17 Burst results for "Shapiro Chang"

"shapiro chang" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:07 min | 3 years ago

"shapiro chang" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Online at melvilletrust dot org and on Twitter at melvilletrust. This is all things considered from NPR news. I'm ari. Shapiro chang. Talks between the US and China have ended without any agreement on trade. President Trump said in a tweet this afternoon that negotiations were candid and constructive. He also said the talks will continue into the future. But he didn't say when meanwhile, the Trump administration has made good on its threat to raise tariffs on another two hundred billion dollars worth of Chinese imports. The US says it's taking this step because China renamed on commitments it had made an earlier negotiations to explain what impact all these tariffs will have we turn now to NPR's gyms Rowley. Hey, jim. Hi, also, just remind what kinds of products are affected by these tariffs. Well, this applies to about two hundred billion dollars in imported products from China. Now only about a quarter of those are consumer goods on. They do not include things like toys and footwear that were exempted by the Trump administration. They do include. Dude, things like bicycles pet food certain kinds of building supplies. These products can still come into the United States from China. Just like they always have. But they will face a a tariff or a tax of twenty five percent. Instead of the the ten percent they pay now. And this will have to be paid by the company that imports them at the port where they're brought in right importers now have to pay this big tariff. But how how exactly will they pay it? Well, anyone of three things can happen. I the importers can call their manufacturing China and try to persuade them to give them a price cut. The menu, right? The manufacturers in China. Forced don't wanna lose business. So AB, though agree to that. Maybe not the second thing is they can they can have that can happen is that the importers just agree to absorb the tariffs themselves, which means of course, they make less money on which they are obviously reluctant to do the only other option they have those to pass the increase onto their customers. In in other words, prices will go up. So my be one of these or it could be some combination of the three we don't really know. But I did speak to Jennifer Hillman who is a professor at Georgetown Law Center. And she says President Trump imposed an earlier round of broader tariffs last year. And she says economists have studied the impact of those tariffs almost all of it close to one hundred percent of it has been paid by US importers and then passed along in various degrees to US customers. So President Trump argues that these tariffs are good for the economy. They bring in money to the treasure US treasury, but home and says. You know, these are ultimately passed on to consumers. So what Trump says may be true. But make no mistake importers are going to try to pass them onto to you. And me. Yeah. And when can you and I expect prices to start rising? Well, they're two points here. First tariffs. They only apply the products that were shipped from China after last night if something was shipped before that, and it's still out there on a freighter heading toward an American port right now, it won't have to pay this higher tariff, and it typically takes two to three weeks of four cargo ships from China to get to the United States. So we have kind of a grace period little wiggle room. The other point is about half the Chinese imports. Are that are facing these intermediate goods that go into making other products? These these are shipped to the United States and used in the manufacture of other products. Something like auto parts or electrical components buttons for coats, the manufacturing process takes awhile. So it will take time for the items to show up in stores, and it will take time for customers to see price increases. All right. That's NPR's. Jim zarroli? Thanks, jim. You're welcome. Okay. Let's continue the conversation about Chinese tariffs with our regular Friday political chat. Our guest this week our JD on of the Washington Post in the Brookings Institution. EJ good to be with you and Bethany Mandel who writes for publications, including the Jewish daily forward and acculturated. Hi bethany. So the tariffs went from ten to twenty five percent on a bunch of Chinese goods just after midnight. So far, the trade war has not really been felt by most American consumers. Yes. Soybean farmers carmakers. But EJ, do you think that it could be felt more widely? If these hires tariffs stay in place. I think the short answer is. Yes, I mean, President Trump is not wrong to say that China engages in unfair trade practices, and he's not wrong to go after them. But he should not take steps as part of a pressure campaign that may well have higher costs to us than to China, and he should certainly not lie and say that these tariffs will be paid by China. No. As Jim zarroli piece just suggested the tariffs are regressive tax that at the end of the line usually end up being paid for by consumers, and they could have a negative effect on the economy and create inflation. I still hope he gets a good deal. But so far, it doesn't look like his great job of it Bethany. What do you think of this, tactically? The trade talks seemed to have been moving in a positive direction before President Trump raised the terrace from ten to twenty five percent, you think that was a smart move. No, I think that from what I'm hearing sort of among people who have been have been following the story is that this this end of negotiations kind of caught the administration by surprise. And that they didn't necessarily realize that they were they were pretty much out of time. And what is worrisome is not necessarily this round of tariffs, but subsequent rounds of tariffs that really will hit the American consumer quite hard and potentially President Trump's base voters, absolutely. There are studies that show that Republican areas getting hit harder by his policies democratic areas. So yes, voters another big standoff in Washington this week is between congress and the White House over special counsel, Robert Muller's report testimony documents. Let's listen to the voices of the top Senate Republican Mitch McConnell house speaker Nancy Pelosi and also House Judiciary committee chairman, Jerry, Nadler, all speaking this week case closed case closed some coding.

President Trump China United States Trump administration Jim zarroli NPR EJ Twitter Shapiro chang President Bethany Washington Post bethany Senate Mitch McConnell Brookings Institution Jennifer Hillman
"shapiro chang" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"shapiro chang" Discussed on KCRW

"The California coastal commission is comes after the developer was supposed to fix up a pair of lower cost ends. Instead, here's KCRW sterile. Seth men. The coastal commission approved the fine after agreeing that sunshine violated state law that guarantees public access to beach areas, the company didn't physically block anyone from using the beach, but it did violate the terms of a permit that called for refurbishing a pair of moderately priced motels near the Santa Monica. Pier. The company instead built a luxury in the shore hotel where rooms run up to eight hundred dollars a night staffers for the commission also recommend. Added that sunshine pay nearly ten million dollars in what the agency called mitigation fees to make up for the loss of affordable. Accommodations that decision was postponed until the commission can come up with a plan for sunshine to build or fund dozens of replacement rooms part of the coastal Commission's mission is to ensure that people of all income levels have access to coastal accommodations. Commissioners blasted sunshine enterprises before yesterday's vote with one calling its actions, and environmental injustice and governor Gavin Newsom has proposed more than two hundred thirteen billion dollar state government spending plan that boost spending on homelessness while fire prevention and k through twelve education. His proposal announced today is up four and a half billion dollars from his first budget plan released in January support for NPR comes from the Walton family foundation were particularly takes wrote. More information is available at won't family foundation. That Omar g six oh, six KCRW. Thanks for being with us. This is all things considered from NPR news. I'm ari. Shapiro chang. As US north. Korea talks have been stalling the regime begins launching short range missiles,.

coastal Commission KCRW Walton family foundation Gavin Newsom California Shapiro chang US NPR developer Seth Santa Monica Korea Omar g two hundred thirteen billion d eight hundred dollars ten million dollars billion dollars
"shapiro chang" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:50 min | 3 years ago

"shapiro chang" Discussed on KCRW

"I'm Ari Shapiro Chang. Tonight's high stakes trade talks between the US and China come just hours before the Trump administration is set to raise the stakes by imposing higher tariffs on two hundred billion dollars worth of Chinese imports. The threat of an all-out trade war has rattled financial markets. The Dow fell again today, though, not nearly as sharply as earlier this week NPR's Scott Horsely joins us now with some perspective. Hey, Scott good to be with us. Now before this week began people were pretty optimistic about a trade deal. But now it looks less likely what is going on. That's just a week ago. Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin and US Trade Representative Robert lighthizer were wrapping up another round of talks in Beijing. And the word we got from the White House was that those talks had been productive. There were hints that the two sides were closing in on a deal. The expectation was that they would be finishing it up. Maybe this week here in Washington. Yeah. But the administration says China started to walk back from commitments it had made earlier in the negotiations and that was confirmed over the weekend and some communications that's when President Trump threatened to increase tariffs as of midnight tonight. Here's how the president put it this afternoon. We were getting very close to a deal, then they started to renegotiate the deal. We can't have that. We can't have that. So our country can take in one hundred twenty billion dollars a year and tariffs paid for mostly by China, by the way, not by us a lot of people try and steer it in a different direction. Really pays ultimately his faith for by largely by China. True. Not really no China might absorb some of the cost of tariffs, but accommodated lion. Shares actually paid by US businesses and consumers and also that figure that Trump's using their one hundred and twenty billion dollars. That's assuming that the US would charge a tariff of twenty five percent on virtually everything we import from China more than five hundred billion dollars worth of goods last year. Now as of midnight tonight, we're only talking about boosting. Tariffs on about half that total. Okay. But if no agreement is reached the president says he's going to add tariffs to everything else. We get from China. So what would that mean for the economy? If Trump follows through on this threat, it would certainly mean a jolt, which is why you're seeing some of this nervousness in the stock market. And we've been on this precipice before tariffs were supposed to go up back in January. Then again, Marsh both times administration held off to give to go. She there's more time. The US is been has been trying to get China to change its behavior on things like protecting intellectual property if the tariffs do go from ten to twenty five percent midnight as scheduled it's going to be higher costs for a lot of Chinese goods. But the real pain would be if Trump follows through on that threat to hit all Chinese imports, including a whole lot of consumer items, the kind of things you find the shelf at WalMart. That's when this would really pinch consumers in the pocket book. Why did China back away from its earlier commitments do we know we don't know for sure? But there seems to be some jock. Talking here over, you know, who's really got the upper hand at the bargaining table. The Wall Street Journal suggests China may have read some of Trump's recent tweets as a sign that Trump is less confident about the US economy, and that would have given Beijing an opening to drive a harder bargain on the other hand Trump might be feeling emboldened by the strong growth, we saw in the first quarter of the good jobs report last week. And that's why he's trying to play hardball here. Of course, both countries economies would suffer a hit. If there is an all out trade war here. Scott horsely. Thanks got your welcome tensions between the US and China are playing out in Europe to Britain plans to let the Chinese company while way, build parts of its five G network, the next generation of wireless technology. The US is lobbying hard against the move yesterday. In London secretary of state, Mike Pompeo suggested Britain could make it easier for China to spy and even control the internet of the future. This is exactly what.

