35 Burst results for "Shannon Bond"

Arkansas AG On Google Antitrust Suit: 'I Don't Want What Google Says Is Best'

NPR's Business Story of the Day

06:49 min | 3 d ago

Arkansas AG On Google Antitrust Suit: 'I Don't Want What Google Says Is Best'

"The Department of Justice is suing Google accusing it of being quote a monopoly gatekeeper for the Internet Google's worth about a trillion dollars, which is very big and the DOJ says it's abusing its dominance over smaller rival companies Google's chief legal officer Kent Walker Calls Lawsuit Deeply. Flawed in a statement eleven republican state attorneys general join that suit including Arkansas AG. Leslie Rutledge who's with me now, and before we start talking I, want to note that Google is a financial sponsor of NPR Good Morning Ms Rutledge. We're good morning. Thanks so much for having me on today of course state attorneys General I should say were investigating Google what is the most compelling evidence that investigation uncovered that says to you what Google is doing is illegal and we should sue the company. Look correct when people google something they believe that it's free to Google and that they're going to get the best products I Brought up to them on that search engine. But what we have found through those investigations is that Google has manipulated those search engines. They have a exclusivity contract essentially when you buy an apple product and automatically defaults to Google, and when you type something into noodle and populate, you may not be getting the the best products or the best services to you. Rather you're getting what Google you to she, and that's what is so concerning is that they control ninety plus percent of the market space in the search engine world. I'm going to get to the point you're making about default in just a moment but the. Thing that I am very curious about have you gotten specific complaints from your constituents in Arkansas saying Google is making it hard for me to do X. Y. and Z in a way that illegal. But we received thousands of complaints every single week I some about search engine, some about robocalls, and so I don't have those in front of me unfortunately right now. But yes, we receive complaints about people not being able to find perhaps their products not being populated your winds, my product my services can't on page ten of a Google search when it clearly most popular product and it should be on page one. Okay. Let's move to the question of it being the default search engine. So one of the main arguments in favor of Google, the argument that Google would make is it is free in the sense that I am not paying anything when I, you know Google my name, for example, which I try not to do it it is the best. That's Google's argument. And if you want to change your search engine Google says, here's how you do it. In fact, in their statement, responding to the lawsuit actually have instructions on how to change a search engine from Google to say Beng why don't you buy that? It is bad but fault and the reason why we don't produce because again, they control ninety percent plus of beat the market space in this area and so it's not hard to shut out competition when you've already shut out competition and people go has now become a verb it's not simply a noun, it's not simply a suburban so people use it to describe even if they were using being or some other search and they will say, well, let me Google that and they might go to blame. They're not going to say let me bring that and it has. To, be a verb I I get what you're saying, but that's not a leak. That's not illegal but the deceptive trade practices and that's why we're bringing this antitrust lawsuit. Stating that. and. Pushing out the competition where there can be no competition is illegal and that's why we've worked with the Department of Justice Attorney General Bar in these other ten states to bring this suit against Google we want Americans to have the best products. The Best Services I know if my two year old daughter gets sick at night and I'm searching, I'm googling if you will to find a pediatrician or how to help her I, want the back Stalker and the best medication I don't want what doodle says as best I want the actual best and that's what every American wants. When they look for something, we don't want something three just because. We want the best it's free. The lawsuit talks about the need for quote, structural remedies but then it doesn't offer any details. What are the structural remedies that you envision? Are you talking about breaking apart parts of this business? Not, necessarily, no not at all I think it's allowing more competition to come in. There are so many new and innovative models for research emerging. But in order for those models to have a chance, we need google to break it stranglehold over the Internet. So it doesn't mean breaking apart the company it means you're breaking apart the stranglehold breaking apart that ninety plus percent and the market place. You Google doing something voluntarily which many businesses would argue. that. It is not in their interest and they shouldn't do it. Let me ask you. About something about who's joined this suit. So it's eleven republican state Attorney General No Democrats just yet as I understand it historically Republicans. Have not been in favor of many types of government regulation of private business. The trump administration often is not what makes this particular case different but we would. Strongly encourage our democratic colleagues from across the country to join these efforts I know that we've been conversations with him. So this doesn't necessarily have to be partisan effort. We would love to be a bipartisan effort a and yes, we're Publicans we are not. Fond of over regulation by government, how you have a companies or big tech companies. Are Shutting out competition or who are impacting individual some free speech rights and yes, we will step in and that's our job as the chief law enforcement and the chief legal officers of our respective states and working with the Department of Justice. Are you considering signing onto any similar lawsuits against other tech giants? So facebook apple and Amazon Spring to mind. Well, it has making starting in recent weeks months with what we're seeing from big tech companies who are blocking speech on their platforms speech that it's not necessarily violent or destructive, but rather speech if they do not agree with and so we want all Americans whatever plant they're using the of the exercise, their free speech, and to be able to use these platforms and to not be shut out simply for political reasons. As you know in right now we're approaching the number thirty election. Many people are already voting absentee or early voting state and. Signs some big tech companies blocking speeches become very concerning. It is something that we were talking about on a national level. I. Will say that we would need to look a bit further for evidence for that as our tech correspondent Shannon bond has pointed out Leslie. Rutledge Attorney General for Arkansas. Thank you so much. Thank, you have a great day.

Google Department Of Justice Arkansas Leslie Rutledge Attorney Chief Legal Officer DOJ Kent Walker NPR Beng Shannon Bond Facebook Amazon Apple
"shannon bond" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:29 min | Last week

