18 Burst results for "Sheila Nevins"

"sheila nevins" Discussed on Origins with James Andrew Miller

Origins with James Andrew Miller

05:10 min | 4 months ago

"sheila nevins" Discussed on Origins with James Andrew Miller

"Apprentice, race was an essential ingredient in the show and its success. And you have Amy gravid, a white woman in charge of comedy at the network. What was that like? It was actually great. I mean, really, you know, I come from the network world where the notes are coming from like a different people, the studio and the network and we know who's notice whom and these notes can fight each other and those power plays in the notes and sometimes the notes aren't super clear and something like any brilliant and tasty at the time before he was promoted was the notes always were rooted in real character or real story and trying to make the thing better without an agenda behind why they're making you better and again in the network world it would be like do this note or else, right? And in HBO, things became conversations. It became like sometimes when you're writing, you think it's clear, but sometimes AMD or Casey might go, well, I'm not quite sure of this, and then you talk it out. Well, this is what we're trying to do. Oh, I didn't know that what maybe we can set it up that way. And they really shaped what I was looking for when I left HBO in the studio going forward because it became conversations. It became like, well, let's figure it out together. It became like partnerships. And so most of the stuff that we had to figure out was all season one stuff. You need a new show, right? You're trying to figure out the tone in the pace and certain things like that. And the one big note that they get that I think really helped the show was the first season was kind of going to end with Ethan and Daniel having sex that we were going to get into the breakup later and Amy grab it to her credit and super smart was like, no, move that up to the middle. And we were like, well, we don't have any more story. And she was like, well, you'll find stories. She was right. And Larry wilmore said the same thing. Like really put yourself in the corner and get out of it. And that was just so helpful. And that's what we did for all the rest of the seasons was let's find ourselves in a corner halfway through and then how do we get out of that? But they were always super helpful and always super and I'm not just saying that because I was there like I'm out of there anymore. They just really set a toad for how to be partnerships with creatives. How did insecure change you? I think it changed me as a creator profoundly I started on girlfriends with primarily in African American show but certainly feeling like we were a marginalized and UPM CW not taken seriously by our peers and I think after having gone to network shows where I was the only person of color in the room. You sort of get used to like accepting things as they are, right? And going to do a secure with Easter Molina, but that energy of a young energy wanting to come in and take over as I did too, but you're also feeling like you're on the island all the time. Off of that experience was just like, no, we're not asking for permission anymore. We're just going to do the thing and speak up for what we want to do, how we want to build our crews, right? Saying that we're not going to 50% has to be people of color on women. And saying we're doing this or we're not doing this, right? And I just think it made me be much more vocal about the types of things that I would want going forward as a producer, like any other person, right? Like any other white creator gets to say, I want to do this. I want to do that. But sometimes when you're the only one you don't feel empowered to do that because you have to justify or explain why it just gets kind of tiring. So it definitely made me much more assertive in terms of what I would expect and what I want to do going forward. And I think as a writer, I would say insecure reminded me why I wanted to write in the first place was when I read that script, it just felt super fun. And it reminded me when you're in the network world or just the business a long time, you can kind of get hammered or drill. This is the way we do things, right? Or don't do it like this, or do do it like this. We're kind of getting this copycat formula and it really just reminded me when you're a kid and you're like coloring a picture and you might call it a cactus pink. You might cover the sun purple, and nobody tells a 5 year old, don't make the sound purple. You just let them create. And I was like, that's what this experience reminded me of. Like just create. Remember to have fun. That's why we're doing it. As opposed to being afraid to fail or not thinking about the business part. Then I went to go make insecure. It didn't make sense to be financially to go to a secure. It wasn't my material. I was losing money, but it was something in the tuning fork of it felt like the right thing to do creatively. So from that place, it has made me a better writer. It just freed me from the anxiety or the insecurity of a fear of what the business can kind of put into you. Next, on origins HBO, episode four, will go one on one with the unsinkable, Sheila nevins. Thank you for listening to origins. The presentation of C 13 originals, a cadence 13 studio. This podcast is executive produced by myself and Chris corcoran. Chief content officer and founding partner of C 13. It's produced and edited by my brother in arms, Chris basil, who always delivers. Many thanks extend to Terrence Malin, who provides much appreciated production assistance in the trenches and our terrific cadence 13 gang. Production coordination by Kelly rafferty, marketing, PR, and graphic design for more occurring, Josephine and Francis, Hillary shelf, and Kurt Courtney. Kate's 13 is an Odyssey.

Amy gravid HBO Larry wilmore Easter Molina AMD Casey UPM Ethan Amy Daniel Sheila nevins Chris corcoran Chris basil Terrence Malin Kelly rafferty Hillary shelf Josephine Kurt Courtney Francis
"sheila nevins" Discussed on Origins with James Andrew Miller

Origins with James Andrew Miller

02:15 min | 4 months ago

"sheila nevins" Discussed on Origins with James Andrew Miller

"How did insecure change you? I think it changed me as a creator profoundly I started on girlfriends with primarily in African American show but certainly feeling like we were a marginalized and UPM CW not taken seriously by our peers and I think after having gone to network shows where I was the only person of color in the room. You sort of get used to like accepting things as they are, right? And going to do a secure with Easter Molina, but that energy of a young energy wanting to come in and take over as I did too, but you're also feeling like you're on the island all the time. Off of that experience was just like, no, we're not asking for permission anymore. We're just going to do the thing and speak up for what we want to do, how we want to build our crews, right? Saying that we're not going to 50% has to be people of color on women. And saying we're doing this or we're not doing this, right? And I just think it made me be much more vocal about the types of things that I would want going forward as a producer, like any other person, right? Like any other white creator gets to say, I want to do this. I want to do that. But sometimes when you're the only one you don't feel empowered to do that because you have to justify or explain why it just gets kind of tiring. So it definitely made me much more assertive in terms of what I would expect and what I want to do going forward. And I think as a writer, I would say insecure reminded me why I wanted to write in the first place was when I read that script, it just felt super fun. And it reminded me when you're in the network world or just the business a long time, you can kind of get hammered or drill. This is the way we do things, right? Or don't do it like this, or do do it like this. We're kind of getting this copycat formula and it really just reminded me when you're a kid and you're like coloring a picture and you might call it a cactus pink. You might cover the sun purple, and nobody tells a 5 year old, don't make the sound purple. You just let them create. And I was like, that's what this experience reminded me of. Like just create. Remember to have fun. That's why we're doing it. As opposed to being afraid to fail or not thinking about the business part. Then I went to go make insecure. It didn't make sense to be financially to go to a secure. It wasn't my material. I was losing money, but it was something in the tuning fork of it felt like the right thing to do creatively. So from that place, it has made me a better writer. It just freed me from the anxiety or the insecurity of a fear of what the business can kind of put into