China US Trump Scott Horsely president Ari Shapiro Chang Beijing NPR Washington White House Mike Pompeo WalMart Europe London
"shapiro chang" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

07:58 min | 3 years ago

"shapiro chang" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"News. This is all things considered. I'm ari. Shapiro chang. The Boeing company always relied on its lucrative commercial airplane market. That's the bulk of its business, but the cash reserves allow the company to bid aggressively for Pentagon contracts now is NPR's. Tom Bowman reports the troubles with Boeing seven thirty-seven. Max jets could spill over into its defense business. Boeing has recently tacked up some big wins on defense programs. It will build a new two seat. Jet trainer for the air force. Also a helicopter and that new navy refueling drone another Boeing project all told billions and billions of dollars in sales over the past couple of years had an amazing score of victory is that's Richard few analyst at group an aerospace and defense consulting company. It was subsidized by the commercial side of the company, particularly the seven thirty seven because a lucrative commercial side accounts for about two-thirds of its business says Lauren Thompson, he's an analyst with Alexa institute a think tank that gets funding from defense contractors, so strong on the commercial side, it makes it easier for the defense part of the company to bid aggressively for opportunities meaning that cash flow allows a company to undercut its competitors. In win the contracts for things like that jet trader helicopter refueling drone. Thompson says Boeing has long had a pretty solid plan strategy for the last twenty years is to have one foot firmly planted in the commercial world and the other end the defense business allowing the company to be nimble. That means is at any given time they often transferring money back and forth between the two sides of the company in order to bid competitively for -tunities. No, the commercial side of Boeing has taken a big. Hit with the grounding of the seven thirty seven max after two deadly crashes in Indonesia, the company says it will fix any problems to the seven thirty seven max. But he of the teal group says that may not be enough the technical not an issue at all getting regulators on board at home and abroad is more challenging, but that can be down. It's quite likely that the biggest showers, they faces restoring confidence of the general public in without that public faith. In more buyers, the longtime Boeing strategy could suffer again, Lauren Thompson, the entire foundation of Boeing's business strategy at the present time is predicated on the assumption that commercial demand for jetliners will remain strong. If the seven thirty seven it's most popular aircraft is impaired. Then obviously that real pulse across the entire strategy. In terms of what the company has that? Could mean says Thompson that Boeing will be. Less aggressive in its bids. And maybe phase more competition from its main rival in projects that include wings Lockheed, as well as other smaller companies still some it'll Todd Harrison of the center for strategic and international studies. Don't the seven thirty seven troubles will have any impact on Boeing and its defense business at an Email to NPR Harrison says besides the new aircraft Boeing will build there's something else. The air force just awarded Boeing a ten year contract worth nearly six billion dollars to upgrade the Casey Forty-six refueling tanker. That's not all in recent weeks. The Pentagon edited more fifteen and eighteen warplanes to the budget both dope by Boeing, Tom. Bowman NPR news Washington. The number of women in prisons and jails around the country has ballooned over the decades. It grew more than seven hundred percent from nineteen eighty to two thousand sixteen. Many of these women are mothers from Fort Worth as Christopher. Connelly reports on how Texas State lawmakers are rethinking motherhood and prison for the eight and a half years. She spent in prison Kristen Kerr looked forward to one thing every month a visit from her daughter Chloe every visit on grove. You can be you can tell. In the one visit. She couldn't read visit. She carry Michigan's reading sums. So that was Bishop for me to Kristen was convicted for aggravated robbery and twenty eleven as the getaway driver. She says she wasn't making good choices back. Then Kristen missed out on a lot of her daughter's life. She says they talk on the phone and send letters and visit. But you can't really do the nurturing part of parenting from prison khloe was well taken care of by her grandmother. But Kristen says you never stop worrying about your kid. There were some tough times for Chloe to add to that. I wouldn't come home for a while. Numerals mama come away. I had to feed the kids. They moms. Just think about it. There are more than one hundred thousand women in state and federal prisons, the number of incarcerated women doubles when you count local jails to exactly how many of them are mothers, isn't well tracked. But in Texas, a recent survey showed that more than eighty percent of women in state prison. Our moms like Kristen that's prompted lawmakers here and in other states to consider bills that would promote probation or other community based sentences over jail or prison time to avoid breaking up families. Michelle Dietsch studies prison issues at the university of Texas. Austin many of the women once they're arrested are scrambling to find someone to take care of their kids. So a lot of these kids get shuttled from place to place, and if they're not able to find a place for them than many of the kids end up in foster care, other states are looking at incarcerating parents closer to their children and expanding visitation. So kids can. See mom or dad more often the effect on kids from having a parent in prison can be severe. They're more likely to commit crimes themselves later in life. But Dietsch says building a strong parent child bond is critical to preventing that at the same time. It's really critical for the parent not to lose touch with their child and to stay involved in to feel like they can make a difference in the child's life to be aware of what's happening to them as the chairman of the Texas house corrections committee, Republican Representative James white. Here's from a lot of women who've been in prison, and he introduced a Bill to address a number of issues they face including pregnancy and childbirth behind bars each one that talked to ask them about their offense white says the crimes that women commit are often different from their male. Peers I hear a lot of things is linked to domestic violence. So they may stab there. Their spouse that's abusing them in their kids. Young women that have experienced repeat it sexual abuse from family member women that have fallen into the trap of addiction. Researchers say a history of trauma underlies a lot of the criminal behavior. That lands women in jails and prisons, that's why Kristen Kerr says if lawmakers want to help moms in prison rehabilitation has to include counseling and drug treatment women, they kids they just maybe stuck in the diction in this just to seek nece. But it only. They don't they during you know, what I'm saying. So maybe they can come up with some help with it Kristen has been working through a list of goals. She set for herself to rebuild her life after prison. She's got a job got her driver's license, and she's spending lots of time with.

Boeing Kristen Kerr Lauren Thompson Texas Tom Bowman Pentagon NPR Michelle Dietsch Chloe Shapiro chang Indonesia Todd Harrison Washington analyst teal group Fort Worth Connelly khloe Alexa institute
"shapiro chang" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

04:04 min | 3 years ago

"shapiro chang" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"NPR news. I'm ari. Shapiro chang. From its hit show jersey shore to the video music awards. Mtv is all about youth culture in its many forms. And now it's branching out to network has announced a new documentary division, Sheila Nevins will lead it. She is eighty years old, and she is an institution in the world of documentary film, NPR's Elizabeth Blair joins us now with all the details. Hale is so okay for people who may not recognize her name. Tell us more about who Sheila Nevins is Sheila Nevins was the president of HBO documentary films. And she started there in nineteen seventy nine so before MTV was even born she grew up in the city, she went to Barnard and the Yale school of drama in the early sixties and as an executive producer. She's got a very broad palette. She's overseeing documentaries about artists and entertainers. But also serious topics like addiction and global terrorism. Some of her credits include citizen for the Edward Snowden documentary paradise lost about the west, Memphis three and more recently. She produced the true crime drama. The jinx about real estate heir Robert Durst family of Kathleen Durst from the beginning head said, they believed Robert Durst was responsible now that documentary which seemed fairly traditional had an ending that really threw people for a loop. And that unexpected edge is something Nevins is really known for finding subjects that appeal, but also experimenting with the form. Entity already has reality shows has news. So what's the thinking behind adding a whole other documentary division? What's the goal here? Well, first and foremost, they need to attract and keep young viewers on whatever platform they're on while they've made some award winning documentaries over the years. They've been in a rating slump until about a year ago. They're looking for something fresh and ducks are very popular right now MTV has also long projected, it's brand is being very civic minded thank rock the vote and it produced the documentary series sixteen and pregnant which looked at different issues facing a teenager who gets pregnant from Dopp Shen graduating high school. And so now it's looking to Sheila Nevins to bring her gravitas and middle skill to helping a new generation of filmmakers explored different platforms and stories. So I'm just going to say it out loud. Nevins just turned eighty MTV obviously caters to teens. Young adults young people what what is the thinking behind hiring someone like Nevins, she's eighty and she has got a lot of experience. I spoke with Christmas air. I spoke with Chris McCarthy president of MTV about this question. And the fact that Nevins is eighty years old does not seem to concern him in the slightest in fact to hear him tell it her experience is her superpower McCarthy who hired her said, he's admired Nevins ever since. He was a kid watching HBO's taxicab confessions, which is a gritty unscripted series of conversations between cab drivers and their customers. He said he loves that Nevins is committed to stories about the underdog and he wants his team to learn the craft of documentary filmmaking from her firsthand he wants her to help elevate the storytelling to new level on MTV. All right. Well, that's NPR arts. Correspondent Elizabeth Blair. Thanks. Thank you. The one month countdown starts today for soccer fans on June seventh the women's World Cup opens in France, the US. Favored to defend its title from the last tournament in two thousand fifteen if the women do win it would be their fourth World Cup championship. They have never finished lower than third since the women's tournament began in nineteen Ninety-one as NPR's Tom Goldman reports that success is in sharp contrast to the US men's team which struggles internationally. The last time the US women's national team played a month ago in Los Angeles. The Americans thumped Belgium six nail the lopsided win thrilled. The nearly twenty one thousand fans who packed.

