35 Burst results for "Shawna"

"shawna" Discussed on The Down and Dirty Show

The Down and Dirty Show

03:23 min | 20 hrs ago

"shawna" Discussed on The Down and Dirty Show

"Purvis. Ken schrader ken. Schrader steve unbelievable robbie stanley del. Fishline kevin lepage. Dave indies tim steele in stevie reeves. Now that's a pretty good feel the car to have a race. The guys that make the race that would have been one heck of a last chance race and look at those name. And it'd been the heck of shauna said and a sidebar on the bush race. Actually it felt like a slow lap. You really don't know because you don't have radio. Communication with crew. All the thoughts that went through my mind were negative ones usually. That's a good son. Joe name a check qualified second and he later gave sean rose to commemorate the big event. Here's how crazy qualifying was that day. Her me sadler failed to qualify his car. Despite running second at the time in the busch series standings are hard and he was the first bush series regular at elton sawyer was six that time and the fourth busch series regular in the standings kurmi wound up starting the car qualified by sterling. Marlin a gaba name mike. Laws crashed his car during practice and he didn't have a backup. So team loaned him their backup. And when elton didn't qualify fast enough in his primary car to make the field. He took his backup back for mike and started it. Did everybody pay close attention that 'cause there will be so steve. Everything was awesome right up until turn three of the first lap of the race and mike wallace went three wide into turn three under shawn joe and that was the end of that. Where pretty ride and going to cut it. Now's the time. Timeline grits situation like that but Gee whiz look at the irony shawn. Owens zippo. Joe is next to her. They start one and what happens. Both of them are not out of the race in the first lap. Shun the poll. Winter and joe playing the gentleman. Dave arose what irony three wide on. The last lap may be bit. I don't know about you. I like i said earlier. I wasn't driving the car. So i don't know what happened. I don't know who was fall. But while at that point i don't know afterward. Joe was pretty blunt when he said about mike wallis. He told a lot of people before this race started. He was going to take some air off her smaller and get her lose. They told me. I should be careful. He did exactly what he said he was gonna do. And then there was shawna. She said it wasn't that he went low on the inside of me. He hit me he flat hit me and there's a mark on my car to prove it now for his part mike went on to finish eleventh and he responded doll criticism by saying. I didn't touch anybody. I didn't do anything wrong. I don't know why anybody's blaming may for anything. Look at my car. Look at their cars. The right side of my car.

Ken schrader ken Schrader steve robbie stanley kevin lepage Dave indies tim steele stevie reeves sean rose elton sawyer Purvis bush shauna Joe shawn joe mike Owens zippo sadler Marlin mike wallace elton
"shawna" Discussed on The Down and Dirty Show

The Down and Dirty Show

05:44 min | 20 hrs ago

"shawna" Discussed on The Down and Dirty Show

"She's back in the garage with a torn up race car after a wreck with mike wallace and joe name check on the first lap of the race between turns three and four. And we're going to talk about the race itself in our second segment. But i remember the reaction to everything that happened and you remember the accident to everything that happened and it pretty much blew up where there was a bladder disagreement about what caused that accident. But i'd like to say for sean. It had to be a really hard blow because she wins the pope. Okay first woman to win. The bush series poll puts herself in the book. And guess what that is something that are awarded her patients you know. If he's a patient the pooper sell. How much of an impetus thinks. She got from winning that poll. I mean she's on her way and then the wreck happens. You almost have to compare it to just a couple of years before when rick mass sat on the pole for the ninety two hooters five hundred that was the first pole of his career and it was obviously very very very big. Raise a very important race. He sits on the pole and on the second lap of the race. He goes into turn one boom. It's all over. That's right so bad as you did. And it's it's it's hard to fathom that you know i know. Athletes can feel disappointment. There's no question about that but just imagine coming off a very successful qualifying session for both. The driver's puts them in a position to expect good things when the race cart. Now what makes it worse as. It's either the first or second lamp when this happened. Let's devastated devastating. I don't know what hap-. I wasn't driving shawna's car and i wasn't driving mike wallace's car so only they know what truly happened. I'm not in a position to make a call who is right who is wrong but just the optics of it watch the race and say what you think. The next year in nineteen ninety five shauna had been going after james fanshawe and asking if she could possibly have a shy in one of his arca cars because his arca stuff was always good and she finally gets a call from mark reno and i had never heard this during one of our interviews before but she had recently taken a pregnancy test and after mark called she went to the drugstore about five more just to make sure and she was expecting. At the time she was pregnant she went margus at. Hey i'm expecting. And i just don't think that i can take this test right now. So she had a son in nineteen ninety six and a daughter in nineteen ninety seven and she started doing some interior design. She started designing some furniture. She would also go to the race track but couldn't stand not having anything to do and i feel exactly the same way. I cannot stand go to the race track without a job to do. I am not agape for after years and years of going to race tracks to.

mike wallace rick mass sean james fanshawe joe mark reno bush shawna shauna margus mark
"shawna" Discussed on The Down and Dirty Show

The Down and Dirty Show

03:10 min | 20 hrs ago

"shawna" Discussed on The Down and Dirty Show

"Definitely different than than the way that. I did it but i would. There's no jealousy there. i think it was. I think i did get when she got the she started on the pole daytonas. At the first time she ran by points it was by spare time but still it was like all this hype on first woman. Ever in first nascar driver female. I'm like a love that wasn't it. Wasn't that i that i was taking that out. Danika can't blame her but it's like well what what about the other. What tammy jo kirk back. There was still at think. I made a mark for a big agenda. Three told me once she's like. I just wish you would have been out there longer. I just wish you would have been out there a longer. Steve shawna talked last week about having this graph in mind when she raised in when she started that graph started going up she had great results and trucks and in the dash series but then she talked about moving into the bush series and impatience getting in the way and she wanted to move up the ladder really fast really quickly but when she reached the bush series. The results weren't exactly kind that she had had in trucks and in the dash series and i asked her how difficult it was to manage those expectations. It would be hard to race only once in a while against drivers and teams who are out there every single week learning and adjusting and adapting to what the car might or might not be doing. She's a racer. She wants to see those results right now. Well problem with that is as she mentioned. That really can't be accomplished on a limited schedule. You're going against teams like you said that are out there week after week at drivers at that plenty of experience so the learning curve get that much steeper when you can only raise unlimited basis in my opinion well. I'm also going to make the case that moving from those great big semi trucks series. I mean that. I can't imagine the difference. There would be in racing those kinds of things but then she goes from the dash car into the bush car and so that was an adjustment. And i don't care if you're a woman a man whatever that's going to be an adjustment absolutely and it's not going to take place over. Not anna's not gonna take place on a limited schedule not for very long. No it is not however she goes to rockingham in the spring of nineteen ninety four. She qualifies second for the bush race at rockingham and then she goes to atlanta as she sits on the poll. That was an awesome store..

tammy jo kirk Steve shawna Danika bush rockingham anna atlanta
"shawna" Discussed on The Down and Dirty Show

The Down and Dirty Show

05:59 min | Last week

"shawna" Discussed on The Down and Dirty Show

"Or if you would prefer just to do a one time show of support you can do that at pay. Pow dot me slash the same podcast. Shawna first things first. How did you get started writing. Didn't your mom and dad both race at one point. Well my dad always raise from before i was ever even born and my brother raised And my mom did race in. I think it was a powder. Puff thing or like that. But i think she anywhere. My dad did not like it whatsoever. Which is really funny. Because i grew up my sisters and all of us grew up with. i mean. here's my dad like we're going to pick a truck. I need somebody to go with me if we're thirteen fourteen year so ride with up to altoona and we're gonna go grab this truck on egypt following back. He didn't ever think anything of that. Because we knew how to drive from the time we were little kids and we had many bikes and we weren't wealthy by any means. It's not like we had a garage full of toys. But he was into Truck wholesale was his business so he would buy and sell fleets of trucks and then he did the racing thing in. Will you sack back in the days in iowa state fairgrounds ran all over pocono milwaukee and when we were little girls we would go in and play in the infield and then later he Took over promoting the iowa state fairgrounds okay and He was one of the original. He was the original who i inverted a field. So he was always trying. We kind of all the circus flood in his whatever. Me dot com the racing. of course. it was a circus so then he started promoting and i was at the point of Graduating high school was eighteen so he wanted me to learn marketing and travel with him. He was starting to do truck races. Because again something different that nobody was doing and so i went to start with the marketing thing and we were unloading at toledo speedway he would he would bring like ten or twelve race trucks and he would get local drivers to to run in then. We have other drivers in I was helping unload them off the trailer. And i just kind of took off on the track and he would watching me exactly. He was watching me and knowing how he knew me is. He's like when he was noticing. That like my just that. I wasn't scared and he's like oh if you do that with trucks you won't be. It'll scare you know. He knew that was like a challenge. So i actually race that night. This was back in the eighty three. I just graduated high. School may twenty eighth. And i think this was the next weekend and so him being the the marketing promoter. Mind he i would go. We would have. We were racing similar to the sprint cars. World of outlaws at the time. We were running wednesday nights sometimes friday night saturday nights so we were running close to sixty events in a season and he would. I would go into safe. We had chicago. So i'd have to go and At this time this is going to show my age but the yellow pages. You'd go through. You know you pick the three television stations and the and two newspapers or one major newspaper. And i would go and i had a budget of what we could spend for thirty second spots and i would go and.

Shawna Graduating high school iowa altoona toledo speedway egypt milwaukee sprint chicago
"shawna" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

08:41 min | 2 months ago

"shawna" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"Inspiring the listeners. To which is really great. And i want just to make that call to action here if you feel inspired act on it. Don't just feel it act on it by saint. Thank you act on it by inviting a nurse to your table to have the discussion because it is critical that we do that and china you mentioned. Hey a lot of people don't know this and the more people know the more people will reach out and ask for help. You guys want hire in denton absolutely and it is really important when you are when you're innovating when you're solving a problem. The different lived experience. The different perspectives are super important. And so yeah we talk about that. You know making sure that we have a seat at the table you know giving boys i have a voice and oftentimes. I have a seat at the table. When i'm looking for a couple more. Things have a position of influence. I wanna have a budget. I wanna have accountability. I wanna be set up for success and those tables wear and the executive decision making bodies. I think it's really important to ask who isn't here. And then the second part is why are they not here and oftentimes the people who were trying to solve the problem for. That's not a really dignified way to do that. I mean we need to be solving with them. We need to have the humility and oftentimes when we asked that question. Why are those people not here. Oftentimes it is because we overlooked them. We underestimated them. We didn't think they know this was meaningful to them. They didn't feel welcome. And so as much as we talk about. Making sure that you have that person in the table that there is burst point abuse. A deeper question is why. Haven't they been here and start looking at that question and then when we get them here make sure that it's not just a token. Oh yeah we have our nurse yet. We have our pharmacist. Oh yeah we have. Our black person know whatever the diversity need might be. I worry that we're not going deep enough to ask what's been keeping both from this great points and it's key right that don't do just to check a box. There's truly value here. You just have to believe right. And i would push on that too. I would say half the courage and sometimes you have to be fearless. You you know. It's okay to fail to pay to fawn skin. Your knees but push yourself into the situation to offer your insight your knowledge your influenced and use your courage stuck out. I was going to say the concept being fearless. I have a lot of fear. I i own that. But i oftentimes can put the fear. Aside and like can be courageous. doing things that i'm afraid of. That's so important. Well what are you both most excited about today. Ooh i think for me. I am actually excited that we are cranking out as many kobe. Vaccinations as we are. And i see opportunity to continue to get more and more and more of those belt. That is exciting. It is. I think what gives me the most hope. I don't think that i'm feeling excited yet. But i'll tell you what gives me. The most hope is our youth. When i take a look at the and i won't even call him students. These are scholars that are entering our health professions. They are coming in with a set of skills with an attitude with a drive with an intention to solve some of our biggest problems. They are willing to ask really tough questions. They are asking people in power to be answerable to the power that has been entrusted to them. I think that that is what gives really great hope. And i'm thinking at the. I mean the the vision that i have in my head at the moment is amanda gorman when she delivered that incredible piece of poetry at president biden's inauguration and seeing greta berg and seeing so many other youth leaders who are boldly bravely intelligently taking on big huge challenges. And saying we can do this. We can fix this. And i think that what gives me hope. I guess that's where. I'm excited frankie. Shawna it's definitely exciting to see our youth and their potential. And what they're doing it is. It is an in so many fields. But you know especially in health care with everything that happened in twenty twenty however recovering. I'm very proud of the work that has been done. Well we are here. And i truly have enjoyed oath of your thoughts and your company. Why you bonnie and shawna leave us with a closing thought and then the best place where the listeners could get in touch with you and learn more about you and the work that you guys are up to. Yeah that's great. You know. I think my parting thoughts. It's hard to sum. All that up and distill it into a little nutshell here but i think basically there is such an incredibly strong reason to be optimistic. Going forward whether it's the corona virus whether it's the changes that i think are on the horizon for us in regards to health equity whether it's around education there is a whole lot going on in the world that is reason to be very very positive and encouraged and i think is shawna highlighted a few minutes ago. Young people in general are really stepping up and have so much to contribute to this conversation. So i'm excited about what the future brings for us. I'm excited about what we all are going to do together. I think that looks really cool in regards to getting in touch with me. I am available on lincoln. And i look forward to people reaching out and communicating with them. That way key balmy really appreciate that. Shana so you can find me on. Lincoln twitter very easily shawn. Butler are anna's my time handle and then of course at this you now podcasts. Dot com website. But really wherever you listen to catch podcasts. That's the best place and like that. That thought of that caring people on a journey being a voice of of comfort whispering in somebody's ear and having a dialogue with them. So that's a good place to to find me. And i think just that that last that thought is that nurses really are from the standpoint of. How are we going to get so excited about breakthroughs. We get so excited about the drama but really the most exciting thing is when people have helped when they're not ill when they're not disabled they have dignity and inclusion and belonging and so when we talk about innovating for hell if you have a mission or a mandate that includes help and beautiful human experience here need nurses and we are there so many of us are everywhere we do so many different things and we are ready and eager to be part of solutions. So please do not hesitate to reach out to make sure that your including us and also to the nurses who are listening. Don't stand by the system on the sidelines or waiting for permission. This is that moment to take all of those tools that have been made to be used off the shelf. Find the problem that you're that you're frustrated about and the technology that you're excited by and find the overlap of those two and just start innovating love it thank you shauna and now is the time and you know. Take action everyone you know. I think really the best thing you could do if you got inspired by bonnie and shana today to include nurses as part of what you do to acknowledge to recognize. They're making a huge contribution and they can make an even bigger one if we embrace their full potential take action and do something about it today as a result of this podcast and so Bonnie shana really wanted to just thank you both and really grateful that we were able to do this today. Abscam salt thank you so much has gone. I really appreciate all the contributions you're making. I love listening in discovering these new ways that people are addressing different problems. Who knew how much transportation was healthcare issue. So i was very grateful for all of the things that you're bringing to the innovation landscape as well. Thank you both. Thanks for tuning into the psalm. Sale nurse leadership series for the show notes and to learn more about how you could have. Nurses join your mission. Visit us at outcomes rocket dot health slash santiago outcomes rocket dot health slash signs e. l. a..

