got sent home from work and people were hurting and and grieving and worrying and and full of anxiety. The probably would probably be a good time to show people some pictures of cats and dogs not given a poop because they don't know any better you know it's it's very soothing to me as well. I love to see all these pets. Love to see all these pets not caring and all these people surviving. But it's really beautiful and putting it actually. What's the strangest pet that you've seen? I guess really I should ask you. What's the strangest slow yet? You've interviewed right. Interviewing them rebel. I tried to interview the pets of any of them. Don't speak English. I often ask their people. Like what is it that makes you know pepper really annoyed or if you learned that your dog. Mildred Pierce was under witches or warlocks spell and was actually a human and you could remove that spell and turn your dog into a human being. Would you the strangest pet I ever saw? I mean I think I think that was one of the most glorious moments get your pets was when a woman showed me her tank of shrimp and it was. It was her pets. It was this sort of thing where somewhere in the comments someone mentioned shrimp. I said boy. I wish someone had some bet. Shrimp and the next person. I went to randomly. Had A tank full of decorative aquarium shrimp and there were bright blue and beautiful wide. You have a tank full of shrimp and she said this is my business. Like cheer self is an aquarium person. Right she has other aquariums full of exotic fish and stuff and aquarium. People like to have shrimp in their AQUARIA. Because the other at a little decorative texture. It's not. It's not swimming in the same way as everything else. And so she put it together. She's like I'm GonNa. I'm GONNA breed these decorative aquarium shrimp and and sell them and you know her businesses still going on. I mean that's that's essential business right there. Yeah there you go. Oh My. God that's amazing Decorative Shrimp I. Just don't even it's hard to wrap my head around that one. Yeah well I mean you know you are a dog person as we know. I am a dog person though. I also have a cat remember. You know you'd go both ways. I'm a cat person who longs for a dog. Are you thinking about getting a pandemic puppy? What is the pandemic puppy? It's when I think I mean based on my friend Jillian from Grad School. It's when you are working from home with your husband. And he relentlessly asks you for a puppy until you cave and get a puppy all right for my point of view. This is the time to just lock it down. Be Calm don't panic. Don't make any rash decisions. Don't get any puppies help people if you can if you're helping someone because they can't take care but because they're sick that's a that's a good pandemic puppy like don't go. Don't go buying a bunch of a bunch of new attract bands like I did the other day. I'm frank well a two two two pair because my my only pair of track pants is worn out and I and I realized mostly I'm just hanging around enough leisure now because there's no one to look good for so I got. I replaced my worn-out pair track pants. I got some more just for just for wearables hanging there into care and hug your loved ones. If you you do all of those exact same things thanks. That was the ever delightful non celebrity. John Hodgman you can find. Get your pets on instagram. Live most weekday afternoons. Just search for John. Hodgman all right. Here's the part of the show where we hear from your pets. Pretty pretty quiet crowd just kidding but we did hear from some of you telling us about your pets and it is delightful grading nuts. My name is Lauren powers and I live in Winter Garden Florida. Hey Greta this is Sonia your cousin calling from Minneapolis Minnesota. Hello Internet listeners. It's Co host America's TRICIA Obeida Heiner. Debt this is Laura in Washington and like many four year olds. My son is very into doing things by himself right now and he recently learned he can pick up our cat and move him places and it's very exciting letting you know that something pretty awesome happened this weekend because I think we could all use a bit of awesome news. My awesome news is that I got a dog her name is Leslie. Nope we have to fantastic rescue Matz. Rufus is a four year old ninety pound gentle giant. Who DOESN'T BELIEVE INSIDE RESTRICTIONS FOR LAPTOP? I am finding comfort in spending time with my little kitty. Lucy Gracie is a two year old bundle of muscles and energy who enjoys long walks and wrestling with Rufus Italy. Would you like to say hello actually? Can you hear her sniffing? She not working which is good. She is shaking though if you heard that. Because she's a good dog. They both came from pedal lines of Greater Orlando shelter that made national news for sorting animals. According to ports houses including Griffin Dog Raven Pau couple fluff and slobbering. He often will pick up. The poor unsuspecting cat and put him outside Gracie and Rufus are both suffolk flux. That's what's getting us through the Corinthian. He says picking up the cat and putting him outside so that he's not to me. Owie but I'm also really enjoying seeing all the dogs out getting walked when I'm out and about walking around and also seen people's cats in their windows and I hope that you're doing okay working from home parenting from home. Whatever you're doing from home I hope you're home and safe. Hope you're doing fine. Love the PODCAST. Thanks for everything and be. Well thanks for doing the podcast love you. The dogs of the world really are winning right now right Tricia. You are absolutely correct. The dogs of the world are winning. Thank you also to Sonia. Love you to its Nastier from the rest of you as well. Speaking of voicemails remember earlier when I mentioned my Grad school friend Jillian. Well you're in luck. Because she and her husband John. Loftus this message on calling in today because I was finally able to trick my wife after eight years of being together and to getting a puppy during this shelter in place period global pandemic. Yeah that that's the reason. Why anyway like Young Berry is a beautiful golden doodle? I can't say how much I love him. I think he is a complete and total Weirdo. He is afraid of baby. Strollers carts in the red jumped. Bikes cannot be near them at all. He's a very strange boy but we love him and we will probably keep thanks you too high berry we. WanNa keep hearing from you so coming up soon. We're GONNA do movies episode. We thought it would fun to collect some listener recommendations. Just tell us your name where you're calling from and what movie recommend and of course why you think it would be good to watch right now record yourself on your phone than email. The file to note at podcast at gmail.com. This is so much more fun when we're all in it together from a distance on my right one more thing in just a minute. Believe it or not. Today is the last day of March and I don't know about you but time is moving so weirdly these days that I can't tell if I should be surprised that April is already almost here or astonished that it's still barely April but what I will say about April aside from it being the cruelest month as ds Elliott says in the wasteland. April is national poetry month which I think means it. Now it'd be a great time to dust off some of our favorite poetry collections. You read Mary Oliver or Poet Laureate Tracy K Smith is pretty awesome or finessing Vincent Malay- like whatever you dig. You know. Maybe you even want to go back to something really soothing. From when you were a kid I feel like now. It'd be a great time to do that for me. That is totally Shel Silverstein where the sidewalk ends. It came out in nineteen seventy four and it is such an amazing collection. Here is shell himself reading a really good poem from that book. It's called the muffins. Listen to the muscles child. Listen to domes. Listen to the shouldn't be impossible's the wants. Listen to the never haves than listen to me. Anything can happen child. Anything can be anything can happen and anything can be God. Damn it all right. That's it for today. The show is produced by Justin Bull. Our executive producer is Brendan Vanak. Take care and we'll see you Friday for Book Club K by.

John Hodgman instagram Mike Catt TRICIA Obeida Heiner Greta Jonsson Jillian Grad School Buji Eagleton Seth Chicago Bucci Peter Peter Eagleton Ponti Shel Silverstein Mac social isolation America NASA Rufus Italy
1715: Eric Erenstoft: How to use Conscious Intelligence as an Entrepreneur!

Conscious Millionaire Show ~ Business Coaching and Mentoring 6 Days a Week

41:11 min | 4 months ago

1715: Eric Erenstoft: How to use Conscious Intelligence as an Entrepreneur!

