6 Burst results for "Sharon Gregan"

"sharon gregan" Discussed on Planet Money

Planet Money

11:42 min | 2 years ago

"sharon gregan" Discussed on Planet Money

"Support for NPR and the following message come from Exxon Mobil the company. That's working to bring affordable scalable carbon capture to industries around around the world. It's one of the few technologies that could help decarbonised industrial plants by capturing. Co Two at its source experts agree that it will also play a critical role in reducing global carbon emissions find out more at energy factor dot com greg. You read the planet money newsletter here. We love it but what I want to know is if your mom loves hope so. Do you think she would love it if she knew that. Listeners have written and said that it is quite clear excellent. One person even said it makes them feel young again mom. Are you listening subscriber. NPR Dot Org Slash Planet Money Newsletter Carolina's Rozanski NPR dot org slash planet money newsletter in some ways listening to the working tapes is like opening up a time capsule. Some of the jobs studs profiled no longer exist in our story says interviews a telephone switchboard operator in walk in Illinois talking to Sharon riggins. You're about seventeen eighteen and you work Illinois Bell Bell. See when you die the appetite. That's which again you get someone like me when you all when they die out. Oh we we get you. That's it because this is the only telephone office in Waukegan. Could you describe so it's a big long long room by half the size of Jimmy's you might say in its down both sides. There's a homegrown switchboards out closes the girl sitting next to you. Oh wow very close. I would say she'd be sitting not even five or six inches away from me cramped yeah. We're krant so now describe it step by step. You were telling a little child what it is L. Qena first of all in front of you. You've got about seven pairs of cords and and all these lights the cows coming from when a light goes on that means to someone waiting there and you plug in and you ask them what they want your arms get tired know your math gets tired. It's the strangest you get tired of talking with talking with a long 'cause you talk constantly for six hours and it's hard going on this point. Well you get to feel and dislike machine because essentially you're on this level of about seven or eight phrases that you use mark. What do you say warning may help you. I may help you on that. It's what number did you want. I don't either collect coffee you from so-and-so. Will you accept the charge something like that. You said it's pretty hard it is because the two doing is like monotonous work but for me. It's a great temptation to talk. When I'm bored it makes little comments or something I talk with a southern the next in her Puerto Rican accent. You try and make your voice really sexy just see. What can we actually Horse Room? Yeah I do but if you get caught talking with the customer they had swum mark against you because the company says you can't personal yeah you. Can't you know some people they'll say operator I'm lonesome. talk to me people. Do there really is there. I'm lonesome when you talk to you couldn't as GM sorry I really can't but you can't. You're doing great deal of talking but the talk has nothing to do with actual human communication right this very true. It's stat that really a lonely profession or anything but it's one where you not a whole lot of communication even though that is your job genuine quite marvelous. Do you see yourselves selves a telephone operator for the rest of you know no no no never never. I did did not become a career telephone operator. My name is Sharon Gregan's back in nineteen seventy two. I was a telephone operator. Peter instead circles working. You know I really remember working. They're very vividly and I don't know maybe that jogged helped me develop a keener leaner ear for what people need and what people want. I think I became a really good listener but let's get get real. I don't think there's much romance in the work of telephone operator. I think about some poor person at the end of that line who's sitting in a cubicle somewhere saying the same things taking down the same numbers for eight hours a day. You know automation is great in today's days world but it's hard to automate everybody's wishes and wants. I mean we've all had those situations. Where all you WanNa to do is talk to somebody and all you have is a list of menu options. I still tell my kids just always always picked zero machines that replace you when they sued. Oh sure sure have to be some machine though because because the people knew how funny they talked how how badly they pronunciation how hard it is to understand some people and she would have a hard time telephone switchboard operator. Sharon Gregan's interviewed by studs terkel. If you pick a copy of the book Sharon appears under the pseudonym heather lamb she's now the director of communications at the Seattle Public Library. Foundation studs didn't just ask people to describe what they did for a living. He asked them how they felt about. It was boring monotonous work. I don't give a shit when anybody says it was boring monotonous to work kind of assembly line that's Gary Bryner. He was twenty nine when Stutz interviewed him at an auto factory in Ohio. I am somewhere between Clean Youngstown and Warren Ohio Industrial Areas Steel automobiles talking to Gary Bryner. Can you Brian or is the president of local title one one one four united auto workers no one one to four one one one two one two a what what sort of plant is basis. It's the General Motors Vega plant in Lordstown. Most automated plant in the world isn't that right the fastest line speed in the world and they've got the most modern equipment the unit mates they got twenty two in a row Lebanon described. It looks like a robot you know and it reminds me of praying Mantis when they took the unit mates on we were building sixty an hour prior to the unit mates. When we came back to work with the unit mates we're building one hundred and one cars per hour see they never tire they never sweat. They never complained. They never miss work. They're always there yeah so what happened to the guys in the plant working on now. It's a funny thing you know when they revamped plant. They tried to take every movement now all the guys day so that he could conserve seconds in time so they could make more efficient. More productive is assembly line approach dependent upon the in fact each other guy right. GM's reason for trying to be more efficient as if they could take one second and save a second on each guys effort they would over a year make a million dollars one second that's right. They used it to stop watches and they say look we know from experience that it takes like so many seconds to walk from here to there. We know that it takes so many seconds to shoot that screw. We know that gun turned so fastness grew so long in the hole so deep we know how long it takes and that's what that guy's. GonNa do. An argument has always been. You know that's mechanical. That's not human. Look we retire. We sweat. We have hangovers. We have upset stomachs. We have feelings emotions and we're not about to be placed in a category of machine. This is something new isn't it the workers in the plant and they feel they have a right and determining the nature of their work to the working man. We we do now. we have some kind of pride being able to stand up to the giant. General Motors Corporation say look. This is what I think is fair and I'm willing to fight to show you this fair. I just think they want to be able to be treated with dignity and some respect and you. That's not asking how awful lot well. It takes me back. I'm Gary Bryner. bryner retired have been for eleven years. I didn't plan to be a union guy. I just wandered into it. In nineteen eighteen sixty sixth through seventy five maybe later the company and the Union were bitter enemies. Every gain we made usually came out of strike and that's just the way it was but the the job of the Union today is much tougher than it was for me. Eh In one thousand nine hundred seventy because the strength of the union has been so weakened and look the unions not perfect. I be the first to say it but you know what we did. In the Union is to create this middle class that were able to do things enjoy their life outside of work and I. I worry about these things that we're losing but listen. You gotTa have a job no matter what it is you. GotTa have a job. It's one of all those things that must be picking it up with Gary. You feel as shape of things to come. I hope that it is because I think what we're doing is right. You know we're we're putting humans before prophets and I think that's necessary. I think if it isn't it that way and other places that should be going through. All these tapes for the nineteen seventies is fascinating to hear how different aren't things were back then unions powerful. He talked to an actual operator to make a long distance phone call but the interview that really struck me the most wasn't about how much had changed changed over the past four decades but how much hasn't fifty years later this feels like deja Vu after the break break the story of Renault Robinson Chicago police officer and one of the founders of the Afro American patrolman's League support for this podcast and and the following message come from the capital one saver card earned four percent cashback on dining and entertainment two percent grocery stores and one percent on all other purchases pisses now when you go out you cash in capital one what's in your wallet terms apply. Everyone is Cardiff Garcia. I'm the CO host planet money's other podcast. A daily podcast called the indicator on an episode. We look at why the Internet's favorite alcoholic beverage white claw might eight though some of its success to a quirk of the tax code. That's why it's so popular with guys in fraternities because it's a responsible choice for sensing Franken. That's on the indicator from planet that money..

