12 Burst results for "Sharon Alphonse"

"sharon alphonse" Discussed on 60 Minutes

60 Minutes

07:16 min | 4 months ago

"sharon alphonse" Discussed on 60 Minutes

"This is CBS News business analyst Jill schlesinger. You've heard me talk about wild Alaskan company before because when I got this delivery straight to my door, I had to tell you it was an astounding discovery. Sockeye salmon, Pacific halibut cod, a variety of delicious individually portioned wild caught seafood. It was just a miracle actually. I never had to really think about anything. Not only is wild Alaskan seafood and excellent source of protein and high in omega threes, it's also quick to thaw and easy to cook at home. They're so confident in the taste and quality of this seafood they offer a 100% satisfaction and money back guarantee. Right now, listeners can get $15 off your first box of wild caught seafood when you visit wild Alaskan company dot com slash CBS. That's wild Alaskan company dot com slash CBS for $15 off your first box. 60 minutes has been looking into an alarming amount of military casualties, not in combat, but in training that involve armored vehicles. What's being done about it? All right, let's go. We found there are solutions, but an important one is stuck between The Pentagon and Congress. Oh my God. We are holding admitted patients in the emergency department for days upon days. So there's just sitting in the ER because there's not a bed. Yes. We can also pull out bed three Michelle, if you need that bed. I feel like everybody is in survival mode. And not only just us in an emergency department, I think the whole hospital is. We had an entire wave of nurses and physicians who'd worked for 25, 30, 35 years. They said, I'm done. I'm not going to, I'm not going to do this anymore. And they left. I grew up a very, very mean woman. Because of all what happened to me. You learned that here, you think. Yeah. She is not the only one. More than a 150,000 children were sent to residential schools, which Canada's first prime minister supported to in his words sever children from the tribe and civilized them. My name was number 65 for all those years. Just a number. Just the number. 65 picked that up stupid or 65. Why did you do that idiot? I'm Lesley Stahl. I'm Bill Whitaker. I'm Anderson Cooper. I'm Sharon alphonse. I'm John worthy. I'm Scott pelley. Those stories and more tonight. On 60 minutes. I'm CBS News, chief Washington correspondent, major Garrett in this podcast is sponsored by Smith AI. Clients demand an instant response, but now, more than ever, businesses, especially small businesses are spread thin. Smith AI provides businesses with virtual receptionists who handle your calls, chats, and text to unlock new business. Smith AI is friendly and professional agents can screen leads using your custom criteria, schedule appointments on your calendar and call back leads to complete your form. They can do it all by phone, 7 days a week, and also on your website through their 24/7 live chat service. They even answer text and Facebook messages, plus, they have English and Spanish speaking receptionists, real people who will block spam, yes, block spam for free, including all those annoying sales calls. Work uninterrupted. Run your business with less stress and get more leads from your marketing efforts. Smith AI can pay for itself and then some with all the new clients there North America based receptionists help you win. Never miss another lead, it's as simple as fording your calls to Smith AI. On our listeners will save $100 when you sign up using our promo code takeout. At Smith dot AI, visit smith dot AI to read 5 star reviews and be sure to use our code, take out that TA KE. To save $100 at sign up, don't let another day go by, try Smith, AI. Last month, two marines were killed and 17 injured, not in war, but in transit. Their truck flipped over on a highway outside of camp lejeune, North Carolina. And it's not as uncommon as you'd think. We found that as a parent or partner of someone in the military, you're far likelier to get that dreaded call and learn your loved one was killed in an accident rather than in combat. And many far too many of the accidents involve armored vehicles during training. First lieutenant Connor McDowell, a platoon leader in the marines, was out on a training mission in a light armored vehicle like this at camp Pendleton, California in May 2019, when he hit an unmarked ditch covered in brush. Describe what happened. He called out to his men, roll over, roll over roll over. Pushed his gunner in the turret next to him down under the armor, but he couldn't get himself down in time, and it careened into that ditch rolled over and crushed him. Connor was Susan flanagan and Michael McDowell's only child. At first, I thought that this was what happens when you train like you meant to fight. But when we went to San Diego to bring him back, I had a couple of idols, moments in the hotel. And I Googled rollover and military. And I discovered that it Pendleton a month before a marine raider had died in a rollover. So I Googled further back. The army, et cetera. And suddenly I saw a whole series of deaths in rollovers of military vehicles, all kinds, humvees, light armored vehicles, broadly fighting vehicles. And then I realized this is not a single incident. This is a systemic problem. During training? Yearning training. I can accept people dying in combat. But if you're training in your own country and you're dying needlessly in preventable accidents, this is a massive problem which has to be fixed. To fix it, McDowell kept digging. And what he uncovered, he says, was so serious and yet so routinely neglected that it led to this scathing report by the government accountability office. The GAO found close to 4000 of these accidents in the army and Marine Corps from 2010 to 2019, resulting in a 123 deaths. Nearly two thirds of which involved rollovers, and shockingly most occurred in daylight on regular.

