18 Burst results for "Shehab"

"shehab" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

05:21 min | 2 months ago

"shehab" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

"Informing communities of like minded individuals, retreat wants to empower people to share their experiences with others to guide them on a journey to better health and living. I'm joining because I want a less crowded space to build a community of listeners, caregivers, and other experts. Watch my current social media feeds for more information about their official launch date. It's never too early to start thinking about brain health. But it can be too late. Whether you are struggling with fogginess, recall, losing items or you just can't remember things like you used to, you know your brain needs help. Is it a lack of nutrition, trauma, disease, or aging? Whatever the cause, memory health has been proven to help. This safe and patented, nootropic supplement began as a solution for Alzheimer's and dementia, but is also an impactful option for CTE sufferers for pregnant and menopausal women and anyone suffering from brain fog due to chemotherapy, illness or aging. With me today is Ed shehab. He has a memory health supplement that is hopefully going to take care of a lot of the nutritional issues that we have in our daily lives that affect our brain health. So thank you for joining me Ed. Jennifer, thanks for having me. So give us a little background on you and how you decided to get involved with this necessary project. Yeah, it's actually become a passion in my life. Jennifer I was not in the supplement business at all. In fact, I was running I run a company in the oil industry. And we have been running that company since the early 2000s and have been fortunate done well with it. And I was happy in my space. I was having lunch with my mother back 2018. And unfortunately, though the conversation was delightful, it quickly dawned on me. She had no idea who I was. And at that moment, it was really a earth shattering life altering situation for me. That someone who had been there and watched us grow the company and enjoyed the successes and was there during the failures and the heartaches and all the joy that comes in life no longer an even knew who I was. And for me, it was just a whole cold, hard slap in the face. And being an entrepreneur, I thought, well, I can fix this. I can do something about it. I can make it happen for her, right? In unfortunately or fortunately the naivety of that statement delve me into the world of research and understanding products that could work and help work and a dear friend of mine and now partner within memory health.

Alzheimer's Ed shehab CTE Jennifer dementia trauma Ed
"shehab" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

05:21 min | 2 months ago

"shehab" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

"Informing communities of like minded individuals, retreat wants to empower people to share their experiences with others to guide them on a journey to better health and living. I'm joining because I want a less crowded space to build a community of listeners, caregivers, and other experts. Watch my current social media feeds for more information about their official launch date. It's never too early to start thinking about brain health. But it can be too late. Whether you are struggling with fogginess, recall, losing items or you just can't remember things like you used to, you know your brain needs help. Is it a lack of nutrition, trauma, disease, or aging? Whatever the cause, memory health has been proven to help. This safe and patented, nootropic supplement began as a solution for Alzheimer's and dementia, but is also an impactful option for CTE sufferers for pregnant and menopausal women and anyone suffering from brain fog due to chemotherapy, illness or aging. With me today is Ed shehab. He has a memory health supplement that is hopefully going to take care of a lot of the nutritional issues that we have in our daily lives that affect our brain health. So thank you for joining me Ed. Jennifer, thanks for having me. So give us a little background on you and how you decided to get involved with this necessary project. Yeah, it's actually become a passion in my life. Jennifer I was not in the supplement business at all. In fact, I was running I run a company in the oil industry. And we have been running that company since the early 2000s and have been fortunate done well with it. And I was happy in my space. I was having lunch with my mother back 2018. And unfortunately, though the conversation was delightful, it quickly dawned on me. She had no idea who I was. And at that moment, it was really a earth shattering life altering situation for me. That someone who had been there and watched us grow the company and enjoyed the successes and was there during the failures and the heartaches and all the joy that comes in life no longer an even knew who I was. And for me, it was just a whole cold, hard slap in the face. And being an entrepreneur, I thought, well, I can fix this. I can do something about it. I can make it happen for her, right? In unfortunately or fortunately the naivety of that statement delve me into the world of research and understanding products that could work and help work and a dear friend of mine and now partner within memory health.

Alzheimer's Ed shehab CTE Jennifer dementia trauma Ed
"shehab" Discussed on UnInfluenced

UnInfluenced

02:19 min | 3 months ago

"shehab" Discussed on UnInfluenced

"Yeah hell. I left the gas station that i when i got home. My twenty miles from saturday twenty miles to empty. I've got tired. Change went to get gas right out of gas station. fucking gun. Launched off all the sticky stuff off from that motherfucker. It's fun yeah. Yeah so yeah. She shits parvanov pretty good these days. Fellows i was gonna do some Viewer questions and stuff. But now we're under that next time so if you're not a patron go join patriot on and ask questions. I'm gonna get into the questions next time this time. We're only sticking to an hour. you don't have anything else do. We're only doing an hour this time. Why because fuck y'all because michaels late and fuck everybody. Yeah mike was late. Fuck everybody that. And i'm tired from fug and taken apart the car earlier listening hawn folk and crying and dave chapelle the fucking ever watch. Dave chapelle feelings are hurt zone. You got anything else. No i think i'm solid. I was scrolling through picture of my ex fucked up to but you what now. I'm just fucking with you know in virginia. He's are just. I didn't understand what you said. Can you repeat just said that Was scrolling through instagram. Talking about cars and i was just like i picture my ex housing. Oh fuck she shehab objectively. Yes but she also cheated on me. So have you ever seen naked pictures over now. You want to also. I'm glad that you're checking out instagram lawyer. You're producing show. I was just. I was just kidding. Yeah sure you know. She texted me like two nights ago. And i was like what is going on. I mean on their wall. We're paying they can't this generation. Just don't get when not to talk of social cues experience with. I mean let me. Just i'm gonna. I'm gonna scroll instagram quick. I'm gonna go to my personal instagram. Hey congratulations your top..

Dave chapelle parvanov michaels mike virginia
"shehab" Discussed on Capital Allocators

Capital Allocators

02:43 min | 5 months ago

"shehab" Discussed on Capital Allocators

"So we all got together. We went out and mature favorite mexican restaurant in ann arbor. We're all talking like we could pick the perfect person to join arboretum. Who would it be and we're all like tom. She had listened so i called. Tom was rounding. It was a friday. And i'm like he. I have like a crazy idea. But i really want to ask you. And he's like oh my god and he was literally going to become. Ceo of this big private specialty practice shortly like within months. And he's like let me think about. I'll get back to you. And he was like sure enough. He wants to change healthcare. I think that's one thing at arboretum. The passion about healthcare is is palpable. So he came with zero knowledge about venture. He came in as a principal to are fine. He didn't even come in as a partner and he said i'm gonna look at this fellowship. I'm gonna learn everything i can about how to do. Cap tables do term sheets. He's really grated evaluating new technologies. Obviously you didn't know any of the strategic corporations that would by the companies. We had to introduce them to all of that but what. Tom has done phenomenally. Well is built his own deal flow and any deal in. The united states comes to tom shehab because he knows g i so well. He knows all the physicians and the other thing. He's really passionate about his women's health. Which is really great. So all these women's at his first exit two years after becoming managing partner was a women's health company for ovarian cancer young woman. Ceo to just knocked it out of the park. Boston scientific bodies so. Tom has just been fantastic. And then we've just recently brought in nicole walker and nicole is a traditional medical device investor. Who was with baird ventures before this and then abbot inches before that. And she's fantastic. She comes out of the guidon family honestly rise. The big thing for us is do. We fit culturally with each other. Do we have the same values we feel. We can teach anybody how to do. Venture how evaluate companies. How we help the board level we can teach all of those things we make sure their cultural fit from a personality standpoint and a work ethic. I think that that's so critically important. Because one of the things that resonates is exactly that we go to the annual meetings and i'm interacting with various arboretum staff. People i feel that. And i don't feel that with every gp or meeting. I go to. I would just simply say when it truly is a family. You can feel it when there is that internal consistency about values. You feel it. And.