Shana amanda gorman shawna shana shauna Shawna bonnie twitter today Bonnie shana denton greta berg frankie two china Lincoln both second part twenty twenty Dot com
How Nurses are Transforming the Future of Health with Bonnie Clipper and Shawna Butler

Outcomes Rocket

01:54 min | 2 months ago

How Nurses are Transforming the Future of Health with Bonnie Clipper and Shawna Butler

"Both of you have just an extraordinary amount of experience. a ton of credibility. You've done so much in your careers you know. I'm just excited for what we're gonna cover today before. We dive into the specifics around what you're doing your current roles. Tell us a little bit more about what inspires your work and your journey in healthcare. Do you wanna go first. Sure i'd be happy to. So i have been a nurse for quite a long time. It's interesting to me because certainly nursing his evolved as has healthcare and for me. I wanted to make sure that. I had an avenue to provide my input. And i'll give you an example way back early on. When i was a bedside nurse actually was working in an organization and As was kind of typical for the time we had bins on the counter that had medications in them. Nowadays we would never think of that. We would put them in a locked storage device or we had bins next to each other. There was kind of normal saline and heparin and potassium and other things. That just happen to be in these bins on the counter. A remember looking at them and actually seeing that assailing flush was right next to the end of tasks him and they both were the same size and they had the same color plastic tops and at the time even be in kind of a pop of a nurse that struck me as being a really bad thing right. An accident or disaster wage right. I know shauna and the crazy thing is that when i talked to the manager about it they said okay. Great thanks for finding this. We're gonna put it on next month safety committee meeting and it just made me scratch my head thinking why can a nurse at the bedside not effect change fast enough that can prevent something really bad from happening. So that's kind of what gave me a little bit of a push to really find how i could get. My voice heard and intervene. Make things better.

Shauna
"shawna" Discussed on Assistive Technology Update

Assistive Technology Update

05:56 min | 6 months ago

"shawna" Discussed on Assistive Technology Update

"They're walking while also helping them navigate through buildings such as shops or restaurants in this partnership. We'll share their aggregated data with tear. And that will allow them to know what routes are most used by folks with visual impairments. So it's gonna help here with different decision making when it comes to distributing their scooters or maybe where they put the parking bays and it can also set up no-go or go slow zone so if it's a place maybe that's frequent and by individuals with visual impairments then they can set those scooters up with automatically go slow in those kind of areas that information can also be integrated back in the app so the folks were blind partially sighted can be more aware of where maurice scooters might be says partnerships already been activated in the uk and they plan to extend it to other cities around europe and the middle east. The two companies are currently holding training sessions for different visually impaired organizations to give them more information on the app and on east scooters. So again i know we had some stories back in the past about east scooters in about how they were kind of messing up accessibility for some different things but with most new companies in new technology. If it's not made for. At we know that sometimes that's not always a first consideration with those companies but it's great to see that they are taking this inconsideration and hopefully this partnership can really help the health and safety of visually impaired individuals when it comes to ease scooters. We'll go ahead and put a link to the story over in our show notes. You can check it out for yourself. There are myriad of different assistive technology supports that we talk about here on this show but if you really break it all down. They all have one thing in common. And that's increased independence woman individuals in this world have neuro muscular disorders. That have them relying on others for tasks that many of us may take for granted such as brushing our teeth opening doors eating and other things. We're guest today is shawna persad. And she's the director of clinical and product management for medical and here to tell us all about the ability assist in how it can help individuals with some of their everyday activities. Shawna welcome to the show. Nice to meet with you today. Thanks for having me on the program. I am really excited to get in and talk about this technology but before we do that. Could you start us off by telling our listeners yourself. Yeah most definitely for me background in pharmacology and throughout my career i've always been passionate about research development and developing new solutions to improve human health and wellbeing and for me what was really exciting about attack medical as idea that we can create a solution. Nc an immediate impact in the lives of patients. And that always a nice thing. Whatever you can see folks actually be able to use these things and and really change their lives. Well the main reason we have you here is to talk about the ability tech assist. So what is it. Yeah the tech assist a wearable device that allows individuals with upper limb weakness to perform activities of daily living are device goes over our users arm and is customized to their strength profile naval them to do simple healthcare cats. Eat drink pressure teeth. Use a computer independently so by restoring independence for individuals. We allow them to engage more fully with their loved ones their communities than regained more independence. It's great and you said kind of with with upper body weakness and everything so it's using that little bit of motion. The individual has left. And just kind of assisting i guess yes. Iron device incorporates springs and motorists to offload the weight of the users arm. So imagine what it feels like when you're swimming in a swimming pool underwater. So by removing the weight of their arm patients are able to use their residual strength to move their shorter elbow. And that's something that's really unique about our devices idea that we have this hybrid technology. That's caused them to for each individuals and help support them and lifting different weighted objects. Is there kind of a limit on. How much can lift or is that dependent on the individual. Yeah it's dependent on an individual. It was designed to help support individuals lifting up to twelve ounces so stronger patients mabel to lift heavy objects on those on the week granted. This factor may be capped at malls patients that could benefit having that minimal. Shrines are device than acids access power. Steering you know helping amplify residual shrink. The patient has gruber to think about quantifying that more clinically it's correlated to manual muscle test score of two to three for shoulder in albany selection visually. If we look at it. It's just being able to let your elbow me an interest so off the table and be able to reach across your mid line so as long as the patient can initiate both of those ranches emotion. There's a likelihood that they could benefit from this type of technology. Still that's going to cover those things you talked about like eating drinking opening doors brushing your teeth all those kind of things. That are great when you don't have to rely on someone else to to do those things for you. Could you tell me about the process that you went through developing the assist for us. Our organization was founded about four years ago so we just reached a great milestone where we listed with the fda launched or products this last month so over this four year period. We really have been partnering with clinicians and patients to develop our process and was interesting idea this overwhelming. The that seem to be overlooked. You know everyone is used to seeing a wheelchair for people that can't walk but if you can't use your arms there are very few solutions out there and that was the driving after informing a bilas. Hack i'm sure in this development kind of phase you you gotta maybe meet some of the folks that were involved in that could. Could you tell me a story about some of the input that you got from from a user. While they were helping you develop the device. Yeah it's interesting..

Shawna today europe uk shawna persad two companies two three middle east last month first consideration one thing four years ago each individuals up to twelve ounces year both about east maurice
Fort Worth Mother Shawna Bieber Sentenced To 12 Years In Prison For Trying To Suffocate Her Baby, Dallas

Chris Salcedo

00:28 sec | 8 months ago

Fort Worth Mother Shawna Bieber Sentenced To 12 Years In Prison For Trying To Suffocate Her Baby, Dallas

"AP News A North Texas mother gets 12 years in prison for attempting to kill her baby Shana Renee Bieber pleaded guilty to a second degree felony charge of attempted injury to a child with serious bodily injury. She was arrested in 2019 after cameras it could Children's Medical center caught her squeezing her seven month old daughters so tight she was described of oxygen. It happened twice. The child named Lana is reported to be happy and healthy. Now Beaver has sent signed over her parental rights

Shana Renee Bieber Ap News North Texas Children's Medical Center Lana Beaver
BAME and Access to Mental Health Services

CAMHS Talk

04:28 min | 8 months ago

BAME and Access to Mental Health Services

"Hi everyone and i'm delighted to entities episode three f series of Podcasts discussing access to services from young females from an asian heritage and today we are joined once again by my colleague. Helen and we also have rush knee with us today. I liza hello on shawna. So for those of you. That have listened to our previous cheap. Put 'cause we've discussed on. Lots of different aspects of how savage says at kansas is support young people from an asian backgrounds. And today what we're going to look at is whether or not you guys. I know that this Understanding and knowledge among staff cam stalls. In exactly how we can support our young people. Helen that this is a subject that you gave. You'll really passionate about that is in operating so of enjoyed during the costs. Kind of getting an understanding. I'm more awareness of wrong credible. Young people of what that might fail. Obey like am i guess. Kind of following on from that Loss podcast kind of what to look at things and improvements recommendations. You know that we can take forward as a service as well as the young ppo. I'm professionals that might be listening to the podcast. Thank you so. I suppose my question than israeli d'ici fail say all four of us can about the fact that you're no longer using cam. Savage says bought when you were being supported by and the staff at cams or actually this could be open to to what the professionals that have supported you in your johnny attacks a gp all people within your school. Do you think that they had enough of an understanding about how your needs might potentially be different from from other people's Apostle Bitings were any different in. The sense needs in times of culturally like really normal about set. You know appreciate the not making a big deal out of things just because the Looking at whether or not deny like religious whether or not a so if they have different difficulties that was good. I'm shoulder lost. I don't remember they didn't make a big deal about it. Just because of what. I look like riches. We'll stay that treating you differently. Which is a nice thing knoxville. Thanks shauna the. I wonder if anyone else has any comments to add. Should you know it. Might be the ashley Made to Not treat you any differently but it might be you know should we. Should we do you not think we should be asking questions about cultural belief. Liza am definitely like relate to sean point to some extent about Maybe needs not being so different. I've mentioned before how identify more westernized nigeria saw. I'm granted very white area and all that kind of stuff. But then i'm go to say. I think i appreciated the effort. That was made by safeguarding. A kind of team. I say cutting officer at school and also my therapist is well. An effort made to try and educate themselves surprise In like i think. I mentioned previous. 'cause my therapist actually ost Their religion is a big thing for me about coach

Liza Hello Helen Shawna Savage Kansas Johnny Shauna Knoxville Liza Sean Nigeria
"shawna" Discussed on Future Ear Radio

Future Ear Radio

01:42 min | 8 months ago

"shawna" Discussed on Future Ear Radio

"Me. It always comes back to double down on the audiology double down on the expertise And if it means you know embracing new technology than than do it and learn from others like shawna who are already doing it so this has been fantastic. Any closing thoughts here as we wrap. I think just to add cheers Audiology erade i mean it. You're looking at this ear canal you it's you're looking at it with a different era and different perspective than other people that are looking at this technology you know so it still takes audiologist is sure and that fitting is so. It's not just. I have this scan and anybody can do the same thing with it. It still takes kind of our knowledge of. What does the acoustics do. The limitations from a physical standpoint that i'm looking at it's still very very clinically involved But it's something that you can provide to the patient a service. Yeah it amplifies your expertise. More less. So i love it. This has been fantastic. Thank you so for coming on today sharing all this has been a really interesting conversation. Thanks for everybody who tuned in here to the end and we will chat with you next. Time cheers. thanks for tuning in today. I hope you enjoyed this episode of future ear radio for more content. Like this just head over to future ear doctor where you can read all the articles that i've been writing these past few years on the world's of voice technology and and how the two are beginning to intersect. Thanks for tuning in. And i'll chat with you next time..

shawna
Hubie Halloween and 25 Horror Movies Classics

The Big Picture

05:29 min | 10 months ago

Hubie Halloween and 25 Horror Movies Classics

"See. CR. Thank you for being here with me today I appreciate you man, of course, man this is this is our favorite time of year in a Lotta ways. Yeah. I, think last year we had a conversation like this to write maybe around the release of mid Samara about what what's going on with horror movies. What are horror movies? Now the world has gotten certainly more horrifying in the last twelve months. We had a conversation like this, but before we get into you. Know Lists and the Adam Sandler movie. I kinda wanted to take your temperature on where you think this genre is at right now. Well, I don't know that we can say for sure because I'm not sure what her movies were not getting, right? I don't know what movies maybe delayed release that didn't get the festival bump that they needed from south by or or any of the summer festivals that might have happened So it's hard to say but I I would say that. I find my appetite for her pretty much the same as it was any other year. I don't necessarily find as festive outside I. Don't know the for one thing in Los Angeles. It's ninety degree. So doesn't really feel like Halloween but for another I, just you know everybody's inside. So I don't think the decorations of really started to go up yet I. Don't know that I don't really spend a lot of time in the Candy Aisle at my age you know what I mean what do you think? Well, I know you're costume guy. No you'd like to dress up just on any. Oh Wednesday. So this must be strange for you to not be able to dress up as a giant clown and run the streets. Pharaoh that's me. Yeah I I agree I think it's a little bit strange to not feel the Halloween and the Halloween season but I don't necessarily associate horror just with Halloween. It's definitely a twelve month a year John Reform me and it's this month a year. History to Halloween is when we are allowed to watch nothing but her for like a month and not seemed like we should be committed. Yes. I appreciate my wife creating a dispensation for me to be able to watch some of the most vile things imaginable on film. I several consecutive days on quite a run right now catching up on stuff seeing stuff for the first time. A lot of it is very gross or very disturbing and you're right. There's like we psychologically grant ourselves the right to do this at this period, which is pretty pretty weird. Come on honey. It's early. October. Let's watch. Torn to pieces. Yeah anyhow. What about from the from the year so far in terms of the movies that have been released have there been any that you actually liked from the Shawna Yeah I've seen a couple of things on demand that I thought were pretty cool. Some of them were like late nineteen things that finally got released this year I think that you and I. were. Really looking forward to seeing a bunch of stuff in Texas at. South by which was the OH maybe we'll go to Austin rate like right as quarantine was starting to become really apparent as the magnitude of the situation was dawning on us. So I I really don't know if you've seen anything in twenty twenty that you think is like really stellar. You know. I wanted to ask from hosts. Really Right. Y-. Right. So I think that that's I think that's where we should take this conversation which is a couple years ago. I. Did this Horror Oscars Gimmick on the site where I picked my favorite. What I thought was the best horror movie of every year since Nineteen, seventy, nine and I like the idea of continuing to hand out that award every year and so looking at kind of what would be the five contenders from each year but as you say Most of the movies of that are sort of noisy studio movies have been pushed back candyman for example, Nia Costa's remake reimagining of that classic is not coming out now until next year that's a bummer i. a lot of people were looking forward to it. I was looking forward to it. We got a few things. You know we got we got the invisible man we got relic There have been a couple of movies on shudder shudder originals, one of which I'll talk about later in the show. But like blood quantum, which I talked about on the show Z, the Beach House that I think are all worth recommending but I wouldn't say are on the order of. Hereditary or or something like that. You know that we haven't had a movie like that. That feels like it's a little bit of a moment. A little bit of a movement announces a new filmmaker in a loud and noisy way I. Don't know you know. Host is really interesting. I think the last time the show is just you and I talked about we talked about host and it kind of feels like it has has the belt for horror movies in twenty twenty if only by circumstance. Yeah I think you mentioned all those other like invisible man etc I would the lodge in there I would throw the rental and they're like. They were really there is some pretty solid doubles to left, but the host was the one where I was just like a watch it again I'm going to recommend it's all my friends I'm going to try and get people who don't ordinarily watch horror movies to check it out, and especially if we're talking about twenty twenty horror movies, it is a movie that only have been made this year. Do you think that that's a movie that's going to stand the test of time or only resonating with people because we're all looking at screens all day. No I think it will I think it's going to be a good time capsule movie for sure. But I think that there are some things that it does and you talked about this with Alex Ross Perry, which was an amazing conversation. If people haven't checked it out and I, think his some of the stuff he said towards the end of your conversation will influence what we're about to talk about today. But I think that you guys talked a little bit about the technology and the the storytelling that it employs and how it seems to be like a step for like an evolution in what could we do with? The collective psychology of what's going on with people and that's what's awesome about her movies is that I feel like unlike any other genre really taps into how people are feeling at any given time about certain things it has at least that capacity.