Union Sharon Gregan NPR GM Exxon Mobil Gary Bryner Illinois Sharon riggins Waukegan Illinois Bell Bell Gary General Motors Corporation Carolina L. Qena Jimmy Puerto Rican
"sharon gregan" Discussed on Radio Diaries

Radio Diaries

13:25 min | 2 years ago

"sharon gregan" Discussed on Radio Diaries

"So the nature of the work you do this book about work. Jabs people do how would you describe your work <hes>. Let's see what i got my wife <hes> in nineteen seventy four studs circle published a book with an unwieldy title working people talk about what they do all day and how they feel about what they do is a collective portrait of america. Okay was based on more than one hundred interviews did around the country and after working came out something surprising happened became a bestseller even inspired a broadway musical musical something about ordinary people talking about their daily lives in their own words. Struck cord certainly did that for me. This this is the sound of my copy of working high school but it's one thing to read the interviews in the book and it's nothing to hear them and very few people have studs recorded all the interviews on his portable reel to reel tape recorder but after the book was released in eighteen seventy four he packed his raw interview tapes into boxes and stored them away and there they stayed stayed untouched until he died. We are ready diarrheas in our friend. Jane sachs to project an were offered the chance to make radio series out of these recordings for me as a proud route archival tape geek. This was uncovering the dead sea scrolls this hour. We bring you our series. Working tastes has said charcoal nasio here. We tracked track down. Some of the people studs interviewed in those tapes but in forty years ago in some ways listening to the working tapes is like opening up a time capsule some the job studs profiled. No longer exist in our first story says interviews a telephone switchboard operator in waukegan illinois talking to sharon riggins. You're seventeen eighteen. <hes> and illinois bell bell see when you die the aperture. That's what you get. You get. Someone like me when you dial all when they dial. Oh <hes> we get you. That's it because this is the only telephone office in waukegan. Could you describe so it's a big long room by half the size of gymnasium out saying down both sides home rose switchboards out closest girl sitting next to you very close i would say she'd be sitting sitting not even five or six inches away from me that cramped were cramped so not describe step by step. Tell little the child what it is okay now first of all in front of you. You've got <hes> about seven pairs of cords and all these lights the tell you where the cows are coming from when when the light goes on that means to someone waiting there and you plug in and you ask them what they want. Your arms get tired. No your mouth gets tired. It's the strangest rangers you get tired of talking talking with so long 'cause you talked constantly for six hours and it's hard kim going on this well. Well you get to feel and dislike machine because essentially you're on this level of about seven or eight phrases that you use mark. What what do you say. <hes> warning may help you. I very may help you on then it's on. What number did you want. Iva collect coffee you from so and so. Will you accept the charge something like that. It's pretty hard it is because the two doing is like monotonous work but for me. It's a great temptation to talk like when i'm bored and make some little comments or something or talk with a southern accent puerto rican accent you try and make your voice. It's really sexy and just see what can we actually horse room. Yeah i do but if you get caught talking with the customer. That's one mark against you. The growth companies as you can get. I know yeah you. Can't you know some people they'll say operator. I'm lonesome. You talked to me people do so there really is there an monsanto you talk to you couldn't as g._m. Cy i really can't but you can't be doing great deal of talking but the talkers. It's nothing to do with actual human communication right this very true. It's it's that really lonely profession or anything but it's one where you not not a whole lot of communication even though that is your job janu quite marvelous research. Do you see yourself as a telephone operator for the rest of your line. No no no no never never. I did not become a career telephone operator. My name is sharon riggins back in nineteen seventy two. I was hit telephone operator instead circles working. You know i really i remember working. They're very vividly and i don't know maybe that job helped me develop a keener ear for <hes> what people need and what people want. I think i became a really good listener but let's get real. I don't think there's much romance in the the <hes> work of a telephone operator. I think about some poor person at the end of that line who's sitting in a cubicle somewhere saying the same things taking down the same numbers for eight hours a day. You know automation is great in today's world but it's hard to automate. Everybody's everybody's wishes wants. I mean we've all had those situations. Where all you wanna do is talk to somebody and all you have have is a list of menu options. I still tell my kids just always pick zero. You feed a machine being good replace. You sure sure have to be some machine though because the people knew how funny talked how how badly they pronunciation how hard it is to understand of people machine have a hard time telephone switchboard operator sharon gregan's interviewed by studs terkel. If you pick up a copy of the book sharon appears under the pseudonym heather lamb mm-hmm she's now the director of communications at the seattle public library. Foundation studs didn't just ask people to describe what they did