Tom tom shehab ann arbor nicole walker baird ventures tom ovarian cancer united states nicole Boston
"shehab" Discussed on Capital Allocators

Capital Allocators

09:10 min | 5 months ago

"shehab" Discussed on Capital Allocators

"I was like. I'm just going to do this myself if i can't get it. I'm gonna can't be that hard by word now that you said it can't be that hard ladies back now. What would you say i mean. I was so naive bras. I had no idea what i was doing. I literally had no idea what i was doing. I in a way that was good because if you did you might not have done it. We might be having this conversation today. Absolutely true a offense. Saying i guess blessed but what i did know was i really wanted to change health care and my big aha for me was at this point. The cost of healthcare was starting to climb. It was about twelve percent of gdp. This is now two thousand two. And i just had this fundamental belief that through innovation we should be able to drive costs out of our healthcare system but still provide great clinical care so i thought adventure fund was the way to do this and so i thought i'll find companies that can drive costs out of the healthcare system and still provide great clinical care and on best those and so. Luckily one thing that happened was another mentor. One of the gentlemen from one of these two funds said that he would mentor me when he heard i was starting the venture fund was starting arboretum. And so he said the very first thing you gotta do is get a partner because no one is going to invest in a single person who has to know about your experience. Yeah i have a lot of success as an operator but not as adventure person. And so i put an ad in what was called venture wire the time saying i was looking for a venture partner to join me in ann arbor to help invest in companies. And i got all these smart biochemist's phd's from the bay area but none of them had run a venture fund either. They were just sort of interested but luckily person ended up joining me. Is tim peterson. Tim had worked at wolverton. Venture fund which was a venture fund contained within the business school at michigan. That was started through a gift from sam. Zell and tim had been the executive director had founded it. he started. he'd run it for four five years. He probably made ten different investments. Over that time. It wasn't a whole lot. But it was a lot more than i had done. And so tim join me very early. And luckily this life-science corridor was still underway and so the michigan economic development corporation wanted a couple more venture funds and so they ran a little rfp p. process there were seventeen applicants into winners. And we were one of the winners. So the state of michigan helped us. They basically said go. Raise five million dollars and once you raise that five million dollars give you two hundred fifty thousand dollars to cover your eagle and your travel. So tim was still working. At university of michigan wolverine venture fund. I was still doing consulting and then we were trying to raise five million dollars so that we could get this two hundred fifty two. I close on arboretum one six million dollars and where did you get the money. We got the money from high net worth individuals that were fifty thousand. One hundred thousand kind of investments in an sba liked our story. And then the bigger ones where we had three foundations in michigan. Where the chief investment officers just love the fact that we were focused more on midwest at the time now we're more national and international but at the time we were much more focused on michigan and the midwest and they love the idea that someone was willing to really try and find healthcare companies in the midwest and would really be focused on that so each of them put in five hundred thousand guidance. Put five hundred thousand striker put in five hundred thousand. Which is you and so between those three foundations in strike on guidance. We really needed those one thing that we did that. I think was super helpful. Was we created an advisory board which were folks that newest that really believed in us that were going to cover the different disciplines within healthcare that we were investing in until this included. Another great mentor for me. Bill hawkins who was banned the chief operating officer medtronic. He mentioned that summer internship again. Back at eli lilly. He had just graduated from duke and was one level above me. I'm the summer internet's bill hawkins than it's three or four other people. And that was ron dolphins and these gentlemen i mean ron was on three of our funds isn't reviser bills on all five of our funds as advisors and it makes all the difference in the world when there's people can see that you have advisers are are very successful really believe legitimate. You said before that you wanted to change the nature of healthcare so talk to us a little bit about how that informed your philosophy of investing. There's a lot to this. So in order to be successful in venture fund you have to make money for your investors sort of the most important thing and so the way to answer this question. Ramirez is twofold one is. We always knew that that was the most important thing if we were going to go from fund one to fund five where we are now and fun one ended up being twenty five million dollars so we closed on the sixth but ultimately ended up being twenty five but now our current fund is two hundred fifty million in order to be successful to bring in new investors. We had to make sure we were making money for investors so one of the really important things that has informed us to this day is to find companies that are very capitol efficient and by that i mean they don't take that much money to get to the exit. That's kind of the core of it and in the world we live in an healthcare. Many of the exits are in the two hundred four hundred million dollar range. So it's pretty simple math if we wanna make four to five to ten times what we invest. The amount of money into that company can't be more than twenty million if it's going to sell for two hundred million or forty million if it's going to be exiting at four hundred million and it's pretty simple but it's hard to develop a company that capital efficiently. The beauty of being in the mid west and focusing primarily on mid western companies is that it takes about a third less dollars to develop the company in the midwest because salaries rent bender cost. Just all those things all combined you basically get an additional one x return on your investment by investing off. The coast nets cutting to the chase in order to implement that. What kind of staffing were you looking for to hope. You implement that vision and philosophy. It's a question and as you can. Well imagine in ann arbor. There's not a lot of people that are already knew how to do venture so tim was teaching me how to answer. We were homegrown. We are totally homegrown. Everybody that we have brought in. We have taught them the arboretum way but the people that we have brought in from healthcare backgrounds at the analyst level which is the entry level for the estimate team or associate one of those. They've come from eli lilly and financial planning. They've come from consulting for elliot k. They've come from optum. They come from experiences where they worked in healthcare companies than they already understand the jargon. They understand the financial planning of it. That's been primarily the entry point at the low level. And when we've tried to bring people that are just like bankers. That hasn't worked out nearly as well for us at the higher levels. We've had these great advisers on each fun one of our advisers and fund three. Was tom shehab and tom. Thomas just wonderful. Tom is a gi physician with a specialty in liver and he is also an incredible healthcare administrator. He was at trinity health system. Saint joe's in ann arbor and he was targeted to be the next. Ceo of this huge private specialty practice with all these physicians in like a thousand physicians and yet he was also advisor and when we got to a point where we said we need to bring in somebody who's been living the affordable care act in particular at that point is that was making a huge difference on access to healthcare. Many more patients. Were coming in. But that was also the time when the cost as the baby boomers were getting older now. Healthcare's eighteen percent of gdp. It's just horrible. I mean it just keeps climbing and we've got to figure this out. Tom had a perspective on healthcare from living it from the inside and we felt. We really needed that at arboretum..

michigan Bill hawkins midwest tim tim peterson university of michigan wolveri ann arbor ron dolphins wolverton Zell eli lilly bay area medtronic Tim
"shehab" Discussed on The Fundamentalists

The Fundamentalists

06:49 min | 5 months ago

"shehab" Discussed on The Fundamentalists

"There's an dimension in reality but from this perspective it's a power locks as both right. It's an incident vented but because invented by a mind that arises out of the universe. It's a discovering to discovery of the universe did see universe covering itself. So that's incredible that means that we're gaining insight into the very nature of reality we get the we get the That's very incredible position to have to be able to for this is you've talked before about Ura take on can't oh yeah and my understanding of can't is basically you know categories in you like the blind men or thing. Your brain has categorised filters information and as a result you can never really know what is you can only know what appears to be But that would appears to be funneled through these your brain circuitry Neuro neurologists neurobiologist. I think would say similar things about perception about nerve endings and how they all connect and all this stuff but it's that Can you trust that. What is that this. Life is actually real that there is stuff around you and then my understanding is that most people would read canton go. He's actually saying no you you can't. It's that sort of like Shadows the platonic. Plato thing where you're chained in the cave and you see shadows on the wall and you think that's what's actually going on. And if you were to turn around behind you would see that. It's just puppets horses or whatever. It's not what you think it is reality is not what you think. It is And so but you're saying because of that because those categories because those perceptions are result of the outside world. You can have some inkling as to the fact that this is. This is reality in some degree. This is in some way reality. But yeah but you're you're right obsolete because compton go there count on the Split the world into the phenomenal. Which is yeah what we can do our senses. Three our intuition which is our sensory experience on three our rational transcendental categories and then there is the new middle and the new middle is the in itself on. We don't have any access to that. And yes when we talked before on an episode. That never went. I i was kind of yes so good at those. Yeah that was a good one too. We're actually prolific podcast. Yeah we do three times a week just for us but yeah i was. We were talking about an. I was saying i will count does want to grind a certain knowledge what he calls Synthetic a priority knowledge but it is different from the new middle. So you're absolutely right. So what he does is he says that count because count creates these things called the intimidates the intimidates of reason where says like a real word picked up worth. Yeah yeah it's were the antenna me. An antenna me is basically a contradiction. And he said you can't do one on he list lewd to them. One of them is did the universe start or is it eternal Was are we free or is everything determined Is there a god or new godse. there's ease intimidates. And he says reason you can be very you can be completely reasonable and go to either direction on. That was his way of saying so. There's some problem with reason on. So he wants understand they not re- reason kinda gets us to these limits higl than turns ryan says these limits are not an appeal impediment and pats to our knowledge of the universe. These are the universe itself in other words. The universe house on within so with visit the move from classical physics to to modern physics you know were in modern physics. Shehab the idea of a kind of quantum also mission within reality. That's what he was saying. The seventeen hundreds is that that the count go right com hub insight into reality constant realize continent realize that the faki said is when i try and use my reason completely consistently i hit a kind of antagonism and then he says yes. That's an insight into the nature of reality paradox. Parks is kind of paradox or power locks relaxes the word yep parallel both at the same time yet depending on. Yeah your position. Uta thinks shift in relation to your position but level. That stuff man. I was such a sucker for that. Von quantum physics emergence chaos doc. So cool that stuff is so cool and hegel was saying is literally in the seventeen hundred. He is the basis of a lot of modern thought. Even even when people haven't read them you know. Well let's let's distill this for a second because that's a lot of In case you're new to the podcast could see But the can't why is this stuff Important just go real garage doors because we're talking about the idea of meaning and we're talking about whether or not Meaning exists so to to. Just summarize the best i can. The reason can't is important is because he Essentially why would be important. I know he's import. Yeah how would you say a sentence that can't ym. Yes why is he. Still in the same way like descartes and all that is super influential like our the way we think as result of like six people. Yes yeah exactly the figures that are incredible rogues gallery. It's the suicide squad of dorks. We have to talk about that as well. He watched it. The other night really enjoyed phone right. Yeah yeah way better than the first one. Yeah yeah yes absolutely yes. Count wise counsel important. I mean he is so vitally important. Because it's funny because he eagled kind of reverses it again but what condos is he kind of help us understand what we can and count new and he helps us understand why we filter reality and he helps us to see what questions are meaningless. As in questions that are that are that can't be answered. He's a he's a critique of traditional metaphysics and he's a real he's the finer of science is the finder really of the scientific method. In some ways yeah kind. Yeah i mean his thinking is is he. He really wanted to give science a foundation beyond just probability right. He didn't think science. Just we see something happening a hundred times but it still doesn't mean it's going to happen one hundred and one time if he will to see him temperature authorities. Times doesn't mean you never know. Yeah just know the probability. Yeah so never say what's going to happen exactly..