Amy gravid HBO Larry wilmore Easter Molina AMD Casey UPM Ethan Amy Daniel Sheila nevins Chris corcoran Chris basil Terrence Malin Kelly rafferty Hillary shelf Josephine Kurt Courtney Francis
HBO Legend Sheila Nevins on How She Learned to Make Documentaries

Origins with James Andrew Miller

01:17 min | 4 months ago

HBO Legend Sheila Nevins on How She Learned to Make Documentaries

"Sheila, do you remember an early project that reflects your own personal thinking at the time? Something that maybe you translate it into HBO content? Sure. The success of the movie bob and Ted and Carol Alice or whatever that was called with Natalie Wood is like four people sort of swinging and I thought, why can't I do sex shows? You know, why can't I break from this? Mold of doctors being about Congress, particularly or about history. Why can't it be like jaws? Why can't I do killer whales? Why can't I do sexy things? Why can't I do murder? Why does it always have to be the assassination of a president? Why can't I do a mass killing of some kind? Why can't I be like fiction? Why can't I be like theater? Why do I have to stick to the mold of doctors high brow? I'm just not highbrow. So I really learned from narrative how to make Doc use. I didn't really know how else to do it. I would see what did well on HBO or in the theater. And I had the great gift of no ads. So that meant if you could catch them in the beginning, then they would stay because we weren't going to sell super subs in the middle. So it was a gift, really.

Carol Alice Natalie Wood HBO Sheila TED BOB Congress
"sheila nevins" Discussed on The Bill Simmons Podcast

The Bill Simmons Podcast

05:23 min | 9 months ago

"sheila nevins" Discussed on The Bill Simmons Podcast

"Yeah. You know, who you are, but the point is they held it against you. No, I was saying with the HBO piece of it, I had no idea that the Pope or lombardo relationship, I knew nothing. I'm walking into a blank slate. I had no idea it was as complicated as it was. From the outside, it didn't seem like it. And I saw lombardo the day before he got fired, which was on a Friday. And he was in my office on Thursday because we were playing in the show and it was like we were launching the show like four weeks after he got fired and he was in the office and he seemed fine. And didn't mention anything. And then the next all of a sudden he was out, and it was the classic Friday, late afternoon news stump, right? Where credit to Richard and to Mike both that they were able to function in a way that you didn't even, I mean, look, that's why I say it's an iceberg. And it was dying below the surface. And, you know, report on all the stuff that was going on. But I will say that ESPN, it was much more out in the open. Yeah, that's true. Cats and dogs living together. And there were all of us who loved tweeting about it and reporting on it and gossiping about it week after week. It wasn't like that at HBO. They really shoved that toothpaste back in the tube at the end of the day. I really like both of them and continue to like both of them. But I also understand why at some point it wasn't a tenable relationship with the two. Where, at some point, I mean, look, I think what I tried to do was I tried to say that they really weren't. They didn't have a great game plan going in because they weren't clear with what their respective duties were going to be and what their and how they were going to divide things up. I mean, lombardo thought it was going to be a partnership. I mean, that's probably the last word that Richard butler would have used in characterizing what was going to be going on. With my. Will you lay that in the book? You said they had a meeting. Where they had a chance to carve out the territory? Was it like 2010? And they didn't carve out the territory correctly. And that was it for the next 5 years. They're stumbling and stammering and stepping on each other. Yeah. And then, of course, the bigger irony is that Richard might get rid of Carolyn. And bring in soon Hegel and that didn't turn out to be that great for everyone. And that was she's an agent. Right. Lombardo is from business affairs. Pleb Lewis from corporate communications. By the way, who else, let's talk about Richard plot for a second. Aside from Peter turning, there has been no one. Public gets in a company in 92. These fuchs is like right hand man in terms of image and PR. And then he bronzes scope into branding of HBO. But who else goes from comps to the CEO? It is, I mean, one of the things that I try to do in the book was show the various inflection points that enabled Richard putler. I mean, he's not a distribution guy. He's not a technology guy. He's not a script guy. He's not. I mean, he's not documentary guy. He's not. But what he is is he's the conductor of the orchestra. So instead of being like one great at one instrument, he just knows how to get up in front of a crowd and talk about the HBO brand and create this Esprit de corps from people that carries him to the top. It's quite an amazing journey. I really like them. It doesn't come off awesome in the book. I got to say it's definitely it's one of the rockier up and down arcs. I think the book has. He was so charismatic in that seat, right? And he really made you feel like HBO was the best and the biggest and the most important and we had the best people. And he had it was funny, John Oliver had that canvas thing because that was like puppers famous for that line, right? We just you're an artist. We want you to paint. We're just the canvas. Like he said that's everybody. But he was always impeccably dressed. Really fun to be with. And yeah, Dan and handsome and just made you feel like, you know, he had a way of whoever is sitting with. They felt like the most important people in the world. The one thing that happens with plethora in the book is he makes a lot of personnel moves, and he gets rid of, you know, a lot of people who had been there for quite some time. And, you know, like Sheila nevins and Michael barto and others, they talk about it. And they're upset about it. So it's not, you know, it's not shocking. I think the fact that plethora always did most of it without any fingerprints was pretty amazing and who he is. And to Richard's Richard's own brand is that, I mean, I tried to engage him on some of this stuff. He wasn't going to get into a street fight with these people. And he wasn't going to talk about, you know, the specific instances or the specific reasons why he did what he did or pushed back on people. And I think that, you know, when you decide to take the high road in a book like this, you know, some people may think, well, you're not talking for a certain reason, but I think that platform just remained consistent to who he is and who he wants to be by not engaging. I believe me..

lombardo HBO Richard Pleb Lewis Richard putler Richard butler ESPN Lombardo Hegel Mike fuchs Carolyn Esprit de corps John Oliver Sheila nevins Peter Michael barto Dan
"sheila nevins" Discussed on The Bill Simmons Podcast

