6 Burst results for "Sharrock"

"sharrock" Discussed on Broken Record

Broken Record

05:12 min | 8 months ago

"sharrock" Discussed on Broken Record

"I see, I've been dying to ask you this. Who is your top 5 dead or alive? This man hard, but okay. I mean, for me, Missy's on there, Kendrick's on there. Big is on there. But you know what? You know what? Always seems so unfair about this question to me. What? It makes me think about all the biases that go into these lists. Like, you know, I know, of course, everyone has their own taste. But you're saying it feels like there's something more than taste reflected in these lists? Yes, exactly. It's implicit bias that's used as a way to cover up the fact that the people making the list think that men are just overall better at rapping. And if there are any women on the list, it's usually just one token one, you know? And it's always the same usual suspects. Lauren, Missy Kim, Nikki. Exactly. But what about Jean grey or zelia or rap city or Megan? And that's why reimagining the canon of the greatest MCs takes real work. We talked to somebody who's doing exactly that. When you're thinking about carving out history and the people who are in power, obviously it's men. And men get to tell these tall tales, basically, about what they did, and men get to create history for other people as well. That's clover hope, a longtime hip hop journalist, whose bylines range from double-x-l and the source to The New York Times and Vogue. But even as a revere critic, clover miss sharrock story was brand new to her. I certainly even as a hip hop head who was writing about it for like since I was 20 and in it since I was like 13. Like I didn't know a lot of these stories about the young girls who were part of creating this culture. I knew the date of hip hop being created and the names of some of the early grandmaster flash. And I didn't know her name. That was a big motivation for clover to write the mother lode. 100 plus women who made hip hop. It's like a reimagined canon that finally puts women front and center. Shah rak is one of the first profiles in the mother lode. Clover writes that Shah's considered quote the first prominent female MC. Clover says she wanted readers to know Shah story because it had been hidden for so long. And that's the case for many rappers. But for Shah, the reasons behind that erasure reveal how bias is built into the foundations of hip hop. I wrote a line in there that I always go back to, which is the history is what a dominant group decides this fact. Shah herself is a living testament of this. History has been changed over the years and I see it in hip hop culture. But I'm not one to allow that to happen. When we called up Shah, she was sitting at a kitchen table in Texas. It's a long way from The Bronx where she got her start. And back then, I wasn't thinking about legacy. She was focused on having fun. Outside, her corner of The Bronx was giving birth to hip hop. And as a teenager, she discovered breakdance and she rocked the oversized sweatshirts and Lee jeans. She was becoming a B girl. The first person that I saw breakdance was Friends of mine, you know, that had went to junior high school with me. You know, they taught me how to break dance. They taught me what it was to, you know, up rock. What it was to, you know, just hit the beats, you know, whenever you hear that certain great beat. Shot traveled all over The Bronx. Every part jam, every house party. Anywhere, DJs would spend and break these. The circles was always male dominated when it came to B boys. And to me, you know, as a B girl, I was sort of like a tomboy, you know, a growing up, and so, you know, when you've seen it, I mean, it's just like a feeling that you knew that you had to be a part of. Yeah, something big was happening in The Bronx. And B girling, that was shy as weigh in. You know, it's just gave you like a feeling like you I mean like you could just like take on the world. You know, because it was, I don't know, it was just like a crazy feeling where it was like it just empower you as a woman. I know it did for me as a young teenager and I'm quite sure it did it for the young guys out there at the time. At the time, she'd also been dabbling in poetry. But she wanted to do something bigger with it. She

"sharrock" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"sharrock" Discussed on KQED Radio

"That you're wondering how I knew baby baby baby about to make members The mountain with some other girl you knew before you even two of us. You know, I love you more. It took me. Bassam. I'm asleep. Oh, and I found out. Yes. Don't you know that I had a great That's not going to be my don't want to be that I had on tomorrow's show. US Poet laureate Joy hard job She's the first American Indian appointed to the position. She has a new memoir that's in part about her family's history. Her great grandfather survived what became known as the Trail of tears, the forced relocation of Indians from their native land. I hope you can join us. Fresh air's executive producer is Danny Miller. Our technical director is odd events in our engineer today was Al Bank. Roberta Sharrock directs the show for Terry Gross. I'm David being equal yourself until lost body had it through the way support for NPR comes from this station and from Viking committed to exploring the world in comfort, offering a small ship experience. Your excursion included in every port destination focused dining and programs designed for cultural enrichment. Viking calm and from indeed hiring platform with tools like instant match, which searches millions of resumes and Indians database to connect businesses with candidates that match the sponsored job description more at indeed dot com slash credit. Coming up next world.