"Welcome to the conscious. Millionaire's show episode number Seventeen fifteen. Welcome to conscious millionaire. The number one show very conscious entrepreneurs and CEOS on a mission to build a highly profitable business that makes a positive impact on Egypt's discover how to make bigger money. Create a bigger impact and live vigor. Live you're listening to the conscious network. Her by over twelve million listeners. In one hundred ninety countries now joined your host. Jay Crawford the conscious meaner mentor master. Nlp Coach Speaker and author of the number one international bestseller conscious millionaire. Grow Your Business by making a difference low entrepreneurs this is J. V. You know during this time of crisis. It's easy to panic and get overwhelmed booth. Fear truth is some entrepreneurs will failing go out of business. However others will thrive and prosper even have their best most financially successful year. Ever I want you to be in the second group the entrepreneurs who prosper and help more people. That's why I want you to attend the special online training and providing called Prosper Twenty twenty master. The three principles you need to win in twenty twenty in this live training sign up now at Prosper Twenty Twenty Webinar doubt com again go now to prosper twenty twenty Webinar Dot Com. Hello this is your host. Jv and I literally am thrilled that you chose to join me today. Because I've been incredible show at great guests but I I wanNA tell you. This isn't just a podcast or a radio show it's a training and entrepreneurial training for you we're GONNA be talking about mindset strategy execution. How you as an entrepreneur on a mission to make a powerful difference build a highly profitable business. That makes an impact how you can do that. That's what we're always focused on on this show so that you get all those pieces so help me. Welcome our featured guest use an expert on conscious intelligence and fat? He's the author of the Book Conscious Intelligence and a prolific author Speaker Futurist Entrepreneur Businessman First Responder Martial artist philanthropist and competitive open water swimmer. He's a book author and Public Speaker. Speaking on conscious intelligence. My guest today is Eric. Aaron stopped Eric. Thank you so much for joining us today. Great to be here. I know especially with the book conscious intelligence. That's why I was so excited to bring you on the show conscious millionaire. I know from all of our conversations. We've been having your are absolutely on a mission to make a difference. What's that positive impact or transformation that you want to help your customers or clients achieve. Well first and foremost I determine and created a framework were conscious intelligence to really help people gain mastery over their circumstances. And when you think about circumstances it's not just the things happening around. You is the things that are happening inside of you how we may be reactive rather than responsive so whether you apply that to business in this high pressure in high anxiety time in these types of circumstances or whether it's at home in relationships it really applies across the board so conscious intelligence really applies to aning mastery over our circumstances in everywhere irrespective. I'm always curious about the journey that entrepreneurs taken especially entrepreneurs like yourself who've made millions of dollars and now you're in this position of going out and creating this huge brand around conscious intelligent speaking all over the world. Doing trainings workshops building products. What was it that brought you to conscious intelligence? Just like for me. There's a journey that got me to conscious millionaire. What was the journey? That got you to conscious intelligence. Oh I didn't realize his radio show was like three hours long. I it's my entire life and of course I can't encapsulated all year but I think some of the things that you mentioned Being you know being a lifelong athlete in the university is child but also being both having worked in corporate America and Fortune. One hundred companies as well as being an entrepreneur in a philanthropist and living and working in the the Far East as well as in Europe and Western and eastern cultures. And it all of these things in form Who I am in the quite in that. In my incessant curiosity has really had me study and learn and try to determine why there's so many challenges why there's some miscommunication in this world. Why we are can can sometimes really freeze or react. In our circumstances read really gained mastery and respond. And these can be very crucial times if you have an important client. If you're about to go out on a pitch or if there's a lot of things going on in your you gotTa bring it to your company every day in generate revenue and continue to connect with your clients. Connect with your employees. Have your products and services connect with the world? All of these things create a lot of pressure in being able to really really address and gain mastery over those so that we can best apply those practices to our everyday lives into our our companies. That's really what has driven me uninformed what I'm doing in Wyatt but this book together you know somebody once said if you can't find a book like this anywhere in the library or anywhere in a bookstore. It's yours too right so I couldn't find anything like this. Not with this approach. It's secular not religious or spiritual even though it's probably the most spiritual non-spiritual book you'll ever read but there's not anything like this and so I created it in that was a just short of a decade. It's taken me to do this so it's been my everest. I want to congratulate you on that and And you may be a listener. Whose listened for a long time. What you might not know is that it took me seven years to write conscious millionaire and I literally rewrote it seven times and each of the Times that I rewrote it. There was an event that happened twice. I got mono for four months I was in bed. Got Out rewrote. It and five months later I had it again. My father died and I almost died myself. I was in bed for for about six months. Almost had legions disease which is fatal eighty five percent of the time it gets in your lungs or or in two major oregon so all these things. I informed the journey just like I know if it took you. Ten years that it wasn't that you're just lolly gagging there were transformations. That were occurring. I'm curious your martial artists. Your Open Water Competitive swimmer and we're talking about mastery so I'd like to dig down into mastery for a moment because I think mastery as an entrepreneur is is one of the main differences between entrepreneurs that are highly successful build a company that that has millions and millions of revenue and those that can never seem to break out of one hundred thousand. I want to help those people entrepreneurs on their journey to that first million or they're in the millions but now they want to add another million or so they want to see. Can I get to eat figures? That's my those are my people. That's who I WANNA help. How does how does martial arts and open swimming and entrepreneurship? What is the key to mastery? That is a great great. I'm so glad you asked that you know there are a concepts. I learned this motion for solid. Start with martial arts it. Strive for excellence. Not Perfection People that are trying to be. Perfectionists will drive themselves crazy. But that means that the way the the small things are the way that you do the big things so creating habits discipline that also disappointing to hear that a lot especially isn't an athlete. If you're going to be a world class athlete competitively. You can't just lolly gagging around showing up the practices when you want and doing whatever you want so there is a level discipline and there's a mindset that has to do with excellence and not with anything that you do and I think the Japanese whether they're doing a tea ceremony or whether they're doing a martial arts with sword or whether they're arranging flowers they are completely focused on every detail because they understand that this applies to a much bigger concept of the way that you're running accompanied the way that you're communicating setting their mission. All these things are details. That are generated that reflect. Everything comes off of your desk reflects your organization in reflects you so gaining mastery that this is the other thing about mastery you reach black belt. That's not a finish line. That's that's like that's the starting line that's wins like great now that you've learned all of the different. Kat does different different techniques. Now they're saying good you you'd have them all figured out now. You get to start to play. So it's not until black belt until you're actually really creating something and congratulations now. Now you're at the starting line now. You get to go and start start doing that. So mastery is also not something that you sit on your right on your laurels. It's not a mountain that you've that you've summited you stand there. I'm there that's I'm done. It's always a climb. It is always striving hiring hiring climbing in elevating reaching owens for something so the there there's a humility to understanding that nobody considers themself a master. They're always striving for that. Other people might note you as a master but it is always even even the. Telly Lama even any twelfth degree. Whatever but they're always trying to get to that next level you're always climbing higher peak so I think that it gets really dangerous when we think we've gotten there. We think we know at all or we think that we've gained every piece of wisdom. That's out there you know. There's that famous quote you know. He thinks he knows does not know who knows he does not know knows so it in a summary. I mean I know I mentioned a lot of things with those kinds of the things that came to mind when you talked about what is mastery mean in. How do you apply to your life and how I have overall especially being an open water swimmer? The ocean if there's ever a time that even Michael Phelps thinks that he is in control of the ocean that's the day that he will drown because there's a humility in understanding to what we do to always have to yield that power to something higher than yourself and when you appreciate that you're going to thrive so. I'm curious how I WANNA see on this mastery theme that I want to just ask one more question then I want to talk about. How did you create wealth not from the mechanics about from the journey perspective? The the principles that you've learned that now you look at it and you go Even the the question of I I'd known that it took me this long to figure that piece outright. If you're not to Noor and you want to achieve mastery. What is the best approach? And by that I mean. Do you take one area and you say. I really want to master this area. And then how should your mindset be about approaching it so? I do believe that if you're really going to do something. Go Deep Go. Deep be the expert be indispensable if people the the person the people that are in your life the listeners. Life Your Life. My life people in my life that are irreplaceable are really in their services or or who they are. What they're doing. Those are the people that are really important to me. So if I start every day out serving my clients providing services of asking myself how can I be indispensable? We'll have means that. I got to become an expert that means that I need to connect with people all these tools. All of these things. That have me be indispensable. And if you're indispensable it's really hard to get rid of that person and I'm in that way you generate value to your clients and I I would add. It was kind of in the earlier question that you had that doing. That is actually not as much empowering yourself when it's really about empowering others it's it's