for a living. He asked them how they felt about it. It was a boring monotonous work. I don't give a shit what anybody says it was boring and monotonous to work on an assembly line. That's gary bryner. He was twenty nine. One study interviewed him at an auto factory in ohio. I am somewhere between youngstown and warren ohio industrial area <unk> steel automobiles talking to gary bryner. Can you bryner as the president of local one four united auto workers no one one to four one one two one one to a went. What sort of plant is this is. The general motors vega plant in lordstown town. The most automated plant in the world isn't it right sa- fastest line speed in the world and they've got the most modern equipment the unit mates. It's got twenty two in a row eleven describing like it looks like a robot and it reminds me of a praying mantis when they took the unit mates on we were building sixty an hour prior to the unit mates. When we came back to work with the mates we're building one hundred and one cars per hour see they never tire. They never sweat. They never complain. They never miss work. They're always there yeah so what happened to the guys in the plant now. It's a funny thing you know when they revamped plant. They tried to take every movement out of the guys day so that he could conserve seconds and time time so that they can make a more efficient more productive is seventy line approach dependent among the fact each guys exactly the guy right g._m.'s uh-huh reason for china to be more efficient as if they could take one second and save a second each guys effort they would over year make a million dollars one second and that's right you know they use the stop watches and they say look we know from experience that it takes so many seconds to walk from here to there. We know that it takes like so many seconds to shoot that screw we know the gun turned so fastness grew so long and the whole so deep we know how long it takes and that's what that guy is going to do and our argument has always been. You know that's mechanical. That's not human. Look we tire we sweat. We have hangovers. We have upset stomachs. We have feelings emotions and we're not about to be placed in a category of machine. This is something new isn't it the workers in the plant and eh feel they have a right and determining the nature of their work to working men. We do now <hes> we have some kind of pride being able to stand up to the giant. General motors corporation say look. This is what i think is fair and willing to fight to show you this fair. I i just think they want to be able to be treated with dignity and some respect and that's not asking a hell of a lot uh well. It takes me back. I'm gary bryner. Retired have been for eleven years. I didn't plan to be a union guy. I just wandered into it. In nineteen sixty sixth through seventy five live maybe later the company in the union were bitter enemies. Every gain we made usually came out of a strike and and that's just the way it was but the the job of the union today is much tougher than it was for me in nineteen seventy because the strength of the union has been so weakened and look the unions not perfect. I'd be the first to say it but you know what we did. In the union is to create this middle class us that we're able to do things enjoy their life outside of work and i worry about these things that we're losing but listen. You gotta have a job no matter what it is you gotta have a job. It's one of those things that must be picking it up with. Gerry utilises shape of things to come. I hope that it is because i think what we're doing is right. You know we're we're putting humans before profits and i think that's necessary. I think if it isn't that way in other places it should be gary bryner in struggle in the early nineteen seventies sometimes studs interviewed people at the end of their careers looking back on their lives trying trying to make sense of what they accomplished eddie. Jaffe was in new york press agent. Let him gary for plane. Quirky publicity stunts on behalf of his clients. He was a small wiry. Sorry man who loved to tell stories as he listened to study interview with jaffe. You'll notice studs barely as a word in how many years have been pressing roughly. Well you know so i started thirty two years ago and in the course of the years i did everything from strippers to a thing called roller derby hell on wheels from gangsters to billy graham riddick gangsters debilitating. You handle both yup but don't forget that i spent most of my life learning techniques that are no value anymore was a client would come to me as i wanna be a star. Get me attention and i've made get her in life magazine zien today she can call the carson show if she can get on there and get more attention than i could have gotten a new year and this has helped destroy press asian asian react we do it well in these thirty years being quite imaginative presaging you feel you've done meaningful work well. <hes> there was a physical kick the scene things you're responsible for in the papers but being a publicity man is a confession of weakness. Yes in a way other words for people who don't have the guts to try to get attention for themselves. You spend your whole life telling the world how great somebody the else is and this is a frustrating thing your your imagination in the ideas. You could have been used some other way of share. I mean almost everybody. I think looks back on their life and says i wasted it and being a precision gives gives you a far greater opportunity to do this than almost any other occupation eight okay eddie jaffe interview by studs terkel in the early nineteen seventies jaffe died in two thousand and three at the age of eighty nine and his job it in new york times referred to him as is the last of a breed the do anything buccaneering presaging.