"shannon bond" Discussed on KCRW

"On Corvo, Coleman, President Trump and Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden will hold separate town halls tonight. They were scheduled to hold their second presidential debate this evening. But the group organizing the debate moved it to a virtual format after Trump tested positive for the Corona virus. NPR's Mara Liasson says the president rejected that. Donald Trump said he wasn't interested. Joe Biden said that in that case, he do his own televised town hall with ABC. Then just yesterday, NBC confirmed that it would do an hour long event with Trump. They'll both started 8 P.m. Eastern tonight. The ABC event with Biden is going to run longer to match the same 90 minutes. At ABC gave to Donald Trump a month ago. NPR's Mara Liasson, Facebook and Twitter are limiting people from sharing a news story with unconfirmed claims about Democratic presidential nominee Biden. NPR. Shannon Bond reports. President Trump and his allies are accusing the social media companies of censorship. Companies say they're trying to slow down the spread of possibly false claims. The New York Post story in question is based on emails purportedly sent by Joe Biden, son Hunter and given to the post by close associates of President Trump. Facebook, which is an NPR sponsor, said it was limiting the articles reach so fact checkers would have more time to evaluate it. Twitter blocked its users from posting the link at all, saying it broke its rules against sharing hacked information. The companies didn't give much detail about why they decided to clamp down on this story that sparked criticism from experts who say they should more clearly explain their policies. Shannon BOND NPR News as countries across Europe take more measures to control a new wave of the Corona virus. Belgium forecasts a crisis for its hospitals. If the current infection rate continues. Teri Schultz reports from Brussels on urgent concerns raised by health officials. Belgium's Crisis Center spokesman. Even Lightem says the number of new infections is doubling every week and warns the country must sharply cut infections or its intensive care units will be at capacity by the middle of November. Admissions to hospital have gone up by 80% over the past week deaths there. Also climbing Ben Lightem says This could be considered a second wave of the pandemic, with the entire country considered either a red zone or a dark red one. Last week. Brussels ordered all bars and cafes to close for one month and authorities aren't ruling out a return to lock down mode. Belgium's neighbors France, Germany and the Netherlands are all tightening restrictions. For NPR News. I'm Teri Schultz in Brussels. The US Postal Service has agreed to reverse all the changes that slowed mail delivery across the United States this year. The settles a lawsuit filed by Montana Democratic governor Steve Bullock. Have been complains that people haven't gotten their prescriptions or their benefits or been able to pay bills on time. This is NPR news. Two American hostages have been released from Yemen. One is a female aid worker and the other is a businessman. They had been held by Iranian backed rebels. The remains of a third person are being repatriated. Associated Press says this release is part of an exchange. Oman's state news agency says 250 Yemenis who had received medical treatment in Oman are being returned to Yemen. The latest in a series of studies about the workplace in Hollywood find it is full of bullies and filled with power imbalances. NPR's Mandalay del Barco has more The Hollywood Commission, chaired by Anita Hill, surveyed nearly 10,000 people working in the entertainment industry about intimidating or humiliating workplace behaviors such as insults. Sarcasm is gestures, yelling, swearing, harsh criticism and physical aggression. One person reported. Quote bullies run rampant and go unchecked and don't get treatment. Women in the survey were twice as likely as men to report abusive conduct workers younger than 40, disabled workers and non union workers. So they have it bad. So do assistance to writers, rooms and executives. A Hollywood commission says it's now training directors, producers, showrunners, casting directors and others to manage bullying mandolin del Barco NPR NEWS, The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration reports that the planet has just experienced its hottest September on record. The agency. Noah says 2020 is on track to become one of the hottest years ever recorded. The 10 warmest, September's on record have all occurred since 2005. On Corvo Coleman NPR news Support for NPR comes from NPR stations. Other contributors include focus features and MSNBC films. Presenting the way I see it an inside look at President Obama and Reagan through the eyes of White House photographer Pete Souza. Tomorrow at 10 P.m. eastern on MSNBC. And this is K. C R. W stories were working on San Francisco Police will see and spend less time responding to calls involving people with psychiatric and substance abuse problems. We can get personnel that are better suited to help people having behavioral and social crises. Mental health professionals and paramedics will respond. Instead, that story is just ahead. Morning edition.

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"shannon bond" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:29 min | Last week

"shannon bond" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Arden and I'm Steve Inskeep. What prompted some evangelicals to start raising money to defeat the president 2020. Also one million Texans have already voted even after the state blocked some ways to do it and some cities take police out of responding to mental health crisis. It's Thursday, October, 15th Day in 2017. When Alissa Milano suggested women post an old slogan me to Within hours, it became a thie news is next. Line from NPR News on Corvin, Coleman, President Trump and Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden will hold separate town halls tonight. They were scheduled to hold their second presidential debate this evening. But the group organizing the debate moved it to a virtual format after Trump tested positive for the Corona virus. NPR's Mara Liasson says the president rejected that. Donald Trump said he wasn't interested. Joe Biden said that in that case, he do his own televised town hall with ABC. Then just yesterday, NBC confirmed that it would do an hour long event with Trump. They'll both started 8 P.m. Eastern tonight. The ABC event with Biden is going to run longer to match the same 90 minutes. At ABC gave to Donald Trump a month ago. NPR's Mara Liasson, Facebook and Twitter are limiting people from sharing a news story with unconfirmed claims about Democratic presidential nominee Biden. NPR's Shannon Bond reports. President Trump and his allies are accusing the social media companies of censorship. Companies say they're trying to slow down the spread of possibly false claims. The New York Post story in question is based on emails purportedly sent by Joe Biden, son Hunter and given to the post by close associates of President Trump. Facebook, which is an NPR sponsor, said it was limiting the articles reach so fact checkers would have more time to evaluate it. Twitter blocked its users from posting the link at all, saying it broke its rules against sharing hacked information. The companies didn't give much detail about why they decided to clamp down on this story. That sparked criticism from experts who say they should more clearly explain their policies. Shannon BOND NPR News as countries across Europe take more measures to control a new wave of the Corona virus. Belgium forecasts a crisis for its hospitals if the current infection rate continues. Teri Schultz reports from Brussels on urgent concerns raised by health officials. Belgium's Crisis Center spokesman. Even Lightem says the number of new infections is doubling every week and warns the country must sharply cut infections or its intensive care units will be at capacity by the middle of November. Admissions to hospital have gone up by 80% over the past week deaths there also climbing Enlightens says this could be considered a second wave of the pandemic, with the entire country considered either a red zone or a dark red one. Last week, Brussels ordered all bars and cafes to close for one month, and authorities aren't ruling out a return to lock down mode. Belgium's neighbors France, Germany and the Netherlands are all tightening restrictions for NPR news. I'm Teri Schultz in Brussels. The US Postal Service has agreed to reverse all the changes that slowed mail delivery across the United States this year. Settles a lawsuit filed by Montana Democratic governor Steve Bullock. There have been complaints that people haven't gotten their prescriptions or their benefits or been able to pay bills on time. This is NPR news. Two American hostages have been released from Yemen. One is a female aid worker and the other is a businessman. They had been held by Iranian backed rebels. The remains of a third person are being repatriated. Associated Press says this release is part of an exchange. Oman's state news agency says 250 Yemenis who had received medical treatment in Oman are being returned to Yemen. The latest in a Syriza's studies about the workplace in Hollywood find it is full of bullies and filled with power imbalances. NPR's Mandalay del Barco has more The Hollywood Commission, chaired by Anita Hill, surveyed nearly 10,000 people working in the entertainment industry about intimidating or humiliating workplace behaviors such as insults. Sarcasm is gestures, yelling, swearing, harsh criticism and physical aggression. One person reported. Quote bullies run rampant and go unchecked and don't get treatment. Women in the survey were twice as likely as men to report abusive conduct workers younger than 40, disabled workers and non union workers. So they have it bad. So do assistance to writers, rooms and executives. A Hollywood commission says it's now training directors, producers, showrunners, casting directors and others to manage bullying mandolin del Barco NPR NEWS, The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration reports that the planet has just experienced its hottest September on record. The agency. Noah says 2020 is on track to become one of the hottest years ever recorded. The 10 warmest, September's on record have all occurred since 2005. On Corvo Coleman NPR news Support for NPR comes from NPR stations. Other contributors include focus features and MSNBC films. Presenting the way I see it an inside look at President Obama and Reagan through the eyes of White House photographer Pete Souza. Tomorrow at 10 P.m. eastern on MSNBC. President Trump and his Democratic rival, Joe Biden. We're supposed to debate tonight, but that plan was replaced with dueling televised town halls. Details on the story coming up next on morning edition. Also in this next segment, three cities, including San Francisco, are taking the police out of responding to most mental and be behavioral crisis calls. Instead, mental health pros and paramedics would respond. First details on that story, too. On morning edition on the foreign Program, which returns today after taking a couple days off for the Amy Cockney Barrett hearings for him at nine with Michael Krasny will have the latest on the confirmation hearings for the woman who may be seated on the Supreme Court. Also a discussion about the Supreme Court's decision this week, allowing the Trump Administration to stop. The 2020 cents is count early Forum with Michael Christening and Meena Cam from.