Adam Sandler Samara Alex Ross Perry Los Angeles Oscars Texas Nia Costa John Twenty Twenty Beach House
What makes a good horror film in 2020?

The Big Picture

05:18 min | 10 months ago

What makes a good horror film in 2020?

"Going on with horror movies. What are horror movies? Now the world has gotten certainly more horrifying in the last twelve months. We had a conversation like this, but before we get into you. Know Lists and the Adam Sandler movie. I kinda wanted to take your temperature on where you think this genre is at right now. Well, I don't know that we can say for sure because I'm not sure what her movies were not getting, right? I don't know what movies maybe delayed release that didn't get the festival bump that they needed from south by or or any of the summer festivals that might have happened So it's hard to say but I I would say that. I find my appetite for her pretty much the same as it was any other year. I don't necessarily find as festive outside I. Don't know the for one thing in Los Angeles. It's ninety degree. So doesn't really feel like Halloween but for another I, just you know everybody's inside. So I don't think the decorations of really started to go up yet I. Don't know that I don't really spend a lot of time in the Candy Aisle at my age you know what I mean what do you think? Well, I know you're costume guy. No you'd like to dress up just on any. Oh Wednesday. So this must be strange for you to not be able to dress up as a giant clown and run the streets. Pharaoh that's me. Yeah I I agree I think it's a little bit strange to not feel the Halloween and the Halloween season but I don't necessarily associate horror just with Halloween. It's definitely a twelve month a year John Reform me and it's this month a year. History to Halloween is when we are allowed to watch nothing but her for like a month and not seemed like we should be committed. Yes. I appreciate my wife creating a dispensation for me to be able to watch some of the most vile things imaginable on film. I several consecutive days on quite a run right now catching up on stuff seeing stuff for the first time. A lot of it is very gross or very disturbing and you're right. There's like we psychologically grant ourselves the right to do this at this period, which is pretty pretty weird. Come on honey. It's early. October. Let's watch. Torn to pieces. Yeah anyhow. What about from the from the year so far in terms of the movies that have been released have there been any that you actually liked from the Shawna Yeah I've seen a couple of things on demand that I thought were pretty cool. Some of them were like late nineteen things that finally got released this year I think that you and I. were. Really looking forward to seeing a bunch of stuff in Texas at. South by which was the OH maybe we'll go to Austin rate like right as quarantine was starting to become really apparent as the magnitude of the situation was dawning on us. So I I really don't know if you've seen anything in twenty twenty that you think is like really stellar. You know. I wanted to ask from hosts. Really Right. Y-. Right. So I think that that's I think that's where we should take this conversation which is a couple years ago. I. Did this Horror Oscars Gimmick on the site where I picked my favorite. What I thought was the best horror movie of every year since Nineteen, seventy, nine and I like the idea of continuing to hand out that award every year and so looking at kind of what would be the five contenders from each year but as you say Most of the movies of that are sort of noisy studio movies have been pushed back candyman for example, Nia Costa's remake reimagining of that classic is not coming out now until next year that's a bummer i. a lot of people were looking forward to it. I was looking forward to it. We got a few things. You know we got we got the invisible man we got relic There have been a couple of movies on shudder shudder originals, one of which I'll talk about later in the show. But like blood quantum, which I talked about on the show Z, the Beach House that I think are all worth recommending but I wouldn't say are on the order of. Hereditary or or something like that. You know that we haven't had a movie like that. That feels like it's a little bit of a moment. A little bit of a movement announces a new filmmaker in a loud and noisy way I. Don't know you know. Host is really interesting. I think the last time the show is just you and I talked about we talked about host and it kind of feels like it has has the belt for horror movies in twenty twenty if only by circumstance. Yeah I think you mentioned all those other like invisible man etc I would the lodge in there I would throw the rental and they're like. They were really there is some pretty solid doubles to left, but the host was the one where I was just like a watch it again I'm going to recommend it's all my friends I'm going to try and get people who don't ordinarily watch horror movies to check it out, and especially if we're talking about twenty twenty horror movies, it is a movie that only have been made this year. Do you think that that's a movie that's going to stand the test of time or only resonating with people because we're all looking at screens all day. No I think it will I think it's going to be a good time capsule movie for sure. But I think that there are some things that it does and you talked about this with Alex Ross Perry, which was an amazing conversation. If people haven't checked it out and I, think his some of the stuff he said towards the end of your conversation will influence what we're about to talk about today. But I think that you guys talked a little bit about the technology and the the storytelling that it employs and how it seems to be like a step for like an evolution in what could we do with? The collective psychology of what's going on with people and that's what's awesome about her movies is that I feel like unlike any other genre really taps into how people are feeling at any given time about certain things it has at least that capacity.

Adam Sandler Los Angeles Alex Ross Perry Oscars Nia Costa Texas John Twenty Twenty Beach House
Coronavirus: Israel marks Jewish New Year with second lockdown

Monocle 24: The Globalist

07:44 min | 11 months ago

Coronavirus: Israel marks Jewish New Year with second lockdown

"Rush Shawna or Jewish New Year begins at sunset this evening. But for Israel this new. Year's anything. But happy as the country becomes the first major economy to enter into a second. Nationwide lockdown against a backdrop of serious discontent towards the handling of the pandemic and the Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu himself Israel, which was one of the first countries to enact stringent measures to inhibit the spread of the virus is shutting down. Again, the three weeks we'll joining me now is Alison Kopplin summer who is a journalist for hurt a good morning to you alison. Why is this can lockdown necessary? Well. It's basically necessary because our infection rates which reached a really dramatic low back in in May. have been creeping up all through the summer months and then I'm have basically exploded beginning. At the end of August, beginning of September which was really. Enhanced by the the return of of kids to school we really see that they've absolutely been able to to mark. A connection between the fact that kids went back to school on. September first and that since then the the rates have been have been doubling and and surging among the general population at an unprecedented rate before that, it was basically concentrated in certain populations, certain cities, certain neighborhoods. But as kids went back to school, it just exploded across the entire population. So this goes against what the so corona virus saw said a couple of months ago when he asserted the socio economic trauma inflicted by covert restrictions was greater than its health impacts. So can you help line the state of the economy and how these further restrictions will impact on businesses? Well. There's been a huge debate going into this lockdown as to the extent to which private businesses should be allowed to continue business as usual a huge debate over the the pain that closing down business will cause versus the attempt to to fight the to fight the lockdown We already have a major unemployment problem and unlike European countries Israel has not been fully compensating businesses for their losses. and. So there's a huge bitter angry rebellion by business owners small and large and not insignificant chance that this time around because people have much less faith than they did in the first lockdown there's going to be a lot of businesses I predict violating the restrictions and an opening for business even in the face of the of the restrictions I mean, what does the Don actually entailed? Everything must close. Everything must close except for essential services such as supermarkets and and pharmacies public offices will be open, but they won't receive. receive the public in In Government Offices Private businesses. Again, this came after fight are two privately reopened with a with a minimal amount of staff in in Workplaces So you know the economy is being partially allowed to function. That's why there are so many as they say, Swiss cheese holes in this lockdown but they're worried that you know in the attempts to keep the economy going to an extent know if schools are out, you can't have a full economy running. That they're putting so many holes in it in order to keep the the economy functioning at a certain rate that it's going to be ineffective in terms of of actually bringing the infection rate down significantly what about the situation in the West Bank and the Gaza Strip? The situation is bad there too. There's a lockdown in Gaza right now and and the West Bank is also suffering from from it from an outbreak. So they are they're not in any kind of renewed full scale lockdown, the way that that we are, but they are they're in a difficult place as well. Now, this as you mentioned a huge amount of opposition to this and people are actually protesting who's out on the streets. Well There's always been a religious secular divide in. Israel? Approximately. Twenty twenty, five percent of our population are Orthodox smaller. percent of that are also Orthodox and those daybreak cities where the ultra-orthodox resided partially because of the large family size there and how how dense their residences is that has been really a hotbed of infection as well as Arab towns and. Cities and so it's been very hard for them to specially over a long period of six months to stop with their large gatherings, their traditions, their prayers, etc, and that is countered by. On, the other side and on the secular side, the need to protest against a Netanyahu how he's had this corruption trial, they've had large protests. So basically, there's this back and forth going on why can we not gather in a? Study Jewish learning while you can gather on the streets and have a protest, and for example, why can you go to your ritual baths and we can't go to the beach? So there's there's a lot of fourth fighting and then the the biggest and most desperate cry is from the business owners who are feeling so much economic pain. So there's protests coming from from all directions and how will this affect the political situation? While the political situation isn't good to begin with one of the reasons that Israel has been. So crippled in fighting the corona virus situation is as I said, really hotbeds of infection at least as of two three months ago we're in these ultra-orthodox cities neighborhoods, and what the coronavirus czar planned to do came in trying to do is to really shut those cities down and really be able without harming the economy on a large scale to focus the approach inside these communities and political pressures. made it impossible for Netanyahu, to really stand behind his are and do the because the ultra Orthodox parties said, if you close our cities if you shut down now. If, you don't allow us to go to synagogue. We are going to leave your coalition and basically bring down the government, and that's why at every turn these ultra-orthodox parties have been able to twist the government's arm into allowing them to have more freedom than the secular public looks at what's going on in the religious sector and they say, well, if they're not GONNA do it. We're not going to do it, and then you've got a very bad dynamic there. I listen Israel forced all foreign arrivals to self isolate on March the night that was before the World Health Organization announced that it was in fact, a pandemic given the the the country is now in this situation, won't you think that other nations around the world can learn by watching this? I think really the biggest lesson that that Israel can teach the world is. Opening up schools particularly when it above the age of ten or so is really a dangerous difficult and problematic as much as we all want to see our children. In school learning getting an in person education that that is really the trigger. This is now the second time that that sending kids to school have have sent our infection rates. Rising, and that's why any kind of a resumption of studies has to be done extremely slowly carefully in a measured way starting with the youngest kids and slowly going. Up and keeping a very, very strong monitoring. On how that that is affecting the society because kids go to school, they get infected, they come home in the infect their entire families. Alison despite everything. Shana Tova.

Israel Prime Minister Benjamin Netany Alison Kopplin Gaza Twenty Twenty Shawna West Bank Shana Tova World Health Organization
"shawna" Discussed on ITN Live

ITN Live

05:30 min | 11 months ago

"shawna" Discussed on ITN Live

"The gentlemen good evening. James takes here from Hicks new media and Infotainment News. It's. Tuesday afternoon. So Great Day to do another great show you guys are going to be in for a serious treat tonight. Let me start off with the the high level overview. So destination aesthetics is arguably Sacramento's premier medical, SPA? They focused on non-surgical rejuvenation and transformation of the face and body. I'm thrilled and honored to have their co founder and CEO here with us today. We're GONNA talk a little bit about the industry in general but it talk about how covert has affected the business. Maybe some key service offerings from the medical spa that's itself and maybe. Maybe get some insight on on what's next for Destination Aesthetics Ladies and gentlemen please welcome. Chana Krizner. Trying to how you doing. Hi I am doing great. Thank you James so much for having me on the show and then a few years but I just I just have to say that your intro video is amazing. So Clubbing right there. Behind the scenes. So yeah. So good to be here. Thank you so much. My pleasure, my push it. So we'll start with that right because I believe it was back in two thousand, ten twenty eleven right when you first open your first fall in in Sacramento and then we we did we did a an introduction to destination aesthetics at that particular time. Now. You got four locations we do. We have four locations Yup we have a Elko folsom. Roseville in Sacramento and we just opened Roseville right before we had to shut down for Cova Ed. So we're happy to be back and be reopened but this journey has definitely been a ride. I'll tell you that. Yeah. So talk a little bit about that right that's. That's that's actually some phenomenal growth in. That short period of time right to have four physical brick and mortar locations providing services talk a little bit about you know. Some of the challenges and matter of fact, just you know some of the lessons that you've learned over the over this period of time. Yeah you know looking back I think I was really soul searching and I didn't really know exactly what my true passion was. I was in Earth's practitioner I was working at Kaiser I was working at center and I was having a great time working at both of those jobs both professional but I was kind of looking for something on the side I. Actually had opened up a residential boarding care facility for the elderly and Carmichael and I owned that for five years and I was still searching. So I started doing kind of Bo, talks on the side and partnered up with a great medical director and my husband at that point was literally like, oh my Gosh what are you doing? You have four jobs. This is not what I signed up for. We were literally just talking about this just on the way back from our getaway this weekend and he's like I don't remember saying that now much like I vividly remember you saying you know what are you doing? You have all of these things going on and I just basically said there will be a light at the end of the tunnel. It was really it wasn't clear at that point. It was just you know I had my hands and a lot of pots. So it wasn't until I started treaty in people with Cosmic Jack Doubles, where I really saw the power of how you can really enhance someone's mental..