facilitating something that allows them to get further in their lives. And when they see that is really powerful and by the way that's the conscious part of conscious millionaire is is being support in empowering others in any powerful leader the ones that aren't wielding power because it's given to them but earning the power Earning it because they're they're empowering others and those people think about when somebody is empowered you. There's nothing there's nothing more valuable than a depreciation that that person has really helped me. That person has really helped me advance. My gratitude for them is is is unbelievable. So if you're that to somebody how can you lose? How can you fail? And I think that that is really the secret sauce to gate gaining and continuing to rise to success in operations in my enterprises. And that's how I've Eric at before we go to break if there's one principal you've learned about being successful financially successful as an entrepreneur making making the millions. What would be that principle that you'd want to impart to everybody listening today? No pressure whatsoever on you. I would it you know. I know people who have are really really wealthy in their miserable and then no cable. That have very modest. Means in their living blissful lives so if we think that acquiring more and more and more wealth is the way to happiness and joy. I invited to consider that. That's not it and instead of buying things or throwing money at things or dreaming about what you don't have a first thing to do is to really really stop first thing in the morning when you weak- and have gratitude for what we do. Have you probably have a roof over your head? You probably have a feeling your stomach. You probably are surrounded by good friends. You're rich you're you're wealthy. I know you hear this a lot but having gratitude every day in that part of that humility that I was talking about is really while that we cultivate. So it's cultivating a lifestyle happiness. It's not just these Objects About Happiness and material thins. It's really understanding and being humbled by the fact that we are blessed every day and I think that that really that that's it that's it for me that's my philosophy and I think that that's the only thing that truly sustains myself or I would I would. I would invite someone to challenge that it that that that is the the Saas to creating genuine happiness joy and not this object happiness where sometimes I'm happy. Sometimes I'm not having to buy more things or acquire more things in order to be happy and successful here with Eric Aaron stopped. He's the author of conscious intelligent. Stay tuned we're going to be back with the twenty four Hour Challenge in the millionaire entrepreneur questions. Hello entrepreneurs this is J. V. I know during this time of crisis. It's easy to panic and get overwhelmed with fear. The grocery stores literally look like war zones and the airwaves and Internet are filled with non stop recession in Corona Virus News. The world feels like it's being turned upside down. Truth is some entrepreneurs will fail and go out of business. Some could lose everything. Well others will thrive and prosper even have their best most financially successful year. Ever I want you to be in the second group not survivors. But the thrive irs the entrepreneurs who prosper help more people and put more money in their bank account. That's why I want you to attend the special online training on providing called Prosper Twenty Twenty mastered the three principles. You need to win in twenty twenty to sign up go to prosper twenty twenty Webinar Dot Com again. Go Now to reserve your place at Prosper Twenty Twenty Webinar Dot Com. Welcome back I'm your host. Jv Chrome the third is the conscious millionaire show. Thank you so much for staying tune. If you just tuned in on our radio show you can get the entire show by going to conscious knowing air. Show DOT COM to scroll down to the title of today's show how to use conscious intelligence as an entrepreneur. I WanNa thank you for showing up. Not For me not for Eric as I always say showing up for yourself to take this next step there. No accidents in life my friend. If you're here this is the information that you're ready for. Take it in and utilize it to take your next step and building a highly profitable business that makes an impact and getting the fulfilment from doing that and now it's time for the twenty four hour challenge. I want to take the concept of gratitude and humble being gratitude and humbled so I want you to find something. Write it down that you're deeply grateful for and then explore. What does it mean to be humble that you have that in your life as opposed to going out and telling everybody you're grateful one hand but now you WanNa toot your horn all over the place? I want to do something different. I want you to be grateful and humble about it and notice how that feels inside of you and now it's time for the conscious millionaire entrepreneur questions I want to start with Mindset Eric. What's the mindset that you used to discover your best business opportunities to be of service to find out what somebody needs rather than push my needs onto somebody else. Listen of course in automatically try to be the resource for another person. What can I get? Can I contribute? I know that if I'm contributing and adding value to somebody's life to somebody's business. That not only. Is that GONNA be significantly appreciated but probably some other. I'm probably somebody that they want to develop a deeper relationship with and as such the same when when approached by people in their services in products as well so You know golden rule there but always looking and listening and asking roving for how I could best the service. Try to provide. Even even additionally tried to provide think of Saddam resource somebody. I can connect them to something some idea that I can provide to them. If my service isn't completely everything that they need or in addition to always be a strong resource. I agree with you and and I think there's a there's an attitude or mindset about even doing that that makes it work and then there's one that doesn't make it work and and I had that experience where were if you're on linked in. I know that you have experience on a regular basis Somebody wrote to me who had just connected and I actually. I seldom take time. I usually just disconnect when people do this. Okay we're not going to build a relationship so there's yes they have connections but let's let's not even bother right and they said glad to meet you and then it was this long what they wanted to sell me and I actually wrote back and I said this is what you wrote. You were glad to meet me now. I want to sell you something and I said. Would you actually walk up to somebody in person and have that kind of a conversation? Because it didn't work for me right. I thought just give them honest feedback. So I think that when we go to be of service. I've been some trainings. That turned me off where people go were. Here's the formula. Give give give ask and but without any real intention to the give give give right. I think it has to do with sincerity and integrity of the service that you provide and if you're sitting there in the back of your mind going and now I can ask for something. I think you're in the wrong place completely. I don't think it works. I think you have to come from a genuine place of a word that I'm using more and more in business. Love that you've gotTa love. You GotTa give love to this person and if you're coming from that place whatever you get back from them is fine get back from others is fine but I find that you build more more goodwill and intention by just coming from a love place with them yet you know and I would add You know you're talking about the distinction between coming from ABUNDANCE SCARCITY WHEN PEOPLE COMING FROM SCARCITY. They're really kinda going what can you do for me? What can you do for me? You're taught you know the Lincoln proposal and and networking when somebody like. Hey how you doing any shove their business card in your hand and say please call me. I have these services I could do this this and this and what can you do for me? It's really a put off and there's two things that you can't fake being generous or faked being really interested in somebody but understand just understand in your deepest part of your essential self. That genuinely caring in generally contributing. It will come back to you because it's not really a give tape. It's it's it's not. I have this piece of the Pie and I want that piece of the Pie. There's no pot is just infinite abundance in there's plenty for everybody so contributing in being that resource for someone is always gonNA come back. It's always gonNA come back Eric. What's his strategy? That you can give all the entrepreneurs listening today that will help them become more profitable in their business. I would say every day. Try to learn and grow in deepen your expertise in what you're doing whether it's researching the sector that Iran whether it's understanding the challenges that the sector has a try to try to disrupt that you know if this doesn't work think outside the box or eliminate the boxall together. I'm always I'm always trying to learn. Grow research deep in my expertise so that I can definitely stand outside. The crowd win being resource for somebody. It's not just about something that I do but I want people to think that they can actually to me as a resource and she knows what would air. What would eric say about this? If they're asking that question and a lot of people do because they tell me I love that I love that and then be authentically available to answer those questions. I have given away a lot of free time and a much. Much to my Chagrin You know I'm I'm not billing our things like that but I do give time and I think that people who truly appreciate the value and and it evens relationships and that's why I have long term relationships with my clients conscious. Millionaires take conscious focused action. And oftentimes I talk about that in the context of business and growing your business but today at like ask. What do you do on a daily basis to actually make a bigger contribution with your life? Well I mentioned the first thing already first thing in the morning I definitely take a moment and have gratitude and be thankful so instead of asking for something I also asked the universe or however you do this whether you pray with you meditate but I ask you know what you know. What will you have me do? Where will you be go what we have be say like like chat like do your work through me like so? It's it's the question of how can I be of service today and I'm not? I'm not blowing sunshine up your you know what I really do. Ask this because you WanNa talk about purpose? You WanNa talk about focus on on something bigger than yourself. I don't know how you I don't know how I can do that. I'll just speak for myself without asking myself. Liz bigger questions. I want to once again. Let you know about Eric Erin. Stuff's new book hatches intelligence. We're going to have a link to that on the show notes at conscious millionaire. Show DOT com. Eric what's book? That is inspired you. That you'd recommend for other entrepreneurs I have to I. We had a conversation about this. I have the the business that I love in that many of heard of seven habits of highly effective people by Steven covy amazing book. The other one might not be as accepted the giving tree by Shel Silverstein. Both of those books have key key principles in them. That will assure you on a trajectory toward success in your not only in your enterprises in your business and actually in your personal life and relationships and with yourself relationship with yourself. We'll have both of those books again. Along with conscious intelligence links to them on the show notes conscious millionaire's show dot com. If someone's listening