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"shannon bond" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:09 min | Last week

"shannon bond" Discussed on KCRW

"Center. This is all things Considered from NPR News. I'm Elsa Chang Facebook said today it is banning all content that denies or distorts the Holocaust. That is a big reversal. CEO Mark Zuckerberg has long said the social network is a place for free speech, even if that speech is offensive. NPR Tech correspondent Shannon Bond is on the line with us now to offer more details, and we should note that Facebook is among NPR's financial supporters. Hey, Shannon. Hey, Elsa. So tell us a little more about this new policy. I mean, how did Zuckerberg's thinking on this change? Yes, I understand that we should go back to 2018. He gave this interview to Recode. And he said that while he personally finds Holocaust denial deeply offensive He said. Facebook shouldn't take thes post down just because they're factually wrong. Here's what he told them. I just don't think that it is the right thing to say. We're going to take someone off the platform if they get things wrong, even multiple times. And really, in the way that Zuckerberg frames this, You know, it's his ideas. Facebook is a place for people to exercise free speech, and the company's shouldn't be the arbiter of truth. He says that over and over This approach, of course, has caused a lot of controversy and criticism. Zuckerberg even had to go back and clarify he wasn't defending Holocaust deniers. So today in a Facebook post, Zuckerberg now says his thinking has quote evolved over how his hand company handles Holocaust denial and that balance between free speech and harm Interesting. Well, what about the timing of this policy change? I mean, why is Facebook taking action now? You think Well, Facebook says this is, you know really about what's happening in the world. They point to data showing a global increase in anti Semitic violence. They also referenced this study of younger Americans that showed almost a quarter say the Holocaust is a myth or exaggerated or they're unsure about it. They say that's an alarming level of ignorance. And there's external pressure. This summer, a group called the conference on Jewish Material Claims against Germany organized a social media campaign..

Elsa Chang Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg Facebook NPR News Shannon Bond NPR Germany
"shannon bond" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:19 min | 2 weeks ago

"shannon bond" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The oil production in the Gulf has been taken off line in anticipation of the storm, and it will take some time to assess how much damage the storm may have caused. As the pandemic continues to keep demand for oil down any increase in oil prices widely expected to be temporary. Camila Domino SKI NPR news Twitter is once again tightening its rules against misinformation over concerns about voter intimidation and manipulation. Pure Shannon Bond reports Twitter users can expect to see more prominent warning labels on the platform that will make it harder to see and share false claims. Misleading posts from politicians and other users with big followings will be hidden behind a warning screen and it will be harder to share those posts. The company will also nudge users to read credible information before Retweeting a post with debunked claims. Like Facebook, Twitter is under pressure to stamp out election misinformation. Both companies have announced a cascade of new rules in the past few weeks, but they've been largely reluctant to remove posts entirely unless they call for violence or try to intimidate voters. Shannon Bond, NPR news Wall Street higher by the closing bell. You're listening to NPR news live from news. I'm terrorist. Siler. Forecasters say more warm, dry and occasionally windy weather will arrive in large parts of the state next week. That means it Renewed chance of P Genie power shut offs is Dan Recchi reports historically, October marks the height of Northern California's fire season. The danger is heightened by periods of strong northeasterly winds warm, often gusty breezes that dry out vegetation already starving for moisture. The National Weather Service says that kind of weather could arrive next week. PG and E, which preemptively turns off power to areas with a high risk of wildfire during strong wind events, says it's monitoring the forecast closely, but so far has no plans for blackouts. The utility carried out to public safety power shut offs last month, affecting nearly half a million residents in about two dozen counties. I'm Dan Breaking the news around. 200 students from UCSF are working to get the vote out in key swing states for the November election targeting voters that may not have come out in years past..

Twitter NPR Shannon Bond Gulf Dan Recchi UCSF National Weather Service Siler Facebook Northern California
"shannon bond" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:47 min | 2 weeks ago

"shannon bond" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"To keep demand for oil down any increase in oil prices widely expected to be temporary. Camila Domino SKI NPR news Twitter is once again tightening its rules against misinformation over concerns about voter intimidation and manipulation. Pure Shannon Bond reports Twitter users can expect to see more prominent warning labels on the platform that will make it harder to see and share false claims. Misleading posts from politicians and other users with big followings will be hidden behind a warning screen and it will be harder to share those posts. The company will also nudge users to read credible information before Retweeting a post with debunked claims. Like Facebook, Twitter is under pressure to stamp out election misinformation. Both companies have announced a cascade of new rules in the past few weeks, but they've been largely reluctant to remove posts entirely unless they call for violence or try to intimidate voters. Shannon Bond, NPR news Wall Street higher by the closing bell. You're listening to NPR news. And this is WN my sea into York. I'm Sean Carlson Marital. Blasio says an arrest is expected soon in the attack against an Orthodox Jewish reporter who was covering protests in Borough Park, Brooklyn earlier this week. Jewish inside our journalist Jacob Corn, Blue says he was hit in the head kicked and spit on. Obviously, that just can't happen. You can not have someone assaulted for trying to actually report the news to everyone. The attack occurred as members of the ultra Orthodox Jewish community protested restrictions put in place by government officials. After the Koven 19 infection rate in the area surged. Two nights of mass protests grew violent and chaotic, but police made no arrests. The NYPD since issued new guidance.

Twitter NPR Shannon Bond Sean Carlson NYPD Facebook Borough Park Jacob Corn Blue Brooklyn reporter York Blasio
"shannon bond" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:44 min | 2 weeks ago

"shannon bond" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Live from NPR news. I'm Shea Stevens. President. Trump has ordered a halt to negotiations on another round of Corona virus relief until after the election. Meanwhile, in a tweet Trump is also called for congressional deal on payroll protection for the airline industry were tens of thousands of jobs are being cut because of pandemic related losses. Facebook has taken down a post from the president that falsely claim Cove it 19 is let's just less deadly than the flu. NPR Shannon Bond reports that the company says the post broke its rules against harmful misinformation. Facebook says you cannot make false claims about the severity of the pandemic. So the company removed the president's post, which said Covert 19 is quote. Far less lethal than the flu for most people. President posted the same message on Twitter, which placed it behind a warning label. Twitter says the tweet also violates its rules. But it said it would leave the post up because it's in the public's interest to see what the president has to say. Both Facebook and Twitter have been taking a firmer line against misinformation about covert 19. In August, they removed a video of the president claiming falsely that Children are less susceptible to the virus. Shannon Bond, NPR news Joe Biden travel to Gettysburg, Pennsylvania Tuesday to continue his call for national healing. The Democratic presidential nominee suggested the site should remind people of the cost of one of the bloodiest battles for the nation's soul. We stand here today, a century and a half later after Gettysburg We should consider again what can happen. When equal justice is denied. When anger and violence and division Are left. Project. Biden made no mention of President Trump during his Pennsylvania trip, but later suggested the cancellation of their next debate next week if Trump is still contagious with Corona virus. Penciling in Senator Bob Casey says he has evidence that the Trump administration is impeding priority mail deliveries in his state from member station W. L v. R in Bethlehem, Tyler Pratt Reports of the allegations follow claims that the US postmaster general Is not taken adequate steps to reverse the cutbacks he imposed over the summer. Casey shared photos he says he received from Scranton Postal workers concerned about a quote scheme to delay the mail. We saw at least five tractor trailer loads of delayed mail. That's a lot of any contacts in anyplace. Casey says to sorting machines were removed from the facility in August and that Postmaster General Lewis to joy later promised to return them. The senator says he's received thousands of complaints about package delays that include prescription medications. And that raises concerns. With an election looming when more than three million Pennsylvanians may cast ballots by mail, A U. S Postal Service representative said they are aware of the delivery problems and plan to resolve them. So Tyler Pratt reporting. This is NPR. A grand jury has indicted the ST Louis couple who pointed weapons at protesters marching past their home last summer Mark and Patricia McCloskey. Both attorneys argue that they were exercising their right to bear arms when they pointed a pistol and a right rifle at the crowd on their private street. Couples say they felt threatened after the marchers knocked over a gate and ignored a no trespassing sign. Nine demonstrators were charged earlier with misdemeanor trespassing. Bars in Paris and its suburbs or closed for two weeks as the French government tries to slow the spread of the Corona virus. NPR's Eleanor Beardsley reports that the restaurant's remain open in the city but must take more precautions. Restaurants have two closed by 10 P.m. and Diners must pay it their table and leave their names and telephone numbers for possible contact. Tracing Parisian elite airman thinks it would have made more sense to shut down the metro system than bars. Because, for example in the transport You got a lot off people in their smooth face. Everyone is required to wear a mask in Paris public transport, and while walking in the street people are overwhelmingly complying. One of the country's top specialist predicts that if France doesn't change the trajectory of the virus, 400 people a day will be going into intensive care by November. Eleanor Beardsley. NPR NEWS Paris stock stumbled on Wall Street Tuesday. The down fell. 375 points in after hours trading. US futures are higher. Asians thought markets are mixed. I'm Shae Stevens. This is NPR news. Support for NPR comes from NPR stations. Other contributors include the candy to fund supporting.