The Bill Simmons Podcast

05:20 min | 9 months ago

"sheila nevins" Discussed on The Bill Simmons Podcast

"So they figured out a way plus the sports boxing they got box earned in hagler and all these Tyson. I mean, at its height, they have all these different kinds of offerings that you can't get anyplace else. So even though they weren't ready with the half hour or the hour model for a scripted television, they were they were able to more than hold their own there for about 8 or ten years. Yeah, like TV shows were 5th on the pecking order because you had movies you'd comedy, you had the sports, you'd music. And then let's be honest, you had movies with nudity, I think, was almost as important to them as TV series. They quickly realized this is another lane for us and they leaned into it with not only some of their first original shows, but even some of the later night movies they showed. And then documentaries. Because Sheila nevins in the documentary documentary unit is doing real sex, cad house. I mean, all these taxicab confessions and those things were huge. I mean, they just, I mean, she told me she said, we didn't even have to publicize them. Everyone knew when they were on. They got great numbers. And no one else was doing anything like that. So I think that they were very, very smart. In fact, it was so hard to get the series started. That Chris Albert wound up making shows for the networks. He does Martin and he does everybody loves Raymond because Michael said we were not ready to carry deficits like that. We can't. We can't afford you to show. So all work says, all right, what the hell? I'll just make it for other people. They struck oil a few times there in the 80s because you had the two Eddie Murphy specials. Which I think the delirious was the reason I got HBO because it was like this the only way you could see this. All right, how do we get this? Start badgering your mom. In my case, my mom I stepped out. We need HBO. I need to say Eddie Murphy. Tyson in 86 was a big one. And you covered this in the book pretty extensively. But the first comic relief was kind of the highlight of comedy, I think in the 80s and a lot of different ways. Even the fact that Letterman and Chris Elliott did a little short film for it. It just felt like everybody who mattered in comedy in 1986 was part of comic relief. And at that point, that was to me between Tyson and comic relief. Those were the two things that you kind of had to have HBO at that point. If you cared about this stuff, right? Absolutely. And I think that one of the things that you start to see with comic relief and with Tyson is that people who normally wouldn't even be thinking about space subscription. They're just driven to it because it becomes it becomes essential. I mean like comic relief was a big deal. And the cast, I mean, the people that they were, obviously, they would be Robin and Billy hosting. But the comedians that they were able to attract and the attention that it got was amazing. And I mean, look, at some point, more than half of the subscribers of HBO in certain years in the 80s were subscribed because a boxing. And that's something that the networks used to have. The problem was the networks gave up on boxing. They moved it to the afternoon. And so fuchs and Seth Abraham were able to come in and say, listen, we're going to put on prime time. And that Don king was like, really? Okay, I'll take less than money. And I'll put it in prime time. If you'll put it on prime time. And I think those were really smart moves on their part. Yeah, when I was growing up as a kid, ABC was a pole position with most of the boxing, CBS had a little NBC out a little. But it was really ABC and then they would replay the big pay per view fights on wide road of sports and, you know, and that lasted really till I would say the early 80s until cosell kind of turned unboxing at the same time. The pay per views are about to come in in the mid 80s. HBO was like, hey, all right, cool. We'll take all this. The comedy thing, I can't tell you how many comedians I discovered on HBO and especially the young comedians special. That's where you saw people like Jim Carrey. Sam canis, Bill Maher. You go on down the line. It was like basically every comedian that that was where they were discovered there in Letterman. I think were the two places. Carson was a little long in the tooth at that point. Right, but the thing with Dave, again, is you're going to get four and a half minutes. And you're not going to I mean, like, for somebody like, I mean, obviously, for people who didn't see it on YouTube. Anyone Sam Kennedy in first appearance on Letterman is just legendary. It is just breathtaking. But the truth is that he could only do so much of what he really wanted to do on network television. Then you get over to HBO and it's the wild wild west. There's no guardrails. He's staying in doing everything. And that's what builds the fan base. The other thing I was able to show was that I looked at the number of comedy clubs before HBO starts doing this in the United States. And there's like, you know, a dozen in the 7th. Like all of a sudden there's like hundreds and the proliferation of comedy comes because people are seeing this. And, you know, these comedians then want to go on tours after they do their HBO special. So.

Tyson HBO boxing Sheila nevins Chris Albert Eddie Murphy hagler Letterman Chris Elliott Seth Abraham Raymond cosell Martin ABC Don king Michael Sam canis fuchs Robin
"sheila nevins" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

07:04 min | 1 year ago

"sheila nevins" Discussed on KCRW

"Rationalized the deaths as he did everything. It wasn't his fault. The people to him just acted stupidly. And their deaths had nothing to do with the fact that he set the fire. They just reacted too slowly. It was too bad about the baby, but that wasn't my fault. Those are the words from a manuscript that was making the rounds in Hollywood in 1991 called Points of origin. It featured a fire investigator in pursuit of arsonist, Erin styles. Now the similarities between the manuscript and real life set off alarm bells with local law enforcement. It turned out that in fact, there was a connection between the manuscripts protagonist and its writer, a fire investigator stationed in Glendale. That story is at the center of a new true crime podcast called Firebug. Carrie, and this is the host. He's a former Hollywood exact turned podcast creator and he's with us right now. Hey, Carrie, how you doing? I'm all right. The story of these fires. Uh, It's harrowing, and I know you worked in Hollywood for a long time. When did you first hear about this? This manuscript? I heard about it as I was driving to a meeting. With a woman who would change my life and essentially birth. My career in the business woman named Sheila Nevins, who ran for 30 years documentaries at HBO. And I heard this story on the radio. I heard that he had been arrested that he was under house arrest in Glendale, and that he written a novel that was being used as evidence against him. And so I When I got to the meeting. I pitched Sheila that idea the idea of getting an interview with him. And she Agreed to let me do it and pay for it and That's that's how it all began. So tell us more about this arsonist carried. Who was he? Well, he was, uh, a a guy who Worked in the fire service Much of his life. He was drafted into the air Force and worked in the fire service in the air Force. Um And he kind of rose through the ranks initially was turned down by the Los Angeles Fire Department failed their examination and then he was hired by the Glendale Fire Department. And worked his way up to becoming an arson investigator for Glendale. And during the course of that time that he served in that capacity he developed Penchant for teaching arson, investigation tactics and skills to his fellow arson investigators around the state, and he kind of became well known as Teacher of these seminars in arson investigation. You know he was married. I think four times he had two Children by one marriage. He lived in a small house in the Eagle Rock Community of Glendale. And he had a Dalmatian named Domino. How many fires is he suspected of starting and we're talking dozens Thousands thousands of fires. He's suspected of thousands. He's been convicted of dozens But You know, the thing is that There's only one fire that he's been convicted of that is keeping him in prison for the rest of his life, and that's the fire at Foley's. Home Center, a hardware store in South Pasadena, California that killed four people, including a grandmother and her two year old grandson. That's your first episode, right? That's the That's the first episode, and that comes back throughout the course of the story because we revisit it when the investigation Comes upon that the investigators come upon that scene as they read the novel, and then we revisit it in our next episode, as we explore The murder trial of John War in 1998. You talk Carry about this. The hardware store fire that killed those people. And I wonder, you know what about the victims? I mean, You're sort of dredging up a terrible memory. In talking about this, although it's fascinating as well, I mean in, um, a cowboy. Have They said anything to you about about this podcast? No, No. We have not been contacted by them. Um, I believed our team reached out to them. But we were also very respectful of There. Uh, privacy. We have spoken with John Orr's daughter, who had be as become convinced that John or is guilty. Um, we have spoken with the prosecutor in the case. The case that put him away. Uh Mike Cabral, who was in L. A Deputy district attorney back in the nineties and follow his specialty was arson cases. Um, and we've spoken. In fact, with John Wars permission, we spoke with his different defense attorney. Um, one of the one of the, um teases that I can kind of throw out to you is that I have been in contact with John or over the last two years and Later in the season, you'll hear some of those conversations. When you spent time with him carry did did you get the sense that he was? Remorseful I You know, that's such a cliche question. I mean, did he feel bad about what he did? Because he killed people know He doesn't He never even though he pled guilty, even though he pled guilty to three, setting three of the fires he never admitted, or acknowledged that he was guilty. So as a plea for it was a plea for a lesser sentence. Exactly. It was a plea on the promise that The sentence that For the crimes that he was pleading guilty to would run concurrently with the sentence that he received for fire set along the route 99 on the way to an arson investigators conference. But one of the things that he one of the mistakes he made. Was In pleading guilty. He set himself up for a much bigger fall, and we'll get into that in our next episode, actually. It's a It's a fascinating story for for sure. And a podcast that I want to keep listening to. And I want to thank you carry Anthopoulos, the host of the new podcast firebug, which is out now you can check it out wherever you get your podcast.