Smith AI Jill schlesinger CBS News CBS Bill Whitaker Sharon alphonse John worthy major Garrett Lesley Stahl Scott pelley Anderson Cooper Pentagon Michelle Connor McDowell Congress Smith Pendleton
"sharon alphonse" Discussed on 60 Minutes

60 Minutes

03:37 min | 5 months ago

"sharon alphonse" Discussed on 60 Minutes

"Tony Bennett's been singing and swinging for 70 years. Now at 95, he's struggling with dementia, but as we saw when we spent time with him, not even Alzheimer's could stop this legend from getting back on stage with his friend Lady Gaga and putting on what may be his last and best performance ever. Stepping out with my baby can't go wrong 'cause I'm in right. Often as we hear banned play, we rarely glimpse fans at work. Much less the biggest band that ever was. Well, teleport to 1969 and meet The Beatles. Director Peter Jackson went deep, sifting through dozens of hours of never before seen film. Allowing the world an intimate look at The Beatles and studio. In an intimate listen to every conversation. Left his home in Tucson, Arizona. New Orleans has been quieter than normal during the pandemic. But musicians find a way. Tonight, we introduce you to New Orleans, self proclaimed best band in the land. So you could hear them and their story. Hey, you ready for a second? This is CBS News business analyst Jill schlesinger. Well, if you are like me, sometimes you're scratching your head. You don't know what to make for dinner. Well, I've got great news. The best tasting meal kit comes from Martha Stewart and Marley spoon. You can get dishes from all over the world delivered to your door or enjoy comforting classics everyone will love, sign up today with code CBS pod and get $120 off your first 5 boxes. All meals feature fresh and premium ingredients. They're all Martha Stewart approved. Ordering is easy and they'll fully flexible subscription lets you skip, pause or cancel any time. If you're tired of grocery shopping and meal planning, sign up today at Marley spoon dot com using code CBS pod for a $120 off your first 5 boxes. Once again, go to Marley spoon dot com and use promo code CBS pod to get $120 off and enjoy delicious meals from Martha Stewart every day of the week. Good evening, I'm Sharon alphonse. Welcome to 60 minutes presents. Tomorrow's Grammy Awards may have been postponed, but we have an hour of music, sure to leave a song in your heart. We'll join The Beatles as they prepare for their final public concert on a London rooftop. And then here, a very different kind of ban, marching through the streets of New Orleans. But we begin with another look at Anderson Cooper's poignant portrait of the legendary Tony Bennett. When Tony Bennett's family announced he had Alzheimer's disease last February, few of the 94 year old singer's fans imagine they'd ever see him on stage again. But this past summer, with his family's help, he began rehearsing for two concerts at Radio City Music Hall with his friend Lady Gaga. No one knew for sure of Tony would be able to pull it off. But his family believed that Tony's story could give hope to others struggling with Alzheimer's and invited Anderson Cooper and a 60 minutes crew to follow him preparing for what would likely be.

Alzheimer's Director Peter Jackson Tony Bennett Martha Stewart Jill schlesinger New Orleans Marley spoon CBS Lady Gaga dementia CBS News Sharon alphonse Tucson Arizona Grammy Awards Anderson Cooper London Radio City Music Hall Tony
"sharon alphonse" Discussed on 60 Minutes