"sharrock" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

09:21 min | 2 years ago

"sharrock" Discussed on KCRW

"The secret to superhuman strength? Now, if you were going to send out a pamphlet in a cracker Jack box or in a comic book, I guess what would you say? What is the secret to superhuman strength? I mean, I think one secret for me anyway, is really trying to understand my own mortality to really grapple with the fact that I'm going to die and to realize that that's not a terrible thing. You know it. Z the Circle of life and that's fine. That's Alison Bechdel. Her new graphic memoir is the secret to superhuman strength. Thank you very much. Thank you, Lulu. Musicians are longing for the road after a year's paws on touring thanks to the pandemic, and for many, it's not just about the money. It's also about their mental health from war on that tune in later this afternoon to all things considered by asking your smart speaker to play NPR or your member station by name. New movie Limbo takes place on a remote island of Scotland, where a group of refugees is waiting for asylum. Among them is Omar, who's from Syria. The only thing tying him to where he's from is his food. That's a Middle Eastern string instrument. If you used to be a musician Omar Omar is famous. And this Donny Osmond. Oh, What instrument is out anyway. I would It's like a guitar. You both out of the way from Syria. Well, we should organize a concert. That's a wonderful idea. Syrian music here on the island and we could have a finger buffet interval. But despite his peers attempts, Omar struggles to merge his new identity as a refugee with what he left behind a mural mastery plays Omar in the new movie Limbo. Been Shark wrote and directed it, And they both join me Now, Welcome to the program. Thank you for having us. I want to start with you. Amir. Tell us about Omar. Who is he when we meet him in this story? From the start. We meet someone who's vacant, who's been stripped of his Identity. He's a young man lived quite a colorful, lavish life playing music with his family, and we see him completely. None of that and void of anything that kind of resembles home. Yeah, and he's almost dealing with Survivor's guilt. I mean, his parents are in Turkey, eking out a living. His brother fought in the civil war in Syria. Absolutely, and that guilt he's trying to justify Constantly trying to have those conversations with his parents about you know what it means to be in the UK in in Scotland. Then tell me about your own journey to this film. Because you have spent time in refugee camps. You studied Arabic and politics for your undergrad. You spent a year living in Syria. What did you take from those experiences that translated into this phone? Yes, it does kind of stand back all the way to the point where I was living in Syria, which is just the year before the civil war started on. Did you know I made friends through playing in the rugby team and Damascus or I'm being, you know, involved in theater there on then, you know, carrying some of those relationships forward as well on that kind of realization that I have so much in common with these people and This kind of label of being a refugee is actually very damaging to their own identity. So I think it's just lots of things along the way that kind of made me see refugees as ordinary people that I called in a difficult and tragic and unfortunate circumstances. A mere talk to me about your journey to this film. I mean, you're British Egyptian on Do you have noted in the past that sort of Middle Eastern and North African actors often get typecast. This film is obviously not that what drew you to play this character? Don't have a problem playing anybody that is, you know, Middle Eastern because that Zumba I'm proud of who you are. That's why I am exactly this apartment identity that so long As you know the character. We understand where he's come from ways going, what is once needs Are and fears and I certainly found that when I read the script when I first got it, you know he puts on her into the