Shehab faki canton compton hegel ryan Von
"shehab" Discussed on Hit Parade | Music History and Music Trivia

Hit Parade | Music History and Music Trivia

03:23 min | 6 months ago

"shehab" Discussed on Hit Parade | Music History and Music Trivia

"The movies were good to bruce springsteen in the ninety s in addition to returning to the oscar's just two years later with another nominated movie song dead men walking from the film of the same name springsteen scored one more pop hit in nineteen ninety seven. Thanks to the hit film jerry. Maguire is a god. She shehab.

bruce springsteen oscar springsteen Maguire jerry
"shehab" Discussed on Slate's Culture Gabfest

Slate's Culture Gabfest

03:23 min | 6 months ago

"shehab" Discussed on Slate's Culture Gabfest

"The movies were good to bruce springsteen in the ninety s in addition to returning to the oscar's just two years later with another nominated movie song dead men walking from the film of the same name springsteen scored one more pop hit in nineteen ninety seven. Thanks to the hit film jerry. Maguire is a god. She shehab.

bruce springsteen oscar springsteen Maguire jerry
"shehab" Discussed on Arms Control Wonk

Arms Control Wonk

03:43 min | 7 months ago

"shehab" Discussed on Arms Control Wonk

"Is that it is progressive in the sense that our knowledge can build upon itself. Right when you know how big a rocket is then it gives you a bunch of other details like how powerful it is how much fuel it takes and you can then use that information to better understand the satellite images. You're looking at. Yeah that's right. If we didn't have a great model of the morgue we might not have realized that it was exactly the right amount of fuel and the last thing which is a little bit more ambiguous for whatever reason and i don't know why they do this but scudder fuel comes in these containers these little containers. You know somewhere between five hundred thousand liters each and that's what we see in iran like there was a severe launch where they had the little containers but we think the oxidizer which would be nitric. Acid would comes in one container one giant container. Probably because it's so toxic and corrosive that you have to have a really special Container to handle it. And there is a giant container that showed up next to the fuel so our some shin is. it's a probably oxidizer. It's probably big enough for all the oxidizer needs. But i don't know that's that's we don't like we have ground pictures of the fuel containers so we're pretty sure that's what those are. We do not have a nice pretty picture of an oxidizer container. So that's like. That's the thing i'm guessing at. It's not a thing. I'm sure about but you add it all up like that's kind of a lot. Yeah no that's hitting the signatures from pretty much every possible angle. You've got the personnel angle cars. Come in so you've got your personnel and staff you've been monitoring you can tell when you have atypical timing. You've got mysterious stranger on the internet providing a tip Which is a different kind of open source usage. That you don't always get well was able to comment. Someone made which. I could not have interpreted without this person saying. Yeah i think. That's what that means. Gotcha but then you have. Someone thing that's actually sticking out to me in particular is being interesting is the scud. Derivative fuel supplies just because that's something that's also used for legacy north korean systems as an identifier is. Just oh anytime you have something. That's from the scud. Arc you can start tracking very specific ground support equipment because it follows the scud everywhere. For some reason it's like they had a discount at the scud support store it all out. So that's your signature. Is you and jonathan dial. Put together this. This open source picture that this launch failed going back to what we were talking about. In the first third of the pod you took this to zachary cohen at cnn. So that he could as you said. Ring the rest of the information out of it. Yeah because you know look from our perspective. The satellite injuries enough. I mean i. It's a way of knowing about the world. It's a pretty reliable way of knowing about the world. I was totally comfortable on the basis of the images that we had saying that between the june six max our image and the june one planet age there was space launch like. They're ju ju just don't go through that level of work and and not do it. You know like well. Maybe they scrub though on. She shehab but then. I think we would have seen other signs. We have the kind of back and forth for. I think for a news story. You really need the pentagon to go..

jonathan five hundred thousand liters first third zachary cohen one container one giant container each north korean every possible angle one planet june six
Naomi Shihab Nye Shares Why Kindness Is The Deepest Thing Inside You

On Being with Krista Tippett

05:57 min | 11 months ago

Naomi Shihab Nye Shares Why Kindness Is The Deepest Thing Inside You

"Naomi. shehab nice. Childhood unfolded between ferguson missouri. Near where her mother grew up and her father's palestinian homeland. Our conversation in two thousand sixteen spoke to so much that he's even more alive in the world. Now i always start my interviews by inquiring about the religious or spiritual background of someone's tighted and i just wonder where you'd start reflecting on what that was in your life all. I felt very lucky as a child to have open minded parents. And i knew they were open minded because they were unlike any other parents. I met my friends parents I also knew that they didn't practice the religions of their upbringings. Either one of them so this fascinated me as even a little child. And i would ask a lot of questions. There was no sense of a taboo subject on. My father had not really had a difficult time telling his family that he didn't want to practice islam. He said i will respect it. But i don't want to practice it and they had accepted that my mother's family on the other hand had been more hard hearted about her rejection of their german lutheran missouri. Synod background but this was something. Both of my parents. Talk about with each other and with their children. You know that people are raised in all kinds of different ways. And if it doesn't feel a meaningful to you maybe you have to search more. You have to keep searching. And i was a religion major in college. Of course you work. Because of my appetite for this topic and i was fascinated to study more about zen buddhism which appealed to me very much from the beginning and it seems like hugh became a writer at a very young inch. You're like seven six. I was six. When i started writing my own poems and seven when i started sending them out and And just today Some students i was talking to a skype class in kuwait. How much. I love the modern world that we can do these things. I was with these students for two hours. And i feel like i'm going to think about them for the rest of my life but one young man asked me. How were you brave enough to do that. What gave you the confidence. he said. i've been trying to run a publication here at our university campus. And i can't get my friends to give me their writing. They're not brave enough. What gave you confidence. And i think just having you know that sense of voice while other people have done it. That's what we do if you know words if you compose wanna share them. Because they'll have a bigger life if you do that so you know. I certainly wasn't thinking about a career. Just thought of myself as having a practice you know if you have a practice of writing then you have a lot of pieces of paper on your desk and you can share the if you chose to. And it seemed more exciting or illuminating. Share them and see what happened next than just keep for myself. So i'm very interested in general in this question of you know what poetry works in us but i think even that question itself hasn't holds the implication that poetry is something separate something distinct but it seems that in your sensibility. You see it. As very organic i mean there's i think it was in in some of your writing for poems by children. He said i do think that all of us think in poems i do i do think that and i think that is very important enough feeling separate from text feeling sort of your thoughts as text or the world as it passes through you as a kind of text the story that you would be telling to yourself about the street even as you walk down or as you drive down as you look out the window the story you would be telling a. It always seemed very much to me as a child that i was living in a poem. The my life was the poem. In fact at this late date i have started putting that on the board of any room. I walk into. That has a board Came back from japan a month ago and every classroom. I would just write on the board. You are living in a poem. And then i would write other things just relating to whatever. We were doing that class. But i found the students very intrigued by discussing that you know. What do you mean. we're living in a poem or win all the time or just when someone talks about poetry and i'd say no when you think when you're in a very quiet place when you're remembering when you're savoring an image when you're allowing your mind calmly to leap from one thought to another. That's a poem. That's what a poem does and they liked that and grow in. Fact wrote me a note In yokohama on the day that i was leaving her school that has come to be like the most significant note. Any student has written me in years. She said well here. In japan we have a concept called you todi and it is spaciousness. It's a kind of living with spaciousness for example like it's leaving early enough to get somewhere so you know you're going to arrive early so when you get there you have time to look around. Or whether she gave all these different definitions of what you tori was to her but one of them was an after you read a poem just knowing you can hold it you could be in that space of the poem and it can hold you in its space and you don't have to explain it you don't have to paraphrase it. You just hold it and it allows you to see differently. And i just love that i mean. I think that's what i've been trying to say all these years.