Sacramento James Destination Aesthetics Ladies Roseville Chana Krizner Cova Ed Elko Hicks co founder Carmichael medical director Bo CEO
Letchworth Village

Haunted Places

04:50 min | 1 year ago

Letchworth Village

"We'll take our first steps through the crumbling remains of Letchworth after this. The architecture of Letchworth village was meant to evoke Thomas Jefferson's Monticello. Built in nineteen eleven and feels New York, but two, thousand, three, hundred, sixty, two, acre Hudson Valley estate was a state institution for the segregation of the epileptic and feeble minded. A small stream known as Misiones Creek Bisects the property dividing it between homes for boys and girls ranging from children to teenagers. Letchworth. Village was presented as the Paragon of care and research in its time. It was entirely self-sufficient. Thanks to the large farm on the property. The young patients tend to the fields and animals on worked as serpents in their caregivers homes. Others were given vocational training in carpentry welding and shoe repair. It was its own ecosystem which also meant that secrets were easier to keep. The attendants were screaming again. So Shana pulled threadbare pillow head trying to drown them out. They did this every night drank themselves silly, and then yelled for hours. If. She was lucky. One of the superiors would come and break things up. She was rarely lucky. She peaked your head out from under the pillow to see if emily was doing. Okay. But the new girls bed was empty. No one was supposed to be out of bed. Bad things happen to the children who left their rooms at night. Shoshana didn't move. She prayed watching be entity pillow until her eyelids grew heavy waiting for emily to return. But by the time, her eyes closed the sheet still lay vacant in the dark. As always the children were roused before for chores. Shoshana was somehow relieved define emily's large is inches from her own she woke. Emily was holding a small cloth doll your hands Je Shana asked if it was from home, shook her head slowly. She said she had found it just sean a told you to put it back. Emily said our jaw firmly. To shot at tried to remind herself that emily didn't know yet. She didn't know everyone would try to take it from her how rare it was to have something to hold onto. Maybe, Shauna was being overly cautious. The doll wasn't much to look at anyways it was smeared with. Blood. One of its is had been torn off the clock had faded to a urine yellow maybe summit at thrown it away. Emily dragged the Dow behind her as she worked with Shoshana in the doctor's house, his family had everything. They weren't allowed to have soft sheets fluffy beds nice. Clothes. When she entered the building in the morning, she couldn't help feeling like emily's new doll broke in and out of place. At bed check to Shana watched as emily carefully hid the dollar under her bed. She made been new but even she knew the attendance stole everything. Shoshana. Rubbed at the fading bruises on her arms. Bruises, the same attendance had given her. It was inevitable that emily would get treated the same at some point. But just sean would protector as long as she could. China won't once again to Emily's big brown is the little girl was terribly dirty aside from the pristinely new dress she was wearing emily insisted that she had found it but just Shana narrowed her is she needed to know the truth she couldn't protect her if she didn't know who emily was stealing from. Emily hesitated. Shoshana. Pulled the dress off her and stood up using the extra three inches. She had over emily for extra intimidation. Emily signed and took Shawna's hand. She wouldn't tell Shauna. Could show her. The two girls snuck out of the dormitory avoiding the night attendance emily letter toward the woods for a small hand into Shawna's large one. The off-duty workers were so much louder out in the open where there are no walls to drown out the sounds. She could hear their argument in full now followed by the sound of a fist hitting skin. She knew that sound well and she hated it.

Emily Je Shana Shoshana Letchworth Village Letchworth Shauna Misiones Creek New York Shawna Thomas Jefferson Hudson Valley Estate Monticello Sean China DOW
How Modsy Brought Consumer Interior Design Online

The Small Business Radio Show

04:54 min | 1 year ago

How Modsy Brought Consumer Interior Design Online

"In one of the biggest shifts in consumer behavior we have ever seen. Companies are rushing to bring their traditional offline businesses online. My next guest has done exactly this many years ago. She speaks on topics ranging from game development to women in Technology Organizations Shawna. Tiller is the founder and CEO of. She was previously at Google ventures where she focused on the future of retail experience three year experience and SAS platforms. She also marcy new. Google ventures to connect fortune five hundred companies with relevant startups sean welcome to the show. Thank you very much. So how are you doing sheltering in place with your family? Adventure. What has been the one thing that will stand out when you look back in this time being the most adventurous. Honestly not Super Adventures, but just special. My son is just about to turn to and to be able to spend this much time with him. And watching his brain really developed like all the words that he learned on a daily basis has just amazing and one hundred years ago. They'll GRANDPA. What was it like? During the pandemic twenty twenty, he'll say I was only two years old I. Don't remember exactly and he will. Bullets Vally. I think that's time. So want to go back to your college days because I saw that you majored in entertainment technology I don't even know there was a major like that. What made you interested in that subject? It's a good question. I didn't know that either I was an Undergrad fine arts, and I liked science, and I could never figure out where they combined, but I took this class doting virtual worlds when I was a senior allege it was It was talked by Randy. Powell shoes a famous professor a. he wrote the last lecture. The course was amazing. It was early virtual reality. It combined like everything. I loved technology and art and design and storytelling. Working in teams, and at the end of the semester with like a week to go, I was like I have to do this. For the rest of my life and I applied to the graduate school. There, we are world history. So, where did this idea come from to take an? Taken offline business like consumer, interior design and dimmer online, offer tools, and also independent Zayn resources. You Know I. Think like a lot of ideas. From my own experience and it didn't really start as like I wanNA. Take this professional online. It started as me as a consumer, I was trying to design my own home with my husband. Pick out furniture. Imagine how everything would look and I just felt that there was a gap in the world like that. There was a missing place where I as a consumer could do that. All in the comfort of my home I wasn't planning to hire like interior designer to come to my house. Tell me how to do it I thought that was more both expensive in kind. kind of elite, but also it was It was outsourcing more of the control that I wanted I imagined instead solution where I would basically like upload pictures of my room, and what would come back? We would be visualizations like a catalog, but beautiful visualizations of how my room really could be that I could fully shop, and that really was kind of the cropped to end up starting Wasi, but you didn't just use of the technology. You also have personal resources that people can get a hold of now connecting the folks that the service to someone that can provide it right. Correct yes, it's beautiful. Of, services, so we have designers that you work with and technology where the product that we deliver it to. You is a virtual product that shows you how things would look in your space, and both have to go together in order to make the whole thing work. Here's the key question. What role did game development play and how this whole service and website turned out? It's a good question. I in turn. Graduate School on the surface to had I will say that that has been a big astray. Shake for what we're doing. And also I spent most of my career using game technologies in tools for the things that I've dealt and you know I believe that. There is like it's amazing. Combination of what already exists so that gains obviously gives you sandboxes things to play around with and a certain amount of control, but they also put you on rails so that it's not. Not so much control that you can't get your end destination. You can't can't play the game and we try to do the same thing in balanced that that right ability of the tool and the process of the product guide you at the designer to guide you, but also giving you the flexibility to make a lot of your indices within experience.

Tiller Google Graduate School Founder And Ceo SAS Powell Randy Marcy Professor
"shawna" Discussed on Hacking Your Leadership

Hacking Your Leadership

02:32 min | 1 year ago

"shawna" Discussed on Hacking Your Leadership

"Hey everyone and welcome to another paid for Friday episode where we highlight people that we feel are doing a great job of Polish leadership content resonates with us. We will include links to their work and tag them on our post to make sure that they know we appreciate them. This is our way to say thanks to other leaders and individuals that are having a positive impact on helping others become better leaders through sharing your thoughts opinions and ideas online for all to see and hear Chris. I have always wanted to use our platform to advocate for other people passionate about leadership and our listeners much content as possible to help sharpen their own skills through different perspectives and approaches. If you like US check out any one specific please tag him in the comments or send us a message with links to their content on this episode. I WANNA recognize Sean. Newsom SEAN is a season retail manager is open to new opportunities with this pandemic. We've seen a lot of people impacted especially in retail now. I could go on for hours about people who lead retail stores in their connection to their people and their loyalty to their companies and their ability to manage. Pnl's present on performance calls deal with HR issues and exceed customer expectations. But that would just be the tip of the iceberg on what most retailers are capable of the reason I wanted to highlight. Shauna is because of how she is handling her current situation. I saw one of her most recent posts and even with the uncertainty of her organization and her job. She was recognizing her team for the hard work they were doing. It was genuine because after checking out her content came across opposed that she shared a wild bag and it read and I quote when I started my new role store manager of a new store at a new company. I not only had to learn an entire new process and new procedures but new employees as well like every new store manager. I began assessing my employees from the beginning. I listen to feedback from the former store manager as well as conducting daily observations one of the quote unquote week performers. I quickly assessed was simply in the wrong role. I moved this young lady to a new role within the store. And she is now flourishing beyond words. The moral of the story is treat your employees like they matter and like their work matters and give them a job that speaks to them and you will be amazed the outcome. So if anyone in the Paynesville Kentucky Wise Virginia and Logan West Virginia area is look for talent. Checkout Shawna's links in the episode notes for everyone else check out her content for some uplifting positive leadership. Great Job Shawna and thanks for helping others to Hashtag be a better leader. Thanks for listening and let us know who else deserves.

Shauna Newsom SEAN retail manager Chris Shawna Paynesville Kentucky Wise Virg Logan West Virginia Pnl
Shawna Newsome

Hacking Your Leadership

02:11 min | 1 year ago

Shawna Newsome

"Hey everyone and welcome to another paid for Friday episode where we highlight people that we feel are doing a great job of Polish leadership content resonates with us. We will include links to their work and tag them on our post to make sure that they know we appreciate them. This is our way to say thanks to other leaders and individuals that are having a positive impact on helping others become better leaders through sharing your thoughts opinions and ideas online for all to see and hear Chris. I have always wanted to use our platform to advocate for other people passionate about leadership and our listeners much content as possible to help sharpen their own skills through different perspectives and approaches. If you like US check out any one specific please tag him in the comments or send us a message with links to their content on this episode. I WANNA recognize Sean. Newsom SEAN is a season retail manager is open to new opportunities with this pandemic. We've seen a lot of people impacted especially in retail now. I could go on for hours about people who lead retail stores in their connection to their people and their loyalty to their companies and their ability to manage. Pnl's present on performance calls deal with HR issues and exceed customer expectations. But that would just be the tip of the iceberg on what most retailers are capable of the reason I wanted to highlight. Shauna is because of how she is handling her current situation. I saw one of her most recent posts and even with the uncertainty of her organization and her job. She was recognizing her team for the hard work they were doing. It was genuine because after checking out her content came across opposed that she shared a wild bag and it read and I quote when I started my new role store manager of a new store at a new company. I not only had to learn an entire new process and new procedures but new employees as well like every new store manager. I began assessing my employees from the beginning. I listen to feedback from the former store manager as well as conducting daily observations one of the quote unquote week performers. I quickly assessed was simply in the wrong role. I moved this young lady to a new role within the store. And she is now flourishing beyond words. The moral of the story is treat your employees like they matter and like their work matters and give them a job that speaks to them and you will be amazed the outcome.

Shauna Newsom Sean Retail Manager Chris PNL
Hottest places in a city often low-income neighborhoods

Climate Connections

01:13 min | 1 year ago

Hottest places in a city often low-income neighborhoods

"Concrete and asphalt absorb the sun's energy so when a heatwave strikes city neighborhoods with few trees and lots of black pavement can get hotter than other areas a lot hotter fifteen eighteen degrees. Fahrenheit difference across the city at the same time. Be Shawna's Portland State University. Leads a heat mapping project funded by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration over the last few summers? The project partnered with local groups in Washington DC Portland Oregon Boston and other cities. Volunteers used cars equipped with sensors that gather temperature and humidity data. Sean does and his team use that data to create digital maps showing how temperatures vary block by block. The hottest areas are often low income underserved. Neighborhoods Sean says. Getting residents involved in collecting data can help inspire local solutions. For example people may initiate tree planting projects targeted at the neighborhoods. That need them. Most the partnerships have been really instrumental in being able to get the communities together to convene them to go out and do this campaign and then to come back and start interpreting what it is that they're seeing ultimately what it is they can do about it

Sean National Oceanic And Atmospher Portland State University Shawna Portland Oregon Boston Washington
"shawna" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

03:20 min | 1 year ago

"shawna" Discussed on WTVN

"It's changing and changing for the better Shawna really is you know not been so proud of of how our conferences come together in you know with our our Republican conference in the house we have a lot of different factions but all of the factions came together it's not only supporting president trump's agenda in look we work very hard to cut taxes even when Democrats said they were gonna make a partisan I said they put me in the party that's for cutting people's taxes are making our country competitive it's worked well but then it's it's all of the other things that this president down to and then they go after him for it they try to remove him from office for Ford literally for following through on the promise is because they don't want to follow through on those promises and so to see everybody sticking together it's been I think it's been important and it's it's even some other senators decided that in the trial they said you know Lamar Alexander so the other day you cited when he said he wasn't in a call for even more witnesses that she already had over a dozen witnesses in in there everybody else that's given all this and you want to reset you know the fact that it was a partisan impeachment that all the Republicans stuck together in the house it's enough time for the center I think it's time for everybody Washington to get a message you know you're there to be servants serve the people what are the main are you will have a waiter your server I was a server I guess is you don't a waiter waitress whatever server serve the people that means get them their drinks get them their food on time ask them if they like more butter can I get you something else with that that's what politicians never do and certainly the president's keeping his promises I respect it and I appreciate it the country better off Democrats do nothing but hate the president Republicans will learn from what the president is doing I think it's good politics but more importantly it's fulfilling a promise to the people there to serve so basically is that why you're doing better president in the face of this never stop doing his job ever deal every day goes to work any cares about those people the blue collar men and women who are forgotten by Washington president trump is standing up and deliver real results for them we all need to be there with them and those people that don't want this for the country they've got an opportunity November to make their case with whatever socialist comes out of the democratic primary I'm here and I will on behalf of the president's campaign we're gonna be putting up a strong United front a tonight at the caucuses throughout I wanna thank you can I have met of metals in Jordan are there to have fun yeah we all of us all right Steve Scalise the house Republican whip eight hundred nine four one Shawn you wanna be part of the program you have the right to remain silent and you news at this six ten WTVN you know pharmacists are experts in medicine and over the counter remedies so when a pharmacist says that she chose C. B. D. products from C. B. distillery for her own health problem maybe we should listen I'm into researching the latest medicines but when I was dealing with my own health concern I looked for natural alternatives first what impressed me most about CVT products is that they may offer many of the health and wellness benefits of medical marijuana but without the high I tried CBT and was amazed how fast to solve.

Shawna
Racist Housing Practices From The 1930s Linked To Hotter Neighborhoods Today

Environment: NPR

03:18 min | 1 year ago

Racist Housing Practices From The 1930s Linked To Hotter Neighborhoods Today

"Low income neighborhoods tend to be hotter than their wealthier counterparts. That was the finding of an investigation. NPR Did last fall. With University of Maryland's Howard Center for Investigative Journalism Awesome. Those hotter neighborhoods are not only poorer. They are also disproportionately communities of color. Now new research suggests that pattern was locked in nearly a century entry ago. NPR's Meg Anderson reports picture city. You know well imagine taking a stroll through. Its most tree covered neighborhood on a hot summer day. We you feel at ease because there's greenery everywhere. That's Sara Lee Anderson from the nonprofit American forests. There might be more people walking around. You might feel cool. Because you're walking underneath the shade of mature well-kept Tree Canopy Cooling. Things down is one of the most important things trees do. And they're also linked to all kinds of other health benefits. Data shows wealthy areas of cities tend to have more trees and that's not an accident our cities they're not like jungles where they developed just by natural selection on their own people design these places which means they were designed for particular people people and by using particular policies in the nineteen thirties the federal government rated neighborhoods to help mortgage lenders decide which areas of cities were risky risk. Risk level was largely based on the number of African Americans and immigrants living there the government made maps and shaded the riskiest neighborhoods red hence the term redlining that practice and the other discriminatory housing policies of the time helped concentrate poverty for generations. You can feel the effects ex- today literally in a study of more than one hundred cities nationwide. Nearly every neighborhood that was red lined in the thirties is hotter and temperature today than the highest rated neighborhoods hotter by an average of nearly five degrees Fahrenheit. It's like stepping into a parking lot from a park. You would feel that relatively quickly. That's be Shawna's a professor at Portland State University and Co author on the study. It was very surprising when we saw that it was a pattern that we were seeing consistently across the country. Shonda says hotter neighborhoods are likely the result of more pavement and fewer trees and that extra heat can make a big difference. Difference in those communities are much more likely to face grave consequences in terms. They're human health their financial health or generally their ability to cope with these effects. The policies of segregation that were followed by the federal government. Were so powerful that they determine the racial landscape of today today. Richard Rothstein is the author of the color of law it breaks down the history of segregation in the US. He says federal policies insured communities of Color stayed paid where they were in denser housing and with fewer amenities like parks and tree lined streets African Americans restricted to neighborhoods because because other neighborhoods so now on the Ford to them restricted to neighborhoods where there are fewer. triest weather is more heat than nineteen sixty eight fair. Housing Act Prohibited Housing Discrimination Asian. But it didn't address. The damage already done nearly ninety years after the redlining maps were created. You can still feel the difference.