Sheila Nevins Mike Cabral Sheila 1991 1998 John Orr John Glendale Fire Department John War Los Angeles Fire Department Glendale 30 years first episode South Pasadena, California HBO three four people Anthopoulos first Home Center
"sheila nevins" Discussed on Here's The Thing

Here's The Thing

02:21 min | 1 year ago

"sheila nevins" Discussed on Here's The Thing

"Back us up Once we convinced them that we had the goods filmmaker. Alex gibney one person who never saw risk free entertainment. Go sheila nevins has the head of hbo documentary films from nineteen seventy nine until her retirement in two thousand eighteen nevins laid the groundwork for our current golden age of documentaries however when she started in the early eighties. Hbo wouldn't even use the word documentary. When we did promos for films we would call them document. We invented this lunatic word. Because we afraid that if we said documentary people would feel that it was for the elite and that it was about politics and that was not going to be about human stories and so we we hid behind his word dr tain men and then slowly but surely took a good twenty twenty five years. We'd be able. Maybe it's not such a dirty word and reality. Programming sort of said real people can be interesting in a trivial way so then somehow it went document reality. Tv yeah documentary. Go fort say that real people people without celebrity people who are trying to survive in a complicated world saying their own words and stayed in their own words to hear more of my two thousand seventeen conversation with sheila. Nevins go to our archives at. Here's the thing dot org after the break. Alex gibney talks about his first job out of film school. Cutting trailers for exploitation films the moments. You'll never forget the stories. They've never told the secrets. They've never revealed buying the music returns exclusively to paramount plus with the spotlight on new and legacy artists reliving the biggest moments of their musical journeys. Get a backstage pass into the lives of some of the most popular musicians of all time and revisit. Some of the most iconic episodes with new interview footage storylines and commentary here about all the memorable rise and fall moments that made the careers of artists including duran new kids on the block. Bret michaels ricky martin. Ll cool j. huey lewis. Busta rhymes and fat..

sheila nevins Alex gibney dr tain nevins hbo Hbo Nevins sheila fort duran Bret michaels ricky martin huey lewis
"sheila nevins" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

06:11 min | 1 year ago

"sheila nevins" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Morning being Thank you so much, And I forgot to mention in all of the credits Born in Oh Park, Illinois, but right across the street from Chicago, the hospital on one side of the street is Oak Park and the other side of Chicago. So that's his close to Chicago's. You can get Now I know that you You went to school in the Los Angeles area, and I think graduated from Beverly Hills high, so We were just a baby when you were here, and it was born here and went out to Los Angeles when I was a year and a half old that I don't think California was a state yet. I think he was territory. But So So, Unfortunately, your memories of growing up here don't really exist, but but I've been back and forth. Yeah. Did you work in Chicago? Ever do plays films? Anything I didn't get to play here years ago. I did any Wednesday here? I can't think of the name of the theater. Forgive me for that. But I I've always loved when I was growing up as a little kid. My mother and dad were both born and raised in Chicago in Chicago, and I was always, you know. Chicago earned federally on was Oh, Chicago is so busy and so this and that and suddenly it went through this whole metamorphosis. It's one of the most beautiful cities not only in the country, but in the world. I love Chicago. I hope we can. I'm not just trying to Please. Anybody? I mean, Yeah. I hope we gave you a good impression As you were coming in from the airport yesterday. You came in right in the middle of ST Patrick's Day madness around here that can get a little ugly. Once we got out of the airport, it got very Irish very quickly. I mean, people of any ethnic background became irate, right? Right. Exactly. Ready when you listen to these clips from, you know, the from the Mary Tyler Moore Show or from the Golden Girls. I mean, you know, we're sitting in were chatting before we went on the air and have a little coffee. But your face lit up when you heard you know some of the setups and Some of the jokes. I mean, clearly this. These were high points in your in your life. Oh, of course, they were high points. But I am the luckiest old broad on 2 ft that I got blessed with a kind of writing the writers on both Mary Tyler Moore. And on the golden girls and then literally David E. Kelly. You can't get any better than that. How blessed can you be, And it's all on the page. You know, actors take so much credit for roles they play. We couldn't do it. If it wasn't on the payoff, we wait. We can help a good show, but we can't save a bad one. Yeah, that's true, but it still is very collaborative in the writing has to be there, but I can't imagine any other actress bringing to such dimension. To the rolls it that you've brought. I wouldn't give him a chance. Not if they didn't want to break their next That day was so indifference as Conceived as it turned out to be. I mean, you must have put a little flourish on it and change it up a little bit, where she turned into the neighborhood nymphomania, But somehow it worked, and she thought she was so spectacular and so gorgeous and so sought after it was only in her own mind. Nobody else felt that way. Did you guys have Ah, sense of the kind of television history that you were making while you were doing The Mary Tyler Moore Show or you know, was it You know, we're going to work today. We've got a pretty good script. We've got nice people, but I mean this. This will be one of the great television shows in the history of the media. It was on for seven years. I didn't come in until the fourth year, but Mary and her then husband, Grant Tinker and my husband, Allen, Ludden, and I We're best friends, So we sweat it out the show with him. We would go toe go to rehearsals. We would go toe things that never dreaming that I'd be on the show it some given point that first year was tough, and I mean it was very if he it didn't catch on right away that it was they weren't sure it was going to get picked up for the second season. By the time it got over the 4567 years, I think even the network knew they had something. Yeah, um Is there a little Betty White in Sue Ann Nivens? Because I mean, you're I've interviewed you several times for different movies and things and you're always so sweet And you're always so nice. But part of me wonders. Is there a little bit of that, You know evil. They used to ask Alan Lab. The name Sheila Nevins, of course, was the perfect happy homemaker. She could do anything. She could fix anything She could. Cook anything. She could have had a spot on your clothes and Alan, but she was this magnificent cook and Allen said, We'll bury insulin a very similar except that he can't cook. So that's about the size of that was about the size of a and e think everybody got suspicious. Kill us, particularly when her husband took Sue Ann home from a party drove her home and he didn't get in until the next morning. They They somehow had to swerve to avoid hitting a dog. And they wrapped well, the she got suspicious when he came home with his clothes cleaner than S 00. It was such writing. This is this is a little suen, Devon's and this is so quaint, essentially Sue, and you'll be able to hear it on the speakers. You want to be on our show? You're the happy homemaker. Yes, And the happy homemaker is very unhappy about what Have done that show every day since July 1963 You know what that means Married? It means I've been smiling for 11 years. I never thought of it that way way I.