60 Minutes

08:10 min | 5 months ago

"sharon alphonse" Discussed on 60 Minutes

"I'm Lesley Stahl. I'm Bill Whitaker. I'm Anderson Cooper. I'm Sharon alphonse. I'm John wertheim. I'm Scott pelley. Those stories and more tonight. On 60 minutes. 75 years after its publication, the diary of Anne Frank remains among the most widely read books in the world. Blinking between hope and despair, the account of a Jewish teenagers life in hiding in an annex behind an Amsterdam warehouse. Gave voice and a face to millions of victims of the Nazi genocide. Yet one question has gone stubbornly unanswered all these years. Who alerted the Nazi search team in 1944 to Anne Frank and her family's hiding place. Two Dutch police inquiries and countless historians have come up with theories, but no firm conclusions. Then in 2016, a team of investigators led by a veteran FBI agent decided to bring modern crime solving techniques and technology to this cold case. And now they believe they have an answer, one will share with you tonight to a question that's bedeviled historians and haunted Holland. Who was responsible for the betrayal. Vince Panko had turned in his badge and gun. He was two years into a comfortable Florida retirement, when his phone rang in the spring of 2016. I received a call from a colleague from the Netherlands who said if you're done laying on the beach, we have a case for you. Were you laying on the beach? I was actually driving to the beach. I wasn't quite there yet. Panko spent three decades as an FBI special agent, targeting Colombian drug cartels. His work had also taken him to the Netherlands, where his investigative chops left an impression. Were you looking to get back when he told you what it was about? After he told me it was to try to solve the mystery of what caused the raid for Anne Frank and the others in the annex, I needed to hear more. 4000 miles away in Amsterdam, the Dutch filmmaker and documentarian had been asking around for a credentialed investigator to dig into a question that he feels Holland has never quite reckoned with. One that gets to the essence of human nature. For me, it was really important to investigate what makes us give up on each other. The area where and Frank lived is a very normal and it's a very warm area with the butcher and the doctor and the policeman. They work together. They loved each other. They live together and suddenly people start to betray on each other. How could that happen? Of the millions literally. Millions of stories to come out of the Holocaust. Why do you think this one resonates the way it does? I think right after the war, people were shown the concentration camps. The atrocities that took place. The horror. And suddenly you find this innocent, beautiful, very smart, funny, talented girl, and she as a lighthouse comes out of the darkness. And then I think humanity said this is who we are. Betraying fellow Dutch to the Nazis was a criminal offense in the Netherlands. But two police probes and a whole library of books dedicated to the Anne Frank case yielded neither convictions nor definitive conclusions. This question of who betrayed and Frank, that has been investigated for years, what was going to make your investigation different than the ones before it? If it's a criminal act, it should be investigated by police. So we set it up as a cold case. Like so many, Panko could read the diary in middle school in western Pennsylvania, and it left a mark. There would be no perp walks or busted crime syndicates here, but he was intrigued. Cautiously. You hear we're going to go back and look at Anne Frank, and that might have the ring of some schlocky media creation. Did that worry you? It did. It did, because as a career investigator, I didn't want to be associated with any type of the tabloid type investigation. You had to make sure this was serious. Let's face it, I mean the honor of the diary, the honor of Anne Frank, we had to treat this with utmost respect. What ultimately sealed it for Vince pankoke the guarantee of absolute autonomy. The ground rules, ties would oversee the operation and could film the process for a documentary he's been making. There would be a book about it, which helped finance the project along with funding from the city of Amsterdam. But this was going to be an independent undertaking, with serious investigators. Convinced pankov was going to take the lead digging in. You'd done cold cases before. Before this, what was the biggest gap in time between when you were approached and when the crime occurred? It was about 5 year crime at that point. So 75 years, a little different. It's a lot different. This is more than a cold. Yeah, this was frozen. To chip away, pan Koch had to draw up his own blueprint. He knew that there was going to be more information to plow through than any human could handle, and that artificial intelligence could be a secret weapon. The book mentioned in FBI man's Dream Team was assembled. An investigative psychologist, a war crimes investigator, historians, criminologists, plus an army of archival researchers. What did all these people with disparate skills bring to this? They brought a different view. It was all of these skills that help us understand and put into context, a crime that happened in 1944. We have to look at things differently. Together they dove in to a familiar story. The Frank family had moved to Amsterdam from Germany to escape the rise of Hitler. They found safety in Holland, where auto Frank ran a manufacturing business. But then the Nazis invaded in 1940. Two years later, the Franks, Otto wife Edith Anne and her sister Margot, along with four other Jewish friends of the family, went into hiding in an annex behind Otto's warehouse. Today, it's preserved as a museum. Doctor hedon Brooke, a historian at the Anne Frank house, showed us in. Oh, well, this is the famous book. This is the book case. It's used to camouflage the entrance to the hiding place. The bookcase helped protect the Franks, as did a handful of Otto's close colleagues at the warehouse, who were in on the secret. We're going sides, mind your head. After the raid, the Nazis took anything that wasn't nailed down. These recreations show what it looked like. Two cramped floors, 761 days, more than two excruciating years indoors. The office workers brought food and supplies, but the 8 in hiding couldn't make a sound during the day. By night, they could listen to the radio, desperately plotting updates from the front on this map. Here's a newspaper clipping from shortly after D-Day. June 1944, with the pins to try to follow the advances of the allied troops in the days and weeks probably after. This is June 1944. 1944. So there's hope. His allied forces are underway. Their life depended on what would happen. And bedroom walls, familiar to any teenager, preserved from the day she was taken away. Here she chronicled the monotony in the horror of life and hiding. Outside things are terrible, day and night. She wrote in January 1943, these poor people are being dragged away with nothing but a backpack and a little bit of money. Her last entry was dated August 1st, 1944. She was 15. Take me to the day of the raid. It's the summer of 1944 and what happens that day? He's a warm day, Sony. And around ten 30 between ten 30, and 11, a couple of men walk in. They were detectives with a Dutch police unit working with the Nazis. In SS officer named silberbauer led the team..