NPR Richard Rothstein Sara Lee Anderson Howard Center University Of Maryland Meg Anderson Shonda Portland State University United States Shawna Ford Professor CO
Times Critics Talk About Their Year-End Lists

The Book Review

08:59 min | 1 year ago

Times Critics Talk About Their Year-End Lists

"It's the end of the year. And so it's time and our three critics. Dwight Garner Parl paralegal and Jennifer Salah have come up with their ten best books of Twenty nineteen. They join us now to talk about those books a little bit about the process and the difficulty of coming up with like these Dwight giancarl. Thanks for being here Nathan. How natural is this process? I mean is this something that you're thinking of from the very beginning of the year when you're choosing your books or is this like Oh my God it's November. We need to think about it for me. It's the latter I mean I I I feel like I was surprised again. Even though he shouldn't have been surprised that all of a sudden we were putting together our lists. I think I'm always thinking about got it. I am always even just like weighing one book against the other ones that I've read does naturally just before you start flinging around attitudes is it. Is it essential all is it. You know arresting rested more or less. I think I think for me. I'm always I'm always going through. But then the real sort of thinking in sifting does sneak up on me and suddenly. It's like I don't know inside some years you know it's like I can only choose ten. Some cheers you're like. How can I stretch ten? Does that play in to your choices. What I'm thinking and not as does it prevent you from or slow you from reviewing something really dreadful because you think well? There's no way that this is the contender. No An and I think it's just the luck of being able to review both Shawna's I've got to review enough books. I much more curious to hear from you John. As the nonfiction critic have not narrows bridge. It's a bit more particular. Your your lane. Yeah no I'll I'll admit that I- internally maybe sometimes externally complain about about having to make the list each year but I do feel like when it comes to the nonfiction books. Yeah there are just certain books that we should review that I should review and so I do it. And then that inevitably takes up a space among the fifty summer sixty some books that will review in a year. So I think that that's partly why I don't think about it during the year and then I just let it sneak up on me and November one thing that I noticed. Yes when I look at your list sometimes I think Oh. I'm surprised this is on here. I didn't think at the time that Parlor Twitter Jen like this book as much and I'm curious if over over the course of time your view of books might change our has. You're saying Parl years are slim pickings. Is that come the end of the year. You think well that wasn't so bad. Compared with what else is out there. This is looking better now. Things sneak up on you. You know it's funny you. You read a book early in the year and you think well maybe this isn't so superb and that as the year goes on the book and a sticks with you and you realize this was far better than I thought pieces. I love to read in general in critics. Go back over the reviews for year even a decade and talk about the things maybe they over praised crazed or under praised. Because as we all know you know works of our change as we look back at them we all know what it's like buying a new record. You buy an album and then you really dislike the first ten times as you play it in. Its the eleventh time where clicks and sometimes mentally that works with the book even on a second reading. Do you think about what might make your list from the beginning of the year. Anyway I do. I remember this April having the stretch. Why reviewed three of the best books I've read in a longtime right in a row to spam Bam? One of them was Susan Choice. Trust exercises distrust exercise and the other was the old drift by non Walis repel. And I'm forgetting the other one. I think it was the new Sally Rooney Novel Normal People and there was something else and I remember born holy cow like this is the best month I've had a critic in terms of just finding things that blew me away on the one hand you love that and the other hand you critical. I'm glad that the year simmered down or no not glad you're did similar was harder to find great things after that for me anyway and all three of those books looks made your list as well as two books that were on the book review. Editor's list the top ten last night boat to Tanger- and the Yellow House Dwight you also review poetry throughout the year. Do you think to yourself. I have got to have at least one book of poetry on my list. You don't but I like to. I mean I read a lot of poetry and it's hard to find the right book review of poem so few slots I feel are open to meet review poetry that I tend to wait until a poet has collected the book of verse out or a selected book that enables you to look at a whole career rather than just doing book but this year this crazy book by this poet. Chelsea minutes in the book is called. Baby I I don't care if it's in a way it's a stunt book it's sort of you know blackly funny poems. Read dark poems that take their the take the subject matter from old Hollywood movies movies and it's free book and it's unusual and I went back and read earlier stuff and I just realized this is a major talent. Who's doing a weird thing with this book? And it's a good book. I've been giving it to a Lotta people because it's a book that it's easy of access like give it to someone. Read a lot of poetry in. They can get it in find it quite charming and smart. But she's very deft. Theft is a poet and there are many layers to all sorts of readers. I find our charms in awed by her talent. What's your process like each of you when you are coming coming up with your list Jen? Well we each have a page on the Times website where it lists everything that we've written and so I look got all the books that I reviewed over the past year and you know there are some obvious ones that jump out at me in terms of being included on the list like which twins this year did you think. I just know that's going to be on there. I thought the Chernobyl book by Adam Higginbotham. I thought was fantastic and it was something that you know. I still haven't seen this. Hbo Hbo Series that. Everybody talks about but I feel like in terms of the book itself. I learned so much in the way that it was written in the way that it clarified certain scientific aspects specs of the meltdown. This midnight midnight interminable exactly and so that was a book that you know. I kept thinking about over the past year. Another book was how to hide an empire by Daniel Miroir Dwight with talking about having a period in the earlier part of the year. Where just is there was one book after another? That was just fantastic and that was another book where I had read a lot of books that were about the notion of the American Empire and critiques of American Empire. But this was a book that actually looks at actual territories the Philippines Puerto Rico Guam. You know all these places that that are sort of. On the periphery I think of the American mainland imagination. I guess when they think of what empire means and so that was another one and you know the Caroline for Shea Book about her time and El Salvador. You know quite stunning. That's sort of the process that I go through where there are certain books. What's that jump out at me? How about you parl? What's your method? It's so scientific research I keep I keep all the books I review. I've I have a bookshelf for them. And I have the order so I just look at them and stare up at them hopelessly but I also do keep like a running list of of about meteorology check and I'll be like okay. What's been in sort of spectacular with my thinking of and then of course but I think that that point that you raise an android did to talking about that book of poetry? Is that in the last couple of weeks of the of the monthly monthly sort of thing like what is stuck with me. What is nagged at me? You know that the books that you admire but you're this book had a power because we do with these books and they changed with time and they changed with looking looking at. What else is out there? They change if I'm honest about the conversation. That's happened around them. Sometimes I do feel like I look differently if I feel like it's been misunderstood. It hasn't been appreciated. Appreciate it enough or looking at the other books year and seeing the other reviews feeling defensive on its behalf and saying how could you miss. This is the one that did something thing different Parl. Two of your best books were more than a thousand pages. I know I like big books. I do I do Docs Newbery Award by Lucy. UC L. men and anniversaries by Johnson. That one how long seventeen hundred pages. I actually had to go to the doctor after that because I I hi developed like bad ice during they were just twitching. I'd like five hundred pages a day insane but the book is so good. I mean just. Don't read it like that. Read it like twenty five pages a day. That's both those books are actually great books to have by your bed over the course of a year. Absolutely because they're about slowly Lee narrating a life and in the case both these books about the life of these really really incredibly scarily intelligent observant women and and them reading the news news and processing the news and thinking about their children thinking about history. As it's happening. I was so impressed that they cross is hold me in that way given that like you know. Time is slow in these books and they're thick with detail and they are

Dwight Garner Dwight Giancarl American Empire Nathan Hbo Hbo Series Daniel Miroir Dwight UC Narrows Bridge Shawna Jennifer Salah Sally Rooney Tanger Theft Susan Choice Philippines Puerto Rico Guam JEN Times Adam Higginbotham Editor Chelsea
"shawna" Discussed on Breakfast Leadership

Breakfast Leadership

12:48 min | 1 year ago

"shawna" Discussed on Breakfast Leadership

"HQ is a wonderful option for any brands that are looking to influence their marketing. Looking to get the program off the ground Suzanne up today using the Lincoln are shown outs and use the code breakfast. It let me know you think like you said I guarantee it will pay for itself and I share cut. Excuse an amazing offer ends a good option for anybody. That's interested in influence or marketing. Now back to the show if the communication would have been you know open and the leadership would have listened to the warning signs that could have prevented invented. Thanks I I I know somebody personally that Recently left and organization and that organization is going to have have some challenges and a potential survival organization and they've been around for several several decades and it's a situation where some decisions that are being made at the higher levels There's concerned by the people that are actually doing you know the type of work going. They not sustainable be not Not being able to meet to those type of obligations that we say we're GonNa make and unfortunately when this individual voiced that opinion it was issue no shot down and they were basically delegated to doing different work and kind of isolated. You know it's your your classic bullying being such rates. That is an my gosh. I'm glad you bring that up because you know that's that's so true. Isolating people is a is a power over over move. It's a play and I think that it's based off of our unconscious. Prime mole desires like to to have power Whoever you know sets others up to be isolated first of all But also it it. Is it leads to the environment of disconnect distrust and then you know creating silos never they never bodes well for the organization overall because if people don't really have those first of all relationships they're not going to have the little conversations that occur That are just natural community building conversations. And they don't have to be profound found actually in conversational intelligence learn. There's there's three levels of conversations did you have you known that or did you hear about that. Three three levels. Yeah verbal physical that type of thing. Are we talking something different. It's about depth like you know what you're able to How deep you're able to connect with others through conversations and one's not better than the other depends on like well what's the intention you know? For Level Level one conversations is just about exchanging information so like for example You know if I'm texting you. I don't want to go into a deep conversation. I just need information right. It's like hey what time do you WanNa meet. Three o'clock great right so it it. It swims in the shallow L. O. N.. But it it serves a purpose but it doesn't really allow for those connections in the long run but there's nothing wrong with it just has purpose built level twos about exchanging information So to kind of position yourself in a way A. That says like hey I know I know something I I know something and I want to share this with you and so this is where people can get stuck in that power overplay. You know that that that game that people play where they're trying to be better than we. We have this addiction if you would to being right and so in conversations if you've ever been an Anna Anna conversation with someone who just has to one up you or I'm sure we've all been there. Where are someone just has to say? Have the last word or you feel like you know they're they. They're the smarter one or they know better and they're always trying to to position themselves so that you know that that they're the ones that You know they know better and a perfect example of this when it's done badly it when I was meeting a long time ago when I lived in Florida I was meeting a friend for dinner and she wanted wanted to introduce me to her new boyfriend at the time and so he came out with us and we were engaged in conversation. This is a long time ago and I was studying Natural Medicine and that's my background and healing and helping people transform naturally Was Kinda how I started my journey coaching. So during a conversation it came up about There was a some study that That the active ingredient in A common artificial sweetener converted to Formaldehyde at body temperature which is not good because formaldehyde embalm is an embalming fluid Ed and so it's not good for the nervous system. It's not good for your brain. So anyway he literally. I joke I joke. You're not here. He literally walked away from the table. Came back apparently what he did was he went into the other room. Got On the computer googled. It and then came came back and said you're wrong and I was like I'm sorry and he was like yeah. No that's that's that's a lie I was like I'm not sure he's it's like yeah I just looked it up. That's that's that's not true and so I was like Ha. That's actually a very bad way to build old friends and I almost said to him. You don't have many very many friends. Do you. Obviously not if you be confrontational that way. Just as a side note I drink my coffee and tea black so I don't use sweeteners so I should be okay with formaldehyde. Exactly not not not yet. That's Hopefully a long time down the road and even the cremation will probably the way to go. So what I I I'll I'll a left my Deal with that when that can sip. Exactly embalming for me then for you. So yeah that actually really does not lead to good connections and that so that's a negative level to 'cause there's positive to you can position yourself with information but not make the other person feel like make your superior to them are at least perceived and then the third level of conversation really goes into a whole new level and and this is about bringing the best out in each other. This is about co creating new possibilities new terrain in conversation by asking questions that we don't assume to have answers to so there you haven't yeah it's that's a great example of of off of all the levels and it's funny. How often we we cross pollinate is a good way to put it in a different mediums? Were text message. You know should be you know quick to the point of view I do. How's it going good in you know if it's more more than a couple sentences these these smartphones are originally phones in call people? I know this is probably Elliot's shock. I probably should have put a spoiler alert. There there there is a phone icon nightmare in. You can actually call it all on the phone and talk with awesome. It's I know it's it's weird. It's right answer with like a question like hello exactly exactly. It's like what is this thing doing. It's like what is this this APP. This is very strange. What is this thing? Give weight right it reach out. Make these connections make the effort. So if you're going to tell somebody you know one thing that you would recommend them to do who in order to really get their conversations to a better place than they are right now both work home life and in just in general you know what would that be if it's more than one that's fine but I'm just curious the one key thing that you see a lot of people struggle with. Yeah I think that but The one thing I'll say is is trust in that's actually building trust and that's an an acronym so trust stands for or be transparent relationship over task share success be willing to talk about your. You're shared success. What success means kind of not analogy of of of Wondering what what's the what does success look like to. You have understanding. I guess I just put the you know in terms of then I just ruined the order so you goes before us but you got it so understanding having understanding is really not about blue like understanding can be a heart to heart conversation that says okay I feel you. I might not agree with you but I feel you in right there. Right there is is the breakthrough and then the final team on in the trust. Wattle is testing your assumptions. Because look you you. We all have assumptions where meaning meaning makers right and we all assume to know the meaning that other people's words have Or actions have but unless you ask those questions and tell people your truth by saying you know this is how I feel. Is that what you meant by it. You're never really going to be able to get into the reality city of somebody else So it's hard to understand someone if you don't know what their reality is so that's it the trust model build trust through transparency relationships understanding sharing your success in telling the truth so incredible list. I think if people just followed that this world would be dramatically. Just that just by to see how. It's not a soft skill. It's an essential essential is an essential skill is essential as oxygen for us. And I think too often we we push it aside and it it's showing. It's showing them. A relationships are homes workplaces everywhere we turn and look it's it's showing the impact impact And those that can you know follow those those guidelines and and really get communication back to where it needs to be. I think will make a huge huge difference and and everything that we do and I think it's the key to pivoting if you want to adapt to a world of rapid change we need to be in Sin Arche which is the opposite of anarchy. We need to come together. Work together creating an environment government that supports that absolutely absolutely couldn't agree more so shadow working people find out more about you in the awesome stuff. You're doing they can find me through just Going to my website Shawn Pelton Dot Com and googling me I guess I actually have of Some some things that I do share Con Constantly engaging community through social media media so if people are interested in staying connected they'll be able to find access to all of my touch points by going to my website. Sean Pelton PELTON DOT COM awesome. We'll have that information in the show notes so Shana always good to talk within. Thanks again for being on show. Thanks for this opportunity to this year. This conversation Michael. I really appreciate it. It's been my pleasure. Hey It's Michael again. Thank you for listening to the PODCAST. I really appreciate it. Sure like many people. You're dealing with some significant stress and possibly approaching burn out. I know how you feel in two thousand nine. My burn out led to a year for.