Shehab Missouri Naomi Ferguson Hugh Kuwait Skype Japan Yokohama Tori
"shehab" Discussed on Further Together the ORAU Podcast

Further Together the ORAU Podcast

02:59 min | 1 year ago

"shehab" Discussed on Further Together the ORAU Podcast

"You podcast join your host michael jenna for conversations with arise research program participants and their mentors as they talk about their experiences and how they are helping shape the future science welcome to the arise feature cast happy wednesday and welcome to another episode of the feature cast. We have an interesting episode today. This is something we've never done before. And i'm really excited to have the opportunity to talk about one of our post doc programs in addition to a couple of the participants the program manager and a adviser. So we've been a lot of people That we're going to hear from today and i'm really excited because they're all fantastic. This is a great program. We're talking about the intelligence community post doc program and What i wanna do is introduce all the folks. Who are you're going to hear from and then we'll get started with a question so nevada. I'm going to start with you. Tell us a little bit about who you are and A little bit about your background. Hello everyone and Thank you so much for having me today. So my name is nabila shehab. I'm an. I see dr research associate at noah. Air resources lab in oakridge tennessee. So i started my shape in january. Twenty honey in order to optimize the use of existent federal data to improve the modeling of the atmospheric bulletin dispersion in washington. Dc so just concerning my background. I grew up in tunisia where i obtained an engineering degree in agriculture sciences. From the national institute of tunisia. Then i moved to france where i pursue my masters in agro ecology and my phd in environmental sciences. Then i joined the staff. At noah irael in oakridge in two thousand sixteen in order for my nrc research falls working on ammonia emission in several ecosystems. Awesome you've been around the world allowed you in tau. Welcome to the rugs future cast. Tell us a little bit about yourself. I sell insurance album. I'm a third year post doc. Fellow program i'm was originally trained as more of a theoretical colleges but I now work with can lafferty at uc santa barbara. On problems. there are sort of at the interface of traditional epidemiology and.

michael jenna january nabila shehab france washington today oakridge wednesday third year nevada one Twenty honey tunisia oakridge tennessee national institute of tunisia uc santa barbara two thousand of the noah noah irael
"shehab" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

10:16 min | 1 year ago

"shehab" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

"Two stage rocket was used for the flight. Well turns out those suspicions which justified the new image is clearly show the launch vehicle. Wasn't a hat that's claimed by Tehran. But it was actually a Shahab three long range ballistic missile the same sort of launch vehicle. We had seen these types of tests before as we pointed out in last week. Show that has these actually a short range surface. Missile usually launch from fighter jets towards ground targets and so the use of such missile on and orbital on system always seemed strange. Have three is raining. Copy of North Korea's not Dong Ballistic Missile Series. Which itself is based on old nineteen eighty s Era. Soviet Union Scud missile technology but equipped with a new upgraded forty percent larger Scott rocket motor which is being developed by Russian scientists when the Soviet Union collapsed Pyongyang provided the scientists and their rocket engine designs with a new communist dictatorship to call home. Then you images show an exhaust plume. Whose color suggests the launch vehicle. Shehab three I age is fueled by on symmetrical DI methyl hydrazine. Propellant at an oxidizer composed of nitric acid with twenty seven percent die nitrogen oxide the launch vehicle. Second Stage is based around the new domestically-developed Salman Solid Rocket Murder. And it's being seen with some trepidation by the fence. Experts has it's likely to be the first step in developing a far larger solid rocket. Booster little is known about the third stage of the rocket stag other than it's liquid fueled and equipped with six by propellant reaction control thrusters that combine rocket stack blessed off from a mobile launcher from the Islamic Revolutionary Guards Cheroots missile range three hundred and thirty kilometres northeast of Tehran. The launch place. Iran's new no-one spy satellite into a fortune twenty five kilometer high low-earth orbit initial reports suggested the satellite was a three unit cube. Set images show? It's actually a six unit keep set fitted with a High Webcam and that in itself is interesting because as a spy satellite it wouldn't provide images of the ground that are as good as what's already available from several commercial. Earth observation satellite operators and it suggests that the root purpose of the flight was to test the new missile stack especially the new second stage. Solid rocket motor. The flight was in clear violation of Iran's two thousand fifteen anti-nuclear agreement with the United Nations. Us Secretary of State. Mike pompeo criticized launch describing. Iran's space program as nothing but a cover to develop ballistic missiles. The same tactic used by. Iran's ally North Korea as it developed nuclear weapons and missile systems needed to deliver them and as we mentioned last week also comes as the International Atomic Energy Agency reports that the Islamic republic is almost triple that stockpile of enriched uranium since November jumping from three hundred and seventy two kilograms up to a one thousand and twenty one kilograms. Another violation of its atty Nikolay Records United Nations nuclear watchdog says Iran. Now only needs another thirty kilograms of uranium. Have enough fissile material to build an atomic bomb at the same time as all this is happening. The Atomic Energy Agency's inspectors being refused access to three suspected. Nuclear sites enriched uranium residues being detected including one side at which they ran describes as a copy cleaning factory surely the only Catholic Lady Factory in the world classified as top sacred. This space time still come the science report and we look at all the available data on how covered nineteen infects the human body. Oh that and more still to come on space time and turn out for a brief look at some of the other stories making news inside this week with a science report the world has now suffered almost a quarter of a million deaths from the covert nineteen corona virus and over three million people of nabbing infected with the deadly disease which spread from the Wuhan wet markets in eastern central China. Now a new report in the journal Science has combined all the available data on how curve in nineteen infects the human body. The data tells us the virus a piece to target as two receptors which have found in the upper respiratory tract at the back of the throat and nose while most people will recover and someone even notice it others will go on to develop far more dangerous symptoms with the virus meeting through the Airways of the lungs into the tiny sx Alveoli by another area rich and h two receptors where oxygen transfers into the bloodstream. There the virus triggers inflammation dramatically affecting respiration and causing pneumonia. And from there often a rapid downhill slide into acute respiratory distress syndrome. The body's immune system response trying to fight the virus goes into a damaging hyper-immune overdrive unleashing chemical cytokine storm into the blood with immune cells even attacking healthy tissues causing widespread blood. Clotting leaking blood vessels and sending blood pressure crashing twenty percent of patients going to suffer hot damage possibly because the hotline is also rich and Esther sceptres. The blood clots can also trigger strokes and combined with a low blood pressure can cause kidney failure further poisoning the blood which then affects the brain causing a whole raft of other problems including issues with the central nervous system delirium and loss of consciousness. In about twenty percent of cases the virus infects the small intestines which are also loaded with Easter receptors and with a virus causes stomach problems nausea diarrhea in the five months since the curve in nineteen virus emerged and spread around the world of eleven hundred. Clinical trials have been registered globally including over five hundred randomized controlled trials. There is currently no effective treatment for covered. Nineteen the most common therapeutic agent currently being trialed hydroxy chloroquine which is currently involved in two thousand four trials with potential sample size of twenty five thousand participants. That was followed by seven trials using Pine Avia Return Avia and five trials testing desire. And you study one. That warmer weather in the northern hemisphere is some stotts may not the transmission of Curve. Nineteen a report in the European Respiratory Journal. Looking at the spread of the virus found no difference between more sunny woman areas and coolest anyone's researches say social distancing suffice remain as important as ever even as the weather changes now. Do you remember that Jim? Research vessel the Polish Donald Pollstar. Which has been deliberately locked in? Arctic ice in October as part of a study to climate change in the Arctic. Well it's being forced to leave it station because of the ongoing nineteen pandemic a report in the Journal. Nature says travel restrictions. Flight cancellations have disrupted necessary. Crew changes on the vessel. Ship is now traveling to Vauban where it will change. Crew and scientists expedition organizers have rephrased the ship at the same spot in about three weeks time and you reporters found that fifty six percent of kids aged eight to twelve and sixty nine. Percents of teens aged thirteen to eighteen watching videos online every day. Now America's National Center for Science Education has launched a new program designed to combat online misinformation about climate change and evolution to Mendham from Australian skeptics. The programs designed to promote effective science communication skills and teaching kids. How to distinguish fact from fiction is essential media. Us Oganization? I did a survey looking at perplexingly. How much Videos KEEPS WATCH ONLINE. And it might surprise you that Teenagers Thirteen to eighteen sixty nine percent of them watch videos online every night. That doesn't surprise me at all. Much of Eight to twelve year olds fifty six percent roles. I watching videos online healthier than the Macho. I was twenty four seven with a sit in front of the box of Simmons. I got home from school and I wouldn't leave till mom forced me to get a bit on. I hit in front of the fire and I put up a book of Biblical history and things and sit there and how. Mtv was basically there's a lot of misinformation and not peer reviewed videos so teaches Trying to understand how to count a lot of the False information that's out there invidious and for all the effort that looks like youtube and Google Fitter at trying to sort of keep the garbage of What's posted on their sites and teachers struggling against these sort of struggling with trying to Establish with the students looks good scientific information. What's bad for my group of the? Us called the National Center for Science Education which was launched these setup to Kanta creationism anti evolution. Theories supposed scientific evidence thing taught in American schools. Which is a lot stronger in American schools entities in Australia and in fact that Llanview doesn't exist in this group setting up to Canada that the number of major campaigns against various textbooks which assault which basically discount evolution in favor of Fundamental Christian creationism CETERA. They then moved on to other areas like climate change again. This is a big area for misinformation so vast applying that training and supplying teachers with information as to how to counter a propensity to not believe in science to not have faith in science actually believe in fight science. It's not necessarily to give them the answers. It's the process which is important. Teaching people pretty thinking skills so that they understand differentiate but that makes teaching the teachers had to communicate properly and a lot of teachers come straight from wherever they come from. Adam I come from a science background but not necessarily the science communicators. So that's what they're trying to do. Just listen to Asha that could do that. Actually Tim Mendham from strain skeptics. And that's the shows now space-time broadcast on sites on radio by the National Science Foundation in Washington. Dc and through both IHEART radio and on.