Sheila Nevins Mtv NPR HBO Elizabeth Blair Robert Durst Shapiro chang Yale school of drama president US Edward Snowden Chris McCarthy Dopp Shen soccer Hale Kathleen Durst Memphis
"shapiro chang" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:12 min | 3 years ago

"shapiro chang" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm Ari Shapiro Chang. After more than five hundred days in detention, two Reuters. Journalists were released from the Myanmar prison today. I'm ready. I can't wait to school by use right along in John so arrested in December twenty seventeen they were accused of violating what's called the official secrets act. The journalists had been covering the state-sponsored sponsored massacre of the Rohingya Muslims, and it was worth that eventually earned them the Pulitzer prize to talk more about what this means for press freedom in Myanmar. We're joined now by Linda luck, dear she's a legal advisor at Human Rights Watch with study this topic extensively. She joins me now from London. Welcome to be here suit. The United Nations today called this release, quote, a step toward improving the freedom of the press and assign of government's commitment to me on Mars transition to democracy. Do you agree with that assessment? No, not at all. I think that this release while obviously much to be welcomed should not blind, the international community to the fact that there is still ongoing repression of the medium yon, mar. And I don't think the release of these two journalists is an indication that that's changing anytime soon. Let's just step back. I mean, how did the situation get so bad for journalists in Myanmar in the first place? You know, it's not at all what we would have expected when the NFL de took power the National League for democracy, the ruling party and more. That's correct. The political party headed by unsung Succi. And there was this real hope that they would be freedom of speech and feed him of the press in Myanmar. And they would get rid of these laws that have been used to arrest. Journalists and activists under previous administrations, and that's simply hasn't happened. I mean, what's happened instead is in part because of what's going on in refined state in part because the media tried to report on military abuses, trying to be active in terms of reporting on things like corruption in government. All of those sorts of things have been used as a basis on which to arrest journalists rather than law than for doing good work. How many journalists remain jailed in me, and my right now, we don't know how many journalists are currently in jail. We do know that at least forty seven journalists have been prosecuted since this government took power in two thousand sixteen. We also know that just two days before the Reuters journalists were released additional journalists were being called in for questioning, what are the lessons that we should take away from this story today? I mean, does it seem like international pressure on the government worked? Definitely I think international pressure played a role in release of these two journalists, but for concerted pressure by journalists by human rights organizations. I think it highly likely that they would still be in prison. What about local journalists who can't attract the kind of international outcry as these two journalists did I mean what what are they supposed to do? In. They are many of them really afraid. I mean, I had a turn is tell me back in late January that he was literally sitting on stories corruption that he was afraid to publish because he thought he would be arrested and those that are arrested. Most of them are for working for local papers regional papers, and those cases don't get attention. And the consequence of that. Unfortunately is that without that pressure. They will sit in jail. What do you think it will take for the situation to change in Myanmar? I wish I had the answer to that question. At the moment. We see no signs that that this is going to change the government is continuing its denial of the atrocities that took place in reclined state, a real sense that if someone criticizes them that they should lash back, and until that attitude changes will continue to have prosecutions, but the fundamental thing that needs to change is that the laws that are being used to arrest and prosecute journalists and ordinary citizens who criticize the government and the military needs to be amended or repealed. And that's something the NASD could have done should have done as soon as it took power. And instead of doing that it's turned around and is itself using some of these laws against its critics, Linda luckier of Human Rights Watch. Thank you very much for joining us today. Thank you..

Myanmar Linda luck Reuters John Ari Shapiro Chang Pulitzer prize National League for democracy United Nations official NASD NFL London five hundred days two days
"shapiro chang" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

08:24 min | 3 years ago

"shapiro chang" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"From NPR news. It's all things considered. I'm ari. Shapiro chang. The US in China's months-long effort to reach a trade deal could be falling apart. Maybe the Trump administration says that China has reneged on previous commitments and the US will increase tariffs on two hundred billion dollars worth of Chinese goods on Friday. Stocks fell sharply today as fears of a trade war mounted but negotiators from both countries are still going forward with a trade meeting in Washington this week to try to strike a last minute deal here to explain his NPR Shanghai. Correspondent rob Schmitz? Hey, rob. Hi. So how is Beijing handling these threats of more tariffs from the Trump administration right now? Well, also, they are taking it in stride China today confirmed that premier Lil hood, the lead negotiator for China is going to go ahead with his scheduled trip to Washington later this week. So that's a sign that China's pudding aside these threats from President Trump and any Accu. Of reneging on a deal. So that it can try to come to a trade agreement with Washington once and for all do we have any sense of what these previous commitments were they China allegedly has been reneging on. Well, we don't know for sure, but we have an inkling of what they are one of them is enforcement mechanism that the US wants to impose on China to make sure that China lives up to its promises, and of course, for China that might infringe on its sovereignty. So that's a big sticking point. Another one is that the US has been demanding that China make structural changes to its economy. And of course, that would weaken the power of China's communist party, which of course, is the government of China's. So that is a no go as well. So as we're heading into this homestretch, or what is reportedly the home stretch on these trade talks. What are the politics for president Xi Jinping back home? Well, he's got to possibility here. These tariffs. Go up on Friday, both the US and the Chinese economy would feel the pain markets would respond and here in China. The timing is not great. China's growth is slowing. The government has stepped in with stimulus to try and cushion the blow and higher tariffs with boomer pressure on China's financial system that said the notion of Xi Jinping standing up to an American president plays into this carefully. Crafted aura of him inside of China as this strongman leader who's willing to fight back against China's biggest global rival so it could play in his favor. Now one thing that has not been on the table during these trade talks is China's interment of millions of Chinese Muslims weaker something that has concerned human rights groups here in the US. Do you think that there's any chance that this human rights concern will be addressed during these trade talks? Well, it certainly doesn't seem like at the State Department has ratcheted up its critic. System of China on this issue, but the Commerce Department in the US trade Representative who are handling the trade negotiations don't seem receptive to having this issue. Be a part of the talks secretary of state, Mike Pompeo did seem to separate the two issues in an interview on face the nation on Sunday saying the administration has to do more than one thing at a time. And you were just inching John last week, right? Tell us tell us what you saw there. Well house on a government sponsored trip in everything was pretty choreographed, but it didn't take long to see beyond that. And what I saw is that China's government is locking up its Muslim population inside these reeducation camps for what it calls extremist thoughts. And when I pressed Chinese government official about it. He told me that China's government believes it should detain Muslims based not an actual crimes they commit. But in crimes, they may someday commit in other words, if she Junge thirties believe it's Muslim residents are showing signs of committing crimes. They'll detain them to try and prevent crime in the first place and among all the interviews. We haddish John it was this one with the governor. Official that left many of the western journalists like me on this trip feeling pretty uneasy about that. I can imagine. Thank you so much that was NPR's rob Schmitz in Shanghai. Thanks. All right. We're going to stay with that. Last topic. The mass detainment of Wieger, Muslims and other minorities in China to talk more about it. We turn out to route Sean a boss she lives here in the US and has actively campaigned for weaker human rights in China last year, she suspects her aunt and older sister were sent to internment camps due to her activism. I spoke about the condition self two camps on September fifth twenty eighteen at the Hudson institute six days later, my sister and my aunt both disappeared at the same day since then she and her family have heard almost nothing about their whereabouts. I have no idea where my sister is. I heard my aunt was released from the distant relatives. But I have no information on my sister. So do you have any sense of what their lives have been like in these camps that they were sent to do, you know for sure that they were sent to camps? I assume that they are any camps because I hear many people such as my sister. They are just a superior in. I don't know what kind of condition that. My sister is being held. But I know the conditions of the camps. We have been talking to former detainees who's being released from these camps people there facing forced indoctrinations a mental and physical abuses forced to take on known medicines food and the sleep rations the conditions are extremely bad. I mean, it's it's not only the people who are in these camps whose lives have been affected by this crackdown by the Chinese government. It's also the lives of people who are just living. In ching. John. Can you describe what daily life is like for them? The people in entire region is facing are Vaean style. I police state. They are being monitored twenty four hours a day. They are news reports that one point one million Chinese cadres deployed to the leaguer homes to live with officials who are just sitting there in the homes with the families to watch them. Yes. To watch them to ask children to spy on their parents. They are eating them living in their bedrooms with them. This is like unprecedented said the question is what should the US government to the US has not used any of the leverage. It has in these trade talks with China to address these internment camps. Is there a specific response? You would like to see from the US government. We have been working more than a year now with the US scholar State Department and atmosphere. Shen about targeted sanction under the provisions of the global Magnitsky Adan to people who are responsible for this mass atrocity MRs legislation that targets officials around the world for human rights abuses. Yes, exactly. We were hoping that will move forward. But the it hasn't yet currently the trade negotiation and the Commerce Department is putting black to that. That's not happening that saddens me because everytime when we talk about trade or policies or defense or public security, the human rights should be included when it's dealing with China, the Chinese human rights abuse this current the crime against humanity should be a subject on every negotiation was the Chinese government. Rashawn abbass. Thank you so much for coming into the studio and talking with us today. Thank you so much. A baseball team in Hartford. Connecticut has broken with an old tradition. It has banned peanuts from the ballpark. So people with allergies can enjoy the game with everyone else. The Hartford yard goats are the first professional baseball team in the US to get rid of peanuts. Connecticut public radio's Frankie Graziano was in the stands as the team embarked on a peanut free era. People have sung the chorus of take me out to the ball game for a century to the.