NPR President President Trump Senator Bob Casey Facebook Paris Shea Stevens Shannon Bond Twitter Joe Biden Eleanor Beardsley Tyler Pratt US Pennsylvania Postmaster General Lewis Gettysburg senator
Social media amplifies conspiracies ahead of 2020 presidential election

Morning Edition

03:25 min | 3 weeks ago

Social media amplifies conspiracies ahead of 2020 presidential election

"So we may be calling it Election day. But there might not be actual results for days, if not weeks in the presidential race, and that's because of all the mail in voting. Right. And during this waiting game, there is some kind of fear that people will start spreading conspiracy theories, especially on social media. Facebook and Twitter say they are well aware of this. They don't want their platforms used to undermine the democratic process. What are they going to do about it? So before we chat about this, we do want to note that Facebook is among among NPR's financial supporters on Let's turn out. NPR's Shannon Bond, who's been looking at all of this is in San Francisco. Good morning, Shannon. Good morning, David. So you're talking to social media companies about these fears? What are they telling you? Well, you know, they've been thinking about the election and misinformation for a long time, looking back to the lessons of 2016 when Russia used social media to try to manipulate voters, and also you know that things like the 2018 midterms other elections around the world. A lot of this planning takes the form of these threats, modeling exercises, So the companies you know, come up with different attacks and then game out how they would respond. You'll Roth, who leads site integrity, a Twitter gave me some examples. A high profile figures account gets taken over to the possibility of a large scale spam or bought attack to the risks of foreign interference like we saw in 2016. This time, As Facebook's chief operating officer, Sheryl Sandberg, told all things considered this week. You know, these companies were concerned about what happens not just before the election, but also after November, 3rd Both Twitter and Facebook say they're now going to be cracking down on post that say, For example, voting by mail is somehow fraudulent post that advocate violence to disrupt the transfer of power or premature claims of victory, and they'll do that by either labeling are removing We should say that some of these kinds of messages on DH spreading doubts have come from none other than the president of the United States himself. I mean, does that fact complicate things for these companies and what they could do? All right. We heard this again from President Trump this week at the debate. He's suggested he might not accept the results of this election. You know, In the case of Facebook, this company has come around pretty reluctantly to the idea that they might have to somehow moderate what the president says. And of course, we've had elections before where we've had to wait to find out who won remember back in 2000, the Bush versus Gore fight that dragged on for more than a month after Election Day, but disinformation expert Clint Watts says, you know we live in a different world now. Yeah, There's some angry lawyers and Bush versus core, but Is pretty tame compared to today. And of course, there wasn't Twitter or Facebook 20 years ago. It's true, and I mean you cover these companies. Twitter Facebook. Are they up to this? I mean, if this becomes a real mess Well, you know, this is not just about the rules that they're making its about whether they enforced thes rules and enforce them consistently. And frankly, the track record isn't particularly great. You know, Facebook specifically has come under a lot of criticism. For just not doing that not enforcing things evenly. Just this week. The Biden campaign called Facebook quote the nation's foremost propagator of disinformation about the voting process. Because it's chosen toe label and not take down a post by Trump attacked voting Now Facebook insists it applies its policies fairly. But you know, to answer the question. We just don't know if the social networks can hold the line after the election.

Facebook Shannon Bond Donald Trump Twitter President Trump NPR Sheryl Sandberg San Francisco Roth Biden David Bush Russia Chief Operating Officer United States Clint Watts
Is Russia interfering in the 2020 election? Yes

All Things Considered

05:26 min | 3 weeks ago

Is Russia interfering in the 2020 election? Yes

"Officials say Russia is at it again trying to disrupt the U. S election and give President Trump of boost through hacking and spreading falsehoods on social media, Just like in 2016. This time, Russia may not have to work as hard. Clinton what studies disinformation at the foreign policy Research Institute. Russia doesn't have to make fake news. They just repeat, you know what conspiracies air coming out of the White House and the administration. Americans, including the president of the United States are raising the possibility of violence, spreading falsehoods about the election online and casting doubt on the whole process to discuss the dangers. Foreign and domestic. We're joined by NPR, National security correspondent Greg Marie and our tech correspondent Shannon Bond. Good to Have you both Here. Hi. So Greg, let's start with you. Is Russia the only foreign threat or just the biggest right now It's the biggest foreign threat and the national security officials and analysts who are studying this a really, absolutely clear. Russia is the main foreign threat. It wants to help Donald Trump win reelection in China and Iran or the other countries that are also mentioned, but at a much lower level. Now there's a big difference. This time the national security establishment, private researchers and the media are all much more prepared for this kind of disinformation. This time, far more eyeballs are looking for fake social media accounts planted stories. Just to give you one example in the 2018 midterms. The National Security Agency sent cyber teams to Europe to shut down the Russian troll factory that had been involved in the 2016 elections. Soas Faras, We know no foreign campaign has gained any real traction. But is it possible that the 2020 playbook is more advanced and sophisticated and maybe escaping the notice of people who are looking for the kinds of things we saw in 2016? Definitely a possibility. Microsoft put out a big report. They said. It's the same Russian agency military intelligence that's added again, but they are using a different tactics. They were using a lot of pots and automated social media accounts last time. This time, they're going to great lengths to hide their tracks. They're trying to hire Americans who unwittingly will write stories for websites. So yes, the playbook has changed. So Shannon tell us about what's happening in the United States. What are you hearing from tech companies and the experts who study this? Well, they're very alarmed. I spoke with your wrath. He's in charge of sight integrity, a Twitter and he puts it really succinctly. The people who know the most about how to mislead Americans are other Americans. So what security researchers are warning is that you know the atmosphere is just so right for disinformation. Right now we're living with so much uncertainty and that opens the door for bad actors to undermine confidence and voting in the election results because of the changes that are happening during the pandemic. There's also worries that bad actors could use fears about coded to discourage voting, and they're really concerns about extremist groups that could use social media to incite violence. And this also creates opportunity for foreign actors to amplify this information that Americans are spreading like those baseless claims that we keep hearing about voting fraud from President Trump and domestic disinformation is more challenging in some way is for the platforms, then foreign meddling. No, if they're going to take action against somebody like the president that inevitably become sort of a political football. Those calls could be much tougher for Facebook and Twitter to make then taking down Russian bots, and we've seen some of that in the last few months. Tell us about what these companies are doing. Yeah, well, they're doing a lot more than they used Tio. Both Twitter and Facebook have new rules against misinformation about voting. Against casting doubt on results or making premature claims of victory in the aftermath of the election, especially Twitter, stepped up labelling posts from the president. That's something we just didn't see them do really, until the last few months. They also say they're working together their monthly meetings with the industry and government and law enforcement agencies to discuss these threats and their responses, and both companies say they have gamed out Mohr extreme measures that would stop really world risks like voters, depression and violence, but they don't give us a lot of details on what those might be. Can we say yet how that's going Well, Critics say Facebook especially is still just too slow at this. It doesn't label or remove posts in many cases until after they've spread widely. The Biden campaign sent Facebook a letter this week condemning it for not just taking down Trump's false claims about voting. It called Facebook quote the nation's foremost propagator of disinformation about the voting process. Facebook says it applies its rules impartially, and we should note that Facebook is among NPR's financial supporters. You know what I hear again and again about social media platforms. This isn't just a question of are they setting the right rules? It's how are they enforcing those rules? And meanwhile, Greg, the president of the United States, is repeatedly questioning the legitimacy of the election and saying things about voting that are just flatly false. How is that shaping this discussion? Yes, this has had an impact. The Russian goal for years and years has been to undermine the credibility of the U. S political system. And now we have a president declaring at campaign events that mail in ballots aren't credible that this is the most corrupt election in U. S history. It's a sharp contrast from what we hear from officials like FBI director Chris Ray. You say Election systems have been hardened, tested and retested, and it will be extremely difficult to tamper with votes as we enter this final month.