Iran Tehran National Center for Science Ed North Korea Soviet Union National Science Foundation Shahab respiratory distress Mike pompeo upper respiratory tract the Journal Pine Avia Return Avia Islamic Revolutionary Guards C pneumonia International Atomic Energy Ag Atomic Energy Agency atty Nikolay Records United Na
"shehab" Discussed on Charlotte Readers Podcast

Charlotte Readers Podcast

09:48 min | 1 year ago

"shehab" Discussed on Charlotte Readers Podcast

"It was like some part of me recognize my destined vacation long before I even knew what a writer was. By the time I was in the first grade. I had set up a writing desk on a little table. My grandfather had made a push the table against the wall beneath the clothes inside the closet. I shared with my younger sister so that I would have some privacy. Then I set it up with my tiny collection of children's books a jar full of pencils and a half. You Spiral NOTEPAD for my dad's carpentry shop. I don't remember what stories are right but I do recall that this was precious real estate. I defended it against my sister's pilfering in nosiness she-bear. Interestingly except for the little bit I in high school and college lit classes. Poetry didn't interest me in the least I graduated from. Unc with a degree in journalism then worked in public relations in wrote advertising copy for a while but it wasn't until I discovered some contemporary poets at Church Wendell Berry Naomi Shehab Mary Oliver John Donahue that I fell in love with the form still. It was another ten years before I wrote my first one. I had been writing essays and short reflection pieces for awhile then one day. The writing took his term. What I thought would be short. Meditation had spontaneously morphed into a poem. Since then I've worked with many wonderful poetry teachers and mentors people who've shown me how to shape and refine my intuitive ramblings into a few pieces that might qualify Israel. One of the reasons I love riding forms particularly acrostic. Poems is because the form allows me to make connections between two or more seemingly separate ideas or objects or people or things. When I ride a porn I start off by making sort of stream of consciousness like associations mushed away memory works then. I make a shift toward clarifying this connections as I do this. I almost always learn something or realized something. I didn't know before I started the work. The writing takes me deeper into my own experience in the deeper. Go into my experience. The deeper I go into the collective experience of all human beings touching the collective human experience is essential for all of us especially during these surreal. Frankly quite frightening times in which we're living. Poetry has always performed this function in society and I think we need it now more than ever introduced in the first poem. She's GonNa read today along with the poem itself. The first poem already today isn't a cross stick piece titled Bob and Sue Nineteen Forty. Five it crosses is a style of poetry in which the poet response to a work of our from another form traditionally painting but almost anything goes today. I wrote this poem as response to an old photograph of my grandparents in it. I engage my imagination. Explore both dramatic paradigm shift brought about by the end of world. War Two in some of the intuitions at long. How about my grandparents relationship and the way those relationship patterns repeated in subsequent generations? It was the way these two concepts in the imagery surrounding them. Intersected that gave me the foothold became the poems. Turn it route. This exploration as is true of most writing is part of quest for self discovery. Bobbins nineteen forty five. The war isn't quite ever but my grandfather is home for good. My grandmother shame of it is one of the first warm days of Spring Green Grass leafing trees in love in full blossom. Just look at the two of them. Hope to one. Another like conjoined twins dapper in their Sunday best posing on the bank. It Hillsborough leg the white of my grandfather sure highlighting his out of season Tan Skin bronzed during his Hawaiian tour of duty. He is glowing with law for her. My Grandmother Still Pale from the Long Illinois. Winter has pulled out. Girlish spring Gingham for this occasion. Church Picnic Birthday Party. We don't ask but in this moment they are alone. A double star inside an expanding universe. She nestles the back of her trim body into his Latin. Wrap his arms around her neck and chest. She couldn't get away if she wanted. Just look at the way. He adores or how he presses his nose in loves into the soft flash of her cheek his eyes closed in ecstasy. He breathes her. And he's home she says and she is in this moment. Smiling her beautiful life-giving smile next year. She'll give birth to a baby girl. My mother later a little boy. Decades will fill ballgames in Bologna sandwiches. Saturday night Pinochle Sunday tallies of the first Christian Church collection plate before either of them can blink there will be grandchildren and got cancer in Gulf deep and wide as Mississippi between them but today the bomb grass in a hangar. Far from this field everyone is innocent. No one speaks of RADIATIONS HALF LIFE. The half lives of the heart. What happens when stars collide today? They are simply Bob Ensue listeners. We've got more coming including the poetry journeys and reflections of Kia flow and Shane Minor. Also their first poems followed by a district. Shane Kia Kathy. J and Blues before they adage Chino that At our next episode we. Now we're going to be having our one hundred episode. This was supposed to be a big party Alive event Catava brewing. The virus. Got Away so we couldn't do that. Sometimes when one door closes another opens. And that's what's happened here because Exciting News Having tried some remote podcasting was able to invite And Record Remotely along way. All across the country with author Craig Johnson You may have heard of Craig Johnson. He's in your ties. Bestselling author of the Law Mar Series. The patience for the hit netflix original series long bar. He's recipient of the western writers of America. Spur award for fiction. Novellas spirit of steamboat was the first one book. Wyoming selection he lives in New Cross Wyoming population twenty five. He is a real conversationalist. I think you're gonNA enjoy this episode so tune in next Tuesday for our one hundredth episode with Craig Johnson which also kick off our season six now back to the poetry. Our next guest poet is Kia flow. Here she is talking about her journey as a poet. My journey as a poet and the reason why I love it so much has been nothing short of remarkable and just attests to that. Saying if you put your mind to what you can do it and I I I just originally started because I had written some poems and I wanted to perform them. Get him off my chest if you will Have been going to spoken word. Events a few years prior to so y understood the concept of open mic. That you know you may not necessarily be trying to travel It'd be seen and be known and record videos and do interviews and such. You just have a poll that you want to perform and that's how it was for me and the first performance and the courage meant that. I got I don't know if it was a drug or if it was an a message or an answer or the moment I found my calling if you will but I was hooked and I kept going back. I had a few more poems and with that I started becoming inspired to write more just based off of the things that I went through in life my perspective and I've always been an entertainer if you will And some form of capacity so it only makes sense to create it into a format where.