Michael Suzanne Sean Pelton PELTON Shawn Pelton Anna Anna Natural Medicine Florida Ed Elliot Shana
"shawna" Discussed on Breakfast Leadership

Breakfast Leadership

13:06 min | 1 year ago

"shawna" Discussed on Breakfast Leadership

"Hum welcome back I have a very special guest with me today. Shawn Pelton tune how are you. I'm great happier here. Great to have a we met at the New Media Summit back in for twenty nineteen and a As I talk with everybody that is part of that ecosystem. It's an amazing amazing event in just have you know all these awesome people come to it. And and the connections that we make that long lasting Still Amazes me now. Wonderful that conference theme same here so to talk about some of the great things that you're doing a in one of the things that we talked about in the pre show notes is Just conversational intelligence. Now when people hear that go get smarter conversations and NIA that's part of it but WE'LL WANNA talk about it from the framework of our day to day. Lives in in our our workforce in jobs and things like that so tell us a little bit about how about that in some of the things that you're discovering sure. Well thanks for the opportunity and I appreciate the chance to be able to share this. In which is I believe a new discovery right. It's a new type of intelligence and many people are familiar with. IQ obviously obviously cue which is emotional intelligence the less known but some are aware of s q spiritual intelligence but in truth. None of those things really Make the impact like conversational. Intelligence can make Conversational intelligence was actually the a work of the late Judith. E glacier who was my teacher my adviser and she she was an organizational anthropologist who was able to help great leaders build trust and get extraordinary results Through this skill because she realized how conversations shape the culture and She she talked about about how words create our worlds and they have the power to move from that position of being dominant which is power over others to have in power with which Brits Bridges Gaps in bridging those gaps. I think is something that we're seeing more and more prevalent in in the workplaces across the globe. `specially in North America where we're seeing and just amazing turnover of staff. People aren't staying in organizations for very long. The engagement is next to the nothing The the communication is broken at best. If at all and I in people are trying trying to find a light bet with what they do in their profession where they work and one of the challenges in this has obvious ripple effect because because people take work home whether they're constantly connected because of their smartphones or just the the stress in the feeling pulling like they're not really connected at work you know that carries through and conversations at home.

Shawn Pelton North America Judith
"shawna" Discussed on TennisPAL Chronicles

TennisPAL Chronicles

11:42 min | 1 year ago

"shawna" Discussed on TennisPAL Chronicles

"And helping to grow the game. We think it's awesome. Thanks fill up. I'm really happy that I got to do this and can't wait to reconnect soon. Yes we'll talk soon. Thank you so much. Thanks so much while. Fill up I really liked what I heard from that interview. I think it's tough you hash. She's so great. I love her passion. I love what she's doing with kind of innovating and creating space for tennis in the private realm so I think that's so smart. Yeah I definitely am excited here for me anyway as a tennis pal APP supporter It does so much for me in my personal life of being like tennis fan and a person who plays tennis That I just. I can't wait to see development. They're like that is what I took away. I mean most of what I just heard is like just being really as a as a fan of you being an amazing coach and hoping that this tool will now help you as well You but just also as a fan of tennis Powell and just seeing the growth and like the ways that they're expanding their horizons super excited and that is the question right. How do we grow tennis? I think all of the US Ta's scratching their heads. Saying how do we grow tennis Especially in the younger areas. One of the problems of growing tennis. Sean points out is we. Just don't have courts so let coaches half courts and this is one of the solutions for that so I think that is super great. I Love Tennis. Pals going to be a part of that tennis. Hal is coming alongside home court and developing this as part of the tennis PAL APP so that it can grow that it can be more inclusive and be kind of an Airbnb for tennis courts I think that's an awesome development. I love it. I think the idea is great and I can't wait to see them soar. Yeah so I think in two thousand twenty will bring Shawna Back. Maybe even talk to holly and see the founder of tennis balanced. See how that's developing but something really look forward to and how about this story about Pam Shriver? That's pretty cool. I mean my goodness I. I would feel so nervous trying to coach child. Can you imagine like Andy? Roddick's kid or Roger Federer's kid who coaches Roger Federer's twins. I mean I know somebody because I saw pictures of the kids playing tennis. Yeah can you imagine the Martinez mom? Just kidding that makes sense. Oh if she did she would have them be little. Grand Slam champions. We always say like if they're two sets of twins that means they could be singles. Champions Doubles Champions Makes Double Doubles. Men's in women's can you imagine. I mean honestly. The odds are so unlikely but stranger things have happened right. It is Roger Fetters. Kids so I wouldn't put it past. And what if what if the next generation was Andy Murray Inverse Prevention Roger? All my goodness Rafa just got married. So hey you know he'll have a young up and comer who will watch none of them play tennis at all. They're like snowboard exactly or maybe soccer or football. Yeah 'cause I think they all played football when they're young. Yeah Yeah Right. They all have incredible hand. I foot high coordination. Yeah I think I think for Roger. He was trying to debate whether he was GonNa play football or tennis. Your same with RAF. I heard that Rafa was a good. Yeah he was good and he had that uncle who was a pro player so I think he made a good choice. You think I mean I was voting. I would've I would've voted for him to kill play soccer. Just kidding Oh man. Wow Yeah and we we have to hear from our Ruffin reporter about the wedding. Yeah don't you think he's kind of stalking him and trying to figure out like how that all went down? There was a lot of cool pictures and video. And I didn't we need to do a recap. Yeah for sure. That'd be great. Well Phil how do people get a hold of? Shawna if they want if they are interested in any of her services or helping with her ideas see. That's why you're here. You're so good so first of all. Her website is S. B. W. TENNIS DOT COM. And that's where you can find out about her coaching program in which he's been doing it you can contact there. Of course you can email her sean At SP W TENNIS DOT COM and then she also said you know you can just call her and connect with their. I'm not going to give out our phone number but you can. Just you know she really wants to talk to people especially if you have a private court in your home that you want to consider maybe using in this way so that Professional coaches can come and coach on your court and you can set up a deal and make that court available Not only to grow the game but also I think it's for their benefit as well. 'cause they get some kind of residual payment as well so. I think that would be super awesome. I'm really excited to see what Sean is going to do in the future and I mean she's been coaching for seventeen years so To be able to do as well as she's done in the very competitive west La area. I mean wow she must have a really really great program Palisades Brentwood Santa Monica so. If you're in that area and you're looking for a great coach and a great program definitely check out S. B. W. TENNIS DOT com great. And I'm going to also put the link for where tennis pal is collecting home court information. They're building a database. So I'll put that up in the show notes and people can just go there. Click on the link and fill out your information and will contact you and kind of connect with the have a one on one conversation about using your courts in the upcoming year awesome. I'll make sure to put my home court on that list. I'm not sure that the carpet mini tennis. That you have all what about the grass court I have in my backyard looks like Wimbledon finals. Day just dirt with a couple of patches of grass like that one area of all dirt right at the baseline. That's what that's how my whole court looks. That's how my front lawn try and play one day and it's in the dirt. I honestly haven't ever played on red clay so I have that to look forward to you. Yes and and of course if I could ever play on like true grass courts. What are some in Palm Springs? That's what I heard. Palm Springs friend of mine is trying to get to go out there. A couple months ago I was busy. I was Outta town In big bear so I didn't get to go but I would like to go me too that we should go together absolutely. You can give me lessons. No we'll just have fun. We'll just play. That'd be awesome. Yeah Love Plankton. So we're at the end of the year this November. And it's like you said it's the off season finally but there is actually kind of a lot of ex- excess stuff happening right. Well I think Rogers and South America doing extra stuff and then isn't their Davis Cup stuff. Happening well guarded right controversial. I'm like if there's no ranking points or prize money now don't pay attention. Yeah I should probably pay more attention to that. I think I think I should to. That would be great but just on a parting note. I mean any last thoughts on the ATP finals and all the matches and the big three going out which was crazy. Well of course as a Roger Fan to see him what. Jovovich like that. And give us such a thrill. And then just follow it up with like a dud performance. I mean I heard people say that since you pastas outplayed him. But I just felt like Roger was really flat and he did not show up at all. it's kind of like actually when the young up and comer will beat like a Roger or a joke of each and then the next round the suck in there like it was like. Roger doing that which is so uncharacteristic So that that was you know it was like a super highlight in total. Bummer but I'll tell you what like Team and Jovic their match was amazing and I think it was a round robin will it was. I don't know I said I think it was round robin and it was an amazing match And then the final. I found to be very entertaining. Cincy POSS team like for me. The one handed backhand like extravaganza. Yeah it was like Christmas morning backhand porn. Oh my gosh totally. It was like so satisfying and it went down to a final tie-break so I mean how much more exciting can it be? Yeah for Real I mean I. I don't even know who I was rooting for. I really didn't care like them. Both as people and tennis players they're games are so fun to watch like sixty PAS to me is like so much variety kind of reminds me of Roger and teams like so powerful. Sometimes he reminds me of of Rinca Interesting yeah and so I was. I don't know I don't know who I was reading but I felt like I was kinda rooting more for team. Maybe because he's older and I felt like his opportunities are just going to be less than sixty possibly for like six pulses future so bright and he is a million things to look forward to Those I was Intr- or it was interesting for me. I guess to see team. Just kind of like not. Take it a buddy. Would I mean he was dominating pretty well? In the beginning I mean he beat Djokovic and Federer and last year as Avera did the same thing. Yeah I thought for sure that team was GONNA take it. I just felt like that was the pattern. You know. It wasn't and they give a weird or not weird that they gave an interesting stat That team was eleven. No in deciding sets this year so he had never lost a decide. Like a third or fifth set Until then and I think he was even Kamini break and playing really well and then just like what was he doing? Just I was very surprised to actually see him lose but again. I was very happy for Cincy poss. I really liked that kid like I can totally get behind him. Yeah so unique. Well I know our sits passer porter Crystal from Talk Tennis T. He was posting a lot on twitter. She was super happy. That's that's one so I'm looking forward to her update and all the exuberance. I'm sure she's gonNA share as well. Hopefully I can get all the reporters to submit a kind of a year end report. And how was the year for their player? I think that would be a lot of fun. Yes I talked to the Serena reporter. She said she would do it. She still easy. They wouldn't be the first person to say. Hopefully we don't get an explicit. What was he going easy going? That's what she is. She's like sailing. Just like exact oh cool cucumber but I do miss our.

tennis Roger Roger Federer Shawna Back Rafa Sean Roger Fan Roger Fetters reporter Pam Shriver Andy Murray soccer Palm Springs Powell US Ta Airbnb stalking Martinez founder
"shawna" Discussed on Breakfast Leadership