China US government US government Chinese government John rob Schmitz NPR Washington Shanghai State Department Commerce Department president Xi Jinping Shapiro chang president Connecticut Beijing Hartford
"shapiro chang" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:38 min | 3 years ago

"shapiro chang" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is all things considered. I'm ari. Shapiro chang. Chinese cyber theft costs the US economy at least fifty seven billion dollars a year. That's what top government officials tell NPR and that feft means lost jobs and lost wages for Americans. Three successive administrations. Have known about this problem and tried to deal with it. Their efforts have been largely unsuccessful the cyber attacks have continued for nearly fifteen years NPR and the PBS show frontline have been trying to figure out why it's so hard to stop the feft. We found that one of the biggest hurdles is in China. It's the victims US businesses. They've kept the US government from acting against China and they've made millions playing both sides of the fence NPR's. Laura Sullivan reports. Hi of Pittsburgh on the twenty fifth floor of an old gothic revival building. Former US attorney David Hickson sits at his desk under the photographs of five men who once worked for the Chinese government. That's the wanted poster for the China case when he took over for the western district of Pennsylvania in two thousand ten he'd only been on the job of few weeks when he said he started getting calls from local companies, they told him they thought China might be inside their computer systems, high literally received an avalanche of concern in complaints from companies and organizations who said we are losing. Our technology, drip, drip, drip, and we don't have any apparatus in place to deal with it didn't open investigation and set his sights on a particular unit of the Chinese military unit. Six one three nine eight hidden and others watched. How unit officers sitting in an office building? And Shanghai broke into American companies computers at night. They stopped for an hour break at lunch and continued in the afternoon. They really were using a large rake think of a rake, you rake leaves in the fall, they were taking everything they were taking personal information. They were taking strategic plans, then they just figured out later how they were gonna use it anything going on for years when I learned that we could actually pin the tail on the cyber donkey cyber donkey being unit six one three nine eight it just meant that we had a chance to actually bring the case. But when he went to the companies eager for them to be plaintiffs an odd thing happened. None of them wanted any part of it the same companies had been complaining and new companies that had no idea they have been stolen from didn't want to be involved. Hickson says they told him they had too much money on the line in China. Even today five years later hick and still won't nameless of the companies involved, and they have never come forward. Eventually he was able to convince a handful of Pittsburgh based companies to join the case mostly he says because he grew up here and went to school with a lot of the managers. How many other companies do you think you could have included in this case? How can you count now? Yeah. How can you count? We've made a terrible mistake. By being so secret about our cyber work. We have not fairly told the people we represent what the threats are for years that threat remained largely underground government. And business leaders say that wasn't an accident. US companies have demanded secrecy. Even in the face of outright theft in interviews with NPR US company said they had too much money at stake and said they had a responsibility to shareholders to manage theft problems quietly. But now the impact of that secrecy is coming to light companies face hundreds of millions of dollars in future. Losses by keeping a secret that hand tied US officials and ultimately failed to hold China to account. It wasn't supposed to be this way. US officials had high hopes when China joined the World Trade Organization in two thousand one there was a honeymoon period. In the first six or seven years, a desire to try and make things work. Michael Wessel has been a Commissioner on the US government's US China economic. And security review commission. He says starting around two thousand six businesses began coming to him saying China had stolen their designs or pressured them into taking partnerships and taken their technology, but just like with David Hickson Wessel says they wouldn't come forward. Visit community wanted the administration to come in hard without anyone's fingerprints being on the reasoning behind it. They wanted the profits. But they also didn't want the possible retribution also says that was never going to work. The US could have brought criminal cases forward enacted. Sanctions are open domestication's. If a company would let them Wendy Cutler was veteran negotiator at the office that could have done some of that enforcement, the office of the US trade Representative. She said it wasn't just that US businesses were hesitant to come forward. In specific cases. She says the businesses didn't want them to take action in any cases. US enforcement officials were not as effective if we. Don't really have the US business community supporting us. But also providing us the information, you know, looking back on it in retrospect, I think we probably should have been more active and more responsive. We kind of lost the big picture of what really was happening court cases. Documents from recent years offer, a clue into what experts believe was happening. The Chinese government has been accused of stealing everything from vacuum cleaner. Designed to solar panel technology to the designs of Boeing c seventeen aircraft. China has broken into gas companies steel companies and chemical companies not long ago. Chinese government companies were indicted for stealing the secret chemical makeup of the color white from DuPont Chinese hacking made occasional headlines, but none really grabbed Americans attention until January two thousand ten. Finally tonight, Google China threat. When an American company did come forward the world's leading search company announced yesterday it had discovered what it called a highly sophisticated and targeted attack Google decided to do what no other company had done. They announced the theft and publicly blamed the Chinese government thirty four other well-known American companies had also been hacked, but to this day. Most have kept it a secret NPR tracked down eleven of the company's. None of them will comment on the hack James MacGregor is the former chairman of the American Chamber of commerce in China. And was there at the time. He says the company's even kept the business organizations from speaking out with this should have done is held a press conference and said we thirty five businesses have been hacked, and you would put it right back on China. Instead, they all hit under a rock and pretended didn't happen. Mcgregor says their silence left little room for punishment and worse. He said it hit the extent of the problem. Dimitri. How para vich was one of the first to see it. He was working at a security firm in Atlanta during the Google one afternoon. Google called said they needed backup. I'll pair of a well-known cyber-sleuth. He says when he took a look he was stunned. I knew pretty much right away that this is something very different for the first time ever. We were facing a nation state and intelligence service that was breaking into companies not government not military's, but private-sector Orgainzation where was the US government on all this. The US was seen ever Medeiros was on staff at the national Security Council at the time and atop China's specialists under President Obama. He says they didn't turn a blind eye. Obama signed an agreement with China to address the hacking, but he says the administration also had other priorities North Korea. Iran, the economy climate change direct confrontation with China does not usually result in lasting solutions. It seems like not confronting China did not provide. Any solutions either? I mean, if you want big structural change. It takes the question is do you wanna play checkers you wanna play chess? But without repercussions the attacks continued in the year after the Google Demitrio, para vich, uncovered two more serious intrusions into American companies in the fall of two thousand eleven he went to the White House to warn officials about what he had found. He sat down in the situation room with half a dozen top administration leaders distinct impression that none of this was news and press them on why they were not taking stronger action against China..