and I'm sure there are a lot of people listening might be you in fact and you want to reach out and say hello to Eric. Get in touch with him. What's the best way for people to connect with you so you can go to conscious intelligence dot org that will link also to my home page? Which is Eric Barren stuff dot com an elevated dot Org Which is elevate ide- dot org so those will connect you can sign up for my for my to stay in touch with me but you know conscious intelligence dot org. That's the name of the book that's the name of the website that will connect with me would love to have you come aboard. And we'll have all of those along with all the social media links again on the show notes conscious show dot Com Eric. You know your your martial artist competitive open water swimmer. Now you're going to become an international star with your book. Conscious intelligence. You're going to become. I've certain of it. You're going to become you know the person known throughout the world for this body of work. What's the next summit? You want to climb and what might be a challenge or obstacle. You have to overcome to get to that mountaintop so my upcoming book conscious intelligence will a platform that has speaking. It will have all kinds of curriculum and everything around it. So there is a lot of spokes to this wheel where that is The axle of the wheel so All these programs including possibly to have you on Mike. I cast wait. I can't wait to do that In in great to be on this so there are a lot of legs to chew such a form. It's not just a book its entire platform. That's GonNa be busy for the years to come a question that probably brings us all together as what's the legacy you WanNa leave you know? I've poured every cell of my body into this work The Conscious Intelligence Paradigm and platform. And I think the legacy. I'm hoping that the legacy will be that Eric guaranteed off. My name who I am will be related to that and that people will ask themselves. What would eric say what they would think of? When they think of conscious intelligence they'll think of my contribution to it and I'm hoping in a positive way and that's you know this definitely has been a life journey alight project in something that it is my contribution to try to support and illuminate the world. So this this has been this is my. This is my column. So this is this is my legacy. And now it's time for the going deeper segment of conscious millionaire show and today we're GonNa talk about the power of curiosity and so eric. I literally am curious. How you use curiosity on your journey as an entrepreneur. I mean as a little kid always been curious. Kid that said why this and you know ask the parent and they would say because that. Nice they will why that will because this because of that will then. Why that they'll Sake Eric? Go look it up so I did and that curiosity. I think has informed everything that I've done all the way to this to this point in my life so I and I do believe that Jerry Acidy is the opposite of ignorance and I think a lot of problems and challenges in this world today has to do with ignorant. The by slickness witness miscommunication. That's really I think facilitated by people's lack of curiosity and lack of ability to look beyond their fear people fear what they don't understand and making the run from it in divide ourselves and separate US wall build walls between us or we can actually be curious in the in in actually learn more about each other and find out that we're way more similar were way more connected than we might initially believe and I think that curiosity lays fear. I think it's the opposite of ignorance and I think it will actually transform this world if everybody had a little more curiosity rather than fear in ignorance listening to Eric. Dont`a me is the living in a binary world instead of a curious world because in a binary world. We approach everything we like. We don't like we agree. We don't agree You know we're coming from that place it you know. I happen to like art so I'm very fortunate. We have a great art museum in Denver for and We recently or having the moon exhibits the second largest in the country ever. I was actually at the largest four. Hundred pieces of Monet was at the Art Institute of Chicago just a piece of Trivia little over thirty years ago this one has a hundred and fifty been twice already booked myself for the third time and each time. I've spent over three hours with one hundred fifty pieces of art what I've learned about art. I think really applies here. There was a time in my life when I look at a piece of art and go like it. Don't like it now. Don't do that at all now. I look at the piece of art and I ask myself what's going on here. You know and I just become one with it and I noticed the artists strokes and the Palette and so I'm curious about the peace and how it was created in where it fit into a particular time and how it fit into the artist's journey as an artist. Why is this piece of art done in this year versus ten years before or ten years later and I think that's the same thing you're talking about? Here's is if we approach everything that happens in our life from a place of curiosity even even getting cut off in traffic because we all have that experience and I will be the first to admit that that it's easy for me to go to reactionary like you home most destroyed my vehicle and Mehan right but be curious about what's going on that. That experience occurred is a completely different place than wanting to your horn and be upset at the person for doing it right. I mean you were talking about art. It's a beautiful metaphor too beautiful because you know. Try walking a mile in somebody else's shoes and art is really about viewing the world through somebody else's Lens and yes sometimes that Lens look at a cost so or manet ends like. That's a beautiful lens that they're looking at the world through the pit and there are and there are ugly lenses that we but but that's compassionate. Empathy comes from our ability to understand I that were wearing a lens and that if we can take off our lands and put somebody else try to look at their world through their lands. It's profoundly transformative because the ability to see somebody else's you may not agree with that perspective. You may not like I may not WanNa hang on the wall off. It's very very interesting as long as we're GONNA talk about. Art Happens Me. One of my favorite areas folks If you don't know the work of Jackson pollock I would suggest you go to and look it up. There's a film that Woody Harrelson. Did it was fantastic on his life. And so I'll just give you the simple. He was an alcoholic created. A lot of his art just drunk is could be and his. Most famous pieces are literally splatterings of art on big canvases. Now I'm telling you this because at one point I just looked at that and said what in the world is this but I was so curious. Jackson pollock is literally and has been for twenty years. Now my favorite twentieth century artist in fact my joke is with a lot of friends. He like you want to give me a great gift. GimMe the Bentley or give me the Jackson pollock. But I'd rather have the Jackson pollock and I'll put a little little. Brass emblem up next to it saying you. You gifted it to me so you'll always be immortalized as the person who gave me the Jackson pollock. But that's a perfect example. I think because once you go look if you're not familiar with him you know this is literally and I agree. He was drunk and it was splattering. Fluttering pain now comes. The question was a genius. Consciousness going on or was he just drunk either way. I find genius snus and consciousness in each of these pieces and I can sit and just look at the Museum of Modern Art for for hours literally and be consumed by the piece but that to me is what curiosities about and if we approach life and we put our clients like when clients do things and go. Why did they do that? And you might be annoyed but wait a minute. What does it mean about them as a person and their journey? And what's going on right now. Wouldn't it be more interesting to ask what's going on and come from a curious place you know and thank God that we are so different? This world would be so boring if we were all the same and to really understand and embrace our differences rather than force them into an weaponize them to divide what a different world this would be fearing differences celebrating them in my upbringing. Fortunately for me. My mom was an educational psychologist so I was around challenged children all the time and seeing their challenges. Some of them were visibly physical challenges. Some of them were mental psychological challenges and I grew up really not looking at them. I thought I was different to even though I didn't look different. I felt I felt it was hard for me to feel like I fit in and so it was my curiosity. Say Hey what's your story. What's going on with you? When they realized that I was really curious they opened up and I would say that's one of the Powerful strengths that I have in business. Is that people really genuinely get that? I Really WanNa know what what's going on with them and really connect deeper with with endless through their eyes and feel their pain. That's another thing. A powerful thing about entrepreneurialism and and being conscious is is understanding and identifying in finding a pain point that they have and figuring out a way. Take it away. You can do that. You'll be a billionaire. Any successful person has done that. They found the pain point. And they have alleviated that pain in serve people in that way and And that all comes from curiosity in asking you know and and learning and understanding in celebrating our differences rather than dividing using his point of divisiveness. We're here with Eric. Aaron staffers are featured guest today. He's the author of the upcoming book conscious intelligence. I WanNa thank you for showing up showing up for yourself not not. Jv Your Eric but showing up because you genuinely are curious because you want to build a highly profitable business that makes a positive impact and you want the fulfillment in the growth. That comes from that journey. We're here to help you every step of the way and I would love to hear from you. Tell me about your business. Tell me what's going on. Asked me any business question? They'll come directly to me. If you go to conscious millionaire show dot com you can send an email or voicemail links at the top of the page or send me a text on my cell phone at three zero three six four one zero four zero one. I want to give that to you again. It's three zero three six. Four one zero four zero one if you've got an ongoing business and you're having snacks something is is is not working. Tell me about your business. And what's not working out. Get back with you. I want to thank you again. I look forward to connecting with you on the next conscious millionaire. Eric thank you so much for being are featured guest today. It's been my pleasure thank you. Thanks for listening to conscious million media. Podcast radio network the host producer of the show distributors and broadcast media. Make no claims. The tragedies and information discussing show results in providence and may result in losses the opinions and advice from the host guests do not necessarily represent those are the owner staff management or broadcast of the show illegal counting or financial or health. Advice is made of the show. Your adviser seek counsel related to Your Business Financial investments or other legal matters from licensed advisors always going to tell you a physician license health advisor prior to making any changes in your diet exercise program and implanting any health strategies or information discuss on the shows now information provided baby suitable for your situation as always take full responsibility for decisions and actions you take including responses that they create and your health.