Facebook President Trump Russia Twitter United States Greg Marie Shannon Bond NPR White House U. S National Security Agency Clinton Microsoft Policy Research Institute Europe FBI Chris Ray
Zuckerberg, Chan invest $300 million in election infrastructure

All Things Considered

00:55 sec | Last month

Zuckerberg, Chan invest $300 million in election infrastructure

"Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and his wife are donating $300 million to promote safe and reliable voting in November. NPR's Shannon Bond reports the funds will help recruit poll workers. My protective equipment and assist local officials. The donation from Mark Zuckerberg and Priscilla Chan is going to a pair of nonprofits working to ensure voting is safe and election systems are secure in a Facebook post. Zuckerberg says he's concerned about challenges to election infrastructure from the cove in 19 pandemic. He says he wants to make sure that officials have the resources to guarantee every vote will be counted. This book has faced criticism for the way its platform has been used to spread disinformation, including from Russian trolls during the 2016 election. The company says it's cracking down on false information about voting and elections this year, and it's pledged to help four million people register to vote. Shannon Bond. NPR NEWS SAN

Mark Zuckerberg Shannon Bond Facebook NPR CEO SAN
Former Uber exec charged with trying to hide massive hack

Morning Edition

01:58 min | 2 months ago

Former Uber exec charged with trying to hide massive hack

"Executive at Uber is accused of concealing a massive hack that exposed the data of 57 million drivers and passengers. He was fired and now faces criminal charges. NPR's tech correspondent Shannon Bond reports and just a note here Uber is an NPR financial supporter. When Joe Sullivan learns that hackers had stolen huge amounts of data from uber back in 2016. He didn't tell regulators, law enforcement or the public. Instead, federal prosecutors allege, Uber's chief security officer tried to hide it. Here's US Attorney David Anderson, who filed the charges against Sullivan in federal court in Northern California. We expect prompt reporting of criminal conduct. We expect cooperation with our investigations. We will not tolerate corporate cover ups. We will not tolerate illegal hush money payments to keep the incident under wraps. Prosecutors say Sullivan arranged for uber to pay the hackers $100,000, and he had them signed non disclosure agreements, saying falsely that they never stole any data. That payment was made through Uber's Bug bounty program. Many tech companies have similar programs offering rewards to so called white hat hackers that test their systems for vulnerabilities. But Anderson says this payment was not a bug bounty. It was a cover up. The problem isn't with the legitimate bug bounty. The problem is that this house money payment was not a bug bounty best. The problem. Whoever did eventually disclosed the breach and fire Sullivan, but not until a year later. Two men pleaded guilty to the hack last year. Now Sullivan is charged with obstructing justice and concealing a felony. A spokesman for Sullivan says there's no merit to the charges. He says it was up to Uber's legal team to report the reach. Huber says it's cooperating with the investigation. If he's convicted, Sullivan could face up to eight years in prison and $500,000 in fines. Shannon Bond. NPR NEWS, San

Uber Joe Sullivan Shannon Bond NPR Npr News David Anderson Executive Huber Us Attorney Northern California Officer SAN
Former Uber exec charged with trying to hide massive hack

Morning Edition

01:57 min | 2 months ago

Former Uber exec charged with trying to hide massive hack

"Executive at Uber is accused of concealing a massive hack that exposed the data of 57 million drivers and passengers. He was fired and now faces criminal charges. NPR's tech correspondent Shannon Bond reports and just a note here Uber is an NPR financial supporter. When Joe Sullivan learned that hackers had stolen huge amounts of data from uber back in 2016, he didn't tell regulators, law enforcement or the public. Instead, federal prosecutors allege, Uber's chief security officer tried to hide it. Here's US Attorney David Anderson, who filed the charges against Sullivan in federal court in Northern California. We expect prompt reporting of criminal conduct. We expect cooperation with our investigations. We will not tolerate corporate cover ups. We will not tolerate illegal hush money payments to keep the incident under wraps. Prosecutors say Sullivan arranged for uber to pay the hackers $100,000, and he had them signed non disclosure agreements, saying falsely that they never stole any data. That payment was made through Uber's Bug bounty program. Many tech companies have similar programs offering rewards to so called white hat hackers that test their systems for vulnerabilities. But Anderson says this payment was not a bug bounty. It was a cover up. The problem isn't with the legitimate bug Bali. The problem is that this house money payment was not a bug bounty best. The problem. Whoever did eventually disclosed the breach and fire Sullivan, but not until a year later. Human pleaded guilty to the hack last year. Now Sullivan is charged with obstructing justice and concealing a felony. A spokesman for Sullivan says there's no merit to the charges. He says it was up to Uber's legal team to report the breach. Huber says it's cooperating with the investigation. If he's convicted, Sullivan could face up to eight years in prison and $500,000 in fines. Shannon Bond,

Uber Joe Sullivan Shannon Bond David Anderson NPR Executive Huber Us Attorney Northern California Officer Human
Former Uber Security Chief Charged With Paying 'Hush Money' To Conceal Data Breach

NPR's Business Story of the Day

01:56 min | 2 months ago

Former Uber Security Chief Charged With Paying 'Hush Money' To Conceal Data Breach