gary bryner eddie jaffe sharon riggins General motors corporation waukegan Jane sachs illinois america studs terkel sharon gregan ohio new york Iva billy graham carson sharon president seattle youngstown
"sharon gregan" Discussed on Radio Diaries

Radio Diaries

07:22 min | 2 years ago

"sharon gregan" Discussed on Radio Diaries

"Time. Telephone switchboard operator, Sharon Gregan's, interviewed by stead Sterkel. And if you pick up a copy of the book, Sharon appears under the pseudonym, Heather lamb. She's now the director of communications of the Seattle public library foundation. We'll be back with more stories from the working tapes after this quick break. The radio podcast has support from Robin Hood an investing. Apple lets you buy and sell stocks ETF's options in cryptos all commission free. While other brokerages charge up to ten dollars for every trade. Robinhood doesn't charge any commission fees. So you can trade stocks and keep all your profits. Plus there is no account minimum deposit needed to get started. So you can start investing at any level. The simple intuitive design robinhood makes investing easy for newcomers and experts alike, and with Robin Hood, you can learn how to invest in the market as you build your portfolio. Discover new stocks track your favorite companies and get customer vacations for price movement. So you never missed the right moment to invest. Robin Hood is giving listeners at ready divers of free stocks like apple Ford or sprint to help you build your portfolio sign up. It diaries, Robin, Hood dot com. That's diaries, Robin, Hood dot com. Going through all those tapes from four decades ago, you can hear how different things were back. Then unions were strong you talk to an actual operator to make a long distance phone call. But the story that really struck me. The most wasn't about how much has changed over the past four decades. But how much hasn't this the story of Renault Robinson a Chicago police officer and one of the founders of the afro American patrolman's league and talking with Renault Robinson? And I'm thinking why? Why did you become police policeman is looked upon in the black community as an important thing? Even though people are afraid of them. What people have bad thoughts about the position itself is still one of them. Coordi- quit a job paying more money to become a police officer and. Sometimes I wonder if that was the best decision to make. Could you describe your day the day of at least for the uniform? Well, first of all you've given in the Samina partner. Mostly white guys are wondering what black? They're gonna get today and the black guys are wondering the same thing. Which one of these foods are going to get today. Black sand only reason with this way, compass because they want to protect this life while he's reading around the black community to ward off the bullets. And so, you know, this hard feelings. So sad what happens than during these eight hours? You sitting what this might say each other at all? Can you imagine if eight hours, so there's no conversation very little very little? Got two studs. Exactly what the situation was my name is Renault Robinson. And when I first started on a police department. I went in there to do the best job. I could as a policeman. But that became very difficult. Once I realized what the true circumstances were what led disenchanted, I think it was just seeing blacks being treated one way whites we treated enough, you know. Majority of the policeman in my station, white the opinions that they have a black people entering all criminals and no morals, new scruples, dirty, and nasty, etc. Etc. Facility triplets with an ordinary citizen could get to run on this. Well, I would say about sixty percent of police citizen contact starting with the traffic situation. Certain units have really developed a science around stopping. In other words in their man's if they stop a hundred cars in the black community. It likelihood them finding more two or three violations of some sort is hiring. They pass. Now, of course, after you stop two thousand you've got nine hundred people who are very pissed off teachers lawyers doctors, which just average working people have broken any low in a very irritated aggravated about being stopped about. Threes and black folks will minority tolerance of police brutality as grow very short won't accept they want except that three what they said that the human as in degrading. That's why more young kids are being killed by the police never before. Fifty years later. Whether it's Chicago or Baltimore, Detroit. This same thing is happening in all of these cities. Is it just feels like deja vu? At the time. I joined the Chicago police department, I was young. And I guess I was very energetic about doing something about racism. You know, I remember they forced us to put sawed off shotguns police issued in the squad cars loaded with double o buckshot. If you're a hunter, you know, what that is. I am a handful of other black police. I was just that was wrong. You're chasing, the Kia though chasing a stolen cried. And you got something that could tear somebody's head off. So the afro American patrolman's league, we raised hell, we picketed we marched. We did everything to get the police department that take those guns out of the squad cars, of course, speaking out on a regular basis made me popular fellow and the police department. You go on to your locker room, and you see in your mail box is human feces and cigarette ashes and trash you kind of know what that means you go on a bathroom as a picture of you on the wall dressed as a native would a bone in your nose. You know, how they feel? They will Nikki net stuff just to try and force me out of the department. I know the fact that you now have the reputation of speaking out speaking your mind every now, and then you're suspended. I've got thirty days suspension Kimmy. What are they use as grounds? Well, this latest one being suspended because I was passing out literature. Police station to black about the patrol mentally. I was arrested in the station. And I'm being suspended conduct unbecoming policeman. In the air. I knew I had to go. I mean, I had fractured to too many feelings, and too many people who didn't want to hear what I had to say. And I left. I get a small Pinson now. And the beat goes on.