Eric Book Conscious Intelligence Prosper Twenty Twenty Eric Aaron DOT COM Jackson pollock Jay Crawford Jv Seventeen Egypt Michael Phelps oregon Museum of Modern Art Eric Erin Eric Barren Iran Shel Silverstein Steven covy America Wyatt
10 Trivia Questions on Angry Amazon Reviews

Trivia With Budds

11:05 min | 5 months ago

10 Trivia Questions on Angry Amazon Reviews

"It's eleven trivia questions on angry Amazon reviews. I'm going to read you a review from an angry parent and you try and guess what product. They're talking about. This is trivia with buds. Talk be and welcome to another episode the Trivia with Buds. Podcast your host Ryan Bud sitting here recording in my new studio which is just my garage pile stuff behind me. If you're watching on Youtube or listening to the show we've got some cool stuff back here. Let's see. What can I showcase this week. Oud under Mifflin paper company hat. That's pretty cool. If you like the office an ice thunder Mifflin hat. I actually got that at five below for five bucks. I bought four of THEM FOR UPCOMING OFFICE. Trivia night that I'm sure I'll do at some point but if you're looking for a thunder Mifflin go check out five below. If you have one in your area I have been watching some new movies and things and catching up on some Oscar stuff. The most recent thing I watched was the new addams family movie with my daughter Annabelle. She was excited. We all saw it in theaters. And I'm glad that we didn't because it was not so good. I saw a bunch of review saying the animation style was really well done and I thought it was real clunky to me. It looked like some of these foreign animated movies and shows that she watches on net flicks. Where you could tell like? They had a lower budget for the animation. And they just. Kinda ship it over to the US with some bad dubbed vocals invoices. So it seemed like that to me but ahead like this all star cast and had like Charlotte's their own and Oscar Isaac and all these different people in it so I think they spent most of the money on the voices but not so much on the production. The movie It has a forty three percent on rotten tomatoes which is not so great and it cost twenty four million to make two hundred million so the marketing was really good for that and people saw that will probably make another animated addams family but I thought the story and the jokes like nothing was standing out. I would never watch it again. Hopefully she doesn't want to watch it anytime in the near future. But that's my quick review of the new addams family movie. And if you WANNA see more in depth some of the stuff behind me If you're watching on Youtube and you want to keep another video where I give a full tour of the shelf and a lot of cool stuff on it. That is a new Patriot video that I put up earlier this month. Go TO PATRIOTS DOT COM Slash Trivia with buds. Donate a dollar or more and get access to a tunnel post just like that. The Patriots tour of my prize garage so Just wanted to promote that. If you've been listening the show for a while and you have a buck to spare patriot. Dot Com Slash Trivia with buds is the easiest way to support the show so head on over there and see what you can get all different reward tears. Today's episode is called Angry Amazon reviews. I have five questions for you on books and movies and you're going to try and gasp what we're talking about based on these angry parent reviews. This was sent to me by Brent Barky from Minnesota. We're going to jump into these ten questions right now. Here we go all right here. We go everybody. This is angry Amazon reviews. Let's see if you can figure out what we're talking about the first five books and here's the number one. What the Heck is this book teaching? I understand giving all you have to a situation but the little Brat only came back when he needed something. He wasn't even grateful. Teachings like this. Are Why millennials still live in their parent's home. What book do you think we're talking about their number one question number two here. The title character pushes his way in forces the kids to disobey their parents and just when all is lost in the moral lesson would be learned to guys show up and clean up the whole mess message. If you disobey your parents things will still work out. What Book Are we talking about? Their based on the angry parent review on Amazon number. Three waste of money neither my three year old son or I could appreciate this book. It had no real story. It's just about this little rabbit. That just says good night to everything in his room including a bowl of mush. Which is what I thought of this book number. Four number three number three. What is that waste of money number? Three number four very weird book. Strange Rhyming and nonsense. Words oranges in quotes. The people are drawn like some kind of aliens and this title character. I don't know if it's a talking animal. Or if he's also a green alien also apparently the author is not an actual MD or PhD number. Four what is that book number? Four number five. I bought this book for my son while the book had some good graphics. I believe the message by Maurice. Sendak is all wrong. He talks back to his mother and I think the message to kids is wrong. I could write a thesis as to why scary looking. Lions monkeys and others are not that great for three-year-olds number five. We're moving onto the movie section. These are five reviews on movies. You're trying to guess the movies. Here's number six. So the whole thesis of this movie is literally build a tower of meaningless boyfriends and claw your way up their flesh to your own sanity and happiness there. I just saved you one and a half hours of your life. Oh and to show a young eleven year old child child stealing credit card from their mother and running away bad taste number six number. Everything is wrong with this movie. First of all the beginnings of the movie only came through in black and white second of all the main character gets really obnoxious. After a while the whole movie complaining I got so sick of hearing her whining. Complaining almost turned the movie off number seven questionable aid. A Children's movie should not have so much foul language in its songs and they'll copy and sing that there was nothing in here even remotely aesthetic in Beautiful. The main character farts burbs. And anything else disgusting you can think of which they think is funny number. Eight number nine. I know it's dated being from the nineties but that shouldn't matter for a good movie. The reason this movie is bad because is because the kid is obnoxious. His parents are stupid and the rest of his family are a bunch of jerks to each other. The only good characters are the burglars and Good Old John Candy. Rest his soul number nine last question number ten. What movie is this? The main message of the film is that your mother and father are too busy for you and the person they entrust you to will make you depend on her right before she abandons you and she'll give you a lot of rules which you're supposed to relish and perform magical stunts to keep you from totally hating her and her rules. I can't see kids or adults liking this message. What is that movie number ten? Those are all your questions and reviews from. Today's angry Amazon reviews episode. We'll be right back with the answers and justice sound effect. We are back with the answers to angry Amazon reviews. These are fun. I did not find these myself. They were sent to me by Brent. Barky so thank you Brent. Here are the first five on books number one. What is this book teaching? I understand giving you all giving your all to a situation but the little Brat only came back when he needed something they answer. Here was the giving tree. Remember that book. The giving tree by Shel Silverstein number two. The title character pushes his way in and a bunch of people. Clean up their mess at the end. Message if you disobey your parents things will work out. That was the cat in the hat thing number one in to come in with that vacuum at the end the cat in the hat number three waste of money neither my three year old or I could appreciate. This book. Had No real story. It was just a little rabbit. Says good night. Everything including a bowl of mush. Which is what I thought of this book. That was good night moon. Goodnight Moon Number. Four very weird book. Strange rhyming and nonsense words. People are drawn like aliens and the guy's not an actual doctor. That's Dr seuss's how the grinch stole Christmas number four and number five. I bought this book for my son. Maurice Sendak and his message is all wrong. I could write a thesis as to why scary looking. Lions and monkeys are not great for three year. Olds where the wild things are. Where the wild things are. Those were the first five years the next five with movies number six so this whole movie is literally build a tower of meaningless boyfriends and claw your way up their flesh to your own sanity unhappiness. There I just saved you an hour and a half year life. Oh and to show to an eleven year old child show an eleven year old child stealing a credit card from mother. Running away bad taste the movie. There was inside out. I don't get the review mentioned the boyfriends other boyfriends and that movie I don't remember that at all I thought it was just her friends. She was upset with number seven. Everything is wrong in this movie. First of all the beginning of the movie only came through in black and white. That's the wizard of is this one had to be like planted review. Some of these other could be legit but that one. It's like come on. You haven't heard a wizard of Oz and that it changes number eight. A Children's movie should not have so much foul language in it. That was home. No that was Shrek Shrek with burping and farting they didn't like Shrek. The next one was home alone. That's right John. Candy rest his soul. They only like the Burglars. They hated everybody else. Home alone and number ten. The main message of this film is Your Mom and Dad are too busy and this other lady will do magical stunts. Leave as well Mary poppins was that movie. Mary poppins so there you go. Everybody those are your angry Amazon reviews. I hope you had fun playing along with his very different Trivia episode today not Super Trivia based kind of more a guessing game but there was speaking of movies that I don't remember as a kid but I watched recently we watched up at knobs and broomsticks. Did you know that is framed around like Nazi Germany in World War Two? I had no idea at the end. There's like a like a Nazi invasion. It's not super serious in the movie but It was interesting. I don't remember that as a kid I was like. Oh they do spells and they get animated or go into the animated mediaeval times type world. Okay Anyway. That is today's episode. Funky monkey question of the day is coming up right now and that question is what city did trumpet. Legend Louis. Armstrong hail from. Send Me Your answer at Ryan. Buds or Email Ryan Buds at g mail DOT COM to be eligible for a prize. Yesterday's questioned that a answer was coppertone. Coppertone and your Trivia team name of today is Vladimir Putin on the Ritz Vladimir Putin on the Ritz. That is it for today's episode. Thanks for watching. Thanks for listening. Thanks for telling a friend and we'll see you tomorrow for more Trivia with buds. Cheers Talk Talk.