Anne Frank Netherlands Bill Whitaker Sharon alphonse John wertheim Amsterdam warehouse Vince Panko FBI Panko Lesley Stahl Scott pelley Frank Amsterdam Anderson Cooper Vince pankoke pankov pan Koch Florida Edith Anne
"sharon alphonse" Discussed on 60 Minutes

60 Minutes

02:22 min | 6 months ago

"sharon alphonse" Discussed on 60 Minutes

"Traveled to Europe to find out how extreme weather is affecting some of the most famous wines in the world. How many bottles were you able to produce? A normal year, I produce around 40, 50,000 bottles. This year, zero. Climate change has affected many of France's vintages severely. Its economy, too. But in rainy old England across the channel, we found a very different story. Do you think that wine lovers around the world already know that great wines are coming out of England? In other words, is it oh la la no more, it's jolly good. If he's not public enemy number one in China, he's up there. Tonight we'll introduce you to body itself. Park guerrilla activist part political cartoonist he lives in exile, traveling the world, using paint and wit online and on walls to draw truth to power. Infuriating the CCP, the Chinese Communist Party. I am an individual. I'm not controlled by any authority. Suddenly not CCP. That scares them because all they want is total control. I'm Leslie stahl. I'm Bill Whitaker. I'm Anderson Cooper. I'm Sharon alphonse. I'm John wertheim. I'm Scott pelley. Those stories and more tonight on 60 minutes. This episode of the 60 minutes podcast is sponsored by our crowd. All around the world, tech companies are innovating and driving returns for investors. Our crowd analyzes companies across the global private market. Selecting those with the greatest growth potential. Then, brings them to you. From personalized medicine to cybersecurity to robotics, quantum computing and more. In state of the art labs, start up garages and anywhere in between. Our crowd is identifying innovators, so you can invest when growth potential is greatest. Early, our crowds are credited investors have already invested over $1 billion in growing tech companies, and many of their members have benefited from the 46 IPOs or sale exits of their investments..

Chinese Communist Party England Leslie stahl Bill Whitaker Sharon alphonse John wertheim la la Europe Scott pelley France Anderson Cooper China
"sharon alphonse" Discussed on 60 Minutes

60 Minutes

02:16 min | 6 months ago

"sharon alphonse" Discussed on 60 Minutes

"From a trip to Afghanistan, its capital and remote provinces. There are obvious examples of the new Taliban control everywhere, and signs of a country in crisis. But we were surprised to hear from aid workers that they're in regular negotiation with the Taliban. As they try to help the most vulnerable Afghans. When you say you have to reach out to the Taliban and talk to them, how does that work as a woman? NASA is preparing at a cost of $10 billion to look back in time with the revolutionary web telescope. What might at sea? How about nearly all the way back to the Big Bang? Everything we know about. Everything we can see, me and you, everything on the planet, all the hundreds of billions of other galaxies. All of that only makes up about 5% of the universe. The rest of it that other 95%, we have no idea what it is. The same here goes, you'll know the newfoundlanders in heaven. They'll be the ones who want to go home. In the adage comes to life on fogo island, a 90 square mile patchwork of ten minuscule fishing villages where clapboard houses, the color of jelly beans, cling to rock 400 million years old. Among its quirks, Newfoundland has its own time zone, half an hour ahead of the mainland. But wander through focal islands villages and you might as well set your watch back to the 18th century. I'm Leslie stahl. I'm Bill Whitaker. I'm Anderson Cooper. I'm Sharon alphonse. I'm John wertheim. I'm Scott pelley. Those stories and more tonight on 60 minutes. This episode of the 60 minutes podcast is sponsored by our crowd. All around the world, tech companies are innovating and driving returns for investors. Our crowd analyzes companies across the global private market. Selecting those with the greatest growth potential. Then, brings them to you. From personalized medicine to cybersecurity to robotics, quantum computing and more. In state of the art labs, startup garages, and anywhere in between. Our crowd is identifying.

Taliban fogo island Afghanistan Leslie stahl NASA Bill Whitaker Sharon alphonse John wertheim Newfoundland Scott pelley Anderson Cooper
"sharon alphonse" Discussed on 60 Minutes

60 Minutes

02:14 min | 7 months ago

"sharon alphonse" Discussed on 60 Minutes

"Who's responsible when a student dies after being hazed at college? That's what 60 minutes tried to find out after a freshman died from alcohol poisoning at a fraternity house at Washington state university. Had he said, no, I don't want to drink. I'm confident that he would not have had to a drink. He'd already had date night. Actually, it's called blackout date night, I believe. These are the virunga volcanos, home to most of the world's mountain gorillas. Dian fossey aptly called them gorillas in the mist. But when the mist lifts, they are guerrillas in the sun doing what mountain gorillas do eat, rest, eat some more. And snuggle. When you look in the eyes of a gorilla, you see a Kindred spirit looking back at you. Ready if you are? Yes. We want me to slate myself? Yes, please. Right. Rita Moreno with one of the world's handsomest men of color. Ever. Okay, interview over. We're done. I can't do any better than that. Okay, I just want to ask you about the obvious. All of your honors and awards. I ended grand. Ladies and gentlemen, Rita Moreno. This is marvelous. I'm Lesley Stahl. I'm Bill Whitaker. I'm Anderson Cooper. I'm Sharon alphonse. I'm John wirth I'm. I'm Scott pelley. Those stories and more tonight on 60 minutes. This episode of the 60 minutes podcast is sponsored by our crowd. All around the world, tech companies are innovating and driving returns for investors. Our crowd analyzes companies across the global private market. Selecting those with the greatest growth potential. Then brings them to you. From personalized medicine to cybersecurity to robotics, quantum computing and more. In state of the art labs, startup garages, and anywhere in between. Our crowd is.