Breakfast Leadership

12:50 min | 1 year ago

"shawna" Discussed on Breakfast Leadership

"HQ is a wonderful option for any brands that are looking to influence their marketing. Looking to get the program off the ground Suzanne up today using the Lincoln are shown outs and use the code breakfast. It let me know you think like you said I guarantee it will pay for itself and I share cut. Excuse an amazing offer ends a good option for anybody. That's interested in influencer marketing. Now back to the show if the communication would have been you know open and the leadership would have listened to the warning signs that could have prevented invented. Thanks I I I know somebody personally that Recently left and organization and that organization is going to have have some challenges and a potential survival organization and they've been around for several several decades and it's a situation where some decisions that are being made at the higher levels There's concerned by the people that are actually doing you know the type of work going. They not sustainable be not Not being able to meet to those type of obligations that we say we're GonNa make and unfortunately when this individual voiced that opinion it was issue no shot down and they were basically delegated to doing different work and kind of isolated. You know it's your your classic bullying being such rates. That is an my gosh. I'm glad you bring that up because you know that's that's so true. Isolating people is a is a power over over move. It's a play and I think that it's based off of our unconscious. Prime mole desires like to to have power Whoever you know sets others up to be isolated first of all But also it it. Is it leads to the environment of disconnect distrust and then you know creating silos never they never bodes well for the organization overall because if people don't really have those first of all relationships they're not going to have the little conversations that occur That are just natural community building conversations. And they don't have to be profound found actually in conversational intelligence learn. There's there's three levels of conversations did you have you known that or did you hear about that. Three three levels. Yeah verbal physical that type of thing. Are we talking something different. It's about depth like you know what you're able to How deep you're able to connect with others through conversations and one's not better than the other depends on like well what's the intention you know? For Level Level one conversations is just about exchanging information so like for example You know if I'm texting you. I don't want to go into a deep conversation. I just need information right. It's like hey what time do you WanNa meet. Three o'clock great right so it it. It swims in the shallow L. O. N.. But it it serves a purpose but it doesn't really allow for those connections in the long run but there's nothing wrong with it just has purpose built level twos about exchanging information So to kind of position yourself in a way A. That says like hey I know I know something I I know something and I want to share this with you and so this is where people can get stuck in that power overplay. You know that that that game that people play where they're trying to be better than we. We have this addiction if you would to being right and so in conversations if you've ever been an Anna Anna conversation with someone who just has to one up you or I'm sure we've all been there. Where are someone just has to say? Have the last word or you feel like you know they're they. They're the smarter one or they know better and they're always trying to to position themselves so that you know that that they're the ones that You know they know better and a perfect example of this when it's done badly it when I was meeting a long time ago when I lived in Florida I was meeting a friend for dinner and she wanted wanted to introduce me to her new boyfriend at the time and so he came out with us and we were engaged in conversation. This is a long time ago and I was studying Natural Medicine and that's my background and healing and helping people transform naturally Was Kinda how I started my journey coaching. So during a conversation it came up about There was a some study that That the active ingredient in A common artificial sweetener converted to Formaldehyde at body temperature which is not good because formaldehyde embalm is an embalming fluid Ed and so it's not good for the nervous system. It's not good for your brain. So anyway he literally. I joke I joke. You're not here. He literally walked away from the table. Came back apparently what he did was he went into the other room. Got On the computer googled. It and then came came back and said you're wrong and I was like I'm sorry and he was like yeah. No that's that's that's a lie I was like I'm not sure he's it's like yeah I just looked it up. That's that's that's not true and so I was like Ha. That's actually a very bad way to build old friends and I almost said to him. You don't have many very many friends. Do you. Obviously not if you be confrontational that way. Just as a side note I drink my coffee and tea black so I don't use sweeteners so I should be okay with formaldehyde. Exactly not not not yet Hopefully a long time down the road and Even the cremation will probably the way to go. So what I I I'll I'll a left my I'll deal with that when that can sip. Exactly embalming for me then for you. So yeah that actually really does not lead to good connections and that so that's a negative level to 'cause there's positive to you can position yourself with information but not make the other person feel like take your superior to them are at least perceived and then the third level of conversation really goes into a whole new level and and this is about bringing the best out in each other. This is about co creating new possibilities new terrain in conversation by asking questions that we don't assume to have answers to so there you haven't yeah. It's that's a great example of of off of all the levels and it's funny. How often we we cross pollinate is a good way to put it in a different mediums? Were text message. You know should be you know quick to the point of view I do. How's it going good in you know if it's more more than a couple sentences these these smartphones are originally phones in call people? I know this is probably Elliot's shock. I probably should have put a spoiler alert. There there there is a phone icon nightmare in. You can actually call it all on the phone and talk with awesome. It's I know it's it's weird. It's right answer with like a question like hello exactly exactly. It's like what is this thing doing. It's like what is this this APP. This is very strange. What is this thing? Give weight right it reach out. Make these connections make the effort. So if you're going to tell somebody you know one thing that you would recommend them to do who in order to really get their conversations to a better place than they are right now both work home life and in just in general you know what would that be if it's more than one that's fine but I'm just curious the one key thing that you see a lot of people struggle with. Yeah I think that but The one thing I'll say is is trust in that's actually building trust and that's an an acronym so trust stands for or be transparent relationship over task share success be willing to talk about your. You're shared success. What success means kind of not analogy of of of Wondering what what's the what does success look like to. You have understanding. I guess I just put the you know in terms of then I just ruined the order so you goes before us but you got it so understanding having understanding is really not about blue like understanding can be a heart to heart conversation that says okay I feel you. I might not agree with you but I feel you in right there. Right there is is the breakthrough and then the final team on in the trust. Wattle is testing your assumptions. Because look you you. We all have assumptions where meaning meaning makers right and we all assume to know the meaning that other people's words have Or actions have but unless you ask those questions and tell people your truth by saying you know this is how I feel. Is that what you meant by it. You're never really going to be able to get into the reality city of somebody else So it's hard to understand someone if you don't know what their reality is so that's it the trust model build trust through transparency relationships understanding sharing your success in telling the truth so incredible list. I think if people just followed that this world would be dramatically. Just that just by to see how. It's not a soft skill. It's an essential essential is an essential skill is essential as oxygen for us. And I think too often we we push it aside and it it's showing. It's showing them. A relationships are homes workplaces everywhere we turn and look it's it's showing the impact impact And those that can you know follow those those guidelines and and really get communication back to where it needs to be. I think will make a huge huge difference and and everything that we do and I think it's the key to pivoting if you want to adapt to a world of rapid change we need to be in Sin Arche which is the opposite of anarchy. We need to come together. Work together creating an environment government that supports that absolutely absolutely couldn't agree more so shadow working people find out more about you in the awesome stuff. You're doing they can find me through just Going to my website Shawn Pelton Dot Com and googling me I guess I actually have of Some some things that I do share Con Constantly engaging community through social media media so if people are interested in staying connected they'll be able to find access to all of my touch points by going to my website. Sean Pelton PELTON DOT COM awesome. We'll have that information in the show notes so Shana always good to talk within. Thanks again for being on show. Thanks for this opportunity to this year. This conversation Michael. I really appreciate it. It's been my pleasure. Hey It's Michael again. Thank you for listening to the PODCAST. I really appreciate it. Sure like many people. You're dealing with some significant stress and possibly approaching burn out. I know how you feel in two thousand nine. My burn out led to a year of worst case case scenarios..

Michael Suzanne Sean Pelton PELTON Shawn Pelton Anna Anna Natural Medicine Florida Ed Elliot Shana
"shawna" Discussed on Breakfast Leadership

Breakfast Leadership

13:05 min | 1 year ago

"shawna" Discussed on Breakfast Leadership

"Hum welcome back. I have a very special guest with me today. Shawn Pelton tune how are you. I'm great happier here. Great to have a we met at the New Media Summit back in for twenty nineteen and a As I talk with everybody that is part of that ecosystem. It's an amazing amazing event in just have you know all these awesome people come to it. And and the connections that we make that long lasting Still Amazes me now. Wonderful that conference theme same here so to talk about some of the great things that you're doing a in one of the things that we talked about in the pre show notes is Just conversational intelligence. Now when people hear that go get smarter conversations and NIA that's part of it but WE'LL WANNA talk about it from the framework of our day to day. Lives in in our our workforce in jobs and things like that so tell us a little bit about how about that in some of the things that you're discovering sure. Well thanks for the opportunity and I appreciate the chance to be able to share this. In which is I believe a new discovery right. It's a new type of intelligence and many people are familiar with. IQ obviously the ASLI cue which is emotional intelligence the less known but some are aware of s q spiritual intelligence but in truth. None of those things really Make the impact like conversational. Intelligence can make Conversational intelligence was actually the a work of the late Judith. E glacier who was I my adviser and she she was an organizational anthropologist who was able to help great leaders build trust and get extraordinary results. through this skill because she realized how conversations shape the culture and She she talked about about how words create our worlds and they have the power to move from that position of being dominant which is power over others to have in power with which Brits Bridges Gaps in bridging those gaps. I think is something that we're seeing more and more prevalent in in the workplaces across the globe. `specially in North America where we're seeing and just amazing turnover of staff. People aren't staying in organizations for very long. The engagement is next to the nothing The the communication is broken at best. If at all and I in people are trying trying to find a light bet with what they do in their profession where they work and one of the challenges in this has obvious ripple effect because because people take work home whether they're constantly connected because of their smartphones or just the the stress in the feeling pulling like they're not really connected at work you know that carries through and conversations at home and everything else where it it has such a huge ripple people affected. I don't think people are really quite grasping that you know the impact because we spend in so many hours working in a day consistent hours that it has such a huge impact. So if you're not happy at work and you're not having meaningful conversations nations in any. Don't feel that you know. Your workers is valued Because of misperceptions of of how your boss communicates with you It they can really have a devastating effect on on yourself. Gary your well being you name it absolutely and you know about such a good point that you bring up and we. We can't really leave our work out the door when we go home. I know that some people say they can on and maybe I suppose if they have a low impact job They they may be able to do that. But the truth is is that a recent Gallup studies reveal but eighty four percent of employees are actually actively disengaged while at work. And that means that there's people on your team that are experiencing apathy. There's low morale people have resistance to to change resistance to authority and as a result it decreases their productivity and creativity And it causes discord in the in the workforce and so of course. If there's maybe from if I were to look at it from the individual individual level like the person who is experiencing this type of work culture you know it just feels like a toxic work environment and when I work with the people who tell me about just how much their job is weighing on them not because of the workload not because of the responsibilities but because of that toxic environment in they And they're questioning. Whether or or not they should stay there. Even if the pay is good someone actually said to me the other day. She said she has her golden handcuffs because she's making good money but she's just unhappy with with The the leadership team and also some of the the connections or the disconnect. I should say at work. So that's on a personal level. But then you have the organizational level and someone who owns a company or runs teams manages teams really needs to consider the impact they have on people and You know one of the things that really I suppose. I have a very strong opinion about when people will say like. Oh you know conversational intelligence. That reminds me of emotional intelligence. Isn't that just a soft upskill right. In air quotes as if soft skills aren't important first of all but you know because of that bias. It's a hidden bias and because of that belief system which is just BS. I think people dismiss the value of being able to really inspire greatness in others through conversations chance and so I just get really. I suppose passionate about empowering leaders to be able all too like I said bring out the potential within the people that they work with. I think that it is an obligation. If anything mints it's an honor and I wonder if you know if more companies did focus on doing that and more individuals within organizations commissions felt that to be important piece we know how quickly with society change. It would make a huge huge difference because a lot of organizations. You have a disconnect when they think well we can't don't be too open and transparent with our our teams so they don't share the stories on the challenges and whatnot assured. I'm sure there's confidential matters that you of course have to you keep the but for the most part as far as the direction the organization getting input It's a lost opportunity. I see a lot of organizations Pass on because their frontlines and the people that are doing the work they're working working with the clients or out with customers or whatever they see things that senior leadership executives. Don't they just they simply we don't and in having a mechanism where you have communication open in safe Because if if you're concerned that your boss is GonNa get upset if you tell them. A particular situation is about to happen or could happen. And you don't it's a missed opportunity and it actually creates a lot of challenges for the organization so you have to have an environment where the communication is coming from a place where people are encouraged edged to share. What's on their mind and what they see Because again if you can't say what you have on your mind then you're holding back and if you're holding back that just turns into a domino effect of things and then you're not GonNa give your best effort page. Like why bother. They're they're not gonNA listen to me and they're not going to change these things when that happens it it actually impacts organizations so you know the impact is or in terms of like what you're sludge to say the mission of the Organization the intentions Jains of the company and the direction that you're heading is you know all well-intended good but if people don't feel like they're heard or that they're you know Important their voices aren't are heard like what you just mentioned. You know if there's this feeling of disconnect than the impact is going to be whatever that highest possibility could could be and you know what this reminds me of. Michael is the story of Elizabeth holds. Have you read anything about that. Founder of I think the company was called the rannells finals. So Yeah Yeah. It's now a defunct company but it. She was predicted to to take this new startup into like a it was multibillion dollar projection and so basically she at a young age aged founded this company with this vision and apparently it was all just be ass it was it was the smoke show. the is that the word describe it. It's the smoke and mirrors right. It was bank but the people who were the workers when they approached her. It was Speaking of transparency she was phony and she would put on this front and she would have this You you know these lies but she would say with INS with such conviction that the people who were working for her were being you know. It was gas lighting railway but they. They really doubted themselves and they kept doing what they were supposed to be doing. But basically they lost so much money like obe. I want to say more than a billion dollars that was invested in this. This company But as a result of lack of of transparency this this vicious cycle and there was other things going on. That wasn't good. The culture was very toxic. But you know people didn't feel heard heard people didn't feel seen and you know what it was a detriment like some of these people their their reputations are tarnished ashed just because they were with her for so long it's one of those things a few are associated with an organization that UNFORTU- richland's up in the press or has a situation like this Than Yeah you're you're going to your resume going from going gonNA probably just scratch that off but but for many but for many people if they were with that organization for a significant amount of time you you don't want to have this huge gap in your resume. Unless you want to say why I I took that time when I backpacked across Africa or something like that it in you know it's like Oh that was very noble of you but the but if you learned all your skills you're applying for for this current application act that organization it it creates a lot of issues and and in that in that unfortunately happens in situations where we'll be back to the show a moment but first of all you know today's show is brought to Hubei are wonderful.

Shawn Pelton North America Judith UNFORTU- richland Africa Gary Hubei Michael Elizabeth
Hurricane relief efforts begin for decimated Abaco Islands

The Lead with Jake Tapper

06:11 min | 2 years ago

Hurricane relief efforts begin for decimated Abaco Islands

"In our boats tossed like confetti. The images belie the obvious question. How could anyone anyone survive this pulse and your the growth we arrive by helicopter in mana war and avocado with billy aubrey embracing his wife shana sean after days of not knowing if she was dead or alive shawna hunkered down with friends in their seaside home until the roof we off and they all scramble to find find anything so nancy. This is what kept you guys alive. This little this little rock this came in hover dow in shauna was on the ground and we were just trying to what did it sound like in here. At the time it was up. There was a lot of crashing eh crashing and whirling stuff coming on this wall. So many in the apple islands lived through hours that resembled unmoved a horror movie exposed to wins that top two hundred fifteen miles an hour like tornadoes touching down every minute describe describe. It wish nobody words can describe it. They could never eric cantor is categorized. Never my grandfather was like a bomb went off residents here. Tell me their little island in paradise is unrecognizable even to them. They're resourceful and self reliant they say but they could have never imagined a storm as powerful as doreen and there's no better way to describe to you. The force of hurricane doreen to be right here where people rode out the storm in their living rooms and their dining rooms. I mean look in this. The roof blew off the house here. The entire kitchen king down there refrigerator ended up here on the ground there living room and dining furniture is strewn all over people described these things being tossed around the island like projectiles they all coward hovered in their bathrooms and closets anything they could find to take shelter. There are now the beginnings of recovery but only the basics medical attention private helicopters to take out those who are sick the elderly young families. I'm sure it'll never be the same again i i but i mean the people are strong and we're going to try to do our best through a bill the best way we can but we know <hes> it'll never be the same. This was a storm of biblical proportions abba conan's tell me and yes they worry it will take a miracle to recover from it. Jake think about everything that we just heard everything we saw so you can repeat that thousands of times over spoke to a man from another island in arbuckle told me that there was a storm surge he had gone under his son reached out to hold them up. He really wanted to let go. He couldn't take anymore but he said no. I'm not gonna let my son see me die this way and he got himself out of there so jake so tough paula you were not supposed to spend the night on the avocado islands so what happened so so we're at the staging area here in nassau and their flights everywhere they just couldn't get us back with the way the air conditions the airline traffic the helicopter traffic. Obviously there was a problem. It's so difficult. Jake on the island was on. I mean they cleared the baseball field so that we could bland so that we could get ourselves billion and get to that kind of reunion and get some supplies as in so we had to stay there. These people men were they'd been through so much and yet they didn't blink an eye. We said we'll sleep on the beach will sleep on the grass. We don't care no. They took choson and a special. Thank you to marcia and angel cruz. I know they have relatives in florida. Thank you so much and what we saw. There is what people are grappling playing with right now of course jake. They're thankful thankful for being alive <hes> but when you see the way they are living i mean they took all the food out of the refrigerator. The cruises cooked it. That's all they really have. They have some more provisions in the grocery store but they're wondering what comes next their kids are supposed to start school and it's things like that that this island's beginning to grapple with and jake. There's more more on this island. Things were fairly under control. People are starting to worry about things like disease. They hear the death reports say that will inevitably go up and they are starting to worry about encore un recovered bodies things that call so much to worry them at this place and as they told us on the island they worry that they won't be able to return at least not not in a fashion that they were there now living there fulltime all newton in nassau the bahamas. Thank you so much for that powerful report we appreciate it.