Chicago Mary Tyler Moore Golden Girls Los Angeles Alan Lab Oh Park Beverly Hills Oak Park Allen California Sheila Nevins Sue Ann Illinois David E. Kelly Sue Grant Tinker Betty White Devon Sue Ann Nivens Ludden
"sheila nevins" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"sheila nevins" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And I hope we can check back with you as you rebuild thank you you're listening to W. NYC I'm Jamie Floyd in the nineteen sixties and seventies astronauts collected nearly half a ton in moon rocks during six Apollo missions to the lunar surface eight hundred forty two pounds is couple refrigerators worth of samples in terms of sheer volume and wait so what happened all those moon rocks anyway we're going to try and find out after news headlines tonight mostly clear a low around sixty nine degrees right now it's seventy seven degrees and it's cloudy in Central Park this is Alec Baldwin documentaries take hard work every single thing in the film is intentional right and commitment you want to be in love again passion no this documentary Sheila Nevins from and Ken burns and Lynn Novick their latest project is the Vietnam War for PBS on here's the thing from W. NYC nine PM.

Jamie Floyd Central Park Sheila Nevins Ken burns Lynn Novick PBS W. NYC Alec Baldwin eight hundred forty two pounds seventy seven degrees sixty nine degrees
"sheila nevins" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"sheila nevins" Discussed on KCRW

"Up at seven o'clock on press play around two hundred employees at Santa Monica based riot games walked out to protest, the company's handling of sexual assault and discrimination this week. We'll hear more about organizers what the company to change and how one man's effort to boost California raisins sales ended up in death threats death threats coming up at seven o'clock press. Play you're on KCRW. This is all things considered from NPR news. I'm Ari Shapiro. The chain from its hitch show jersey shore to the video music awards MTV is all about youth culture in its many forms. And now it's branching out to network has announced a new duck. Commentary division, Sheila Nevins will lead it. She is eighty years old, and she is an institution in the world of documentary film, NPR's Elizabeth Blair joins us now with all the details. Hi, high so okay for people who may not recognize her name. Tell us more about who Sheila Nevins ins Sheila Nevins was the president of HBO documentary films. And she started there in nineteen seventy nine so before MTV was even born she grew up in New York City. She went to Barnard and the Yale school of drama in the early sixties and as an executive producer. She's got a very broad palette. She's overseeing documentaries about artists and entertainers, but also serious topics like addiction and global terrorism. Some of her credits include citizen for the Edward Snowden documentary paradise lost about the west, Memphis three and more recently. She produced the true crime drama. The jinx about real estate heir Robert Durst family of Kathleen. Lean Durst from the beginning had said, they believed Robert Durst was responsible now that documentary which seemed fairly traditional had.

Sheila Nevins Robert Durst MTV Ari Shapiro NPR riot games Santa Monica California Yale school of drama assault HBO Edward Snowden New York City Elizabeth Blair Memphis executive producer president Kathleen
"sheila nevins" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

04:04 min | 3 years ago

"sheila nevins" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"NPR news. I'm ari. Shapiro chang. From its hit show jersey shore to the video music awards. Mtv is all about youth culture in its many forms. And now it's branching out to network has announced a new documentary division, Sheila Nevins will lead it. She is eighty years old, and she is an institution in the world of documentary film, NPR's Elizabeth Blair joins us now with all the details. Hale is so okay for people who may not recognize her name. Tell us more about who Sheila Nevins is Sheila Nevins was the president of HBO documentary films. And she started there in nineteen seventy nine so before MTV was even born she grew up in the city, she went to Barnard and the Yale school of drama in the early sixties and as an executive producer. She's got a very broad palette. She's overseeing documentaries about artists and entertainers. But also serious topics like addiction and global terrorism. Some of her credits include citizen for the Edward Snowden documentary paradise lost about the west, Memphis three and more recently. She produced the true crime drama. The jinx about real estate heir Robert Durst family of Kathleen Durst from the beginning head said, they believed Robert Durst was responsible now that documentary which seemed fairly traditional had an ending that really threw people for a loop. And that unexpected edge is something Nevins is really known for finding subjects that appeal, but also experimenting with the form. Entity already has reality shows has news. So what's the thinking behind adding a whole other documentary division? What's the goal here? Well, first and foremost, they need to attract and keep young viewers on whatever platform they're on while they've made some award winning documentaries over the years. They've been in a rating slump until about a year ago. They're looking for something fresh and ducks are very popular right now MTV has also long projected, it's brand is being very civic minded thank rock the vote and it produced the documentary series sixteen and pregnant which looked at different issues facing a teenager who gets pregnant from Dopp Shen graduating high school. And so now it's looking to Sheila Nevins to bring her gravitas and middle skill to helping a new generation of filmmakers explored different platforms and stories. So I'm just going to say it out loud. Nevins just turned eighty MTV obviously caters to teens. Young adults young people what what is the thinking behind hiring someone like Nevins, she's eighty and she has got a lot of experience. I spoke with Christmas air. I spoke with Chris McCarthy president of MTV about this question. And the fact that Nevins is eighty years old does not seem to concern him in the slightest in fact to hear him tell it her experience is her superpower McCarthy who hired her said, he's admired Nevins ever since. He was a kid watching HBO's taxicab confessions, which is a gritty unscripted series of conversations between cab drivers and their customers. He said he loves that Nevins is committed to stories about the underdog and he wants his team to learn the craft of documentary filmmaking from her firsthand he wants her to help elevate the storytelling to new level on MTV. All right. Well, that's NPR arts. Correspondent Elizabeth Blair. Thanks. Thank you. The one month countdown starts today for soccer fans on June seventh the women's World Cup opens in France, the US. Favored to defend its title from the last tournament in two thousand fifteen if the women do win it would be their fourth World Cup championship. They have never finished lower than third since the women's tournament began in nineteen Ninety-one as NPR's Tom Goldman reports that success is in sharp contrast to the US men's team which struggles internationally. The last time the US women's national team played a month ago in Los Angeles. The Americans thumped Belgium six nail the lopsided win thrilled. The nearly twenty one thousand fans who packed.