Rita Moreno Washington state university Dian fossey Bill Whitaker Sharon alphonse John wirth Lesley Stahl Scott pelley Anderson Cooper
"sharon alphonse" Discussed on 60 Minutes

60 Minutes

02:13 min | 7 months ago

"sharon alphonse" Discussed on 60 Minutes

"Nationwide since last year, there has been a 53% increase in the murders of police officers. Police departments are dealing with growing resignations, too. So is it possible that defunding the police may help? The adage has been in law enforcement since forever. 80% of what we do has nothing to do with law enforcement. It's all social work. The kitten up the tree stuff, do you need a badge and a gun for that? And we're starting to cut away at the things that we've asked law enforcement to do that they don't want to do. This is it? That's it. Oh wow. If you are planning to travel by air over the holidays and millions of Americans are, would you jump at the chance to get to your destination in half the time? When I look several decades out, what I want is to be able to be anywhere in the world in four hours for a hundred bucks. Now, that's not where we start, but that's the end goal. That's the temple of Castro and Paul. Exactly. Exactly. The Roman Empire centered around conquests and the outsized personalities of its emperors. Research and archeology continue to search for reliable evidence from that time and tonight will introduce you to some new discoveries about one of the most ridden about, if not misunderstood emperors of all time. Caligula. I can't believe that we were sitting on the steps that Caligula may have walked on. It's amazing. I'm Leslie stahl. I'm Bill Whitaker. I'm Anderson Cooper. I'm Sharon alphonse. I'm John worthy. I'm Scott pelley. Those stories and more tonight on 60 minutes. This episode of the 60 minutes podcast is sponsored by our crowd. All around the world, tech companies are innovating and driving returns for investors. Our crowd analyzes companies across the global private market. Selecting those with the greatest growth potential. Then brings them to you. From personalized medicine to cybersecurity to robotics, quantum computing, and more. In state of the art labs start up garages and anywhere in between. Our crowd is.

Caligula Leslie stahl Bill Whitaker Sharon alphonse John worthy Castro Scott pelley Anderson Cooper Paul
"sharon alphonse" Discussed on 60 Minutes

60 Minutes

01:59 min | 8 months ago

"sharon alphonse" Discussed on 60 Minutes

"Thank you, Scott. What is it like to see him today? It kind of takes my breath away Scott. Does that helps to bring some closure and some help? Help, for heroes, has been the mission of the Carnegie fund for 117 years. It has bestowed 10,000 medals and awarded $40 million. And back in 1904, Andrew Carnegie sensed what science has now confirmed. Heroes, he said, can not be created. They act on an impulse. A mysterious gift to the few. Now, an update on a story we first reported in 2018. Sharon alphonse looked at how a plastic plague was turning oceans into vast garbage dumps. A young Dutch inventor buoyant slat created a device meant to clean up the notorious great Pacific garbage patch. The eventual goal of this cleanup is to get to a 90% reduction by the year 2040. The combination of pipe and nylon netting collected more publicity than plastic. But slots organization the ocean cleanup has developed a new design. In tests, this summer and fall, its successfully collected some 63,000 pounds of ocean plastic. I'm John wertheim. We'll be back next week with another edition of 60 minutes. If anything has got a chance of solving the world's problems, it's science and technology. And every breakthrough was the result of somebody doing the breaking through. I'm David pogue. This is unsung science. The untold creation stories behind the most mind-blowing advances in science and tech. Presented by CBS News and Simon and Schuster. You can listen to unsung science wherever you get your podcasts..

Carnegie fund Sharon alphonse Scott Andrew Carnegie John wertheim plague David pogue CBS News Schuster Simon
"sharon alphonse" Discussed on 60 Minutes

60 Minutes

04:38 min | 8 months ago

"sharon alphonse" Discussed on 60 Minutes

"How does a country go from democracy to dictatorship in one generation? It's easier than you may imagine. This is Juan Sebastian chamorro, a Georgetown educated economist, who was planning to challenge the dictator Daniel Ortega for president of Nicaragua. This video was recorded just hours before he was violently taken from his home by mass police officers. In it, he says, if you're seeing this and then I've been captured. This we're saving. I mean, you can see we Americans spend 90% of our time inside buildings. Well, we found a group of young architects who have set out to create a new model of architecture one that is both beautiful and healthy for the people who build and use them. Inspiration, they say they got in Africa, and have now brought home. What you were doing in Rwanda, you were also doing in Haiti, Malawi. And Poughkeepsie. You've all know a harari is a world renowned historian who's looked into the future and has more than a little concerned about what he sees. We'll soon have the power to re-engineer our bodies and brains whether it is with genetic engineering, or by directly connecting brains to computers, or by creating completely non organic entities, artificial intelligence. And these technologies of developing a breakneck speed. I'm Leslie stahl. I'm Bill Whitaker. I'm Anderson Cooper. I'm Sharon alphonse. I'm John wertheim. I'm Scott pelley. Those stories and more tonight on 60 minutes. Next.