Jake Nassau Eric Cantor Billy Aubrey Doreen Shawna Baseball Bahamas Shana Sean Florida Conan Arbuckle Angel Cruz Paula Marcia
Iran seized 2 British tankers in the Strait of Hormuz

Sean Hannity

02:46 min | 2 years ago

Iran seized 2 British tankers in the Strait of Hormuz

"Are joining us we now have for oil tankers seized in the straits of hormones by the Iranian revolutionary guard to British one Liberian and apparently a few days ago we weren't aware of it probably because of the close proximity across the straits or moves one UAE tanker also the president commenting on it earlier and he basically saying the Iran's economy is crashing very competently saying all it's gonna work out there in a lot of trouble right now especially I think based on strategic alliances that now have been built Dan how but I think I can say this C. I. A. ops officer thirty years and I think I'm I know the president's thinking on this having interviewed a mentor in times he is not going to get involved in a long protracted conflict the president took off the hand cuffs in Syria and guess what the caliphate ISIS will be back a bomb the crap out of them and the rules of engagement changed dramatically from one of hand cupping our troops took to allowing the troops to do their job I would imagine the president is not going to allow the Iranians to keep the straits or move on hold hostage and I would imagine that there's going to be an alliance that will engage our rand if this behavior continues and I wouldn't be surprised to something happened as early as today or tonight yeah Shawna I agree with you a hundred percent about the strait of Hormuz I think what we also need to watch for is that Ron amounts asymmetric warfare against us they know they can't go toe to toe with the United States military they'll lose but they get props malicious Lebanese Hizbullah Alicia's in Iraq the young men who these in Yemen they tried to kill the Saudi ambassador here in the United States and so the concern I think in our in our intelligence community and also domestically here in United States will be there to run seeks to mount additional attacks against the nay symmetric warfare on to the Persian Gulf and that is also something that will be looking at and I'm sure you're looking for whether it's back channel or older messaging from our administration if Iran attempt to do that in a tax our people and our installations even via their proxies there will be hell to pay on the Iranian side in their territory we know thank you Dan Hoffmann thirty years CIA ops officer knows around well I know the president's strategy it's not going to be a protracted war it's going to be overwhelming force and they have a lot of allies to do it

President Trump Iran Officer Syria Shawna United States Alicia Iraq Yemen Persian Gulf Dan Hoffmann CIA UAE RON Thirty Years Hundred Percent
Rockets' James Harden becomes first player in NBA history to score at least 30 points against 29 other teams in a season

BBC World Service

00:25 sec | 2 years ago

Rockets' James Harden becomes first player in NBA history to score at least 30 points against 29 other teams in a season

"James harden is making headlines again in the NBA Shawna the MVP last season for the Houston Rockets. He's made a little bit of NBA history. The first player in the history of the league to score thirty points or more against each of the twenty nine other teams in the NBA and a single season is quite a Mark. And he is reached it with some style. So congratulations

NBA James Harden Houston Rockets MVP
Why People Store Fat In Different Parts Of The Body

Rutgers

01:20 min | 2 years ago

Why People Store Fat In Different Parts Of The Body

"And it was really, you know, us on this medication and that medication this cream in that cream and all those things are very expensive as people probably know. And so he lost thirty one pounds in forty days. Which is you know, it's a little below typical man. We we typically see twenty thirty five to forty five plus with men, but still thirty one and forty is tremendous. And when he came in, you know, we we did the hair and saliva diviner jetty scans. We looked at his blood work necessity. I don't know functional level. He got we gave them a liver support we give mental support. We also give mute support for a lot of times. Those things are on our auto immune type of issues. So for whatever reason the bodies attacking self? So we game some immune support got the body work in the right way. Thirty one pounds forty days the psoriasis he says is eighty to ninety percent completely gone. And it's great because then we're gonna use the DNA, and that's gonna show what supplementation. He's going forward and data show data scan for forty different. Metabolic factors to not only help them keep weight off. But also how to stay as healthy as possible going forward for really for the rest of his life. So once we get the body work in the right way. There's very little things that you that it cannot overcome on its own, and that's nj diet dot com. You can also call one eight five five five nj diet. One eight five five five six five three four three eight. I forgot to mention when you were talking about the C Pap machine. I knew I had somebody in mind that I wanted to talk about. So the CPAP machine is very uncomfortable for the person using it for the person sleeping next to them. All. You know, because they do make noise and. It's just not the most attractive thing in the world to have next year. Right. So we actually and Michael command in and they both did the program. She didn't have too much weight to lose. But I think she did it more as a support system for her husband, which by the way it works. Great. We have a husband and wife command. We really see tremendous results for both usually because you've got the mental support. You've got the cooking support and all these other things. So michael. Is down thirty six pounds in twenty seven days. Right. So one of the biggest reasons he came in today it over pound day. But one of the biggest reasons he came in wasn't even so much because he was using a CPAP machine, but he was on three different. He's not hungry at all. No, not hungry. He was on three different diabetes medications. Well, yeah. Because his glucose levels used to be one fifty to two hundred in the morning, and so he he used to take three pills in the morning to get those numbers. Now, three pills. Now, his doctor actually took him completely off the meds twenty seven days into the program because at day twenty-seven, his glucose levels in the morning ranging between ninety seven and one five that's where he's averaging and basically which is normal, right? And the CPAP machine is completely gone. Also and his wife apparently is now sleeping back in the bedroom. No, you go. I mean, there's gotta be some pluses and benefits to that one. Right. I jammed just saying Alison people's imagination. I'm just saying. Yeah. So I think that's really cool. I really, you know, I fortunately do not take any medications but hearing from people in terms of a how much money they're saving by not getting their monthly meds. Refilled be how much better they feel without those medications on a daily basis, and listen, you know, being married to a set of pills every morning is really really depressing in a lot of ways, I think, and I think that that's what our patients really start to realize if they hadn't already realized that before they came to us, but one of the things in one of the benefits is when they come in. And they're like, you know, hey, I don't have to take that medication anymore. My doctor told me I don't have to do that. It's really great. And you don't have to be best friends with your pharmacist. No, really don't know. You know, you could be best friends with someone else who provides positive things for you. You know, it's true Shawna came in and she was down. So Shawna did did the program. She kind of did it in a weird way. She did it for thirty days, then she had a two week vacation. So she did the program for thirty days. Stop the program. Two weeks short before a vacation get a little re to get the reset couple of days in then she came back in June. She did another twenty days of the programs. You said a total of fifty days. The cool thing is she was away. So she stopped the program. She thirty days lost a bunch of weight loss at twenty five or thirty pounds or something like that in third in the thirty days went away on vacation for ten to fourteen days and didn't put any of the weight back on while on vacation, which is awesome. And then she came back and did another twenty one days of the program. So basically should fifty days of the program and lost. So fifty six pounds total in the fifty days. That's pretty impressive. Yeah. That's great vacation vacation in the metro said you must have customized that one for her. Yeah, we have to play with it a little bit. That's fine. So she had a she says she had a vacation plan. She hadn't been away. And look I'm not gonna tell somebody not to go on vacation. So we customize it for we played with it a little bit. Did it the right way? And what's great is? She no more thyroid meds. No more no more sugar, medications or thyroid levels. Are normal. So she doesn't need that Ginny the foward medications anymore. And would she came in?

Shawna Michael NJ Diabetes Ginny Alison Thirty Days Fifty Days Twenty Seven Days Forty Days Thirty One Pounds Thirty Six Pounds Fifty Six Pounds Twenty One Days Ninety Percent Fourteen Days Thirty Pounds Twenty Days
"shawna" Discussed on 103.5 KISS FM

103.5 KISS FM

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"shawna" Discussed on 103.5 KISS FM

"Shawna Shawna good how are you guys very well welcome to the show it's waiting. By the phone tell us about? Michael about your date or dates and where you guys stand right now Out for dinner and drinks you. Know pretty basic and it was kind of last minute but we didn't. Really, have, to, plan. Much I'm really into? This guy, though I think he's. So my tights when he's. Kinda shy and maybe that's the issue pretty much the one who asks came out okay I'm, really outgoing so I thought why not you ask about and. Then what. Was the date like how did that go I thought the date good I mean I thought that, we were getting along fine and chemistry but he's seen, a little more shy than, me and I'm just really outgoing. And confident and I don't know if, that's why I'm. Not hearing from all right so you were hoping that you guys would go on another date, and that, was sort, of the I guess that was your, feeling when you laugh was you know he. Seemed shy but I'm sure he'll. Warm up you'll call me again and he hasn't and. That's annoying no one likes to be ghosted and you wanna know what. Happened Yeah I mean he. Got kind of flyer towards the end, but I thought. Maybe I'm coming on strong and he's so shy that you know I don't know we'll call him and. We'll see if, we can figure. Out what's going on and at some point definitely jumping, on the call and hopefully we can straighten this out maybe he's just I don't know, maybe you still being shy or. Lacking. In. Some confidence, and maybe he'll agree to another date will, pay for that and that's where you know that's where things begin to develop okay Can you, hang on for a second stay here part to waiting might have thought right after Riyadh, we'll do it in four.

Shawna Shawna Riyadh Michael
Elon Musk's troubled love of a magical unicorn

The Vergecast

04:04 min | 3 years ago

Elon Musk's troubled love of a magical unicorn

"Is great it's fifteen minute episodes every week the crew that showed that makes it actually works in the office right near us they're like scrambling around it's it's kind of wild to have a tv show get made near you it worked really hard at this week the episode is about east sports paul you love semi sports you aware of the the significant medicine illegal legends no ally for for years you typically had a an eighty eighty c and a support and i forget what eighty stats for put a high end damage dealer at a support in the bottom lane and now people doing all sorts of stuff they're like layer like funneling experience to the juggler the meta has shifted and it is rocking the word world of league of legends well if you have no idea what that meant like i did i definitely i knew it all those words work but if you if you are just interested in sports and you got an ethics account go watch explained a netflix this week's episode explores why eastwards to different where they came from there's a long history here there's a difference apparently between arcade play and what we now know is he sports this is what they told me to say it's just like explained is is really good i i'm supposed to tell you watch the eastwards one i'm going to tell you watch the cryptocurrency one because it's narrated by christian slater come oh come on there's doing it it's it's wild to have the show get made narrows so go watch explained a netflix from our friends at box watch c sorts upset wash them all all right now we're gonna try something new ready shawna cain is going to tell us what happened this week anyone lusk hey this is sean kane and transportation reporter at the verge and this has been the week in elon musk he lon musk drawn into farting unicorn dispute with potter elon musk is being accused of violating the copyright of a colorado potter who gained notoriety for making mugs that feature a unicorn farting electricity must spotted the mug on twitter and early twenty seventeen and remarked that it might be his quote favorite mug ever a month later the drawing from the mug wound up in a promotion for sketch pad feature that tesla added to the touchscreens of its cars tesla also ended up using the unicorn drying in other parts of its software and so now the potter is trying to get paid or at least get credit must said on twitter he can sue for money if he wants but that's kinda lame if anything this attention increased his mug sales in a series of tweets that has since been deleted elon musk racist exit tesla's production hell it's been almost a year since must told his employees that they were about to enter six months of production hell in order for the company that make enough model threes to fill the waiting list of half a million people and the company is still struggling to get their musk's latest milestone for tesla is to make five thousand model threes per week at the end of the second quarter which is just about to happen never mind the he originally thought that they'd be passed this mark by the end of twenty seventeen what's important now is whether tesla hits and sustains that rate of production until that happens tesla is losing money on every model three it makes which is not good for it's already tenuous bottom line in the meantime the wall street journal just interviewed musket the factory and found out that he's still sleeping there some nights recently staying three days in a row at the factory in a sign of how all out tesla's going to hit that production rate tesla built a giant tent to expand production of the model three tesla built fourth assembly line under a giant tent in one of the parking lots of its fremont california factory the company has been building the tent or sprung structure or whatever you want a call it since late may but just last week started assembling cars outside underneath this structure must praised his workers on twitter for doing this and rallying together to meet his goal now it's funny about this tesla's usually pretty secretive but because this is happening out in the open the ten his kicked off a sort of cottage industry with twitter and read it spies peering through the holes in the fencing or flying drones above it even scouring satellite imagery in order to.

Fifteen Minute Three Tesla Six Months Three Days
Hawaii Volcano: Lava May Cross Highway 137 in Next 4 to 7 Hours

News, Traffic and Weather

02:50 min | 3 years ago

Hawaii Volcano: Lava May Cross Highway 137 in Next 4 to 7 Hours

"To teachers cynthia tis deal and glenda and perkins along with eight students killed in the rampage christone era mcleod kimberly vaughn shawna fisher sabika chic and exchange student from pakistan along with christian garcia jared black and angelique ramirez angelique she was very funny person and she was very love thirteen others are still recovering from injuries including school police officer john barnes from gunshot wounds the alleged shooter seventeenyearold dimitrios pagor cheese is now behind bars charged with capital murder is where i'm not sure what he understands lawyers for the suspect telling abc news the shotgun and pistol police say the teenager used in the shooting or locked in a gun cabinet and his parents had no idea of their son's alleged plan they didn't know they didn't expect and they surely couldn't have predicted cloth authorities continue to investigate why this happened an outpouring of support for the grieving community from across the country including an offer from nfl player jj watt of the houston texans stepping up and offered to pay for all of the funerals set to begin in the coming days and tonight the suspect is being held in confinement on suicide watch his lawyer say the teen will he is still very much in shock himself with her abc news santa fe texas no tonight investigators trying to figure out exactly how this happened unbelievable this is in midtown atlanta and it happened last night a sudden explosion caused a window washer scaffolding to collapse leaving two men dangling the two workers finally themselves to safety was able to put his feet on the railing below one got up on one balcony just an incredible scene there so glad everyone is okay the workers did make it safely to the ground with only minor injuries lava flows in hawaii have covered a roadway forcing rescuers to pull some stranded people to safety the number of fissures on hawaii's big island has now reached twenty two that is since the first one opened up just two weeks ago some of them so powerful they can be heard from miles away meanwhile there was another explosive eruption at the killilea summit this one happened overnight and that's sprayed ash seven thousand feet into the air i'm thinking that this is the new normal officials are preparing for more possible evacuations experts say the activity could last several more weeks still had on komo news starbucks is making a major policy change find out what would.

Glenda Perkins John Barnes Murder Atlanta Hawaii Starbucks Shawna Fisher Pakistan Officer ABC NFL Houston Texas Komo Seven Thousand Feet Two Weeks
"shawna" Discussed on The Writers Panel

The Writers Panel

01:39 min | 4 years ago

"shawna" Discussed on The Writers Panel

"Got shawna showing a duggan's by the way the greatest stunt double and now great stunt coordinator she she wouldn't innate the he could not get his head around it for the longest time until incidentally realize he was not going to get them finally they will standing there waiting i'm like she's not coming stop chocolate being tired i can only imagine jennifer garners work schedule and weektoweek basis but from everything i've read she was one of those people who just never complains and always was was ready to go she was all she talked broderick number one it's the number the euro is associated with an actor on her arm a call she she was an incredible number one everything was done with enthusiasm and generosity and mort and she she was like a professional athlete in terms of which went to with that smiled she's like a sweet southern girl and she she was phenomenal and i mean this this we would work at the beginning fourteen our days she was doing stance these complicated action sequences did these emotional centers very or character was very vulnerable emotional and she was learning mandarin chinese like i mean like the and then these guys with rows of atr like okay you're you're going to describe the way they could put together you know and a are fifty seven to a wrong a gun dealers in mandarin and she would have to like learned that and we get plus she would spend saturday and sunday doing publicity.

shawna duggan coordinator jennifer broderick mort