forefront of the narrative. He gives an agency And also we were constantly reminded of how beautiful Syria is and how much he longs to be back home with his family. Have to spring. The Hypocrites will start to go in the garden. Long would use them to make all my dear. Like Sweet apricot leather in Arabic. We have a saying it Z vocal for Mission mission. Means tomorrow there'll be a pro quotes. But you use it for something that will never happen. I never want to saying because we always had a progressive You spent time with refugees to prepare for this role? Yes, we were very fortunate. We were working with an organization in Scotland that work with Syrian, a single men's group. On Previous kind of hardships. And I actually love that. The film has that balance between humor and tragedy to tell a story like this yet because the film is profoundly funny in parts And then the film was shot in the outer head. Birdies in Scotland and the fictional characters give Lot of comedic lift for the film. They're very idiosyncratic. Why did you want to place this story there? We actually started looking in Iceland in the Northwest fjords on then realized that This story could be told much closer to home in Scotland but then also placing on on the island and then sort of developed this metaphorical depth where the island is limbo itself. The island is a metaphor for America tree. Well, I mean, the refugees are welcomed by everyone We see very early on that Omar is ridiculed and harassed by a group of young adults. You make the point that refugee men in particular viewed as a threat. Yeah, And that was part of the decision making Tonto tell this story That was about a group of single male refugees that are sent to this remote Scottish island. And yeah, that's really connected to the idea that in the right when media it's the single male refugee, that scene is the biggest threat and is part of that process of dehumanization and demonizing of refugees. You know, this film has been very well received, particularly though in the Middle East, which I thought was really, really interesting. It's had a lot of resonance there. Yes, well above incredibly passionate about bringing it into the Middle East. What was amazing, actually was when we did screener people didn't know they didn't know that Ben was Scottish. They whoever whoever directed and wrote, this must be minimalist and must be it must be, you know, the very least Egyptian When we went face time Ben onstage and on it was, it was amazing. They gave a standing ovation and they were just kind of completely like loading and rightly so, loading him for his amazing achievement in the Directing this mean for me this it was really very strange but incredible experience of being obviously during the pandemic and not being able to travel to Cairo Film Festival. I was in my wife's parents kind of farm house in the mountains and in the Basque country, and suddenly I'm you know, I'm on stage in the Cairo Opera house. Facing. Ah, standing ovation on bond was just amazing to see that response. I mean, I guess that speaks to something about the kinds of films that People want to see about refugees and other immigrants. I mean, what kinds of stories do you think we're still not seeing? I think it's it speaks to more than just about the subject matter. It speaks more about identity. Speaks more about representation and how people want to be represented on screen as well. I mean, I think it was less about it being someone who was a refugee and more about someone being portrayed in a positive light. I mean, this this Omar is as positive reflection as they can get really a man who is Unashamed of his background and someone who is Muslim, but doesn't were not kind of using that in any way. It just happens to be part of his identity. We're constantly reminded of things that we can relate to, regardless of your background, and I think that's what people want to see more off. You want to see themselves like anybody else. Limbo is the film directed and written by Ben Sharrock. Amira al Masri plays.