Juan Sebastian chamorro Daniel Ortega Georgetown harari Nicaragua Poughkeepsie Rwanda Malawi Haiti Africa Leslie stahl Bill Whitaker Sharon alphonse John wertheim Anderson Cooper Scott pelley
"sharon alphonse" Discussed on 60 Minutes

60 Minutes

08:14 min | 8 months ago

"sharon alphonse" Discussed on 60 Minutes

"Robert Gates served under 8 U.S. presidents ran the CIA and oversaw the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan for president's Bush and Obama. Given the rising tensions with China, and the chaotic withdrawal from Afghanistan, we thought it worth hearing what he thinks about how President Biden is doing. It's time for American troops to come home. And the biggest challenges facing the United States. It's an American story. Cattle ranchers in Wyoming, who every spring pushed thousands of cows along the same 70 mile route their ancestors pioneered 125 years ago. The green river drift is the country's longest running cattle drive, and as we saw, it's filled with sensational sunrises. Hard dusty days, all of it worked on horseback. In a changing Britain, nostalgia can reside at the bottom of a glass. In the oh so English village of aldworth in Berkshire, you'll find just a cricket green, a church, a few houses, and a pub resistant to time. The bell inn has been in the family of Heather Macaulay for 200 years. We've talked to some pub owners who've said they felt us pressure to evolve and they're trying Gourmet food and DJs and technology. Well, I don't even have a mobile phone. I'm Lesley Stahl. I'm Bill Whitaker. I'm Anderson Cooper. I'm Sharon alphonse. I'm John wirth I'm. I'm Scott pelley. Those stories and more tonight on 60 minutes. Few people know more about the depth and complexity of America's national security in Robert Gates, who spent nearly three decades at the CIA and National Security Council before running The Pentagon under presidents George W. Bush and Barack Obama. Given the end of the war in Afghanistan, tensions with China and deep divisions in this country, we thought it would be worth hearing from the only Secretary of Defense to serve under presidents from different parties. Gates is 78 and lives in Washington state where he says he moved to get as far away from Washington, D.C. as possible. He told us watching the chaos of the American withdrawal from Afghanistan on television made him feel sick. It was really tough. For a few days there, I actually wasn't feeling very well. And I realized it was because of what was happening in Kabul, and I was just so low about the way it had ended, if you will. And I guess the other feeling that I had was that it probably did not need to have turned out that way. Prison Biden said any withdrawal is messy. Certainly the military considers the withdrawal the most dangerous part of an operation. But they really had a lot of time to plan. Beginning with the deal that president Trump cut with the Taliban. So that was in February. Of 2020. Robert Gates who oversaw the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan from 2006 to 2011, told us president Trump failed to plan properly for the evacuation of Afghans who'd helped the U.S. fight the Taliban. And Gates also believes President Biden didn't act quickly enough after announcing in April he was pushing back president Trump's deadline for the U.S. withdrawal by four months. It's time for American troops to come home. Once President Biden reaffirmed that there was going to be a firm deadline date. That's the point at which I think they should have begun bringing these people out. You'd have to be pretty naive not to assume things were going to go downhill. Once that withdrawal was complete. So the former president and President Biden, both share some responsibility in this. Absolutely. As for the collapse of the Afghan government and security forces, Gates believes he and others before him made critical mistakes and helped the U.S. built and trained the Afghan military. I bear some responsibility for this. It had started before I got there. But I think that we created an Afghan military in our own image. And one that required a lot more sophisticated logistics and maintenance and support than say the Taliban. The Taliban didn't have years of training from foreign advisers. They didn't know how to read. We were teaching Afghan troops how to read before anything else. Well, they needed to know how to read in order to operate the equipment we were giving them instead of being light and tactical and basically self resourced as the Taliban were. We created a logistics heavy sophisticated equipment heavy military. And when you pulled that rug out from under them and you add on top of that, the corruption of the senior military leaders and so on. It's not a surprise to me that the Afghan army collapsed. We all maintain the fight against terrorism in Afghanistan. President Biden has given assurances that the U.S. can still target terrorists in Afghanistan. We have what's called over the horizon capabilities. Which means we can strike terrorists and targets without American boots on the ground or very few if needed. But Robert Gates is skeptical. The military reversed to it is over the over the rainbow 'cause it's a fantasy. This notion that you can carry out effective counter terrorism in Afghanistan from a great distance. It's not a fantasy, but it's just very, very hard. As evidenced by the botched drone strike in Kabul in the final days of the withdrawal. The U.S. Military claimed they'd killed an ISIS terrorist and turned out to be an Afghan aid worker and 7 children. If you don't have the kind of sources on the ground to have kind of real-time intelligence that allows you to target people, it's very complicated. If they can't get that right a few blocks from the Kabul airport, are you going to get something right over the horizon? Exactly. When he was Secretary of Defense, Gates would write personal condolence letters to the families of fallen service members. We wondered what he would say to them now and to all who fought in Afghanistan. I would say that you accomplished your mission. There has not been a terrorist attack a successful foreign based terrorist attack on the United States since we went in to Afghanistan in 2001. What happens now that we're gone remains to be seen? Before becoming Secretary of Defense, Gates spent nearly 27 years at the National Security Council and the CIA, which he ran under president George H. W. Bush, Gates and President Biden have crossed paths for decades as he wrote about in 2014. You wrote Joe Biden was a man of integrity. Still, I think he's been wrong on nearly every major foreign policy and national security issue over the past four decades. I think he's gotten a lot wrong. You're talking all through the years as vice president and supposed every one of Ronald Reagan's military programs to contest the Soviet Union. He opposed the first Gulf War that list goes on. Now I will say that in the Obama administration, he and I obviously had significant differences over Afghanistan, but he and I did agree in our opposition to the intervention in Libya. And frankly on issues relating to Russia and China. But you think he made a mistake in Afghanistan in the way he handled the withdrawal? Yes. Do you think he believes he made a mistake?.