Sheila Nevins Mtv NPR HBO Elizabeth Blair Robert Durst Shapiro chang Yale school of drama president US Edward Snowden Chris McCarthy Dopp Shen soccer Hale Kathleen Durst Memphis
"sheila nevins" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"sheila nevins" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And pregnant which looked at different issues facing teenager who gets pregnant from Dopp Shen to graduating high school. And so now it's looking to Sheila Nevins to bring her gravitas and for middle skill to helping a new generation of filmmakers explore different platforms and stories, so I'm just going to say it out loud. Nevins just turned eighty MTV obviously caters to teens. Young adults young people what what is the thinking behind hiring someone like Nevins, she's eighty and she has got a lot of experience. I spoke with Christmas. I spoke with Chris McCarthy president of MTV about this question. And the fact that Nevins is eighty years old does not seem to concern him in the slightest in fact to hear him tell it her experience is her superpower McCarthy who hired her said, he's admired Nevins ever since. He was a kid watching HBO's taxicab confessions, which is a gritty unscripted series of conversations between cab drivers and their customers. He said he loves that Nevins is committed to stories about the underdog and he wants his team to learn the craft of documentary filmmaking from her firsthand he wants her to help elevate the storytelling to a new level on MTV. All I will. That's NPR arts. Correspondent Elizabeth Blair. Thanks. Thank you. The one month countdown starts today for soccer fans on June seventh the women's World Cup opens in France. The US is favored to defend its title from the last tournament in two thousand fifteen if the women do win it would be their fourth World Cup championship. They have never finished lower than third. Heard since the women's tournament began in nineteen Ninety-one as NPR's Tom Goldman reports that success is in sharp contrast to the US men's team which struggles internationally the last time the US women's national team played a month ago in Los Angeles. The Americans thumped Belgium six nail the lump cited win thrilled. The nearly twenty one thousand fans packed the stadium almost.

Sheila Nevins Chris McCarthy MTV Dopp Shen US NPR Elizabeth Blair HBO Los Angeles soccer Tom Goldman president McCarthy Americans France Belgium eighty years one month
"sheila nevins" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"sheila nevins" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is all things considered from NPR news. I'm Ari Shapiro. The chain from its hitch show jersey shore to the video music awards MTV is all about youth culture in its many forms. And now, it's branching out. The network has announced a new documentary division, Sheila Nevins will lead it. She is eighty years old, and she is an instant. Itution in the world of documentary film, NPR's Elizabeth Blair joins us now with all the details. Hale is so okay for people who may not recognize her name. Tell us more about who Sheila Nevins is Sheila Nevins was the president of HBO documentary films. And she started there in nineteen seventy nine so before MTV was even born she grew up in New York City. She went to Barnard and the Yale school of drama in the early sixties and as an executive producer. She's got a very broad palette. She's overseeing documentaries about artists and entertainers, but also serious topics like addiction and global terrorism. Some of her credits include citizen for the Edward Snowden documentary paradise lost about the west, Memphis three and more recently. She produced the true crime drama, the jinx about real estate heir Robert Durst family of Kathleen jersey, from the beginning head said, they believe Robert Durst was responsible now that documentary. Which seemed fairly traditional had an ending that really threw people for a loop. And that unexpected edge is something Nevins is really known for finding subjects that appeal, but also experimenting with the form. Entity already has reality shows has new so what's the thinking behind adding a whole other documentary division? What's the goal here? Well, first and foremost, they need to attract and keep young viewers on whatever platform they're on while they've made some award winning documentaries over the years. They've been in a rating slump until about a year ago. They're looking for something fresh and ducks are very popular right now MTV has also long projected, it's brand is being very civic minded thank rock the vote and it produced the documentary series sixteen.

Sheila Nevins MTV Ari Shapiro NPR Robert Durst Yale school of drama Edward Snowden HBO Elizabeth Blair New York City Hale Memphis executive producer president Kathleen jersey Barnard eighty years
"sheila nevins" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:38 min | 3 years ago

"sheila nevins" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"WHYY in Philadelphia. I'm Terry gross with fresh air. Ninety women have a hard time admitting even to themselves that they're being physically abused by their husband or partner says on abuse was in denial in her first marriage back then she heard a radio interview with the woman who opened a shelter for battered women. I remember thinking loudly in my head while that is so awesome. That she's doing that. Because I'm sure there are a lot of people that need that. But not I didn't think I needed it, no abuses. Now, the CEO of a domestic violence crisis. Enter that pioneered a new approach to protecting women in danger of being murdered. We'll hear from debuts and from Rachel Louise Snyder author of a new book about domestic violence, titled no, visible bruises and Ken Tucker reviews, the debut album by the net Turner rebellion there. Seventies R and B group at the album's just been released for. The first time. First news. Live from NPR news in Washington, I'm Lakshmi Singh. A broad-based sell-off has major market indices falling as much as two percent at last check. The Dow is down more than five hundred thirty points feeding into that worries about escalating trade tensions between the US and China both sides are scheduled to resume negotiations. This Thursday on the eve of the Trump administration's deadline for raising tariffs on two hundred billion dollars worth of Chinese goods from ten percent to twenty five percent FBI director Christopher Wray says he has no evidence at the FBI illegally spied on the Trump campaign leading up to the last presidential election. Something Trump has alluded to repeatedly as NPR's models. Parks reports. Ray answer questions today from senators on Capitol Hill the hearing was technically scheduled to discuss FBI funding for the next fiscal year. But Ray spent most of his time looking back at twenty sixteen senators from both parties pressed on whether spying occurred on the Trump campaign leading up to the election as a turning general William. Bar said it did at a hearing last month. Here's Ray lots people have different colloquial phrases. I believe that the B is engaged in investigative activity and part of investigative activity includes surveillance activity of different shapes and sizes race it. He has no evidence that the FBI did anything illegal as part of its investigation, but he didn't elaborate and instead so he's waiting to hear from the Justice Department's inspector general later this summer, miles parks. NPR news Washington Secretary of state Mike Pompeo has abruptly cancelled his first plan visit to Germany since taking office more than a year ago. NPR's Lucian Kim reports from Berlin the State Department is citing pressing issues and has rerouted Pompey's plane to an unspecified destination. Surprising announcement came only hours before secretary of state Pompeo was due to visit his German counterpart, Heiko Maas and Chancellor Angela Merkel officially the foreign ministry expressed understanding for the postponed. Visit but German media are criticizing the cancellation plenty out. Pompeo has already visited thirty eight other countries and is now planning to make his first visit to Russia to see President Vladimir Putin next week after Pompeo's cancellation one Munich newspaper said bilateral ties are in ruins while major Berlin daily called for a tough response from the German government relations have been strained since the election of President Trump who has criticized Germany for not spending enough on defense building pipelines to Russia in maintaining a trade surplus with the US Lucian, Kim, NPR news, Berlin. The White House confirms its instructing its former counsel Dom, again, not to give records from his time in the Trump administration to the democratic led House Judiciary committee in response to its subpoena. At issue are reports that President Trump press Mcgann to remove Robert Mueller special counsel than later told Magana deny that ever happened. Democrats argue Trump's actions would amount to obstruction Trump continues to argue that he is the target of a political witch hunt. This is NPR news. The global youth brand MTV is turning to a season award winning executive to head its new documentary division Sheila Nevins was the president of HBO documentary films as NPR's Elizabeth Blair reports. The eighty year old Nevins has earned Oscar EMMY and Peabody awards for work spanning more than thirty years with some fifteen hundred credits to her name Sheila Nevins has been called the DeAnne of documentaries. She is executive produced a range of films from the jinx about real estate tycoon, Robert Durst to taxi cab confessions, he.