Ben Sharrock Amira al Masri Iceland Alison Bechdel Donny Osmond Turkey Syria Amir Lulu Omar tomorrow UK Scotland Middle East Cairo Film Festival Ben Zumba Omar Omar Limbo America
"sharrock" Discussed on WBUR

WBUR

07:49 min | 2 years ago

"sharrock" Discussed on WBUR

"What instruments out anyway? Oh, It's like a guitar. You both out of the way from Syria. Well, we should organize a concert. That's a wonderful idea. Syrian music here on the island and we could have a finger buffet interval. But despite his peers attempts, Omar struggles to merge his new identity as a refugee with what he left behind a mural mastery plays Omar in the new movie Limbo. Ben Shark wrote and directed it, And they both join me Now. Welcome to the program. Thank you for having us. I want to start with you. Amir. Tell us about Omar. Who is he when we meet him in this story? From the start. We meet someone who's vacant, who's been stripped of his Identity. He's a young man lived quite a colorful, lavish life playing music with his family, and we see him completely numb off that and void of anything that kind of resembles home. Yeah, and he's almost dealing with Survivor's guilt. I mean, his parents are in Turkey, eking out a living. His brother fought in the civil war in Syria. Absolutely, and that guilt he's trying to justify by constantly trying to have those conversations with his parents about You know what it means to be in the UK in in Scotland. Hmm. Then tell me about your own journey to this film. Because you have spent time in refugee camps. You studied Arabic and politics for your undergrad. You spent a year living in Syria. What did you take from those experiences that translated into this phone? Yes, it does kind of stand back all the way to the point where I was living in Syria, which is just the year before the Civil war started on Did you know I made friends through playing and the rugby team and Damascus or I'm being, you know, involved in theater there on then, you know, carrying some of those relationships forward as well on that kind of realization that I have so much in common with these people and This kind of label of being a refugee is actually very damaging to their own identity. So I think it's just lots of things along the way that kind of made me see refugees as ordinary people that Our cordon. They difficult, tragic and unfortunate circumstances. A mere talk to me about your journey to this film. I mean, you're British Egyptian on Do you have noted in the past that sort of Middle Eastern and North African actors often get typecast. This film is obviously not that what drew you to play this character? I don't have a problem playing anybody that is, you know, Middle Eastern because that Z something I'm proud of who you are. That's who I am. Exactly. It's a part of my identity as so long as you know the character. We understand where he's come from ways going. What is once needs Are and fears and I certainly found that when I read the script when I first got it, you know he puts home are into the forefront of the narrative. He gives an agency and also you were constantly reminded of how Beautiful Syria is and how much he longs to be back home with his family. After spring, the Hypocrites will start to go in the garden. Mom would use them to make all my data. Like Sweet apricot leather in Arabic. We have a saying it Z looking for missions. Means tomorrow there'll be a pro quads Let you use it for something that will never happen, But I never want to saying because we always had a pro quote. You spent time with refugees to prepare for this role. Yes, we were very fortunate. We were working with an organization in Scotland that work with Syrian, a single men's group. And one of the things I noticed, actually from sitting with them was the amount of humor that they use to kind of cover or to talk about their previous kind of hardships. And I actually loved that film has that balance between humor and tragedy to tell a story like this yet because the film is profoundly funny in parts, and then the film was shot in the outer head, Birdies in Scotland and the fictional characters give Lot of comedic lift for the film. They're very idiosyncratic. Why did you want to place this story there? We actually started looking in Iceland in the Northwest fjords on then realized that This story could be told much closer to home in Scotland but then also placing on on the island and then sort of developed this metaphorical depth where the island is limbo itself. The island is a metaphor for Arrogant tree. Well, I mean, the refugees are welcomed by everyone receive very early on that Omar is ridiculed and harassed by a group of young adults. You make the point that refugee men in particular viewed as a threat. Yeah, And that was part of the decision making Tonto tell this story That was about a group of single male refugees that are sent to this remote Scottish island on. Yeah, that's really connected to the idea that in the right wing media, it's the single male refugee. That scene is the biggest threat and is Part of that process of dehumanization and dehumanizing of refugees. You know, this film has been very well received, particularly though in the Middle East, which I thought was really, really interesting. It's had a lot of residence there. Yes, well above incredibly passionate about bringing it to to the Middle East. What was amazing, actually was when we did screener. People didn't know they didn't know that Ben was Scottish. They seem whoever whoever directed and wrote this must be Middle East. That must be it must be, you know, the very least Egyptian When we went, I face time, Ben onstage and on it was it was amazing. They gave a standing ovation and they were just kind of Completely night loading and rightly so, loading him for his amazing achievement and directing this mean for me this it was really very strange but incredible experience of being obviously during the pandemic and not being able to travel to Cairo Film Festival. I was in my wife, parents kind of farm house in the mountains and in the Basque country and suddenly I'm you know, I'm on stage in the Cairo Opera house. Facing. Ah, standing ovation on bond is just amazing to see that response. I mean, I guess that speaks to something about the kinds of films that People want to see about refugees and other immigrants. I mean, what kinds of stories do you think we're still not seeing? I think it's it speaks to more than just about the subject matter. It speaks more about identity. Speaks more about representation and how people want to be represented on screen as well. I mean, I think it was less about being someone who was a refugee and more about someone being portrayed in a positive light. I mean, this this Omar is as positive reflection as they can get really a man who is Unashamed of his background and someone who is Muslim, but doesn't were not kind of using that in any way. It just happens to be part of his identity. We're constantly reminded of things that we can relate to, regardless of your background, and I think that's what people want to see more off. You want to see themselves like anybody else. Limbo is the film directed and written by Ben Sharrock. Amira al Masri plays Omar. Thank.