President Biden Afghanistan Robert Gates U.S. president Trump Taliban aldworth Gates Heather Macaulay Bill Whitaker Sharon alphonse John wirth CIA Washington, D.C. Lesley Stahl Obama Biden Scott pelley Iraq
"sharon alphonse" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

04:49 min | 1 year ago

"sharon alphonse" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"In his twenties or thirties with short black dreadlocks and are asking anyone with any information to give them a call More now on the report in The New York Times on President Trump's tax situation, the report says, the president has not paid income taxes for 10 of the last 15 years, and in 2016 and 2017. You pay just $750 in federal taxes. CBS's never Alfa Romeo has more on this report. President Trump is blasting. The New York Times report claims he paid just $750 in federal income taxes in 2016 and 2017 is no actually papered. The report shows. He paid nothing at all in 10 out of 15 years, largely because his many namesake businesses reported losing much more money than they made. The report also Shows. Mr Trump took tax deductions on what some people would consider personal expenses, including housing aircraft and $70,000 in hairstyling for television appearances tomorrow night, President Trump and former vice President Joe Biden will have their first presidential debate will be in Cleveland. Joe Biden is preparing for his debate, and we have more on the strategy on the Biden campaign, a campaign source told CBS News. Biden is directed to not go in the weeds on policy and focus on what he perceives as the president's most serious faults in leadership with the Koven 19 pandemic, racial justice and election integrity. Out of CBS's Bo Erickson. The debate tomorrow night in Cleveland. W. B. C news radio will carry it live beginning at nine o'clock and, of course on the I heart radio app tens of thousands of refugees who came to the U. S fleeing War and persecution convert as American citizens for the first time Now Arizona to Florida, New voters have been studying the candidates. If, if reelected President Trump may continue to haul a lot of program that once resettled on average of 95,000 refugees a year. Democratic challenger Joe Biden says he plans to pump that goal even higher. Or on Fisher, Sand and Gravel, the company that worked with conservative fundraising campaign accused of fraud Now to build sections of border wall on private land. Three former administration officials telling 60 minutes, the president pressured officials to direct wall contracts worth nearly two billion officials, sand and gravel. More about the deal with Sharon. Alphonse is speaking to Mississippi Congressman Bennie Thompson. Those things figure in typically when you're when you're deciding who should get a contract, Fisher could potentially Have been de bar from bidding only any fellow contracts, but they weren't the president made no bones about it. His support for fishing. And guess what? Yes, you got the contract. There are claims now coming forward of women undergoing unwanted medical procedures out of south Georgia Detention center Chris Camp has more on what a congressional delegation found out during a visit over the weekend. What has happened here is horrific, said one member of the delegation. In interviews, They heard stories of women being placed in solitary confinement or being treated for mental illness when reporting the unwanted gynecological procedures or resisting the doctor, they said, perform them. That's Dr Mahendra Mean referred to as the uterus collector through his lawyer Means says he had patient consent for all procedures. The Irwin County detention center is no longer sending women to the doctor. Chris Camp for CBS News Atlanta changes in total restrictions taking effect today in Britain. These restrictions, though getting stricter, starting today, anyone who ignores an order to quarantine could be fined up to $13,000 that call to return to your office rescinded and thousands of first year university students have shown up for their orientation weeks only to be put in a lock down after a positive covert test. And with every London borough now on a covert watch list, more restrictions may be coming. Vicki Barker. CBS NEWS London For the first time in seven years, restaurants in the North Attleboro area are not participating in a popular fundraiser this year. You could blame it on Corona virus more from W. Busies Kim Tanaka state. Rep. Bette Porter was forced to cancel her annual fundraiser Betty's Angels Restaurant Day this year due to the pandemic. Dozens of restaurants normally donate a portion of their proceeds on a chosen day toe, Leonard's food pantry Warrior says, because eateries air hurting this year, she decided not to hold the restaurant. Hey. Instead, she held a food drive in front of town hall over the weekend, and it went much better than expected. The challenge was to build the front end loader. We filled it five times with food for us the interest as well as taking many generous monetary donations. People are aware of the situation and they're very generous and willing. Honorable people who don't have the same images. Thank you. Kevin Tonic.