US China Chinese government Google theft NPR US attorney David Hickson Pittsburgh Shapiro chang Laura Sullivan David Hickson Wessel President Obama DuPont Chinese Boeing hick World Trade Organization
"shapiro chang" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

02:25 min | 3 years ago

"shapiro chang" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"All things considered. I'm Ari Shapiro Chang. If you live in the central part of this country, you don't need us to tell you about the weather. You're having starting in the southwest and spreading to the Great Lakes wind and snow having your daily companions and many of you have lost power. This is the second bomb cyclone to hit the region in a month in whether speak the low strengthened as the system moved east, which actually was the cause of a lot of mischief. David Roth is with the national weather service. He says, although the system was not as bad as the March storm the sudden drop in air pressure was severe recorded. Wind gusts across west Texas is highest seventy eight miles an hour last. I heard over twenty wildfires sending caused by system. K L K photojournalist Larry Rodriguez in Lubbock Texas was driving around the city on assignment Wednesday when he pulled over to take a video of the dust storm. A very sunny day here. And then all of a sudden raid. Gets blown up into the sky, and you can still see the sun. But it's just orange. I've never been to Moore's, but I would imagine what it would be like maybe some of that dirt showed up in tweeted photo posted by Jennifer Everley in Minnesota. It shows the words Texas dust written in thirty snow on the hood of a car part of Minnesota the state patrol took a video of one of their troopers fighting the wind on an ice-covered road in the town of lake field. He slides sideways and finally succumbs falling to the ground to the east snowfall topped previous records in parts of Wisconsin. Late for snow. Hope Kerr win is a public radio. Reporter in southwestern Wisconsin, she pulled her car over in the town of westby to talk to us. She says it wasn't just snow in yesterday. There was thunder snow snowing. But there Sunder and lightning. There were a lot of power outages because of the wind knocking over polls. I know a lot of communities around the lacrosse area were affected by that whole told it was bad enough, but the second bomb cyclone could have been worse for those folks along the Missouri river who got flooded after the last bomb cyclone. There's good news. The weather service says this storm is not expected to cause further flooding because the ground isn't frozen anymore. All right, bad news for those stragglers out there. If you have not started watching game of thrones yet there are literally not enough hours left to catch.

Texas David Roth Wisconsin Ari Shapiro Chang Larry Rodriguez Minnesota Great Lakes Jennifer Everley westby Missouri river Lubbock Kerr Reporter lake field Moore
"shapiro chang" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:12 min | 3 years ago

"shapiro chang" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm ari. Shapiro chang. Today, Julian Assange supporters are calling him a hero London. Judge calls him a narcissist later. President Trump hosts South Korea's leader as the White House to discuss their northern neighbor. We think that North Korea has tremendous potential and. Really potential under the leadership of Kim Jong UN and a deadline tomorrow forces some transgender servicemembers and their families to make tough decisions. I'm scared that now it's easier for someone to change the policy and say, we have the piece of paper that says that you have gender dis fauria, and we don't like that. Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Shay Stevens. President Trump says he knows nothing about WikiLeaks or its founder, Julian Assange, who's facing a US hacking conspiracy charge. Trump was responding to reporters questions about the arrest of Assange and the Justice Department's efforts to extradite him from London I've been saying what happened with. And that will be a determination. I would imagine mostly by the attorney general doing an excellent job. So he'll be making a determination. I know nothing really about him. It's not my it's not my deal in life into hundred sixteen candidate Trump often praised WikiLeaks and the group's publication of Hillary Clinton stolen emails. Vice President Mike Pence is once again calling for tougher US immigration laws cage as Michel Marie Cocco reports on Pence's trip to Arizona's border with Mexico yesterday flanked by a group of all of uniform border patrol agents, and what the US Mexico border fence topped and concertina wire as a backdrop Pence column congress to Hardin immigration rules got to continue to build a wall. We got to continue to give these courageous men and women the resources they need to do their job. But congress has got to act ten said, the Trump administration is not considering separating migrant families again, but urged congress to change the floors agree. A court settlement that established rules under which immigrant children could be held and he called for faster deportation proceedings to Central American countries for NPR news, I'm school in Nogales Pope Benedict as released a letter expressing dissenting view on the clergy sexual abuse crisis Benedict who resigned the papacy six years ago is blaming the scandal on cultural change and lacks church teachings NPR's. Tom gjelten reports that the letter is a challenge to pope Francis. It's been six centuries since the Catholic church last had two popes and the prospect of the church not speaking clearly with one voice Benedict has much more conservative than pope Francis. So far it hasn't been an issue because Benedict has kept his views to himself with his new letter. That has now changed and it concerns. The biggest problem. The church faces the clergy abuse crisis. Francis says the church's failure to address it stems from an accent. Deference to clerical authority Benedict sees a breakdown of cultural mores arising from the sexual revolution. And the emergence of what he calls homosexual clicks in Catholic seminaries Catholics will have to decide which pope to listen to Tom gelatin NPR news authorities in southwest Pakistan, say a bomb exploded at an open air market in Quetta today, killing at least sixteen people and wounding dozens more the blast occurred near a Shiite residential area. The city the group no group has claimed responsibility for the attack. You're listening to NPR news. Attorney Michael I have an ATI is facing a sentence of three hundred thirty five years in prison. If convicted on all charges related to tax evasion. Bank fraud and stealing millions of dollars for clients. Charges stemmed from thirty six count federal indictment announce yesterday in Los Angeles at Nadia's also facing wire fraud, extortion and other charges in New York in connection with an alleged attempt to extort money from Nike. He's best known for representing a porn star. Who sued President Trump for denying that they ever had an affair New York state plans to sue the Environmental Protection Agency for lowering General Electric to start removing PCB contamination from the Hudson river in upstate New York. As w AMC's Lucas Willard reports the says it considers the work complete that further study is needed the EPA Thursday announced to actions regarding General Electric's work to remove toxic PCB's from the upper Hudson, the company polluted the river for decades region to administrator Pete Lopez said EPA issued what he characterized as illegal. Receipt for GE's work to remove contaminated sediment for a forty mile section of the river. But he said GE's work is not complete issuance of a certification of completion of remedial action. Does not let g off the EPA says it will not determine the effectiveness of the remedy until more years of Hudson river fish tissue, data are gathered for NPR news. I'm Lucas Willard in Albany New York on stock markets in Asia shares closed mixed higher Tokyo, I'm.

President Trump NPR Benedict Julian Assange Mike Pence Hudson river pope Francis Catholic church US General Electric New York congress Tom gjelten London WikiLeaks Kim Jong UN attorney Nogales Pope Benedict Shapiro chang EPA
"shapiro chang" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:31 min | 3 years ago

"shapiro chang" Discussed on KQED Radio

"All things considered from NPR news. I'm ari. Shapiro chang. After seven years inside Ecuador's embassy in London. Julian Assange was thrown out today. British police took him into custody paving the way for his extradition to the US. The Justice department has charged him with conspiracy related to the leak of national security information while some have hailed Assange for exposing government secrets other say he has put US missions and staff at grave risk will hear more about that. In a few minutes at first, let's understand why Assange took refuge at the Ecuadorian embassy in the first place. We're joined now from London by NPR's ofeibea, Quist arcton. Welcome greetings. So it has been a pretty dramatic day in London for Assange. Can you just briefly describe what has happened today at about ten o'clock local time, the British police arrived at the Ecuador embassy way, you say he's Bayden since two thousand twelve and invited in by the Ecuadorian government. They hung. Lead Khaw carry Julian Assange, who's looking gone frail with a huge white bed out of the embassy. He was shouting this is unlawful this is unlawful and they bundled him into a waiting van. Can we just rewind the clock seven years? I mean what what was the co founder of WikiLeaks doing taking refuge in Ecuador's embassy in London in the first place, Julian Assange was accused of rape and molestation in Sweden, which was seeking his extradition. So in two thousand twelve he was in cold in Britain, and he was out on bail. Now, he jumped bail said to speak, and he literally ducked into the Ecuador's embassy, and he has been there ever since. So he has spent seven years inside an embassy his movements have been restricted for the past. Several years. How did he cope initially pretty well? I mean, we used to see Julian Assange on the balcony all the Ecuadorian embassy. Speaking almost holding court, then he was very confident he was confident because the then president all of Ecuador was a friend of his he made one of these pronouncements from the embassy balcony back into twelve hundred. Jason. Months ago one hundred.

Julian Assange Ecuador London NPR Shapiro chang WikiLeaks US Quist arcton Justice department Jason Khaw rape co founder president Britain Sweden seven years
"shapiro chang" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:28 min | 3 years ago

"shapiro chang" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Shapiro chang. After seven years inside Ecuador's embassy in London. Julian Assange was thrown out today. British police took him into custody paving the way for his extradition to the US. The Justice department has charged him with conspiracy related to the leak of national security information while some have hailed Assange for exposing government secrets other say he has put US missions and staff at grave risk. We'll hear more about that in a few minutes that I understand why Assange took refuge at the Ecuadorian embassy in the first place. We're joined now from London by NPR's ofeibea, Quist arcton. Welcome greetings. So it has been a pretty dramatic day in London for Assange. Can you just briefly describe what has happened today at about ten o'clock local time, the British police arrived at the Ecuador's embassy way, you say he's been since two thousand twelve and invited in by the Ecuadorian? Government. They have led half carry Julian Assange who's looking on frail with a huge white bed out to the embassy. He was shouting this is unlawful this is unlawful and they bundled him into a waiting van. Can we just rewind the clock seven years? I mean what what was the co founder of WikiLeaks doing taking refuge in Ecuador's embassy in London in the first place, Julian Assange was accused of rape and molestation in Sweden, which was seeking his extradition. So in two thousand twelve he was in court in Britain, and he was out on bail. Now, he jumped bail said to speak, and he literally ducked into the Ecuador embassy, and he has been there ever since. So he has spent seven years inside an embassy his movement. Have been restricted for the past several years. How did he cope initially pretty well? I mean, we used to see Julian Assange on the balcony of the Ecuadorian embassy. Speaking almost holding court, then he was very confident he was confident because the then president of Ecuador was a friend of his he made one of these pronouncements from the embassy balcony back into listen. One hundred.