Ben Sharrock Iceland Omar Ben Shark Amira al Masri Scotland Turkey Syria UK Ben Middle East Cairo Film Festival Amir Limbo tomorrow Civil war Middle Eastern first civil war British
"sharrock" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:47 min | 2 years ago

"sharrock" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Thank you very much. Thank you. Lulu. Musicians are longing for the road after a year's paws on touring thanks to the pandemic, and for many, it's not just about the money. It's also about their mental health from war on that tune in later this afternoon to all things considered. By asking, you're smart speaker to play NPR or your member station by name. New movie Limbo takes place on a remote island of Scotland, where a group of refugees is waiting for asylum. Among them is Omar, who's from Syria. The only thing tying him to where he's from is his food. That's a Middle Eastern string instrument Did you used to be a musician or more modest, famous? Dennis like Donny Osmond. Oh, what instruments out anyway? I would It's like with Are you both all the way from Syria? Well, we should organize a concert. That's a wonderful idea. Syrian music here on the island and we could have a finger buffet interval. But despite his peers attempts, Omar struggles to merge his new identity as a refugee with what he left behind a mural mastery plays Omar in the new movie Limbo. Been Shark wrote and directed it, And they both join me Now, Welcome to the program. Thank you for having us. I want to start with you. Amir. Tell us about Omar. Who is he when we meet him in this story? From the start. We meet someone who's vacant, who's been stripped of his Identity. He's a young man lived quite a colorful, lavish life playing music with his family, and we see him completely none of that and and void of anything that kind of resembles home and he's almost dealing with Survivor's guilt. I mean, his parents are in Turkey, eking out a living. His brother fought in the civil war in Syria. Absolutely, and that guilt he's trying to justify Constantly trying to have those conversations with his parents about you know what it means to be in the UK in in Scotland. Then tell me about your own journey to this film. Because you have spent time in refugee camps. You studied Arabic and politics for your undergrad. You spent a year living in Syria. What did you take from those experiences that translated into this film? Yes, it does kind of stand back all the way to the point where I was living in Syria, which is just the year before the civil war started on. Did you know I made friends through playing in the rugby team and Damascus or I'm being, you know, involved in theater there on then, you know, carrying some of those relationships forward as well on that kind of realization that I have so much in common with these people and This kind of label of being a refugee is actually very damaging to their own identity. So I think it's just lots of things along the way that kind of made me see refugees as ordinary people that Our cordon. They difficult, tragic and unfortunate circumstances. A mere talk to me about your journey to this film in your British Egyptian on Do you have noted in the past that sort of Middle Eastern and North African actors often get typecast. This film is obviously not that what drew you to play this character? I don't have a problem playing anybody that is, you know, Middle Eastern, you know, because that's something I'm proud of who you are. That's who I am. Exactly. It's a part of my identity. As so long as you know that the character we understand where he's come from ways going. What is once needs are on DFI ears, and I certainly found that when I read And script when I first got it, you know, he puts all more into the forefront of the narrative. He gives an agency and also you were constantly reminded of how beautiful Syria is and how much he longs to be back home with his family. Have to spring. The Hypocrites will start to go in the garden. Movement used them to make all my days. Like Sweet apricot leather. Another look. We have a saying it Z looking for missions. Means. Tomorrow there'll be a pro quotes. What do you use it for? Something that will never happen. But I never what they're saying, because we always had a progressive You spent time with refugees to prepare for this role? Yes, we were very fortunate. We were working with an organization in Scotland that work with Syrian, a single men's group. On And I actually loved that film has that balance between humor and tragedy to tell a story like this. Yeah, because the film is profoundly funny in parts, and then the film was shot in the outer have bodies in Scotland and the fictional characters give Lot of comedic lift for the film. They're very idiosyncratic. Why did you want to place this story there? We actually started looking in Iceland in the Northwest fjords on then realized that This story could be told much closer to home in Scotland but then also placing on on the island and then sort of developed this metaphorical depth where the island is limbo itself. The island is a metaphor for their bigotry. Well, I mean, the refugees are welcomed by everyone. It was he very early on that Omar is ridiculed and harassed by a group of young adults. You make the point that refugee men in particular viewed as a threat? Yeah, And that was part of the decision making Tonto tell this story That was about a group of single male refugees that are sent to this remote Scottish island. And yeah, that's really connected to the idea that in the right when media it's the single male refugee, that scene is the biggest threat and is part of that process of dehumanization and demonizing of refugees. You know, this film has been very well received, particularly though in the Middle East, which I thought was really, really interesting. It's had a lot of residence there. Yes, well above incredibly passionate about bringing it to to the Middle East. What was amazing, actually was when we did screen it. People didn't know they didn't know that Ben was Scottish. They assume that whoever whoever directed and wrote this must be minister must must be. You know, the very least Egyptian When we went face time, Ben onstage and on it was it was amazing. They gave a standing ovation and they were just kind of Completely night loading and rightly so, loading him for his amazing achievement and directing this mean for me this it was really very strange but incredible experience of being obviously during the pandemic and not being able to travel to Cairo Film Festival. I was in my wife, parents kind of farm house in the mountains and in the Basque country and suddenly I'm you know, I'm on stage in the Cairo Opera house. Facing Ah, standing ovation on bond is just amazing to see that response. I mean, I guess that speaks to something about the kinds of films that people want to see about refugees and other immigrants. I mean, what kinds of stories do you think? We're still not seeing. I think it's it speaks to more than just about the subject matter. It speaks more about identity, you know, speaks more about representation and how people want to be represented on screen as well. I mean, I think it was less about it being someone who was a refugee and more about someone being portrayed in a positive light. I mean, this is Omar is as positive reflection as they can get really a man who is not ashamed of his background and someone who is Muslim but doesn't were not kind of using that in any way. It just happens to be part of his identity, were constantly reminded of things that we can relate to, regardless of your background. And I think that's what people want to see more off. You want to see themselves like anybody else. Limbo is the film directed and written by Ben Sharrock. Amira al Masri plays Omar. Thank.