"Former top executive at Uber is accused of concealing a massive hack that exposed the data of fifty, seven million drivers and passengers he was fired and now faces criminal charges, NPR's tech correspondent Shannon bond reports, and just to note uber is an NPR financial supporter when Joe Sullivan learned that hackers had stolen huge amounts of data from Uber, back in two thousand sixteen, he didn't tell regulators law enforcement or the public instead federal prosecutors allege Uber's chief security officer tried to hide it. Here's US attorney David Anderson who filed the charges against Sullivan in federal court in Northern California, we expect proper pouring of criminal conduct. We expect cooperation with our investigations. We will not tolerate corporate cover ups we will not tolerate illegal hush money payments to keep the incident under wraps prosecutors say Sullivan, or for Uber, to pay the hackers one, hundred, thousand dollars and he had them signed nondisclosure agreements saying falsely that they never stole any data. That payment was made through Uber's Bug bounty program. Many tech companies have similar programs offering rewards to so called white hat hackers that test their systems for vulnerabilities. But Anderson says this payment was not a bug bounty? It was a cover up the problem isn't with a legitimate bug. Now, the problem is that this hush money payment was not a bug valley best the problem overdid eventually disclose the breach and fire Sullivan but not until a year later, two men pleaded guilty to the hack last year. Now, Sullivan is charged with Obstructing Justice and concealing felony a spokesman for Sullivan, says, there's no merit to the charges. He says it was up to Uber's legal team to report the breach Uber says it's cooperating with the investigation. If he's convicted, Sullivan could face up to eight years in prison and five hundred thousand dollars in

Uber Joe Sullivan David Anderson NPR Shannon Bond Us Attorney Executive Northern California Officer
Former Uber exec charged with trying to hide massive hack

All Things Considered

00:18 sec | 2 months ago

Former Uber exec charged with trying to hide massive hack

"Criminal charges for allegedly covering up a massive data breach that affected 57 million passengers and drivers. Federal prosecutors say the former executive conceal the breach from authorities and paid hackers $100,000 to cover it up. NPR's tech correspondent Shannon Bond joins us

Shannon Bond NPR Executive
"shannon bond" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:33 min | 2 months ago

"shannon bond" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Twitter put a temporary ban on the Trump campaign account until they took down the post on Facebook removed it altogether. I'm David Greene and I'm Rachel Martin. A new NPR Ipsos poll says most teachers thing going back into the classroom is too risky. Journalist Maria Ressa on defending a free press in the Philippines and the parallel she sees in the US and we look back 75 years ago when an American warplanes dropped the first atomic bomb on the city of Hiroshima, Japan, It's Thursday, August 6. Also on this day in 1965 President Johnson signed the Voting Rights Act theme news is next. Live from NPR News on Corvin, Coleman, Twitter and Facebook have removed a video shared by President Trump. They say it broke their rules preventing the spreading of misinformation about the Corona virus. The video clip shows the president claiming Children are virtually immune from the Corona virus that is demonstrably false. NPR Shannon Bond says tension is growing between the social media companies and the White House. Twitter has taken a more aggressive stance against the president. Lately, it's added warning labels to some of his tweets, and on Wednesday it banned the Trump campaign's account from tweeting until it removed the video. Facebook, on the other hand, is usually more hands off. But when Trump posted the same video to his Facebook page, the company did take it down. It said his false claims have violated its rules against Cove in 19 misinformation. NPR's Shannon Bond reporting. Facebook is a financial supporter of NPR. A new national poll from NPR. Ipsos finds there is overwhelming concern from teachers about returning in person to classrooms. Thiss fall, NPR's Anya Kamenetz reports 82% of K through 12 teachers expressed this worry. 77% of K through 12. Teachers are worried about risking their own health and 2/3 say they would prefer to teach primarily remotely this fall. But teachers have concerns about teaching online. More than four out of five say it will widen learning gaps and the same number are worried about forming ties with students. They've never met when online classes begin this fall. The vast majority of teachers are dealing with uncertainty as the new school year begins and district's announced shifting plans. Just 11% of teachers said in the poll that their school district's plan for the fall was finalized and clear. Anya Kamenetz. NPR News Japan marked the 75th anniversary of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima today with a ceremony that was scaled down because of the pandemic. As NPR's Anthony Koon reports from Seoul. The bombing killed 140,000 people, most of them civilians. Participants observed a minute of silence at 8:15 a.m. At a ceremony in Hiroshima's Peace Park Prime Minister Shinzo Abe remark that as the only country to suffer an atomic bombing, Japan must work for the elimination of nuclear weapons. Hiroshi Montemayor Kazumi MIT silly pointed out, though, that Japan itself has refused to sign a U. N treaty to ban atomic bombs. In a videotaped message, U. N Secretary General Antonio Good, Harish lamented the fact that Postwar arms control agreements are unraveling. Japan still has more than 136,000 survivors of two atomic bombings. Their average age is over 83 there are 9200 fewer of them than last year. Anthony Kun. NPR NEWS SOUL You're listening to NPR news. Officials in Lebanon say that 137 people have died from the gigantic explosion that wrecked the port of Beirut on Tuesday. Some 5000 people were injured when dangerous chemicals that were badly stored exploded in warehouses. Beirut's port has been destroyed. Some 300,000 people are homeless. Officials in India say that eight people are dead after a fire at a hospital in the western part of the country. Such meets at Pontiac reports from Mumbai. All the patients had Cove in 19. A media fire broke out early Thursday at a private hospital in the western Indian city of MD. But police say an electrical short circuit was the cause of the blaze, which in love, the hospital's intensive care unit. Dozens of covert 19 patients within the facility when the fire good have been transferred to other hospitals in his prime Minister, Narendra Moody has announced a Montreat compensation for the families of the victims. Authorities have ordered an investigation..

NPR NPR News Facebook Japan Twitter Hiroshima President Trump Anya Kamenetz president Shannon Bond Cove Trump prime Minister Maria Ressa David Greene Beirut Philippines Rachel Martin MD
Twitter Expecting FTC Fine of up to $250M for Alleged Privacy Violations

Press Play with Madeleine Brand

00:48 sec | 2 months ago

Twitter Expecting FTC Fine of up to $250M for Alleged Privacy Violations

"Twitter is under investigation by the Federal Trade Commission. NPR's Shannon Bond reports, The tack comedy could be on the hook for a multi $1,000,000 fine related to privacy violations. The FTC is looking into Twitter's privacy practices. The probe is related to what the Social network did with the phone numbers and email addresses that users provided for account security. Last fall, Twitter admitted it had been using that data to target people with ads for years. It's said that was an error and it would stop the practice. Now. The FTC is investigating whether Twitter violated a 2011 agreement made with the agency not to mislead consumers about how it uses their information. In a securities filing. Twitter says it is setting aside $150 million for a potential fine but could end up paying up to $250 million. Shannon Bond. NPR NEWS SAN

Twitter Shannon Bond Federal Trade Commission NPR SAN
Report Slams Facebook For 'Vexing And Heartbreaking Decisions' On Free Speech