Robin Hood Renault Robinson Chicago Apple Sharon Gregan officer Robinhood Seattle public library foundat director of communications Heather lamb Samina Pinson Coordi Ford partner Kimmy Baltimore Detroit four decades eight hours
"sharon gregan" Discussed on Radio Diaries

Radio Diaries

06:17 min | 2 years ago

"sharon gregan" Discussed on Radio Diaries

"Yeah. Well, it takes me back. I'm Gary Bryner retired have been for eleven years. I didn't plan to be a union guy. I just wandered into it. In nineteen sixty sixth through seventy five maybe later, the company in the union, were bitter enemies. Every gain we made usually came out of a strike. And that's just the way it was. But the the job of the union today is much tougher than it was for me in nineteen seventy because the strength of the union has been so weakened and look the unions. Not perfect. I'd be the first to say it. But you know, what we did in the union is to create this middle class that were able to do things enjoy their life outside of work. And I worry about these things that we're losing. But listen, you gotta have a job. No matter. What it is. You got to have a job. It's one of those things that must be picking it up with Gary you feel as shape of things to come. I hope that it is. Because I think what we're doing is. Right. You know, we're we're putting humans before prophets. And I think that's necessary. I think if isn't that way in other places that should be. Gary Bryner viewed by studs terkel in the early nineteen seventies in some ways listening to the working tapes as like stepping inside a time capsule. Many of the jobs studs profile, no longer exist. Like this one a telephone switchboard operator in what Keegan Illinois talking to Sharon Reagan's. You're seventeen eighteen and you work, Illinois bell. Oh, yes. Ma bell. See when you die the app it. That's what you get. You get someone like me when you dial when they dial, oh, we get you. That's it. Because this is the only telephone office in Waukegan could you describe? So it's a big long room by half the size of gymnasium out say in its down both sides. There's a home rose which boards out closest the girl sitting next to you. Very close. I would say she'd be sitting not even five or six inches away from me cramped. Yeah, we're Krant. So not describe it. Step by step. You were telling a little child what it is. Okay. Now, first of all in front of you. You've got about seven pairs of cords and all these lights the tell you where the cows are coming from when the light goes on that means to someone waiting there and you plug in. And you ask them what they want. Your arms get tired. No your mouth gets tired. It's the strangest. You get tired of talking were you talking with so long 'cause you talked constantly for six hours, and it's hard can going on this point. Well, you get to feel dislike machine because essentially you're on this level of about seven or eight phrases that you use Mark. What do you say warning may help you may help you on what number did you want IVA collect call for you from? So and so will you accept the charge the something like that? It's pretty hard. It is because the to doing is like monotonous work. But for me, it's a great temptation to talk like when I'm bored and make some little comments or something or I talk with a southern accent Puerto Rican accent, you try and make your voice, really sexy. Just see what can we actually your horse room? Yeah. I do. But if you get caught talking with the customer, that's one Mark against you. Because the companies as you can't get I know you can't, you know, some people they'll say operator, I'm lonesome. You talked to me people do. So there really isn't. I'm lonesome. Will you talk to you? Couldn't is is Jim sorry. I really came. But you can't. You're doing great deal of talking. But the talk has nothing to do with actual human communication, right? This very true. It's it's really a lonely professional anything. But it's one where you not whole lot of communication, even though that is your job. Sharon knew quite marvellous. Do you see yourself a telephone operator for the rest of you lying? No. No, no, no, never never. I did not become a career telephone operator. My name is Sharon Gregan's back in nineteen seventy two. I was a telephone operator instead circles working, you know, I really remember working. They're very vividly. And I don't know maybe that job helped me develop a keener ear for what people need and what people want. I think I became a really good listener. But let's get real. I don't think there's much romance in the work of a telephone breeder. I think about some poor person at the end of that line. Who's sitting in a cubicle somewhere saying the same things taking down the same numbers for eight hours a day? You know, automated is great in today's world. But it's hard to automate everybody's wishes and wants I mean, we've all had those situations where all you wanna do is talk to somebody. And all you have is a list of menu options. You know, I still tell my kids just always pick zero. You feel a machine replace you. When they I'll share sure they have to be some machine though, because the people knew how funny they talked how how badly they pronunciation how hard it is to understand some people a machine have hard time.

Gary Bryner Sharon Illinois Waukegan Sharon Gregan Ma bell studs terkel Keegan Illinois Puerto Rican Sharon Reagan Jim eleven years eight hours six inches six hours
"sharon gregan" Discussed on The Kitchen Sisters Present