Julian Assange Ecuador London Shapiro chang WikiLeaks US Quist arcton Justice department NPR rape president co founder Britain Sweden seven years
"shapiro chang" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

05:01 min | 3 years ago

"shapiro chang" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"From NPR news. This is all things considered. I'm ari. Shapiro chang. Attorney general William bar was back on Capitol Hill for a second consecutive day today this time before the Senate bar provided a couple new details related to special counsel Robert Mueller's final report, but the attorney general also said something else that we're going to dig into. Now, he said that the US government spied on the Trump campaign. NPR Justice reporter Ryan Lucas was listening in and he joins us now. Hey, brian. So President Trump has accused the Obama administration before spying on his campaign. Then this comes up at the bar hearing today, what exactly the attorney general say so bar was asked by democratic Senator Jeanne Shaheen whether he actually thinks that the US government spied on the Trump campaign, and this is what bar had to say. I think there's spying Kerr. Yes, I think spying that occur. Well, let me. Predicated adequately predicated, and I'm not suggesting it wasn't predicated adequately predicated to translate that out of lawyer speak. What bar sane is that he wants to figure out whether that quote unquote spine was done legally. Now, he said it would be a big deal if the government had indeed a legally spied on a political campaign. He says that he's putting a team together of people at the Justice department look into this. He says it's not a formal investigation. Now, these allegations are actually something that the department's inspector general is already looking at and bar said yesterday actually that that investigation is expected to wrap up in may or June another probe. Okay. So this is an idea that the president's allies in congress have been long pushing for you know, for months, so do you feel like it carries more weight? Now when it comes from the attorney general what's the big deal for the attorney general to say this. He's a very good very experienced lawyer Bill bars, he's usually pretty circumspect with his language in his decision to call this spine, which of course, echoes the president's. Raise a lot of eyebrows. Here's democrat Brian chats. I think the word spying could cause everybody in the. Cable news ecosystem to freak out. Senator Schadt said that it's different when the attorney general uses the words spine in this context. He says it's provocative it's inflammatory, and he gave chance actually a bar to reconsider his word choice. Here's how that exchange went. I'm not sure of all the. Connotations of that were that you're referring to unauthorized surveillance. I wanna make sure there was no rush surveillance. Okay. Thank you is that is that more appropriate in your mind. It sounds a little testy there. So I mean, we do know that there was some surveillance targeting people involved in the Trump campaign did bar get into what his specific concerns are. Right. We know for example, that a court approved surveillance against Trump campaign aide Carter page, this was because the FBI had concerns that page might have been working with the Russian government. We know this because the government's top-secret application to the court to get the authority to conduct that surveillance was actually made public bar said he doesn't have any specific evidence that the FBI or other US intelligence agencies today anything wrong, but he does have concerns about how all of this went down. He said normally law enforcement with Tele campaign if they thought that it was targeted by foreign intelligence. We know that the Trump campaign did receive a counter intelligence briefing in the summer of twenty six sixteen. We just don't know what they were told mom line here, though bar has concerns. He wants to look into it. All right. That's NPR's. Ryan Lucas, thanks Ryan the investigations into the fatal lion air and airlines crash. Che's have revealed troubling details about safety, for example. Boeing was charging extra for a safety feature. One that might have helped the pilots in those flights. Boeing says it will now make that feature standard. We wondered whether the same could be true of safety features in cars. Some new cars have features to avoid collisions or staying Elaine, depending on the make and model features like those could come standard or cost extra. David Friedman was acting administrator of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, and he's now on the policy side of consumer reports. Welcome to the studio. Thanks a lot for having me. Let's start by talking about a feature called automatic emergency. Breaking understand this is a technology that has been really widely adopted largely because of a voluntary agreement where automakers said, they'll make it standard by twenty twenty two. What does this do how important is it? Well, this technology is fantastic. Basically, if you're about to rear end, someone this technology will I warn you. And if you don't act it will hit the brakes for you and the data show that it could reduce rear end crashes by forty percent or more. Said it'll be standard by twenty twenty two. But if I buy a new car today likely to have this feature, honestly, it's fifty fifty if we look at twenty nineteen model year data about half of the automakers sell vehicles where the technology comes standard Toyota, for example, and Honda have been making a lot of this technology standard on their vehicles with the others..

Attorney US Trump Ryan Lucas president William bar NPR Brian chats Senator Jeanne Shaheen Shapiro chang FBI Justice department Robert Mueller Senate Boeing Senator Schadt twenty twenty reporter
"shapiro chang" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:40 min | 3 years ago

"shapiro chang" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is all things considered from NPR news. I'm ari. Shapiro chang. Secretary of state Mike Pompeo was on Capitol Hill today defending the Trump administration's decision to cut aid to Central America Pompeo, tried to convince lawmakers that money to Guatemala, El Salvador and Honduras should be withheld until those countries do more to stop their citizens from coming to the US. Some lawmakers said that is backwards thinking as NPR's Michele Keleman reports. The ranking democrat on the Senate Foreign Relations committee Robert Menendez says USA decentral America is meant to address the root causes of migration. Why are people fleeing they're fleeing because of violent crime, their choices stare or flee and have a chance at living or sees stay see my daughter raped or stay see my son forcibly put into a gang. We need to fight at the very essence of that. And the very essence of that is not at our border. It's in Central America, but argues that US aid programs in El Salvador. Doris in Guatemala are not working his evidence the situation at the US southern border. You can see if they fact of this crisis that it has not been affective. And so we are endeavouring to change that right? This is that we deal in reality. Not enough to take taxpayer money and spend it there you need to get something for that. And that's what we are engaged in. Now secretary told Senate appropriators Tuesday that the US has stopped allocating new funds until those countries take seriously the need to control their own borders. Some lawmakers see this as a major departure Congressman, Tom Mellano sqi. A former State Department official says it's one thing to help these countries deal with the causes of migration. It's another to demand that they stop people from leaving can you think of any precedent historical precedent in which the United States has urged another country to stop people from leaving. I mean, we urge the Soviet Union to allow Soviet Druce to leave. We we would we have condemned North Korea from stopping people. From leaving its country. We would be outraged if the Madero regime were to stop people from leaving. He was addressing his mostly rhetorical questions to the head of the US agency for international development at a hearing Tuesday. I would this even work are we advising the Honduran police to arrest or shoot people if they try to leave their country, fellow democrat Brad, Sherman, raise similar doubts pointing out that the US has seen a dramatic decline in my Gration from Mexico because things are better there. Now, he says the same could be true for Central America. If aid is used well secretary peyot, though has a different priority. He's urging lawmakers to change asylum laws so that central Americans can stay in Mexico. I worked on an agreement where we would allow those with proper asylum claims to wait for their asylum here and the numbers are overwhelming to wait Mexico. We had a court fundamentally misread the law and the Nias the ability. Do that. We need your help today. Senator Tom udall pressed him on. Why do you believe our country is quote full as the president said that we should not accept any more asylum seekers or immigrants to the United States. This is the most generous nation in the history of civilization. Just the this the case secretary of state carefully avoids answering the question or showing any daylight with the president determined to stem the flow of migrants from Central America. Michele Kelemen, NPR news, the State Department as we just heard Central American migrants who arrive at the US border often talk about violence and poverty, driving them north. Jonathan Blitzer writes in the New Yorker about another big factor in this crisis climate change. He spent time in Guatemala reporting on how the changing climate is helping to drive people to leave Jonathan Blitzer. Welcome Paul things considered. Thank you. Tell me about one of the small towns Guatemala visited where the impact of climate change is really apparent. There was a small town about nine thousand feet above sea level called clemen doto. And basically the way you begin to feel the impact of climate change sometimes feel so vast as to almost be impossible to fully survey is in the form of first of all how few young men were visible in the streets of this town. Most of the young men in this town had already left for the US. And the reason specifically is a community that consists almost entirely of substance farmers who grow potatoes maize few other vegetables, it's hard to grow things of that altitude under the best of circumstances. It's hard to grow things at that altitude. Exactly exactly in recent years, in whatever said almost to a person that over the last six or seven years things really began to change the weather patterns started to become a Radic the rains didn't come when they were supposed to come and increasingly it became impossible for people to grow their staple crops to grow potatoes to grow maize. And as a result they had. Not only nothing to eat. But also nothing to survive on to sell. And so as a result, increasingly people were abandoning their land and heading north in the Senate Clinton, tore you say there were almost no young men of working age. But the migration crisis at the border is a lot of parents with young children. And you saw evidence of those departures to tell us about that. That's true. The new dynamic as you say is that increasingly families are coming to the US seeking asylum. And you you saw that to a lot of these communities. People would say, for example that look we're gonna leave anyway. But if we go as a family, we at least have a better shot of making it across the US border. A lot of these subsistence farmers were barely scraping by anyway, how do you know that the struggles are having today are result of climate change to good question? I think for one thing there's a general stipulation that has to be made which is that climate change on its own is in the single thing that drugging people north but seriously exacerbates the existing problems in the region. But concretely the descriptions of how weather. Patterns were changing the increasing spikes and then drops in temperature. People spoke extremely specifically about how crops were so people. For example, planting potatoes would say look now, we have new funguses that are growing that were in here for years ago to invest more money in pesticides to kill some of these new funguses that are that are growing as a result of increased humidity. Now, it's impossible for us to make any profit on our crops all of this stuff was identifiable as being a a new force new phenomenon in the last few years. Well, this makes me think about what we hear from the US government that countries like what needs to do more to address the migration crisis. And generally, they're referring to problems of instability and violence, but problems of climate change can't be addressed by the government of Guatemala, right? That's right. I in fact, all of the problems really that that are affecting this region. And that are forcing people to leave everything from violence to to to massive interest corruption two years of poverty, all of these things are too big and too complex for any. Single government on its own to solve a policy matter. The US needs to take the lead on this. And the fact that the Trump administration seems to be moving in the exact opposite direction that is to say planning to cut aid seeming to penalize these governments basically for the desperation of their situation is just obviously kind of productive. There was a US funded program to help some of the farmers who are struggling with the change in climate. And it sounds from your reporting it actually had a positive impact tell us about it. There was a small tiny hamlet called Leone where beginning in around twenty fifteen the community received help from a group of local NGOs that had money from the US. We're talking about tiny sums of money hundred ninety thousand dollars of the course of three year period, and this community, basically had agronomists and forestry experts. Come to the community instruct them how to diversify their crops. Help them begin to. Respond to some of these acute pressures wrought by climate change and more and more people decided they did not need to leave because they saw a viable future in this community. This funding stream ended in two thousand seventeen because of the Trump administration's hostility climate change as a force in the region. And as a problem that needed to be solved. And so everyone was very much buoy by the money that came through and the opportunities that presented for them. And now that money is gone. And that some of those opportunities have been taken away, it's harder. I think for many of them to imagine stain. Donovan blitzer. Thank you for sharing your reporting with us. Thanks much reported for the New Yorker on how climate change is helping to fuel the US border crisis..