All Things Considered

03:57 min | 3 months ago

Report Slams Facebook For 'Vexing And Heartbreaking Decisions' On Free Speech

"Facebook has made quote, vexing and heartbreaking decisions about free speech that is, according to an independent audit. And how the social network handles issues such as discrimination, hate speech and election interference. Facebook asked for this investigation two years ago. Today, the investigators are slamming the company and its leaders for some of their decisions for this week's Alltech considered NPR's Shannon Bond joins us and before we get going, I should mention Facebook is a financial supporter of NPR. Hey, Mary, least alright. So investigators slamming decisions by leaders of Facebook. What decisions are we talking about? This is really about speech, and the most prominent example is President Trump. So recently he's put up Facebook posts falsely claiming that voting by mail is rife with fraud, and he made a really inflammatory post about the recent protests against racism. The auditors say Those post clearly violated Facebook's own rules against voters depression inciting violence, But Facebook didn't take the post down. The audit also slammed the company's policy of not fact checking ads by politicians that something Facebook has gotten a lot of criticism over and over all, the audit says, You know these decisions really emblematic of how Facebook has chosen to prioritize free speech above all other values. They say that risk over shadowing games it has made fighting discrimination, for example, that no longer allows advertisers to target housing and job ads based on age, gender or zip code. What is Facebook say in response. Well, the company, as you said, didn't ask for this audit A commissioned it from Laura Murphy of former Sulu executive and a civil rights law firm and chief operating officer. Shelves Cheryl Sandburg said today that Facebook will make some of the changes that it's recommending. Including hiring a senior vice president, who will make sure civil rights concerns informed decisions on products and policies. But when it comes to setting firmer boundaries on political speech, that's something CEO Mark Zuckerberg has resisted. He says Facebook is committed to free expression even when politicians make false claims. And Facebook says it won't adopt every recommendation being made in this report. Now this audit drops as another development plays out all of these brands. I think we're more than 1000 now pausing their advertisements on Facebook in the name of protesting hate speech, or any of them are the organizers of that boycott. Are they speaking up today? Yep, And what I'm hearing is a lot of skepticism about Facebook. Here's Rashad Robinson. He's president of color of Change, one of the groups behind the boycott. The recommendations coming out of the audit are good as the action that Facebook ends up taking otherwise. It is a road math without a vehicle and without the resources to move, and that is not useful for any of us. Another boycott organizer I spoke with today is Jonathan Greenblatt of the Anti Defamation League. He told me he thinks the boycotts just going to keep growing and remember, it's already gone Global until Facebook takes real action on their demands. Yeah, it sounds like we now have this damning audit this big boycott pressure from for many directions on Facebook to change its ways. That's right, and civil rights groups told me they're not going to ease the pressure on Facebook. I spoke to Benita Gupta, She's head of the leadership conference on civil and human rights, and here's what she had to say about the audit. It is a work in progress clearly and pour. In some ways it is. Starts and not a finish for the civil rights community. Gupta and other leaders. I spoke to you know, they say it's just so urgent that Facebook act now because the presidential election is just a few months away. That's something the auditors also say they're really worried about. They say it in the audit. They say a Facebook doesn't get more serious about enforcing its policies, holding politicians to the same standards as other users. That will open the door to more voter suppression even calls for violence on

Facebook Senior Vice President President Trump Jonathan Greenblatt Benita Gupta NPR Mark Zuckerberg Anti Defamation League Shannon Bond Alltech Cheryl Sandburg Mary CEO Fraud Chief Operating Officer
"shannon bond" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:04 min | 4 months ago

"shannon bond" Discussed on KCRW

"Some are acting just for this month of July. Others for longer and the boycott includes Facebook's property, instagram. Cos they're pressing Facebook to do more about malicious content. Facebook We should notice among NPR's financial supporters, though we cover them just the same, including criticism of the company, which we're hearing this morning from NPR Tech correspondent Shannon Bond. Good morning. Morning, Steve and we should note the advertisers are pressing Facebook because they're under pressure. Who's pushing him? A coalition of Abassi groups is urging these advertisers to pull their money from Facebook. One of those groups is color of change. There are civil rights organization and I spoke with the president Rashad Robinson, He says. Facebook has given its critics no other choice. This failure to address these problems have given those of us in the civil rights community as well as corporations on Ly one path, and that is the path of having to pursue this boycott. So the coalition is making 10 demands of Facebook, ranging from giving advertisers their money back if their ads appear next to content that gets removed to cracking down on lies from politicians do all 300 The companies that are dropping Facebook for awhile, support all the demands. There's a real mix. Some do support the demands, but some others like Coca Cola and Target, say, yes, we're going to pause and reconsider our Facebook advertising, in some cases, all of their social media advertising They say they're not officially joining this boycott, and I think what's going on there is these companies feel pressure there. These huge protests this reckoning over racism we're seeing in this country. Companies feel pressure to show they're doing something. They also want to put some distance between themselves in this campaign, so they're more free to make their own decisions about whether and when to resume advertising on Facebook. Well, how is Facebook, responding? Facebook says it invest billions of dollars in keeping its platform safe. And just yesterday, it said it banned hundreds of accounts and groups connected to the boogaloo movement. That's a loose network of far right extremists, and that's the kind of thing advertisers want to see the company doing here's what Facebook's top spokesman Nick Clegg, told CNN on Sunday. Facebook. We have absolutely no incentive to tolerate hate speech. We don't like users don't like it advertises understandably don't like it. Clegg pointed out that over 100 billion messages are sent on Facebook's platforms every day, and so, you know, the company tries to crack down. It's not perfect. You can't remove everything. Last week, CEO Mark Mark Zuckerberg did announce some policy changes. Facebook is going to put warning labels on post from politicians like President Trump. The briquettes rules, and that's a huge reversal. But when Zuckerberg made that announcement, he did not mention the advertising boycott at all. Well, can I just ask? You've mentioned a couple of times here that for many companies, this is a temporary departure there coming back. How dependent? Are they on Facebook? Well, you know, Facebook has a huge stable of advertisers. I mean, it's whole business's advertising. But for many of these advertisers, it's just not really a choice to leave Facebook, Facebook and other social media groups. Let them reach specific communities at a fraction of what they would pay to, you know, buy a commercial on broadcast television. You know, a really good example I think is one of in one of the biggest spenders right now is the Biden campaign. You know, Joe Biden has been very vocal lately and criticizing Facebook. He's calling for changes. He says the company needs to crack down moron hate speech. But you know when NPR asked his campaign if it was going to stop advertising on Facebook, the spokesman told us quote with less than five months until election Day. We cannot afford to see these platforms to Donald Trump and his lies. It's a quote NPR's Shannon Bond. Thanks so much. Thank you. Russians are voting today on more than 200 amendments to their constitution. They're being asked to give a simple yes or no answer to all. Here's why it's so high stakes. One of the amendments would allow Vladimir Putin to stay in power for another 16 years. NPR's Lucien Kim is in Moscow. The Russian constitution is strangely specific about presidential term limits. It says. No person shall serve more than two consecutive terms. Thanks to that wording, Vladimir Putin is now in his fourth term after taking a break and serving as prime minister. Some Russians wondered if you try that again in 2024. They got their answer in March with this sub novel only Institute. A member of parliament proposed a constitutional amendment resetting Putin's presidential term limits but deviated civilian Bilbo has emotion, Putin told parliament it might be a good idea, but only if he got the blessing of the constitutional Court and the Russian people. Political analyst Masha Lipman says Putin wanted a national vote because it lends him legitimacy. It is very important to him to have this popular endorsement. Even if it is a forest, even if it is a travesty off popular will the amendment letting Putin stay in power was tacked onto a raft of changes enshrining Russians, faith in God in the Constitution. Banning gay marriage and elevating the status of the Russian language. Sure enough. The amendments were rubber stent by Russia's parliament and the constitutional court. But then the Corona virus hit Russia and Putin reluctantly had to postpone the vote. Originally scheduled for April, he was forced to eat gold to the power of the virus, but he never concedes the pressure. I think this is a unique situation, which he had to yield. Now the vote is going ahead. Even though Russia has the world's third highest number of Corona virus infections. The Central Election Commission says all health and safety precautions are being taken with temperature controls, masks and gloves at polling stations. TV ads have shown Russian celebrities saying why they plan to vote for Putin's amendments.