Amazon Brent Barky addams Maurice Sendak Youtube Oscar Isaac Ryan Bud Vladimir Putin Lions US Mary poppins Annabelle John Candy Shel Silverstein Louis Charlotte Germany Shrek Shrek Dr seuss
The Growlers: Your Best-Kept Secret Favorite Band

World Cafe

40:01 min | 7 months ago

The Growlers: Your Best-Kept Secret Favorite Band

"This is world cafe. I'm rain adress. California banned the growlers are one of those bands at Penn feels like a secret. They originally got started because they were asked asked about a house party and for over a decade since they've managed to keep that underground party band feeling where every show feels. Like you're seeing something special league. You're part of this community of cool gets it's their music. Blends Lo fi surf rock Americana Garage psychedelic. It is something so unique. They had to come up with their own name for the Genre Beach Goth but while the growlers still hold tight to their diy ethos. They've grown a dedicated fan base including people like Dan. Auerbach Julian CASABLANCAS and Ellen DeGeneres. The growlers released their latest studio album natural affair back in October just before playing three sold out shows at their own Beach Goth Festival in Hollywood today Frontman Brooks Nielsen. Joins me to talk about that album. That festival what big name attention is meant for the bed and how they stayed true to their vision even when it meant turning down one of those big names my conversation with the growlers Brooke Nielsen on the way after this live recording of song from the growlers latest record. It's called die and live forever. mm-hmm you may you know you know how they do not about why the main room sir you don't have to. It's not about Dan me more and man Bam the little I know but they never more. Aw Man UH hello You just heard die and live forever from the new growlers album natural affair. I'm cadore is talking to the front man of the growlers singer. One of the founding members Brooks Nielsen. Welcome to World Cafe. Thank you Rita. So I've been listening to you guys for years but for a lot of our listeners. This might be an introduction to the growlers so to give an idea of just how beloved the growlers are you wrapped up a sold out three night show at your own beach festival. Back on Halloween at the Hollywood palladium. How many people does that? Venue hold four four thousand one thing all right so over three nights. That's a lot of people and you guys sold at shows without even releasing the lineup until half an hour before the show started. Why why did you decide to keep the light up a secret this year We've always wanted to do that. We finally got to do it. It's amazing I feel we have a good reputation with fans and we finally took advantage of it For us to be able to keep it a secret and Surprise them is wonderful and it feels good. This year really felt like a success. It just wasn't the beginning like a big party. That feels illegal and fun. Well you guys are you guys are known for having this do it yourself approach. was there a the moment. You realize that you guys weren't just a band having fun you were running a company kind of I can do that from here from from. I'm from present time. You know during it. You can't tell you know one big show playing on television these. You don't notice anything the next day. It's just what are you going to do the next day. We gotta make sure it's we gotta get on the road we're GONNA fix the bus we got to Make more music. We've got a check in at home and make six or they. They know we're still alive. So it's just a can't could never really tell in it but now and I can tell them you know we're older and grateful and and we're still doing I'm Marina Dora's this World Cafe I'm chatting with Brooks Nielsen of the growlers WanNa get into another live track here for its from your last album. Two Thousand Sixteen City Club It's an album described by some people. As as you're sort of mainstream radio new even ended up on Ellen playing stuff up from it. What did that feel like Well we love Allen. I mean I've got a lot of respect for her and In a hers is a person and especially Comedians you know they have it rough. It's it's a tough life and It's tough to be funny all the time and So that was a cool cool. Milestone for the growlers the negative side of it at brought a lot of people out of the woodwork. In our people we hadn't seen a longtime. Hey we saw you on. TV can become hang out but no it's all it's all good like I said it's you know remember to think about it now it's all just one big blur. Let's take a listen to the track from city club. This was recorded. Live four world cafe. It's nice ride They do but your okay. It is not in writing away from Oh Law and birds uh-huh Immune Law uh-huh take you off with their own data without you. Too Okay Aw thank can you be bad. Take a take a anti yeah Recorded live for world cafe. That was the growlers with nightrider. I'm Reiniger is talking to Brooks Nielsen of the growlers. That's all from your two thousand sixteen gene album city club an album produced by Julian Casablancas of the strokes. Now over the years growlers have gotten lots of attention from other artists who are fans ends. Who Want to work with you? Produce for you what was it about. Julian Casablancas that made you want to let them into the club Yeah it was pretty pretty precious about about the growlers and keeping it tight for a very long time And just afraid of getting too big or or Losing track of what we were. which is a newer slow growers and we had to kind of keep it tight and and I was afraid of outside influence? You know I really think all these things can take away from your creativity. The little walls that make you think about you know too much. Watch when you really just got to kind of let go and but Julian was easy. Matt Taylor Are Guitar. Player has always been in love with the strokes and so that was like A. Can we please of course not. That's one of the first bands. I started singing too when I was driving around my car and going well. I think I can kinda sing. I sound a little bit like like him. And you know we've always respected and liked him and and it happened organically he kind of ran into some friends of ours and ran into my wife and And we're like yeah. Let's let's try this and it really motivated us to be more serious about once again. growlers growing up a little bit more like this. Is Julian CASABLANCAS. We should uh we should work a little harder on this so matinee grinded out like seventy songs in a matter of a month to get ready for it. Are you still afraid of. You've getting too big I have yeah I mean really Yeah just it's a lot of attention. I'm a very a private person and I kind of let people get glimpses one. I want to and I have control over that and a lot of situations in the industry may give me anxiety. You know just just certain things that don't WanNa see. I really protect myself and keep myself in a small little bubble a little world you know. I saw like a video. The Old Music Awards ceremony. A few years ago I had I was for two weeks. I wanted to quit. It was like what am I doing this industry. I'm in So so I have little breakdowns and then And then I remember why I'm doing this and And that we do make a lot of people happy and nothing in the world can do that. I like music so its ups and downs for me If I was put around the wrong people at the wrong time you know I would. Uh You're snap I'm reiniger as talking to Brooke Nielsen of the growlers on World Cafe. Now you did get some big name attention fairly early on twenty thirteen Dan. Auerbach of the black keys wanted to produce your third album hung at heart and you made a whole version of that record with him Dan but it was never released right. Yeah famous people like that. Make it easy. 'cause you meet someone like Dan and he's down to Earth immediately A sweet guy right up front and you know wanted to share with us and help us achieve what he had achieved success and and I think he was. It's like you know you guys are going to be on the radio and It's going to help you a lot. And help grow really quickly. And he explained that to us and he kinda got a glimpse of how how we're living too much poverty we're living in and I mean we're very comfortable being poor and You know every day was easy and fun to S. Bud from an outside perspective. I think he saw that was like you know I'm going to help you guys out here but once again I got cold feet and it was just it. It sounded too big in too far away from what I'd known and we were. Diy Everything we did and people considered US garage but that was a necessity. And I got used to it. You know working working with very small means and very little things and I just got a little shocked now. What in their brought a lot of material and and I started hearing it sound on big and and too big for me and I we pull the plug But we love. Dan and I wish it worked out. But could you tell me what was it like to make that decision to not release the stuffy worked on together. had started having conversations with matt the band and going. I don't know about this. The guys got really excited to work with the big name and to see dance studio out amazing equipment and to get in there and You know so there's thought like let's get in there and try it but it still let's get there and try it and it was another learning experience for us to go. Hey this is a business and but this is our baby and I didn't really feel comfortable Doing that with our music yet so I did something more comfortable and it said let's take Achot to our studio down the street and now that we kind of played the music we know it. Well we'll go record this thing completely on tape and capture. How raw all we were? You know I thought it was always cool. I wanted people to hear the you know the time I was like. We're not that good but later on if we do become great People are GonNa be privileged to hear the growlers This raw and so I just wanted to capture that and not do any tricks yet. It's it's one of my favorite albums. Ever the song naked kids. It didn't like my top ten songs. Vol- time thank you. I liked how we we might try to play a little bit of a comparison of some of the stuff that record because you might know this the versions are online at their. How do yeah around the Internet? I'm cool with it now. I mean at the time would have been like what's going on But that's fine. You know now. The body of work speaks for itself Dow and and the devotion from fans that you know that chills everything out for me That's it's history. That was a time in our lives and so years later like this all right by me. We're GONNA take a listen. We're GONNA compare one million lovers the Dan version of a UH. That's one million lovers as produced by Dan. Bach never officially released but floating around on the Internet. And now. Here's the version. The growlers rallied released on their album. Hung at heart. Take a look. Yeah that was one million lovers from hung at heart the growlers on world cafe. I'm Marina Duras. Speaking to Brooks Nielsen of the growlers. You didn't perform this one live for us. But there's a song on your new album natural affair that I wanted to ask you about called social man. Could you talk about social man a little bit for. That's really going to come off looking like a lot of issues. I mean it's another like social anxiety but not really leagest. I've wanted to poke fun at you. Know I think people poke fun at me for being such a an old soul to say it nicely I've been ed never been on social media. I've never really followed these things and so kind of the old guy in the band or I'm looking over someone's shoulder like what is that going on You Scroll and Is there a reason that you don't use it. I think it's just it doesn't look fun to me. You know at A. Ah I don't have a lot of time and when I do I wanna be thinking reading Writing I don't know I just it's not interesting to me and it's just it's just looking at people. Don't look exactly happy from it. You know and it's an experiment so I think I'll wait and see how that turns out but You know I look at people's phones and they're looking at pretty girls and cheap jokes and people falling really hard and I don't know I just. I'm not really that that guy and so but the more I started thinking about it and you know in the studio and there's downtown and looking over and the guys are looking their phones. I started researching it and seeing what people are talking talking about and you know there is a lot of positive negative attributes to it and I just kind of wanted to goof around with it you know at the time. I think I had a poem ahead that I was reading to my kid. The Captain Hook by Shel Silverstein and I started applying my thoughts about social man to to the same kind of rhyme style of of that of that poem and And kinda fit over that song kind of like a rap Good fit into the folks on quite well and They record needed some of that too. Something a little more goofy rather than everything else. It seems to be pretty personal. Always happy to play a song inspired by Shel Silverstein here is here is social man from the growlers new album and natural affair. NFL in May that that was social man from the new album natural affair. I'm speaking to Brooks Neal's of the growlers you You started as a band almost fifteen years ago playing playing house parties this is scrappy bad and now you have all these people working with. You have a backing band with professional musicians what do you think that scrappy party. Banned in two thousand six would say to you now. He was a pretty judgmental. A little tricky probably would make fun of me right now. Call Me Recoup And try hard I was up for negative then Probably tell me to quit but Yeah I don't know my perspective's changed. I've learned to grow and have a lot more respect for everything around me. You know. I thought everything was cool to not care not try and to suck it music And through that through working with other people and playing with other bands and seeing a little bit. How other bands dance work? I found a a whole new respect for people that are good Of what they do and I know what it takes now you know. It is a lot of hard work that that young on me. That thought I want to join a band because I don't WanNa do anything I just WANNA party was completely wrong It's it's takes a lot of work just like anything in life to to be successful and I think it's a little crazier in the creative world because it's not just learning a trade and you're good you gotTA keep starting from scratch it is you gotTa love it It is funny that you would say like you joined a band. You wouldn't have to do any work when you think about all the things that you guys have done now. You know that your sixth album. Eight a year of Music Festival when every other music festival there seems to be struggling You have to right after record to do interviews like this one right now. You have to a tour to pretty grueling tour schedule. How do you manage to do all of these things and really kind of keep it in house Keep it in house and you keep it inside in a doesn't sound good to complain about work in this industry I think it's a matter of like you don't really think about it. It's just what's the next thing you gotta do. And if it's a cool idea and people are WanNa do it with you then. It doesn't really seem like it's like all right. Well how are we going to get this done with with what we have. We have no crew. We have very couple few people that work very the hard and We pull off more than big cruise. Can you know we just We just think of some creative and get it done and it's one thing and a time I really don't don't multi task that much. It's Kinda like what's next. Let's get that done and get to the next thing and And it still fun. So that's probably the only reason we haven't quit uh-huh and we still get along. which is the other important part For the most part you know a lot of these bands don't and that's why they They don't make it this far. It's kind of like a family. It is a very dysfunctional family And so we got each other's backs and and there's rewarding parts let's do it and You know and it's friendships that stick around because of a in a I mean otherwise we'd probably be too busy being. GROWNUPS hopes to be hanging out. Let alone be drinking off together. There's one more recorded live world cafe from the new album that I'd like to talk to you about Again the new albums called natural affair and this song is called pulp of us. Could you tell me about pulp of youth Yeah it's a love song for my girl She's been here since the beginning of this band and And so it's GonNa Anna daydreaming about About Wimmer young and when we Take psychedelics together and do crazy things together and And all the way through that was beginning band stages of be growing. She was there and helped me through it when I was very poor and very silly and I'm just talking about how you know. We still have something. We're still in love or still hanging on the line And we will hang on together and fall aloft together and I duNNo. She's been part of this ride. It's kind of a continuation like a apart. Be Part to to to another some. We wrote before her Problems come in three and just kind of envisioning that the same early dating when you know the I dates we had when I Borrowed a friend's boat and dropped acid and went looked at Christmas lights. I don't know Kinda came back to me and I kind of wrote another part to okay. Thank you of youth. This is from their new album natural affair. It's the growlers on world cafe purpose the Now they do yeah. Uh Home uh-huh uh out of I I ah glad you Komo and mad thou Home is a Recorded live for world cafe. That is Paul Hall of youth from the growlers from their new album natural affair. I've been talking to Brooks Nielson singer. Frontman founding member of the GROWLERS Brooks. Thank you so so much thank you. It's nice therapy now. And Hey guess what the growlers sent a couple of bonus tracks recorded live for you. Oh so here you go as a prize for sticking around back to back its decoy face and pavement and the boot from the growlers exclusively on world cafe. Yeah In dalley Atarot news download download the clown causing to child in. I can see ars the Wizard D. or face as a mine wall we will do in them and this is bad a gas is out there so many voyeurs good show in years chard close Creator Linda Wearing de Corps As we do in bear in this is Chris and a Jewish. You are mm-hmm Eighty game now days me too bad winnings what they're calling my d a said we didn't mm-hmm a you. You uh-huh I Azzam shot and be nick NBA. uh-huh the day as an. Let me the Jon. It's not a a new tain. It may be with Bro. Aw Man who you don't win I I MM-HMM Breath Awesome uh-huh