President Trump NPR Mike Pompeo FBI Trump administration Trump Ray Sheila Nevins Lucian Kim Berlin William Washington Terry gross US Germany
"sheila nevins" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

07:30 min | 3 years ago

"sheila nevins" Discussed on KCRW

"Flicks is called American factory. It premiered this year at Sundance. And it follows what happens when a Chinese auto glass company buys a shuttered. Former GM plant in Dayton, Ohio at first it seems like everything's getting a facelift, including the factory street address. Join me. We out. Just before the factory opens under new management, a fool Yao, vice president olds and upbeat press jobs, give a future to your kids, and my kids that that did for those trucks back there when our parents and grandparents worked on refrigerators and cars and the future is bright votes. The future is bright. Spoiler alert. The future turns out to be complicated. When Pearlstine I started working at participant in two thousand thirteen streaming companies like Netflix were just dipping its toe into creating its own content. Now, of course, it's a very different story who are this dreamers to you. I mean, in a way, they're a distribution partner, in a way, they're a competitor. Because they're producing so many documentaries, right? I think that's the pendulum that were all watching. There's a swing back and forth between the streamers acquiring finished films, and then kind of stepping back closing their wallets and just. Financing the creation of their own content. And just in the last couple years we've seen that change. If you look at Sundance this last Sundance this dreamers were spending money again on both documentary and narrative film, acquisitions, and there's just increasing competition. You have apple streaming coming online Disney, plus Hulu is becoming more robust. Amazon is back in the game. There's a lot of competition. So so that's a good thing for documentaries documentaries, and hopefully for content in general, but there's always going to be a question about whether it makes more sense for them to invest in their own content or acquire finished content. You haven't done a ton with net. Flicks. I know you're producing with Eva Duve Rene a series about the central park five. But you haven't done a ton with net. Flicks. Do you have a kind of attitude about the streamers, and general and Netflix in particular, we've done more on the narrative side with net flicks. So Roma beasts of no nation. The different series that you're talking about which is actually a a narrative version of the central park five story. But we're having our first experience on the documentary side. But we've known that people over there for a long time. They're great they're real, you know, original documentary people who understand the genre. And they're looking for quality too. So this dreamers are our friends the more distribution options. There are for documentaries. The better it is for us as finances of documentaries, and the better it is for the filmmakers and the better it is for the audiences. But you haven't cut any kind of deal. It seems like with every film, you're deciding what is the best path for this film. I mean, we're we're platform agnostic when it comes to distribution, we're trying to find the best platform for that particular film in terms of both audience and impact. So we've been talking a lot about American factory partially because it's a great example of what we've been talking about. When you go to Sundance and you try to sell. A film is the biggest price is what they promise in Princeton advertising. Is it what are the, you know, the variables that go into deciding who is going to distribute at home when we go to Sundance or any other festival with a film that we're trying to sell to a distributor. We do our homework. And we think about who the possible buyers are, but then we have to see who comes to the table and what they're offering. So it's a combination of obviously, we're trying to be sustainable. We're trying to at least hopefully get the budget of the film back. But we're also looking for the greatest reach and the greatest distribution eyeballs and impact why did you go with net flicks? To to stream American factory we had fantastic options for American factory bit. You did we really did. And it was very difficult choice because you know, you you you hope to be in the position that that we were in with American factory. Where we had honestly incredible options and ultimately the net flicks platform really did provide the biggest reach in terms of the potential audience. So that was really the decision just reach an audience. Can they promise you that? It will be on the suggested for you or on the top of the front page, or is that part of the deal, you can make this really we we didn't. There were no promises made about particular placement foster is a film. That's coming out is a very affecting film about kids and their experience in the foster care system, and the HBO will be distributing that film and HBO has just been sold to a big conglomerate AT and T, and I wonder if that gives you pause if you think how you think that's gonna play out for HBO, documentaries, which has been such a respectable part of their business. I don't really think I can speak for HBO. I. But you as a person who sells films to them does. I mean for for us HBO is a is a perfect home for foster why because they respect the filmmakers, they're respecting. And allowing us to do the impact work around the film that happens off of HBO, it's a very collaborative relationship, and we have a long standing relationship with HBO. I hope that HBO doesn't lessen its commitments to documentaries because I'd say as much as net flex is. Today. HBO has been a stalwart of documentaries and Sheila Nevins, and it's always been a place to find really high quality film. So I think given how popular documentaries all right now. I can't see them moving away from it. But for our sake, I hope that it continues to be a really strong distribution option. He spent twenty years making documentaries. As they should be reaping the benefits of it. Now. So this is a this is a big broad question. What do you think the future of documentaries is John as an opportunity for social change? But also as a business, I think the future of documentaries is awesome. And I've been in business for a long time. And I was joking. The other day that when I go through old notebooks from notes from films. I kept finding lists of other jobs. I can do. I'd never felt like documentary filmmaking was a sustainable viable long term career path. And I think that's really changed. It's never going to be easy. I mean, if you it's not documentary filmmaking and documentary financing documentary distribution is not a get rich quick scheme. But it's incredible work. It's meaningful work, it's creatively fulfilling, and I really think that there's a the market has matured for documentaries. I don't think that it's just a passing fad? So I'm very encouraged will at least Pearlstine is the senior vice president of documentary at participant media. Thanks for.