US Guatemala Central America Trump administration Mexico Senate NPR secretary El Salvador State Department Mike Pompeo Shapiro chang president Senate Foreign Relations America Pompeo Robert Menendez
"shapiro chang" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:22 min | 3 years ago

"shapiro chang" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm ari. Shapiro chang. Attorney general William bar was on Capitol Hill today for a public hearing technically it was about the Justice Department's twenty twenty budget. But no surprise much of a hearing instead focused on the highly anticipated Muller report within a week. I will be in a position to release the port to the public. That is a redacted version of the special counsel's report on the Russia investigation. NPR Justice reporter Ryan Lucas joins me now. Hey, Ryan other other than the time line of the release. What else did we learn from bar today on the Miller report what we got more details on how the department is handling the process of redacting the report before it's released to congress. And the public bar has said that there are four categories of material that are going to be blacked out before it's made public. He reminded lawmakers today of what those categories are. They are grand jury materials information that you aspire agencies believed could reveal their sources or methods information that could interfere with ongoing law enforcement investigations in information that touches on privacy reputational interest of so-called peripheral individuals who weren't charging the Russia investigation bar said, he's not making these decisions alone. He described described the review process as a team effort right now. Now, the special counsel is working with us on identifying information in the reports that fall under those four categories are also said that all of the reductions will have a note explaining why the information is being kept secret. Okay. But but is that going to be enough for House Democrats because all along they've been pushing for the Miller report to be released without any reductions will mess at all. They also want all of the underlying documents from the investigate all the evidence. Right. So during the hearing today, Democrats, they did raise concerns about how these reductions are being handled in how sweeping these reductions could be one democrat today described the category of privacy and reputational interest, as an exception. Big enough to drive a truck through Democrats also press bar about reductions related to grand jury proceedings. Now, there are strict federal rules that prohibit the release of those materials, but there are a couple of very narrow exceptions bar himself could seek court authorization to provide lawmakers some of the information developed during those grand jury proceeding. But today Bartels lawmakers he has no plans to do that at all. All right. So this redacted report is heading our way, very soon at the same time. You know, the attorney general has said that he wants to be transparent with this report. How does he square that? Because especially with the redaction say related to the reputational interests. Where's the transparency remember bar said that he wants to be as transparent as possible consistent with the law? That's a very important distinction. What bar made clear today that he wants to get a version of this report out. So that people can see it that can draw their own conclusions make their own judgments, but he also said that he's willing to talk to lawmakers down the road to see if he can provide them with more information from the investigation that particularly applies to the democratic chairman of the House Judiciary committee, Jerry Nadler, he has a subpoena in hand for the full report. He said today that he should get all of the materials from this. So there's definitely a potential fight for. Yeah. Okay. So beyond the Miller report bar mentioned another investigation today relate. Into the Russia probe. What can you tell us about that? Well, the Justice Department's inspector general is looking into alleged surveillance of uses in the Russian vestich in. This has been a favourite topic of House Republicans we've talked about it a lot about their allegations. They allege that the department and the F B I abuse. Surveillance powers to target members of the Trump campaign bar said today that he expects the inspector general's investigation of these allegations to wrap up by may or June. Okay. That's NPR's. Ryan lucas. Thanks, ryan. Thank you. At the White House today. President Trump hosted his Egyptian counterpart and the to address each other like old friends that worries human rights groups. The government has jailed tens of thousands of people as it cracks down on political activity, and it is trying to tighten state control even further NPR's. Michele Keleman reports. Describing president of dough Fattah Sisi as my friend, President Trump said the two are working well together and making progress on counterterrorism efforts and on trade, we've never had a better relationship Egypt and the United States that we do right now. Egypt has been a key regional ally to the US for decades presidency has become especially close with Trump touting that relationship as he spoke through an interpreter in the Oval Office. East novel all of the credit goes to use the presence. Thank you very much support on all fronts. This is what we're seeking to promote our left relations in various fields liberal economic military, cultural of visit comes as he prepared to vote later this month on constitutional amendments that would give CC even broader powers and allow him to stay in power until twenty thirty four President Trump was asked about that effort as his aides tried to get reporters out of the room. I think he's doing a great job. I don't know about the effort. I could just tell us doing a great job. Trump ignored shouted questions about Egypt's potential purchase of new Russian fighter. Jets. An activist with the therere institute for Middle East policy. May also Donnie says by hosting CC at this moment. The administration is sending a signal that Egypt is a stable partner. No matter what it does. And that no matter what you do is very dangerous. Message to send both to Egyptians inside the country who still believe in preserving democratic values and principles and to other to to the region. Other autocrats who are watching. She says the government has done a good job at saying the things the US wants to hear C C presents himself as someone who protects Christians and other minorities and promotes women's rights. Michelle done of the Carnegie Endowment for international peace disputes that. But I think there are those in the Trump administration. I mean, if Trump tweet. Heated about this recently who accept that. Who believes that? He's doing great things for for women. And for Christians inside of each done doesn't see Trump pressing Egypt on human rights, though. Members of congress are speaking out seventeen senators this week accused Egypt of unjustly detaining. At least a dozen Americans noting that the country receives one point three billion dollars a year from the US Senator Patrick layhee on the appropriations committee is threatening to hold up the sale of new Apache helicopters until Egypt. Compensates an American who was badly injured in Egypt. When the military mistakenly fired on her tourist group administration officials say they have raised that case with the AGIP shins and are seeking the release of Americans detained in Egypt. Michelle Kellerman, NPR news, the State Department polls have closed in Israel where the country is electing a new parliament, which will choose the next Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu is seeking a. Fourth consecutive term after already serving a decade in office. He's ruled with what's perhaps the most right wing coalition in Israel history. His main challenger is a retired general who says Israel needs a unifying leader and cleaner government right now both sides are claiming victory NPR's Daniel estrin joins us now from Jerusalem to discuss what election day has shown so far. Hey, daniel. Hi there. So what did you see as you went to polling stations today? Well, bottom line, I met many voters and heard many opinions this was a very complex election. They were dozen main parties to choose from. So I heard a lot and what kinds of trends have you been hearing and seeing talk to voters. Well, there were those who were voting for guns. The main centrist candidate Benny guns, they tended to be older voters some were right wing, and they were turned off by Netanyahu's corruption allegations, his aggressive approach and some of his supporters were left-wingers who were sick of. Netanyahu's right-wing rule. Here's an example. I spoke to a seventy seventy two year old voter named CPA's more. And here's what she said about any guns. It's nothing. But.