Craig Johnson nosiness she-bear writer Church Wendell Berry Naomi She Shane Kia Kathy Bob Shane Minor netflix Israel Spring Green Grass Bologna Mary Oliver John Donahue Long Illinois Gulf Mississippi America Wyoming New Cross Wyoming
"shehab" Discussed on DivaSpeaks

DivaSpeaks

07:00 min | 2 years ago

"shehab" Discussed on DivaSpeaks

"Easy. pull to have to be able to talk to you. The past definitely affectionately soul and says love molestation does happen early on child. Affiliated ability in the view is not to say that they can't ever reached that level a section of the Kern so I guess now question. How much do you love the person you know what real week back to Menas arena on apartment? Hasn't had trump hasn't gone yet. She's the question take care of me sometimes is the case of a woman is just not that take sometimes case a woman she made he sees you professing her love for you then by all. It's not her body is not inside eight it. It doesn't tell you something. Her mouth justice part. What do we do when we're industry and everything goes we're not making? What does it tell of office relationship? We're not you know that's what I'm saying. Say she's the shaving as some if we're trying to go somewhere relationship and we're not a quick here only thing is not truly with the and what does it. What does it tell me about? It attended by. Sometimes things. Don't always come and not click in in that area. which has something sacred religious this? This is one area venture struggling. I think you should take a challenge in concert. Together knots of that you could start exploring to get your mate to the level in which you can sexually satisfy. I mean appearance if you're not if you're not getting attentive to you if you're not white yes you. If you're if you're not in a way that is not optus quietly this can you make much more points but is saying we talk about six and we talked about as they should. There's something else we're this emotional. He's not speak to me like let's be real air relationship Carney's but I think most relationships six stills reduce body the only way or bring a whole bunch of baggage I should or boyfriends girlfriends. There of how how sexual relationship should be that. Uh speaking communicating want conversation because Astro. She's Dros we all have ups and have that relationship independent wash. She had been so bad in something a series and our relationship that we can't because the truth is you change your own way. That's the truth is this is not. Oh He's this is ease taught you about you. Know We. We've been seeing all females feel one bit. God Guy Can feel this insane bread sandwich. Hey Kathy Sandwich thanks. That gap has essentially the Shehab troop the as we refuse. I refuse and you know in what you're doing is home. No holding back. Not because males and females that always always always approached. You got to be that way. This isn't true relation and I'm not talking about the whole enough for somebody who has been this use. That debt is something that is just we came to talk about it and put it in context. Six aches right because it's totally different. Rooms person hurt person as a person and they were asking them to come out all move between it around it to say that's as well all of us all of us all of our service the abuse and I M we we all must right. Maybe there but you can't take advantage it too right so what I'm saying you're the truth is your damaged. Don't get into a relationship with somebody else to do but we might do but the truth is we should write a lot of times. We move so fast we can't even hear gutsy and rhys take ankle. Brace yourself before you move because what you're doing you're taking dance to hand care from the other person who carried it into the root new relationship as you're putting it on him or put her and they don't deserve any.

Menas arena Kathy Sandwich Kern optus Carney rhys Astro
"shehab" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

04:24 min | 2 years ago

"shehab" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Understanding orange slavery our understanding our slavery and this it is a <hes> an interesting project. You've been doing this for almost couple years sort of twenty seventeen yeah this is i remember yeah. We were talking to your early on in the i have a copy of the what the book used to look like this is an early version of it but because is it had he was making the comparison between the four countries you government shehab east germany soviet russia the united states and nazi the german border there common things that they have in controlling the people well because you've got a sticker and the hammer and sickles and as east german signal insignia insignia or something but if you have that up there and they go oh it's got got a nazi. Zimba's got swastika again and the game touch so didn't you take and you put the picture picture of the <hes> american pictures where the flag salute used to be. I pledge allegiance to my flag ziege high hi and after war to and in order to get you know so they said we'll do the hand over heart thing but the sentiment behind the pledge same thing thank you know and so were the you think is going to be the response when you have administration schoolteachers and everything everything and they see this understanding our slavery okay. I'll go in there. At what point are they going to be. Oh my god they're penetrating the bureaucracy and and get to the minds of the kids and they should know what what is it you think is so challenging to the system in there so i think the artificiality of the system so i think once you realize that this is a series of techniques like a playbook the tube slave up and rob a population and you realize allies that the soviet union east germany nazi germany are all using the exact same techniques <hes> i see a lot of people have kind of like aha moments where her where just because you revealing the repetition of the pattern and they can see something was invisible to them before now becomes visible. It's that repetition repetition of of that that revelation of the pattern of our officiality that they realize hey. They're forcing us into these schools. They're forcing us to learn this. The stuff and i think that's the thing that the kids don't really esi. The idea that kids don't really get exposed to in school is that there is this group is controlling the information they receive the information they receive says. Pay money to these people in this group and do you know and do what they tell you to do and roll over when they tell you to roll over and you can see that it's artificial. I think that's one of the first steps to bring on. That's what's artificial so the so. I mean the whole program so we're going to force these kids in to this kind of artificial program where we're going to control all the information they received from the time that they're in kindergarten which is oppression were which means a art to raise children the ideology of state and we're going to separate them from their parents. We're going to control the information that they receive and we're going join us all of the tools and techniques of an unethically manipulative colts or unethically manipulative religion to slide the pseudo religion of state is in this belief in in having a government in the the idea that it's legitimate government. That's necessary to have a government. It's desirable the abbott government. We're gonna take idea. We're going to bake it in a kind of pseudo religion population where they didn't really see it coming because we slipped into when they were young. We didn't tell him it was religion. We just used all the tools and the techniques of a religion but that's the big that's the big secret of that's the hidden curriculum in the school system and nobody's gone in and widely exposed the tools and techniques before were and i think that that exposing tools and techniques us the first step to getting kids to <hes> to wake up to what's being done to them well..

germany colts abbott government soviet union soviet russia Zimba united states
"shehab" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