HBO Sundance Netflix Ohio vice president Dayton Yao GM Eva Duve participant media partner Amazon Sheila Nevins senior vice president Princeton Pearlstine AT apple
"sheila nevins" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:47 min | 3 years ago

"sheila nevins" Discussed on KCRW

"To be an American. NPR's? Mandalit del Barco reports that biographical docs, have grown in popularity along with budgets and prophets. Here's what's up with docs. They're doing great at the box office that really impresses producer Sheila Nevins who ran HBO documentary films for thirty six years, and it's considered one of the most influential people in the business. It was a real hot year for films making money. I mean money money document when I say films, doc doc is making meal money and doctors got very hot free solo the story of Alex Hans climbed to the peak of Yosemite. El capitan without ropes is still climbing at the box office, so far it's almost sixteen million dollars box office. Mojo ranks in the top twenty most profitable documentaries. The National Geographic film is a front runner for the documentary feature. Oskar so is our BG a portrait of supreme court Justice, Ruth, Bader Ginsburg copy. I am. And everyone wants to take a picture with. Torius. Here. RPG has earned fourteen million dollars at the box office, putting it in the top twenty five highest earning docs, category directors. Julie Cohen and Betsy west both former TV journalists documentaries as a counter narrative to the quick short media world of Twitter and social media people. Actually, it turns out well sit down for an hour and a half and really get engrossed in a true story film. We're very excited about that. Especially the opportunity to tell stories that really have been ignored over the years. Our BG is also competing for an Oscar against minding the gap. In HALE county, this morning this evening, and fathers and sons, it's an undeniable golden age for documentary filmmaking right now, Tom powers is host of the podcast pure nonfiction. He's also a programmer for the Toronto international film festival for a long time. There was a bit of a stigma around documentaries that you know, it was going to be educational. It was going to be a bummer was definitely not going to be. A date night movie. Power says all that has changed especially with streaming platforms like Netflix, and I tunes making documentaries more accessible powers watches as many as five hundred documentaries a year. He says the popularity has spurred streaming services to fund documentaries like never before that ability to reach such a large audience is a dream for most filmmakers. However, you another big dream for most filmmakers is to see their work on a big screen not to be watched on someone's smartphone during a commute for one week in March the giant screened. I max theaters will present Apollo eleven new documentary about the historic nineteen sixty nine moon.

Tom powers NPR Sheila Nevins El capitan Alex Hans Netflix HBO Oskar Oscar HALE county Twitter producer Bader Ginsburg Julie Cohen Toronto Ruth Betsy west fourteen million dollars sixteen million dollars
"sheila nevins" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"sheila nevins" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Nine moon landing adult landing over. Nasa gate director Todd Douglas Miller access to hundreds of reels of never before seen fifty year old footage some in seventy millimeter plus eleven thousand hours of audio from Apollo eleven which was painstakingly sinked with visuals. There's no narration. There's no talking heads nothing that takes place modern days. An all archival experience. Miller says he cut different versions of Apollo eleven for different platforms. I would love for everybody to watch this on. I'm ex green. You know, it's been calibrated that will be the best place to watch it. But I'm a realist, I know where the industry is going, and it's amazing to see on a small screen to in. This thing is that you just want a maximum number of people to sit director Ursula McFarland and producer. Poppy Dixon are talking about their documentary untouchable. It's about the rise and fall of movie producer Harvey Weinstein who denies all allegations of nonconsensual sex, and criminality the film includes testimonies of his alleged rape victims such as pas de LA aware. I was in simulated by him. Power Dixon, says they're looking forward to being shown in theaters. This something about that. We know if you'll sitting in a darkened cinema, and you can't go anywhere. You can't look away from the testimony of these women. And I think that that is really powerful thing while filmmakers and audiences are showing enthusiasm for the cinematic experience Sheila Nevins says this trend could change. I mean, that's success all over the place playing with monopoly money buying up everything every network's doing dockings every docu person, I know has more than one job. It's just a great year for jockeys. But you know, things are cyclical I think he's too much product. The real challenge remains.

Todd Douglas Miller Poppy Dixon director Harvey Weinstein producer Sheila Nevins Nasa Ursula McFarland rape LA eleven thousand hours fifty year
"sheila nevins" Discussed on Sex With Emily

Sex With Emily

02:49 min | 3 years ago

"sheila nevins" Discussed on Sex With Emily

"Do they get jealous Joe? Yeah. Right. That's right. They get possessive and jealous. Like, I used to have this thing with men. They like, oh, yeah. I love that. You're so independent free. And then eventually they would say something to the effect of. Oh, I love it. You're out there. But I really want wanna put you in this box. Or let me put you in my pocket. There was a million different ways of heard that they want to own it and keep us on what they're so. To in you. They actually just want to own it down. I think wing you, and I both share this same light. Right. And I think that people are attracted to that light. But once they realized that the light is ours. And it's just there for them to stand in to not take we immediately become the asshole, right? Yeah. I guess so you're right. That is what happens. We'll look how self aware. You are this is happening. I mean, I think this is the next step, right? Get my path. Now, they're standing at the and then being really, honestly, I don't think that I was as honest with people earlier on because I even from a younger age. I never felt that monotony made sense to me like I was in college. And I was like I do it because there was really no other options on the table. But then I always felt like I struggled with it a woman too. So it was like it's a. Right. It is. And so, but now I think its just now I think this is great that you're shedding light on it. Like people don't have a lot of great role models of what it means to be bisexual and to be open in the world. And to be a man who's bisexual people just they just say, oh, you're just gay. It was funny. I was sent here Sheila Nevins podcast. I love Shiites to documentary filmmaker before I was before it had sex with Emily. And I just I was such a Sheila Nevins fan like she was like the Queen. She's still is like I just want. She'll never to meet with her. Somebody's in. Honey, you're not you're not bisexual day your gate. You seeing psychiatrists like she was hilarious. Right. She was just like, but I get a generational thing. It really is. So you're really in this place right now. I think that at the end of the day, we only believe what we see. And we've seen predominantly one story since the beginning of time, you know, and it is a white man and a white woman with hits. That's it. That's the only thing we've seen and now in the last like fifty years, maybe a little bit log in that. We're seeing all these other stories in the last ten twenty years now with social media. We're seeing all the stories, and we're starting to believe that more things are real is what I love possible alternative relationship. Hi, Anne, Marie. And it's for me. It's all about normalizing. The AB nor the quote on quote, abnormal. Right. So let's talk about sex fervent. About how we met being full circle to a panel know, how has it changed for you over like, even let's say since you got sober. I would imagine sexual. Like, a mock air your once I got sober, right?.

Emily Sheila Nevins Joe younger age Marie Anne ten twenty years fifty years