The Kitchen Sisters Present

11:37 min | 3 years ago

"sharon gregan" Discussed on The Kitchen Sisters Present

"Radio, welcome to the kitchen sisters present. We're the kitchen sisters. Dave Nelson N Nikki Silva. Fashion history is about more than just pretty close to to know that cardigan and Leotard were men before they were items of clothing for the denim is actually named after the city of names and France. Have you ever wondered just who the real people were behind your favorite brands with over seven billion people in the world. We all have one thing in common everyday. He'll get dressed. Take a listen to the new podcast dressed and join fashion, historians April Callaghan, and Cassidy Zachary each week while they explore the who, what when of why we wear? You can listen to dressed on apple podcasts for wherever you find your podcasts. This episode of the kitchen sisters present the supported by secret active. Now, there's an active deodorant, especially for women. It's called secret active. It's deodorant activated by activity, which means that it is designed to work when you move around, whether you're at the gym at work gardening mountain, climbing, it's activated when you're active. It uses sent bubbles to trip odors and replace them with a better sent secret. Try it out. This episode of the kitchen sisters present is supported by travel Portland, Portland, one of our favorite cities. If you haven't been there, you really should plan a trip. There's so much to do up there. It's long been known for its farm-to-table dining and innovative food cards, stellar, coffee. It's hard not to eat local important. If you're into beer, they've got breweries and beer pubs more than any city on the planet, seventy six in the Portland metro area for anyone looking to hike bike run. Bird watch Portland's. Forest park is one of the largest urban forests in the United States with more than eighty miles of trails. And if you're looking for more of an adventure, you can go to mount hood, the Columbia River gorge, the coast, all reachable within a couple of hours, visit travel Portland dot com to start planning your trip you can in Portland. Hi, this is NICKY of the kitchen sisters. We're working on a new series of stories called the keepers, activist archivists, rogue librarians collectors, historians curator's keepers of the culture and the cultures and collections. They keep one of the ultimate keepers in our minds is studs terkel. We've been inspired and propelled by this man and his work since the two of us began producing radio together. One of Stutz mottos one that we've appropriated at the kitchen sisters is I tape, therefore I am and studs taped everything that moved as we warm up for our keeper series. We thought we'd share a beautiful piece that reveals a lot about studs terkel his work and his processes a keeper. It was produced by our radio Topi colleagues, dear friends over at radio diaries along with Jane Saxon and project. And today the kitchen sisters present the working take. Of studs terkel. The nature of the work you do with this book about work jabs people do. How would you describe your work? Let's see. How would I describe my white in nineteen seventy four studs? Terkel published a book with an unwieldy title, working people talk about what they do all day and how they feel about what they do. There was a collective portrait of America. It was based on more than one hundred interviews Ted's did around the country. And after working came out something surprising happened, it became a bestseller, even inspired a Broadway musical, something about ordinary people talking about their daily lives in their own words struck a chord. But it's one thing to read the interviews in the book, and it's another thing to hear them. And very few people have recorded all the interviews on his portable reel to reel tape recorder. But after the book was released in eighteen seventy four, he packed his raw interview tapes into boxes and stored them away, and there they stayed untouched until he died. We are ready diaries in our friend, Jane Sachs project and were offered the chance to make a radio series out of these recordings for me as a proud or tape geek. This was like uncovering the Dead Sea scrolls. In some ways, listening to the working tapes. It's like opening up a time capsule some of the jobs studs, profiled no longer exist in our first story says interviews, a telephone switchboard operator in what Keegan, Illinois. Talking to Sharon Riggins your vote, seventeen eighteen and you work Illinois bell. See when you do the aperture. That's what you get. You get someone like me when you down when they dial all we get you. That's it. Because this is the only telephone office in Waukegan. Could you describe so the big long room by half the size of gymnasium out, saying, it's down both sides. There's a home rose, which words out closest the girl sitting next to you. Very close. I would say she'd be sitting not even five or six inches away from me. Cramped. Yeah, we're Krant. So not describe step by step. You were telling a little child what it is. Okay. Now, first of all in front of you, you've got about seven pairs of cords and all these lights, the tell you where the cows are coming from when the light goes on, that means to someone waiting there and you plug in anyway, ask them what they want. Your arms get tired. No, your mouth gets tired. It's the strangest you get tired of talking. Were you talking with so long? 