09:00 min | 3 years ago

"shehab" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"It's a snooze or but I just don't buy that even even stasis at the is new. So the announcement is this news. I think the news conference is going to be absolutely fascinating. Quite clearly the president the faces of. Economy, quite clearly, he has very limited policy options to address it. It's ready ready difficult also to gauge what's happening with the euro-zone economy manufacturing recession, sevices resilient Leiper market. Okay. What do you do if you lead in the very good shop Jones for this with Credit Suisse? And I guess you want to go is Mr. Draghi's going to do everything not to move the euro. And yet you've got to decide if there's alpha or pop or gain either way in the euro is the euro movable over the next six months. Well, the markets has sold implied volatility in Europe in massive size. So the market Sunday thinks that there are many reasons for launch remove I think in terms of today the biggest surprise would be is a positive in. A you see druggy decides to address head on this issue or the stories in the markets around the possibility of tiered rates in the future. I think if there's a substantial discussion around that topic, then take the euro could move, and it would probably be downside. Let's talk about the move to have difficult. That would be your tolerance really stuck with to break. One twelve to hop them. We froze a lot of it. What is it gonna take to get the euro to break that level? It's going to have to be something. Like like what I just described some something along the lines of a conversation that raises the possibility of new innovations in monetary policy designed to dress more specifically what we can see which is very low inflation of very falling inflation expectations. A high likelihood of the missing it's targets inflation in the future to now druggy has maintained that ultimately the economy would cover inflation expectations himself. We'll move up again. So anything that suggests that there's a greater risk of dot on happen. We would need to see that before the European conclusively breakdown through those levels. This is critical shops in the trenches on this of this massive as you call it binary, call John just coming up on what central banks do what does the next move. I mean, president Draghi tastes the prospects that we could have. A pulse. It right at the bay. Or they would do something to offset the pain of negative interest rates to financial and the financial sector Shehab. It doesn't seem to me that that's on the horizon in terms of happening anytime soon. No, that's right. And I think that's the reason why as we discussed volatility in the euro implied the so low, and why markets basically that thing on the current ranges holding. It would be a surprise. If to frankly today, he decides to make it big issue of these of these famous, but the thing is it's still difficult to completely give zero this because at alternately it's still the case that the economy is shaky and inflation data a very weak. So that you don't really hard from that. And that's why we should live to this risk dumb question of the day, which we just take for granted. But I think for a lot of our audience is not a dumb question Shaab can the EC be cut rates it still technically possible, the central banks, for example, the Swiss National Bank that have even lower rates than they used to be current rates. Does the debates about how you so that would be particularly for Bank. Stability and therefore credit creation, which comes from banks ultimately in your area. So, but it's, but it's technically possible. And again, the issue is what does she do? If we go into another major slow down with another big fool in inflation expectations. When tool sets is as limited as as it is as long as the market doesn't perceive there to be a wide range of other options. It will still keep open keeping in mind around the possibility of more negative rates, which again, I think tells us that maybe the problem lies elsewhere in all of you that if they're going to do solution. It probably will need a fiscal components. The countries that have room for fiscal expansion like the play a role in that. But that doesn't seem to be on the menu. John wasn't a ten days ago that chair Yellen in Asia said exactly what you're Mr. Jaylen who say I think many people at this point. And for whatever reason Europe just doesn't want to explore the policy of Shihab when that changes when does the penny. Funny drop that you need a countercyclical fiscal policy in Europe. I think the difficulties is lies not so much in the fact that it's not been discussed efficiently to the house. It's just it's philosophically of the German seem disinclined to go that way. But also, maybe they want to see more signs of reforms that they approve of in the other countries of becomes like FRANZ, for example. So there's a quid pro quo. So it's a playing out to the question is whether the European economy consistent self long enough for this to really work itself out again, this plays into the view of some who believe you need crises the first issue, and in the absence of those nothing much happens, which is why so many investors tend to have a structural Berisha review. Well, let's talk about structural Barish year of you and talk about the cycle as well. At the moment. You'll view is different degree of bad. It's wake will agree that its way to Europe. But to what degree issue how because manufacturing? Very much wake in a recession. Pretty much services is how the hard data is still coming out. Okay. The self data looks terrible. How do you think druggy actually analyzes the euro-zone economy today with all of those different things going on? It's not that clear. It's really not clear because there are problems to for example. We don't know whether the US and President Trump will push on and force this year round other terrorists, which obviously if the US which impose time in Europe would be a new economic shock and something that isn't currently it's been talked about, but I wouldn't say necessarily in the price at this point in time for the euro or maybe even drugs assessments of the future. So I think it's very difficult because of the changing nature of global trade relationships, and especially for the euro area being expertise region laws in Germany. This is a key factor. I think in the current data as you suggest you do have the split between the services sector and reasonable employment outlook, by European standards on the one hand, and yet, obviously there's terrible manufacturing story and the other. But I think ultimately what I'm looking at that to to solve that dilemma is inflation expectations. And and if you look at some of these these owns David measures for the five year five year inflation swap for it, it they'd be fully these accession expectations are going lower than haven't bounced too much yet either even with positive news, like China's upside PM, I surprise some odd. So I think that as long as that's the case we should be on the side of these TV having to be remaining on the pressure to come up with ideas, Jonas with Credit Suisse. Thank you so much, and John I had forgotten about five year five year forwards in EU, and they have dropped like Iraq. I'm gonna put that chart on Twitter. You'll see. I I'm Bloomberg radio on John. I got to be blunt. I gotta use his chart tomorrow. I wish I use it today Bloomberg television policy in potentials excessive I chose. Well. That's the problem. I thought you're brilliant. They're on a fiscal. There's there's no worse fiscal solution out. Even if you the will to do this all his veto guests for this. I am tomorrow. The next day whenever it is. Where you got the will. But what's the transmission? Mechanism to affect tell them. That's the problem. Three issues. You always look at an analyze policymakers with these following three issues. What's their ability to act what is that willingness to act and what does the effectiveness if they do act and in Europe, the answer to all those three questions is not great. And that's the problem. Yeah. Stunning. You know, you're you're looking at the inflation is go to the dragging press conference in one thousand nine hundred miniature looking at the flation here really getting back to summer of two thousand sixteen views fishers of six down futures of fifty quiet take euro one twelve seventy nine this is Bloomberg. NFL news from New York City is John soccer. Tommy, John attorney general wisdom barn baking his way to Capitol.

Europe John Bloomberg Credit Suisse president Mr. Draghi Jones US NFL Swiss National Bank New York City Twitter Germany Berisha Asia Shaab FRANZ John soccer
"shehab" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:37 min | 3 years ago

"shehab" Discussed on KCRW

"On the last day of the world. I would want to plant a tree. But for. The fruit. A tree that bears. The fruit is not the one that was planted. I want to treat it stands for the first time. The sun already going down. And the water touching its roots in the earth full of the day and the clouds passing one by one over. It's leeann. W s Merwin from the two thousand fourteen documentary, titled even though the whole world is burning the young Merlin when he was ready for college earned a scholarship to Princeton where he also worked in the campus dining halls. He went on to Europe became a translator. And soon a poet his books started to appear and if you saw a photograph you'd notice that the poet Edward Hirsch thought, this is a great looking guy. When I first saw picture, I thought he looked like Orpheus his physical beauty was released. Quite startling always Edward Hirsch says Merwin by the time of his fifth book was in despair worried about the planet nuclear issues, Vietnam. He wanted his writing to be more urgent and to start Merman decided to do away with punctuation. Suddenly using punctuation felt like nailing words on a page, you seeking something like the movement and lightness of the spoken word, then as he became more involved in the ecological movement his poems began to root themselves in the earth in one of the most amazing things in his work is by the time he became a poet of old age he had sort of morphed into poet of praise. A poet of praise that happened on the island of Maui. Mervyn found a worn out pineapple plantation and with his wife Paula were to restore. For the rainforest his day would begin early with tea and the birds and the wind and maybe some poetry notes on the back of an envelope. The afternoon was given to bringing back the palm trees you talked about this in the documentary. These big beautiful palm. I planted them almost thirty years ago. Anybody thought they grow here. But they look at home now. He has kept very diligently that precious quiet, a waste of solitude Naomi. She Shehab ni- is a friend of the Merlins, she's often traveled to Maui. She I read his poetry in one thousand nine hundred sixty nine and said Merwin, this is a voice that could save us Naomi, and I went on to become a poet herself and a teacher and once she was asked to give a week long workshop at a private girls' school. They said please use the work of only one poet, she chose Merwin and afterwards, the girls will thank you note, saying it was the sense of mystery. They really liked that was the attitude the girls had how is it possible that poems which are a little bit mysterious. Help us to know so much more about our own lives. The trees the WS Merman raised a seedlings implanted more than two thousand the home that was shared and the literary legacy will all be set aside as part of the Merwin conservancy, Noah Adams. NPR news. As you have probably heard by now, the annual south by southwest music festival.

Merwin Merwin conservancy Merman Edward Hirsch Maui Naomi Merlin Mervyn NPR Noah Adams Europe Orpheus Paula Merlins Vietnam Princeton thirty years
"shehab" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