World Cafe Auerbach Julian CASABLANCAS Brooks Nielsen Dan Brooke Nielsen Ellen DeGeneres Hollywood Matt Taylor Shel Silverstein California Rita Penn Brooks Nielson NFL US founding member Marina Dora Allen
Episode 6 Where I am Wrong about Poetry with Jaime R Wood

The I've Been Wrong Before Podcast

34:33 min | 10 months ago

Episode 6 Where I am Wrong about Poetry with Jaime R Wood

"Diarrhea Van Frank is a book memoirs by Thirteen Year. Old Ana Franck while she who was in hiding for two years with their family and four others during the Nazi occupation of the Netherlands after two years of living in the eight highways were apprehended handed and placed in Nazi concentration camps. Where on a Franken? Six of the other day while in captivity only on his father auto survived to tell the story. The help of his daughter's diary stays left. Productions in surprise Arizona will present the newly adopted version of the diarrhea man. Frank October number eleven through twenty two thousand nineteen showtimes and tickets are available and dot com. I've been wrong before. podcast about tackling the intersection of disagreement and relationship through conversation. Sometimes I'm wrong. Sometimes my guest is either way and we talk to each other my guest sheer passion for our topic or a story about being wrong. If you've ever been wrong if you've ever disagreed with somebody this podcast is for you. So join us at. I've been wrong before. Dob Blueberry Dot net. That's blueberry spelled B. L. U. B. R. Y.. I've been wrong before dob blueberry dot net subscribed so you'll never miss an episode calicut started. Welcome to the PODCAST Jamie with us. Who is a local teacher? Sure and Where do you teach your of well? I've actually a faculty developer now at Portland State University I have also taught at Clackamas Queenie college and several arose places right and you are poet and poet your Polish poet. That's right hey and my stance on poetry is I. I have not been a fan of poetry for a while so I figure I go to the source of somebody who is a poet you if you made money with I have actually gotten a couple checks from poems. The biggest one was fifty dollars. That's you had dinner out. You're saying hang. Yeah but she now. I think placing the importance of poetry in the realm of capitalism. Is the wrong way to think about it okay. His poetry autry is not about making money so what is poetry. Poetry is about feeding your soul which sounds like you know do. But here's the reason why I think people get turned off by poetry. I certainly am. I've been teaching for a really long time when I started out teaching teaching middle school like my students of most of my students have your attitude toward poetry so I am well versed pun intended with with argument. Oh dear the The thing is is that we're todd. That language is supposed to make logical sense. That is not the purpose. The poetry poetry is not an instruction manual. It's not a grocery list although it could be potentially the purpose purpose of poetry is to try to evoke strong emotion imagination just thoughtfulness and to connect us to parts of ourselves the rest of the world that other types of writing can't get to. I'll admit I'm attracted by that okay. Okay noticeably about the the activity of writing poetry being intrigued by that. But the idea that that's what poetry is supposed to bring out okay. You're looking for some a poet upon here you wish to read I am I am working on it. Yeah we can. We can keep talking while I have finished this. Are they different types of poetry. There are so many different types which is another reason. Why I I think people give up on poetry quickly? There are poems that feel very much like reading a story. There's narrative poetry Were there are characters and setting in you know late tension and climax and all those things and the thing that sort of separates it from a short story would be like the form alarm or the conciseness or the attention to like sound rhythm may be the kind of poetry that I tend to gravitate toward is his. Maybe more lyric poetry which is Rosetti violets are blue sure yeah but not to Limerick but lurk race also yes. Yeah Yeah Okay so talking about songs right okay. I was thinking about this on the way over a half because when we listen to songs I don't know you know what your favorite songs but if you just looked at them on the page and tried to make logical sense of them they'd be frustrating. Yeah and the point of a science to feel the song okay right. It's supposed to give you an experiences experiential form. Probably the most powerful thing that I learned about poetry I was from taking a class surrealism and to learn about the surrealist tradition. which is maybe my favorite sort of like tairea surrealism so surrealism was a an artistic movement? Started by a bunch of people in Nineteen Twenties and Thirties Paris France who had this ideological mission to free people from the trappings of society. And what do we mean by this right like. What are we trapped by society money and cultural norms? The fact that people think that we're supposed to fit into male and a female and those kinds of things all sorts of lake ways that we define reality that aren't necessarily real. We create all these structures around around ourselves people who would be the precursor punk. Maybe you think their mission might be very similar. Because the surrealists were like a reaction reaction to the industrial revolution where human bodies were placed into factories and treated like machine and the surrealists were basically like were killing their souls. Elsa killing the soul of humanity by doing this and industrialization is not necessary for us to function and be happy in a center but the surrealists kind of took it further. Said we really don't know humanity is capable of the mind that we get to I use in our daily lives is pretty limited and so they would play all kinds of games. The most famous surrealist game is called exquisite corpse. Okay and it's a game where I write a word but you can't see it and the right word I can't see and we'd go back and forth and by the end we have a sentence and it's nonsensical Michael Literally doesn't make any logical sense but it's often funny and exciting and strange as like the kinds of things that you can do the tricking the brain to stop thinking logical round. That's what surrealism is all K- so it's not about sense making it's about saying that There are all kinds of ways to get us in touch with other ways of being alive being present in conscious without having to like restrict ourselves to it. Society says. He's okay so in that class that you took that you're learning the send really kind of brought poetry out Really Okay I've written some surrealist poetry I mean maybe we all share my my one of my poems. I don't know that I would consider this a surrealist poem but it has some things about it than I would. I would love to hear my head but I think I think the thing that turns people off is that we are trained from you. Know little babies when we're learning books that language has to go uncertain order for to make sense that generally a story needs to be involved or there's some purpose was the purpose was the point. And and you know poetry is is an escape from all of that you know it gives us like another way to communicate about our existence which is Kinda China Nice. That's just think way of thinking that I have been your experience with poetry that it's purposely obscure yeah. Yeah but that's really annoying is but that's been my experience. This is like well and of course my experience has been. And here's this poll lovely poem. The teacher puts out here. Here's this lovely poem. Now tell me what it means. Yes why weren't they clear. Therein lies the problem. I see teachers out there myself. Being one of them stop asking people what it means. That is not the point as a survey Are used to tell my students were not going to talk about about nece. No because that's what we do our where like reading a novel evil. Oh Hey was a novel about was book about. What are you reading today? Oh is that about right. We do that with movies. We do that we have with all these other things that we do but but when you read a poem maybe the better question instead of what does it mean would be of how does it feel. What does it bring up for you? Where did it draw your attention? Those kinds of things are more important. Okay because poetry is is not a logic puzzle. Oh I'll read your palm okay. This one was called Haiti. Eighty two thousand ten. Now the children frolic kickoff dandelions and trash from the gutters dance like lice on the dogs of night on fastening their lives and fields of cardboard rain. This is not the time for dying they sing. Let's grow bean stocks to heaven. Make our own Mana while the troops gathered there ammunition and sale to Haiti waiting. Waiting waiting the day doesn't come under. Concrete Crete and dust the troops march in without their guns and lust own. Haiti your blocks cinderblocks blocks of fire raining training centers in the hair dancing children hands flapping like nothing but the dust that rises and falls the steel down. Its guard ARD set down the children whose hands rise up fly heart the earth. The bugs crawl into other nations with the news. The towers towers of atonement have fallen. Forget your sense. Forget the day. One man cursed his brother and one woman sacrificed her child for God. The cinderblocks Fox had fallen and our children on fasten themselves in the rain slows. About how doesn't matter. Do you have a reaction that I mean. You don't have to say anything nice about it because I know it was. My poem was a little awkward. Why start off? I thought I knew it was about what do you think. Yeah what was your sort of reaction you talking about. You know what Haiti from the earthquake as the Haitian earthquake absolutely you know talking about a beautiful place devastated and I'm like Oh then you got into some other things that I was like. What the Fuck Gbi like a these are all beautiful words? Well put together. What do you make of it right? And you're like you want it to feel. How do you want it to feel? I don't know it left me feeling unsettled. Good don't you. I think people earthquake probably feel unsettled. Probably that's good A. I should point out that I've met you as my teacher. That's a good point. We should probably tell people they were my teacher. I so I don't get relationship comes back by the but you think so sometimes like I keep going. I know she's teaching. South cannot about thing now now I think everybody teaches each other something I think so too you okay see this could be my brain. I would come out that way because I wouldn't have come at it as as poetry I would come at it more essay. Sure ed but that's how I would express myself. That's great. I write essays to and I think that there are times when like whatever it is. You're trying to express fits better in an essay and sometimes The the poetic form gives you more. I don't know if freedom is the right word but They're just a lot of interesting things. You can do in a poem that she can't can't do here. I have something that I don't usually have when I hear a poem. Yeah I have the author of the poem here. The high poet ear as we want us about. What were you trying kind of Oak? When you're writing this what was going through your head? The real honest answer is I don't know and I think that if you asked like offers offers a lot of times if they're being honest the real answer is. I don't know this was a writing exercise that I gave myself the first. I drafted this was written really fast and I often will start with like a line that I like the or an image or something and then I just kind of let things build. I also think it's difficult because I've studied poetry for a long time and so I have all these things that I've been tied or things that I've studied that I'm like. Oh I wanna make the poem leap. That's the thing that people do in so poetry trees opposed to gosh has push should not be predictable okay. You shouldn't shouldn't read Paul and be like I knew exactly where that was going. You know it should feel surprising K.. And maybe unsettling. I'm actually glad that you felt like that. It was a little bit unsettling It should not necessarily lake hand. You all of the answers to the palm look but it also shouldn't didn't confuse you to the point of frustration. Having said that I think that like you have to sort of check your expectations. If if your expectation is I will know the meaning or I will learn the lesson. That's not always going to be the case K. I will admit I do have a favorite poet Shel Silverstein. Oh I abs- you. I want to see books of yes. Love shall slurs that when I was in grade school that was that was how. Yeah that was that was. That was what poetry was with the cool pictures too. So yeah and so. We made sure that Angie has them for her lover classes. Love love that in yeah I mean rather signing Sasa. What is it that you like about short interesting poems? The Shirt Zhou who I am the story. The key was able to start with an image. Yep Take cajal through emi come on Spaghetti right. The one that that is about the meatball that that is my favorite right there. I mean what what would that approach is still occasionally be doing something kind of think about that. Govan right as it gets tainting. It's interesting. Yeah that's that's true that's true for big. It's the story but it is. It is poetry so so I can't say it's all bad day. Bad poets will talk about how some poets are accessible or some poetry is accessible in the poacher world. Sometimes that's considered like a dig. The which is weird because like why do you WanNa be so obscure or so kind of out there that nobody can like relate to what you're doing us me. Accessibility is is is a great thing. I think the reason is considered a dig as because it's like it's easy and s other. We we want readers have to work but we want it to feel. I'd Armagh like a ballet right. Imagine the difference between a ballet a square dance. I think that's the difference between poetry and maybe other genres where the square dances. You can really see the pattern and you can start predict the way things are going to go on the dance floor but the ballet not necessarily or even like say modern dancer jazz or something like that. We start on you. What I'm saying? Oh Do you hate jazz too much. I don't like jazz either. I mean like I say jazz but I'm not going to like I don't hang hang out with jazz lot now. It's not that I consider it musical masturbation so and I just is not a thing that I I get into. I think the Lake Chris that comes from a bad experience so really yeah. I went to see somebody perform jazz and he was on after the band that was playing and he was supposed to be on eh at nine thirty