'cause you talk constantly for six hours and it's hard. You get to feel dislike machine because essentially you're on this level of about seven or eight phrases that you use Mark. What do you say warning may help you very may help you on some? What number did you want IVA, collect, coffee, you from so-and-so? Will you accept the charge something like that. It's pretty hard. It is because doing is like monotonous work. But for me, it's a great temptation to talk like when I'm bored and make some little comments or something. I talk with a southern accent, Puerto Rican, ex, you try and make your voice really sexy. Just see what can we actually horse room. Yeah, I do. But if you get caught talking with the customer, that's one Mark against you because the companies as you can't get personal year, you can't. You know, some people, they'll say operator, I'm lonesome. You talked to me, people do. So there is say, I'm lonesome. Will you talk to you couldn't ISIS GM. Sorry. I really can't, but you can't. Doing great deal of talking, but the talk has nothing to do with actual human communication. Right? This very true. It's it's that really lonely professional anything, but it's one of you not a whole lot of communication even though that is your job. Sharon, you quite Meyer wireless. Do you see yourself as a telephone operator for the rest of you lying? No, no, no, no, never never. I did not become a career telephone operator. My name is Sharon Gregan's back in nineteen seventy two. I was a telephone operator instead circles working. You know, I really remember working. They're very vividly and I don't know. Maybe that job helped me develop a keener ear for what people need in what people want. I think I became a really good listener, but let's get real. I don't think there's much romance in the work of telephone operator. You know, automation is great in today's world, but it's hard to automate everybody's wishes in wants. I mean, we've all had those situations where all you wanna do is talk to somebody and all you have is a list of menu. Options is still tell my kids just always pick zero. Students didn't just ask people to describe what they did for a living. He asked them how they felt about it was boring, monotonous work. I don't give a shit what anybody says. It was boring and monotonous to work on an assembly line. That's Gary Bryner. He was twenty nine when Stutz interviewed him at an auto factory in Ohio. I am somewhere between Youngstown and Warren, Ohio industrial areas, steel automobiles talking to Gary Bryner. Can you Brian or is the president of local one? One, one, four, United Auto Workers? No one one to four. One one, one, two. One. One to a, what? What sort of plant is this is the General Motors Vega plant in Lordstown the most automated plant in the world. Isn't it? Right? It's the fastest line speed in the world. And they've got the most modern equipment. The unit mates they got twenty two in a row Levin described the unit. I reminds me of a praying mantis when they took the unit mates on, we were building sixty an hour prior to the unit mates, and when we came back to work with the unit mates, we're building one hundred and one cars per hour. See, they never tire. They never sweat. They never complain. They never miss work. They're always there. So what happened to the guys in the plant? And now it's a funny thing. You know, when they revamped the plant, they try to take every movement out of the guys day so that he could conserve seconds in time so that they can make more efficient, more productive GM's reason for trying to be more efficient as if they could take one second and save a second on each guys effort they would over a year make a million dollars. You know, they use to stop watches and they say, look, we know from experience. That it takes so many seconds to walk from here to there. We know the gun turns. So fastness grew so long and the whole so deep, we know how long it takes, and that's what that guy's going to do. And our argument has always been, you know, that's mechanical. That's not human look. We tire, we sweat, we have hangovers, we have upset stomachs. We have feelings emotions, and we're not about to be placed in a category of machine. This is something new, isn't it? The workers in the plant and they feel that they have a right in determining the nature of their work to the working man. We do now, we have some kind of pride being able to stand up to the giant General Motors Corporation say, look, this is what I think is fair, and I'm willing to fight to show you this fair. I just think they want to be able to be treated with dignity and some respect and. You know that's not asking how lot. Yeah.