Donny Osmond Ben Sharrock Iceland Syria Amira al Masri Turkey Omar UK Middle East Lulu Tomorrow Amir Dennis Cairo Film Festival Scotland Ben Damascus Limbo Tonto later this afternoon
"sharrock" Discussed on Food Safety Matters

Food Safety Matters

04:30 min | 2 years ago

"sharrock" Discussed on Food Safety Matters

"Association's quality assurance executive study group and currently serves as an education advisory board member with the food safety summit and is an advisory council member with sandy. Professional shrug holds a bachelor of science in biology and chemistry. Shrek has a lot of interesting stories to tell and great experiences to share with our audience. It was great fun to talk with him. And i know. I'm a broken record on those but it's another you can't miss it. I love it okay. So now it's time for that. Don't miss interview highs sharrock and welcome to the food safety matters. Podcast really excited to talk to you about your four decade-long career in food safety so let's get started and notice i'm not gonna say anything forty years that's a long time but we won't focus on how long because you look so young. It's it's all good. You know you. You were gracious enough to send me your bio and your career in the food. Industry is really taken Very interesting path. You've served as regulator for number of years and you've also been involved aspects of food service distribution and retail. So you've got a lot of different positions over the course of your career. Can you describe your perspective of the interconnectedness of the food supply chain given this unique vantage point of having served in so many different positions barbara first off. Thank you for inviting me to talk about something. That's been near and dear to my heart as.

forty years Shrek four decade sharrock food safety sandy barbara first