at night. Yeah and the jazz band before him. They got into a free form flow and yes so an hour later. No no I was like Not staying like this is so Harry is on done. Yeah understandable but that was my experience with jazz so so it kind of a vote. The whole may thing. Yeah and I mean that's kind of the purpose of art I think ray is like for the person creating it. It's an expression of their emotional lives or sometimes it's luxury lives but But for the person viewing it or or consuming it Hopefully it's helping them connect to something in a different way okay but if it keeps you out. Which is what the jazz did her? What a lot of poetry trays doing for you? Then of course it I like it that makes sense but I think teachers do their students a disservice when they treat poetry like a puzzle to be solved for like an equation of some words like Oh. This is a metaphor for this and did an. It's like stop it. I appreciate the thing as you would teach art right so you teach art appreciation. It's like teaching paint by number or or something. Why would you do that? It's terrible so I don't know. Did you have another one or I do and I chose it because I think that it's probably the kind of poem you'd hate. Oh Okay Wall and I might be wrong. The run the run foreign. I might be rock. So let's see if you're on. TLC wrong okay. So this is a poem by Dean Young and Dean younger. My favorite poets okay. I don't know that I want to necessarily set it up but we can talk about it after laying on me on okay says promise called belief in magic because right now had feeling calm. I'm enjoying myself and I feel pretty good. He's I'm pretty open to this whole opened his right. Now I likely concept of how you're describing poetry. Okay way this one on me. Let's have excellent okay. It's called belief in magic. How could I not have seen a man walk up to piano and both survive have turned the exterminator away seed lipstick on a wine glass not not shatter the wine scene rainbows and puddles been recognized by stray dogs? I believe reality is approximately sixty five percent if life all rivers are full of sky. Waterfalls are in the mind we all come from slime even Alpacas I believer Vir- surrounded by crystals. Not just Alexander Vitebsky maybe dysentery. Maybe a guards bullet did him in nonetheless nevertheless. LS I believe there are many kingdoms left. The declaration of Independence was written with a feather. A single gem has throbbed and my chest my my whole life even though even though this is my second heart because the first failed such was its opportunity was cut out in pieces and incinerated I asked and so was denied the chance to regard my own heart in a jar strange tangled tangled emp. We sleek it in red brambles you know what it feels like to hold a burning piece of paper maybe even trying to read it as the the flames. Get close to your fingers until all you're holding is a curl of ash by its white ear tip yet. The words still hover in the air. That's how I feel L.. Now Okay what he'd make you laugh I laugh. You said you thought I wouldn't like that. I love that Paul my God they love it. I love it up of just the images was invoking really good. Yeah it was like nothing logical about this poem. Now that's all just like this. Weirdness dislike thrown together to bunch of leaps who fan of weirdness though I mean equator than I do I really do on. This is the person who met her wife play d you know exactly. I'm kind of into the weirdness cool. Yeah maybe you'll be exiting. Yeah I mean I love him. I am one hundred percent I I also love him because when I emailed him and asked him if you'd be on a an ADP panel with me which is a the associated and writers writing programs conference. He emailed back. How can I say I will never ever be on? WBZ panel ever but he was Super Nice. Made it very it clear that he is not a fan. You know like a lot of poetry. Is this a lot of poetry. Is like exciting and beautiful and strange range. And you know you don't have to try to make sense of it. I WANNA I WANNA try to find one more for you. Okay because we're in Portland. We're nowhere it we're actually not. We're in Oregon somewhere. We're in Milwaukee. We're in the the more than Dreaming Studios Nice. Yes it is beautiful studio by the way. Well thank you very well set up. Thank you very cheap. I'm going with free and very inexpensive right. That's that's what you gotta do it. So what is your first memory of poetry story. That's an edge. I think that's an approved I Mary Poetry Fourth Grade Having to write a Haikou. Okay how'd you feel about it. I felt like I had no idea what she was. Talking about. Yeah I was more excited to be able to be playing with multicolored pens to. Aw Aw draw. The Haiku was written eventually on paper. I enjoyed that part. Yeah thank you like math poems this you know what I mean in math poems. That's a phrase for that. Yeah five seven five or something like that for a number of syllables or something. Yeah I still remember it. Their uh-huh well you know when you asked earlier. Are there different forms poetry in their sonnets and Haiku and SESTINA 's and just like a million different farms care if we had an hour could take you through a brief history and but the basic gist of it is that we're back in the day basically before Emily Dickinson and Walt Whitman had offered Google. Yeah like early eighteen. Hundreds and before mark was all formal ever palm was a former poem. Everything was before rhyming and had meter and and all that stuff okay and then what women and Emily Dickinson at least in the United States where the two poets that SORTA breaking all those rules they are considered sort of lake parents or grandparents of modern poetry. which I love the both? They're amazing. Yeah and so now we can kinda do whatever we want. And they're even you know one of my favorite poets around right now. Is Claudia rankine. Curbing citizen is like if you look at it you'll be like this is in poetry but she considers the poetry. She considers herself a poet. It's a blurred line about what pushy is now. Okay so maybe this poem by William Stafford. I'm reading it because I think it's a good problem is a very a famous poem but also because he's from Oregon and his son still runs the occurred writing program at Lewis and Clark Wjr and I WanNa know what you think about this. Okay great into trash nor Gordon Okay says com traveling through the dark traveling through the dark. I found a dear dead on the edge. The Wilson River road it is usually best to roll them into the Canyon. That road is narrow to swerve. Might make more dead by glow of the tail light. I stumbled back of the car and stood by the heap. A Doe a recent killing. She stiffened already almost cold. I dragged her off. She was large in the belly. My fingers touching her side brought me. The reason her side was warm. Her fawn lay there. They're waiting alive still never to be born beside that mountain road. I hesitated the car. Aimed ahead is Lord. Parking lights under the hood purred the study engine. I stood in the glare of the warm exhaust turning Red Round our group I could hear the Wilderness. Listen I thought hard for us all my only swerving then pushed her over the edge into the river. Rethink that Kinda hurts. Yeah say years retail's one. The this is wro- Poetry Erin. Erin saying man. It's like it makes you think also a good palm you can read it over and over. I read this poem at least a dozen times. It makes me. I learned something new about it every time I read it to say I want more poetry. Okay I'm not saying that I do the the eagerness there. Let's say I do want more project casino. Maybe I'll have listeners. One day they'll listen to this. It'll be like aw wants poetry. The poems that I read today I found on the Poetry Foundation website. Okay that's a great place to go. There is also puts dot org which is a good place to find portrayal line so poets are known for being starving artists. Yeah okay the fact that they have poetry treat our There's the poetry foundation. There's I think it's poets Dot Org always not enough just to make sure amuses the hell out of me. Why at another self? That have been my mind that says as they had to get a dot org. It is literally an organization. This is like legit man Not Commerce Yeah Yeah so it is put dot Org You can donate was Cobra Pods Dot. Org is that they have a poem day. You can you can like sign up to get them to send you a pulmonary which school they also do events around national poetry month and they're affiliated with the Academy of American poets. So there's there's all kinds of stuff on both of those websites that the phone Poetry Foundation website or good. Okay There's another thing I know from you and we're GONNA WE'RE GONNA plug that the On Sundays Oh yeah yeah. I'm so glad that's so sweet of you to do that. So skin on Sundays is my friend. Jessica Ladd grits writes. She is from wine and and basically she calls it. physio poetry Moore. She writes on people's bodies. Okay and she writes upon on just for you. Like if you're doing it. She gets to know you a little bit. Na and she writes a poem just free you on your body on your body wherever you want it. Oh pretty so that. I didn't quite know the catch that from the seeing the pictures of the poems written on people's bodies but some naked some partially negativism. Some elmore dress than others but Yeah then that I realized that they were tailored to each person asks really cool. It's really neat. And it's not all models no I did it one of pictures as we can't see my face of yeah so get on Sundays. Dot Com is her website. And she's literally gone all over the world and done that she's she's done this in Barcelona Argentina Mexico. The United States like our life so yes. He's very cool. I see poetry can be literally everywhere even on your feet if you even on my feet poetry or method. I don't think I'm going to go there. You are put. Yeah okay okay. Can people buy your stuff. Well I'm all about giving you. I know right yeah too bad. I'm not prepared to be like commercialized. I I mean if you Google my name which is Jamie Spelled J.. I me like high. Made Jamie Arwood. you'll see some of my poems online okay That poem that I read today Haiti was was published in an anthology about Haiti Called so spook the earth and like an I'll put links to the show not. Oh cool so yeah yeah I have a palm published in Zuma which is It is the last word in the dictionary six visible and I'd have to look it up to his. I think he's like Z. Z.. Y. The editor. I don't get me wrong. But it's a journal out of if I think San Francisco Northern California I believe so. Yeah so like there. There are journals that might work has been in. I have a collection but it hasn't been published yet. Don't have a template that hasn't been published yet which there's just like a small collection. Are you going to publish. That is up to a publisher who expose my work. I mean I'm I'm trying to like hold off on self publishing. Look because I because there's the Internet I mean I'd catch yourself up self-published that's right. You know this was the whole thing is starting the you could get him out there. That's true the thing. Here's the thing about poetry and you know this better than anybody. Nobody likes to read it all right so through. The the way I feel about is if I'm going to be publishing this I want for someone to choose it. Okay and and it's my own. Ego knows unnecessary. And it's silly but I've worked a long time trying to make poetry into something that I think is like worthwhile. It just kind of would hurt my soul to put it out there and have lake for people read it. Oh which is fine India but when I'm publishing journals and if I if I were to have a checkbook maybe you'd still only be for people but I know that like there was an editor out there that saw that and said you. What about all else this year? I WANNA publish that book okay. And that makes me feel good little validation there. You're saying professional validate validation. Should I also have to plug my friend Manet on twitter. She's Manet with love at Manet with love. She does some really cool writing contest contest. So and I've done a couple of contests in their their these little flash contest with that means as flash is like a short perform. So we have to rate like thousand words or less and She actually does not do poetry. And it's funny because she and I both were into the same program both for poetry but she's she's been writing a lot of fiction nonfiction So these contests are right a flash essay or a FLASH FICTION STORY LORI. Everybody who turns one in gets to read everybody else's vote which is Super Fun. Okay and so getting to read all these really cool stories. But they're only about those were so it doesn't take a long time but yeah so I would totally follow her on twitter. She's great okay. All right yeah I can't I can't think arena. Yeah right well we think are the three Paul I read to. You feel like you're not total hater anymore well K.. I may not be a total hater anymore. Having admitted that I do love my Shel Silverstein. I'm Ryan I do there. Is there a place in my heart for poetry. It might be just a certain type back and it's one hundred percent it may also have been a bad teacher who had tried to shut down my throat. Miss Right you know that you know lyrics. He was a man from Kentucky in That it makes receive either inaccessible or silly and there's a lot of between maybe maybe I can accept being wrong. I'm trying to live in that space. Be Wrong space. My friend tells make sure uncomfortable. Yeah I'M GONNA I'm GonNa let that be in. Maybe the thing is you don't have to like poetry and your life will be okay. Yeah you'll be a little less enlightened cool up just kidding I've ever recall either. It's okay you don't have to like jazz. You don't have to like poetry but just know that they're pushy out there. That is pretty good Jamie thank you for being on the PODCAST and I'm sure that at some point I'm going to come back and go Kay Jamie. Hey why don't you. Why don't you tell me why we shouldn't have grades? Owns will teacher. Yes I could go on for hours outside. Face Loving San Levian all right everyone. Thank you for listening. Thanks I really appreciate your time. This is your host Erin fearing for the. I've been wrong before podcast. I hope you'll give us a five star review on itunes or every get your podcast from this podcast. Production of more than dreaming studios produced by Aaron Fury anti-syrian sound engineered by. Angie ran the music you here in. This episode is seven floor Tango by silent partner which can be found in the Youtube Free Library.

Haiti Paul Kay Jamie Gordon Okay Shel Silverstein Poetry Foundation Angie United States Erin Oregon Van Frank Google phone Poetry Foundation diarrhea Arizona twitter Manet Portland State University Franken autry