Portland Stutz GM apple Dave Nelson Terkel Illinois France Jane Sachs Nikki Silva April Callaghan General Motors Corporation United Auto Workers Waukegan Gary Bryner Ohio Forest park Jane Saxon Sharon Riggins mount hood
"sharon gregan" Discussed on Radio Diaries

Radio Diaries

01:38 min | 4 years ago

"sharon gregan" Discussed on Radio Diaries

"But for me it's a great temptation to talk i'd when i'm bored and make some little comments or something art i talked with a southern x in her puerto rican eggs and you try and make your voice really sexy just see what can we actually or zero yes i do but if you get caught talking with the customer that's one mark against you all the growth to cut losers secure your personal year you can't you know some people they'll say operator i'm lonesome we talked to me people do so they're really the say among some way you talk to what he couldn't as his gm says i am really can't but she can't me during great deal of talking but the talkers looking to do with act your human communication write this very true it's if that really a lonely profession or anything but it's one we not a whole lot of communication even though that is your job january marvelous you're gonna do you see yourselves a telephone operator for the rest of your land no no no no never never i did not become a career telephone operator my name is sharon gregan's back in nineteen 72 i was had telephone operator instead circles working you i really remember working there very vividly and i don't know maybe that job helped me develop a keener ear four um what people need in what people want i think i became a really good listener.

gm sharon gregan