13:15 min | 3 years ago

"shehab" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"And it has an opportunity if you look at the events weather forecast is opportunity really cold in Arrowhead stadium on Sunday. Where temperatures are going to be ten degrees can actually be. Below zero potentially on Sunday for that game in the AFC championship game. What are you looking for Billy? When you look at this matchup chiefs and patriots New England, and what they represent a Kansas City, and what they've done here for Andy Reid, and what is going to be a turning point. What does the Saudi factor this matchup? Yeah. I think when you get to this point of the season. I mean, obviously, the everybody's focus is usually on the on the quarterbacks and the offense the head coach is to is to a certain degree. But I think you made a great point. I think the elements are going to be a big factor in this game. And I'm with I think it'd defense is gonna it's gonna come down to who plays better defense. And if you just step back in if you're if you're picking the Team New England or Kansas City to play great defense on Sunday. I think most people say New England has a better chance to be strong and show up on defense. So that's where that's where I see the difference. Right now England is much. Much much stronger on defense in Kansas City. I'm still not sold on Kansas City's defense hanging in there for the duration. It'd be tough to argue with that Billy. So if we shift gears to the NFC, somebody take man are we going to see a shootout in the wall is to Sunday what the Rams tough dome to play those saints man that is and that place was crazy the other day, and they'll they'll ramp it up again, there's there's no question that and that crowd is a factor guys. It really is when you're on offense the offensive line for the visiting team. He's got a real real disadvantage when in that environment. And again, I I always step back and say, I I look at us two quarterbacks, right? How do you ever? How do you ever go against brief pick against breeze is capable and that offense offenses capable with Rodney tax attack as balances they are putting up great great numbers. But again, the scope is you know, he's been a little bit shakey the last night. Month in December. It's gonna I think it has a chance to be a great, great bow. But here's what I say. I think the saints are they don't get enough credit and paid and doesn't get enough credit for being kind of a gritty team. They can run the hell out of the ball. Now. I know this they're they're one of the toughest hardest working teams during the week. They their practices are extremely extremely physical. They pride themselves on being being able to run the ball and pound the ball. And obviously the Rams are loaded at running back. Also. So I know we're everybody's kind of expecting this wild ass. Shootout and told the ball all over the place. I see too great great running teams that are going to put on a show on Sunday. Billy. It's interesting because I was kinda thinking the same thing when I looked at the match up is it's almost like now with the rankings injury for New Orleans, and that's a huge loss with the tortoise Gillies. It was a study interior linemen coming out of Louisville for the last three years and you look at the trying to protect the back end of that secondary. Aside from Toledo the rest of the guys in that secondary for the Rams have struggled and without Kerber Cup that offense for the Rams is not look the same. In almost seems to be two teams that really want to try and play keep away with the football emphasize the ground game. And we saw that with the Rams against the Cowboys were clearly they're all offensive line dictated won the battle upfront. And that was the biggest determining factor that game. No doubt. It's great great great points. And just go back while we were talking about a minute ago with that with that crowd. There's no doubt being a factor. It's a heck of a lot easier for those offensive lineman to run walk in that environment than it is to get off the ball against the against a really good pass rushing teams. So I think you're spot on. And I think that's exactly what the what the Rams were thinking. We wanted to go back. We want to go out established a run control the line of scrimmage and town had the war Orleans, and then the process keeping. One of the great hall of fame quarterback drew Brees on the sideline as much as possible. So Bill talked about an NFC team that's out next to eagle. So I wanna get your opinion man on the quarterback spot. Which would they do man. That's a tough one. We were just talking about that last night here at the hotel that is you know, what I'm probably guessing the minority. I find a way to try to keep polls. Whatever whatever you have to do to keep them might when when Carson Wentz was coming out. I absolutely loved him thought. He was the best player in the draft had all the physical skills to is one thing that always kind of bothered me about him was store ability. There's a reason this guy was at North Dakota state. He was hurt his senior year in high school. He was not heavily recruited. He was hardly recruited at all. Nobody knew who he was. He didn't he didn't play his his last year at North Dakota state. He was heard twice and he was like the Spurs might have been the first game of the season. At a high ankle sprain. In this time that he was hurt later industry. And you know, there's been questions now since he's been Philadelphia. Now, they're all there are legitimate injuries. This guy's just tough is anybody. But I know in in Howie Roseman, the general manager at Philadelphia, he's gotta be he's gotta be holding his breath said if we kill polls, and we're going full bore with wins. I I hope he makes it through the season. That's the only that's only knock on Wednesday at this point is career and windows now Philadelphia. I mean, if they gotta they gotta take shot next year. It's not that young team. They they have to go forward. And I think their best to go for is try to keep foles. You you have Carson Carson Wentz on his rookie contract. So it's not like you're trying to keep to really high price quarterbacks on your roster. You can afford you can afford to. Hey polls more than what way more than what a normal number two would be. And you're still be able to live with it. So I don't know that they're they're in a tough spot. I really tough spot. Guys, did a great spot is full absolutely as an awesome spot. So and and she got gotta root for it's nice to see somebody have that kind of success in handle things. Like, I mean, he's handled things like a champ humble guy. Very humble, really great great guy. We're talking to former ram Shehab Billy Devaney currently with the allies for American football the Atlanta legends. We'll get to the af here momentarily, Billy what did a pick your brain. Because now, I it's interesting when you look at guys that fall through the cracks, right? We're discussing momentarily the Rams ground game. Because my wife asked me this question, we're watching it and watching C J Anderson run it all up and down the field, and I explained well, this is the fourth team. He's been on this year. He started the year with Denver was with Carolina got cut by them with Oakland got cut by them. And then got picked up by the Los Angeles Rams after the girly knee injury explained. When you watch a guy like Anderson who clearly could run it amaz-. Clearly, we saw that in Denver that he can run it. How does a guy like that fall through the cracks here? Billy because we we see a lot of teams in the National Football League could use a guy like C, J Anderson, and there it was at the end of the season available for everyone to be had. Exactly it it. It is amazing. And you see you see it. I don't wanna say often, but time and time again, those kind of stories I think it's a classic case being in the right place at the right time. He's a good runner. He's really is elite broader, no, he's he's a solid NFL player. And I tell these kids we on down here with the alliance league. And part part of our sell to them is there's a lot of guys walking the street that have ability. But for whatever reason this scheme might not be great where the team is. They may be throwing team committed to throwing the ball over the field, and you keep to top tier running backs oftentimes things happen out of your control. And it's just not the right fit. You the other thing is who. Who knows maybe all of a sudden the light has come on? And I'm not talking about CJ. I'm talking about people in general all of a sudden like, wow, I better get my act together. This career is not going away. I thought maybe I maybe I need to work a little harder at my craft. Maybe I need to pay a little bit more attention and apply myself a little bit more. I I'm having a hard time finding a landing spot. There's a lot of factors. Why players don't stick in one place move on and finally settle into a scheme or team where they're comfortable? And and and the light comes on. I think that's a great example with C, J Anderson. So Billy speaking of you, just you down to land. So how's everything going with the and the Atlanta legends? I mean, you know, I know it's it's just so brand new and everything so talk about what's going on. But you guys, and I'm sure you're excited about the team. Oh, man. It is we're having a blast. And you're right. It's brand new every day every day. It's a new day, and as you can imagine with a start up. We're not just starting up a new franchise. It's a it's a whole new lake. So every day, there's some there's a new challenge and something else pops up, but it is awesome. I equated I go way back. I was part of the Washington Redskins when we put that strike team together the year we won the Super Bowl not. So unlike that eighty seven here. Yeah. Exactly, right. You've got guys here that basically, no man, I've got one more chance to try to get my foot back in the door, and the NFL I can't screw this up. So they were getting their best shot on and off the field. They've been I mean, they are we've got seventy five guys here. In training camp. And it's been a joy to be around these guys because they know they're they're trying and their hunger extremely hungry. And it's just the coach has been tremendous. This guy. Charlie Ebersol is the guy that's kind of orchestrated this alliance place co founder and pull this thing off in the amount of time that he did we're we're actually down in San Antonio. There's eight teams in the alliance league and all eight teams are training in the San Antonio area. All at different feels around San Antonio. And like when I presented that I said holy Christ. I know how hard it is for to have a training camp, which one team everything in have eight teams. It's one tenth of one town. Yeah. One in one town is amazing how they pull this off. It's been a blast Billy. I wanna ask you about that skins eighty-seven team here. What do you think for the you've been around football and pro football for a long time the greatest challenge the af has initially upon startup? Oh, man. That's a great question. The greatest challenge. Really to get. Find the time to pressure of time 'cause you guys have really no time to get rolling. Right. I mean, dude, we're kicking off in about twenty twenty five days. As a way to grab the attention, the NFL to grab the attention the football fan, Billy. What what do you need to see his league early? Oh, I think right out of the gate guys. We we've got to be competitive, and we gotta we gotta score. It's gotta be exciting football. I mean, I think our worst fears. We've got a bunch of nine seven games on opening opening weekend. You know, they get people like offense where we're at. I mean, that's just that's just the reality of things. And I think that is the challenge now, especially for the coaches, you can imagine they're tempted to empty the playbook, but initially the times we kind of taking a step back and say shoot if we're lucky if we get five or ten percent of the playbook installed initially we can build as we go on. So I think that's the greatest challenge right now is to get players up to speed on on what we're doing defensively takes care of itself. I mean, that's a reacting deal does not as there's teaching involved. But you just go. You go out and play offense. There's way more technical aspects of where there's a lot more teaching and where you're thinking about things where I've been reacting. So that's that's the greatest challenge. And then just getting all eight teams competitive and the other thing that we don't want. We don't want one one franchise start out Owen four own five because whatever market that in the hope it's not Atlanta, you're dead in the water. They're not gonna be any support. So you're hoping to come out and try to win some games show people in in your market that this is really good competitive football and kids are playing their butts off trying to get back into the NFL. Well, surly going to be interesting to watch Billy. I I grew up a skins fan. So I had to ask you about that eighty seven because if you go back to that strike season your organization that you worked for at that stage. They embraced putting a quality team on the field. Where a lot of teams did. I mean it hurt the giants. Parcels on the giants didn't. And then when the regular players came back. They so talk a little bit about Gibbs that skins team eighty seven and what you guys did as an organization during that strike year. Yeah. You're exactly right. And there's a lot of really good things about Joe Gibbs the one that best part..

Billy Devaney Rams National Football League football Atlanta Kansas City Carson Carson Wentz J Anderson Arrowhead stadium New England Philadelphia Team New England AFC alliance league North Dakota high ankle sprain giants England San Antonio Denver