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WNYC 93.9 FM

03:59 min | 3 years ago

"shapiro chang" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is all things considered. I'm Ari Shapiro Chang. And you report out today takes a deeper look at how Latinos experienced discrimination in the US if Latinos with darker skin tones are more likely than those with lighter skin to say that they have been discriminated against NPR's Lewan reports on the results of this national survey by the Pew Research Center, and we should note there is one scene in the story that some listeners might find upsetting in Lleida Diaz family. There's diversity in skin tones, the lightest one of my siblings. We come from the darkest of the latest, my mom is dark, and my father is very light skin tone and with red hair freckles D as lives in Queens, New York and identifies as Puerto Rican and afro Latino sometimes though she says other people overlook her Latino identity including during a recent shopping trip and this lady was asking for help. But she was saying in Spanish. She was with a friend as she goes ask her. She goes, oh, she doesn't speak Spanish like yoga, the others. Have also judged her brothers by their appearance their black Hispanic Modano as they would say, so. Oh, watch them. What I know. He might steal says Joseph Latino. And then all Saudi oh, hey, like now, you try to play at all just walked in. And you just classified me as a thief. It's a kind of discrimination that the Pew Research Center says some Latinos and Latinas are more likely than others to say they've experienced because of their race or ethnicity Latinos and Latinas with darker skin tones are more likely than those with lighter skin to say that they've been subject to slurs or jokes in that people acted as if they were suspicious of them Juliana Horowitz is one of the co authors have fused new report is something I talk about. But it hasn't really necessarily been part of the more public debate about race and experiences with racial discrimination in the US. These new survey results could help deepen that debate. According to Margaret hunter, she's a sociologist at mills college in California where she studies color ISM hundred says in the Latino community discussion about discrimination based on skin tone, usually takes place within families behind closed doors. You'll hear people say sometime don't air dirty. VM public. But I don't think we have to think about it that way. I mean, we're all being influenced by the unconscious bias of racism, white supremacy, a white privilege doesn't really have one country. An international thing guest near ho sway Betty is director of programs and communications for the Dino effort Latino forum, it's organization based in New York City that's trying to raise awareness of Latinos. And let Dina's of African descent in the US. There's a myth in community that we are this rainbow multicolored ethnic group that there's no racism in Tino communities because we all mixed. This not true. There's a lot of this nation in many different ways. Stephanie pause of Brooklyn says sometimes she feels that from within the Latino community, fair skin light eyes have long hair. I was told never today a Latino specific countries or anyone darker them. You know, I was encouraged to ten says she thinks her appearance has helped her dance. Her career as a wardrobe stylist, Christina Gomez, a sociologist at the school of the Art Institute of Chicago says addressing ISM begins with more open conversation about the problem, and she's noticing a generational shift. Our young people today are really talking about this on college campuses and making it literally visual to all of us. And so they talk about afro Matt next people in a way that twenty years ago, we weren't talking about it Gomez when we talk about discrimination. It's not enough to know that someone is Latino or Latina she says we also have to knowledge what someone looks like Honsi long and Jerry news New York today. New York City mayor Bill de Blasio declared a public health emergency to fight an outbreak of measles.

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"shapiro chang" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

08:01 min | 3 years ago

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"Confidence. Hello, holly. What's happening on the roads right now in van Nuys? On the northbound four zero five Sherman way, we have a collision there that's blocking the carpool in two left lanes. And that has you backed up from Ventura boulevard. Is he day on a Monday as we move on with the news KCRW? It's four thirty five from NPR news. This is all things considered. I'm Ari Shapiro Chang. The Senate finance committee has been digging into the high cost of prescription drugs in the committee's third hearing on the topic tomorrow senators will cross examine executives from companies known as pharmacy benefit managers. Some of them are familiar CBS care, Mark, for example, and Express Scripts. These are companies that manage the prescription drug insurance plans for most insurance companies and employers and some senators and many others say pharmacy benefit managers. Carry a lot of blame for hydrog prices NPR's Alison kodjak joins us now. Hey, alison. Hi, also, what are the senators on the finance committee hoping to learn tomorrow? Well, there are couple of big things. The first is they wanna show how secretive this system is pharmacy benefit managers system. And how that secrecy can. Trouble. So the way the system works is drug company said what they called this list price for their medication really high. Then they negotiate price breaks this with the PB and they control the drug benefit for millions of millions of customers. So those discounts come in the form of secret rebates that drug companies pay back after the fact the whole system is try to secrecy in that breeds mistrust. So I talked with Senator Chuck Grassley today, he's the Republican chairman of the committee, and he called the PB a secret organization. Let's hear what to say. When you have a list price up here. And I'm raising my hand, and then you have rebates in between. And then you have a price down here for the consumer. How come we don't have everybody pay that that prices down here? What do you expect the pharmacy benefit managers, these PM's what to say to defend themselves? Well, they've been defending themselves a lot recently. So I'm expecting me here the similar thing, which is in the end they actually reduce overall drug spending because they can control what drugs are millions of customers by and so they can demand. These discounts a lot of communist and analyst I talked to say there's no question they've reduced spending mostly by directing consumers to generic drugs, which are cheaper than brand name drugs. But in areas where there are no generics. Benefits less clear. They say they save loads of money off the list prices, but many expert, including the secretary of health and human services. Are you the rebate system drives that initial list price artificially, high the PBS say that's the pharmaceutical manufacturers fault because they're the ones setting that price. Will are they correct about that well to some extent? Yes. Drug companies choose their initial price, and they raise those list prices every year even on drugs that are the same. They say they have to do this. So they can offer PBMR's better rebates. So there's this big blame game going on. And Senator Grassley even noted it when I talked with him, the pharmaceutical companies pointed their figure at the PBS, the PB M's pointer finger at the pharmaceuticals, and then both of those are pointing their fingers at the health insurance companies. So aggressively is really frustrated here he actually sort of threatened that he would call another hearing bring all these three groups together because he wants to get them all at the same table and figure out what's going on. So what happens next at this point? Do you expect anything to actually change? Well, there's a lot of action out there on drug prices, and particularly in this report issue legislation in the house and the Senate both Democrats and Republicans Senator Grassley says he's going to craft a Bill, but even more immediately. The Trump administration has proposed making these after the factory Bates illegal that they would. Require PM's instead to negotiate for discounts up front, which being customers would pay the lower price. Even if they haven't met a deductible, but those discounts and no longer be confidential. All right. That's NPR's. Alison kodjak. Thanks. Thanks turn out was way up in the two thousand eighteen midterms. And in the southwest that translated into gains for Democrats now. Republicans in south western states are pushing bills the change the rules around voting. Critics say these changes are designed to reduce turnout in future elections from Phoenix cage. As e Brett Jaspers reports on how it's playing out in Arizona. Republicans had full control of Arizona's politics until last fall. Then after democratic turnout surged they lost four out of nine statewide races, including a US Senate seat. Now. Republicans in the legislature are proposing new voting rules that could make it more complicated to cast a ballot one change would remove some people from the permanent early voting list. It says permanent early voting lists. I don't know why everyone morning the operative word which is early. That's the Bill sponsor Republican state. Senator Michele Eugene t Rita people on the permanent early voting list. Get ballots mailed to them so that they can mail them back or drop them off on election day. You Rita wants counties to purge people from that list, if they don't vote using an early ballot into consecutive election cycles, we wanna make sure that the lists are up to date. That's just good practice. That makes sense. On frankly, any kind of database that you have that you're really communicating with those who want to be communicated with that are using the service is a service. It's a convenience local election officials say they already have ways to maintain clean voting rolls. The secretary of state's office estimates two hundred thousand voters currently on the permanent early voting list. Didn't vote in both twenty sixteen and twenty eighteen but the office also says the bill's language is unclear making it hard to estimate the impact democratic Representative the Solomon calls it voter suppression to purge the permanent early voting list known as pebble or people. There is a creek debates around whether or not it is pebble or people. But I find it fitting that if this Bill passes the list will no longer be permanent. And so one might call it evil. Republicans dispute this is an attempt to make voting more difficult. The Bill doesn't remove people from the registration rolls. Just the mailing list for early ballots. Some local officials say it will create more confusion. Republican lawmakers have proposed other bills this legislative session that have drawn criticism from voting rights groups, including one that bans paying workers for each voter registration form, they turn in both the good and bad side of the fall out of the twenty eight teen election. Danielle Lang is an attorney with the campaign legal center, which works with voting rights groups across the country, including in Arizona. She says lawmakers often reexamined voting laws after an election. For example. There's a push from Iowa Republican governor to make it easier for convicted felons to. Restore their right to vote after release that effort is by partisan unlike zone as Bill which has advanced along party lines all Americans care about election integrity, and yet these issues get framed in very unhelpful partisan ways, Republicans control the Zona legislature, the Bill to purge the permanent early voting list still has to pass the full house GOP governor Doug ducey's office says it doesn't come on pending legislation for NPR news. I'm Brent Jaspers in Phoenix..

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