President Trump president Joe Biden CBS Fisher The New York Times vice President Chris Camp Cleveland CBS News Romeo Congressman Bennie Thompson Irwin County detention center south Georgia Detention Kevin Tonic London W. Busies Kim Tanaka Bo Erickson
"sharon alphonse" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

04:11 min | 1 year ago

"sharon alphonse" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"J breaking news center Aaron Rodgers passing for 283 yards and three touchdowns. The Packers unbeaten with a 37 30 win over the Saints. On Sunday night football. Amazingly, the Packers 37 points is a season low for three weeks of the regular season. The Packers are averaging 40.7 points per game. Head coach Matt LaFleur credits everyone involved. It's just a bunch of guys working together and trying to do the best possible quarterback Aaron Rodgers official much more comfortable in the offense this year, and I think, Matt, you know it's really settled in tow. The rhythm of the play calling and it's You know, it's made my job my job a lot easier. As for the defense that is allowed over 30 points in two of three games played, although we're happy with the wind, there's lots of improve upon Greg Nancy W. T. M J Sport, Packer said Coach Man LaFleur on what's making the offense stick this season. That's a credit to everybody. We're taking everybody's input from happy to get seat Adam set of it's just now and really everybody. There's a lot of great communication going on and then also the communication with our quarterback. So it's just a bunch of guys working together and trying to do the best job possible. Next up the past. Peckers will host the Falcons in Green Bay Monday night Football just a week from tonight, even with a losing record and eating help on Sunday from two other teams, the Brewers air back in the postseason for a third straight year, outfielder Christian Village says they're happy with an opportunity to prove they belong. All you can ask for is a chance and the Dodgers are a tough team. Now It's not gonna be an easy serious by any means and dare to collect ourselves and trying to get together and see what we do out there. Bruce and Dodgers play their best of three series in Los Angeles starting Wednesday night. All games can be heard right here on W. T. M. J DECISION. Wisconsin. Neither President Trump nor Joe Biden are scheduled to be here campaign this week, but Jill Biden will stop. She is scheduled to be in Madison first to take part in a get out the vote event. She will then speaking walking shot to discuss Biden's plan to help the states. Me recover from the pandemic. Tuesday will be the first of three debates between President Trump and Joe Biden. Both the Democratic Party of Wisconsin and the Republican Party of Wisconsin. Will host watch parties across the state. W T. M J will broadcast The debate live starting at eight PM Rusty Mellberg w. T. M. J New President Trump's claims about his wealth disputed in The New York Times report about his tax returns of report he dismisses as fake, according to the Times, most of the president's core businesses Including his golf courses in hotel just blocks from the White House report losing millions, if not tens of millions year after year. The paper also accuses the president and his companies of claiming questionable deductions on some of those businesses. Including at Mar a Lago when the president was in office more than $109,000 for linens and silverware and nearly $200,000 for landscaping. ABC NEWS Senior White House correspondent Cecilia Vega Sunday night 60 minutes, taking a closer look. Att fisher Sand and Gravel. It's a company working with a conservative fundraising campaign accused of fraud to build sections of the border wall on private land. Engineers say the sections will likely fail reporters Sharon Alphonse, he's speaking with Javier or Pina, an attorney representing at neighboring landowners who say the wall infringes on them steps did they skip All of them. What should they have done? They should have gone to the I b W c to the A and presented their plan an actual plan. What about this idea that you know this is private money being used on private land and the land under Khun do whatever he wants. They absolutely can do whatever they want on their property. As long as it doesn't affect other people's property. And you think the wall infringes on other clearly stuck in there and then the waters. It's a giant break, just like a rake in your yard. And it's gonna catch all that debris and redirect that water. Three. Former administration officials tell 60 minutes President Trump pressured officials to direct wall contracts to Fisher Sand and gravel. The company has been awarded almost $2 billion in contracts. Despite questions about the quality of the work, Wisconsin's morning news sponsored by our and our insurance, they are the knowledge brokers coming up re openings in bloom on Milwaukee. Southside W T. M. J News Time is 805 acquisitions.

President Trump Jill Biden president Packers Aaron Rodgers Dodgers Wisconsin Coach Man LaFleur fisher Sand football Adam Saints Democratic Party of Wisconsin Greg Nancy W. T. M ABC NEWS W T. M J Falcons Cecilia Vega Los Angeles Matt