Facebook Vladimir Putin NPR President Trump Shannon Bond constitutional Court Russia Mark Mark Zuckerberg Abassi Nick Clegg Joe Biden Steve Rashad Robinson Coca Cola Central Election Commission CNN
'We Can't Take Your Call': Uber Drivers, Other Gig Workers Struggle For Unemployment

All Things Considered

02:11 min | 5 months ago

'We Can't Take Your Call': Uber Drivers, Other Gig Workers Struggle For Unemployment

"The uber drivers to Airbnb hosts that dog walkers they are the millions of people who make a living from gig work thanks to a massive federal relief package they are temporarily eligible for unemployment benefits but the unemployment system was not built for gig work and so many states are struggling to help this new class of workers NPR tech correspondent Shannon bond reports many of them are still waiting for their money Michael o'dell as a jazz musician in Columbus Ohio but music doesn't pay the bills so he drives for lift in Newburgh in since the pandemic hit he only goes out when he needs cash right away I definitely don't put the time into it like I normally do because I'm not going to get good rights unemployment benefits should be a lifeline for gig workers like him but dell hasn't seen a check yet I've been applying every week and every single week I get the night like regular unemployment denied because lift and uber don't consider themselves his employer they say there are millions of drivers are independent contractors who choose when and how much to work that's how many apps operate and that means they don't do what a normal employer does Jay Shambaugh a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution explains normally if you're eligible for unemployment insurance it's because your employer has been paying into the insurance system and it's part of paying in their reporting earnings gig workers have to show proof of their earnings so the state knows how much to give them an unemployment benefits and Gemma says most states have to set up systems to process those claims that's been the big hold up figuring out how they track who is supposed to get this money it's been more than seven weeks since Congress made gig workers eligible for unemployment and according to Brookings thirty nine states are now processing those claims but even those who got their claims in really early are still waiting like lift driver Jerome gauge in Los Angeles he applied for unemployment in early March make sure that all on your reported earnings looking over your reward is zero dollars because you don't think that your employee earning their knowledge days appealed he's still

Shannon Bond Columbus Ohio Newburgh Dell Jay Shambaugh Senior Fellow Brookings Institution Gemma Congress Los Angeles Airbnb NPR Michael O'dell
Uber Cuts Thousands of Jobs, Citing Coronavirus Pandemic

BBC World Service

00:53 sec | 6 months ago

Uber Cuts Thousands of Jobs, Citing Coronavirus Pandemic

"Uber is laying off more than three thousand employees as demand for rides plunges and Paris and Bonn reports that uber joins other tech companies and cutting jobs due to the corona virus pandemic the layoffs are hitting fourteen percent of uber's corporate workforce jobs are being cut in customer support and recruiting because of the drop in ridership and a hiring freeze over is also closing around a hundred and eighty help centers for drivers and CEO Dara Khosrowshahi is for going the rest of his one million dollar salary through the end of this year Coster shy he said there will probably be more cuts to come as the company tries to rein in costs he told staff quote days like this are brutal over was already losing money before the pandemic which has hit transportation and travel companies hard uber's competitor left and Airbnb both laid off thousands of employees in recent days Shannon bonds NPR news San

Coster Airbnb SAN Paris Bonn CEO Dara Khosrowshahi Shannon NPR
"shannon bond" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:04 min | 6 months ago

"shannon bond" Discussed on KCRW

"This day is may first international workers day and around the world it is traditionally a day to celebrate Labor Day workers from Amazon and Walmart and target and other companies are organizing mass protests they say the companies aren't doing enough to protect them NPR's Shannon bond has more the hashtag for today's protest is essential workers day those essential workers check you out of the supermarket pack your online orders to deliver your groceries they've been thrust onto the front lines some have even died from the corona virus now they're demanding more protective equipment expanded sickly even better pay by walking off the job in protesting outside stores we're dealing with multi billion dollar companies here and we're we're a very very small group and individually speaking when it comes down to trying to drag issues yeah each company will lease works for the grocery delivery apps checked which is owned by target he organized a walkout of shift workers in April one of many protests in recent weeks by delivery warehouse and retail workers he says today's strike is about bringing all these different workers together to show how much they have in common it's just a beat profit over people for the most part and that is where the disconnect is because at the end of the day the work force in the work labors are the ones that are helping the company become who they are as the pandemic puts low wage work in the spotlight so least another organisers are hoping to seize the public's attention and galvanized a new wave of labor activism across a broad range of companies they come from traditional organizations like Walmart fed ex whole foods target the new gig economy apps like Instacart and Shipt and fast growing Amazon warehouses I know that most of these companies are among NPR sponsors it's unclear how many people will participate today the company's in response say they welcome input from workers they've increased pay and stepped up health and safety measures however Amazon accuses labor groups of being irresponsible by making false claims about the company it says protesters don't represent the majority of workers Shannon.

Amazon NPR Shannon bond Walmart Instacart
Warehouse and delivery workers call for May Day strike over safety concerns

Morning Edition

02:03 min | 6 months ago

Warehouse and delivery workers call for May Day strike over safety concerns

"Day is may first international workers day and around the world it is traditionally a day to celebrate Labor Day workers from Amazon and Walmart and target and other companies are organizing mass protests they say the companies aren't doing enough to protect them NPR's Shannon bond has more the hashtag for today's protest is essential workers day those essential workers check you out of the supermarket pack your online orders to deliver your groceries they've been thrust onto the front lines some have even died from the corona virus now they're demanding more protective equipment expanded sickly even better pay by walking off the job in protesting outside stores we're dealing with multi billion dollar companies here and we're we're a very very small group and individually speaking when it comes down to trying to drag issues yeah each company will lease works for the grocery delivery apps checked which is owned by target he organized a walkout of shift workers in April one of many protests in recent weeks by delivery warehouse and retail workers he says today's strike is about bringing all these different workers together to show how much they have in common it's just a beat profit over people for the most part and that is where the disconnect is because at the end of the day the work force in the work labors are the ones that are helping the company become who they are as the pandemic puts low wage work in the spotlight so least another organisers are hoping to seize the public's attention and galvanized a new wave of labor activism across a broad range of companies they come from traditional organizations like Walmart fed ex whole foods target the new gig economy apps like Instacart and Shipt and fast growing Amazon warehouses I know that most of these companies are among NPR sponsors it's unclear how many people will participate today the company's in response say they welcome input from workers they've increased pay and stepped up health and safety measures however Amazon accuses labor groups of being irresponsible by making false claims about the company it says protesters don't represent the majority of

Amazon NPR Shannon Bond Walmart Instacart
Amazon, Instacart workers launch May Day strike to protest treatment during the Coronavirus pandemic

Morning Edition

02:03 min | 6 months ago

Amazon, Instacart workers launch May Day strike to protest treatment during the Coronavirus pandemic

"This day is may first international workers day around the world it is traditionally a day to celebrate Labor Day workers from Amazon and Walmart and target and other companies organizing mass protests they say the companies aren't doing enough to protect them NPR's Shannon bond has more the hashtag for today's protest is essential workers day those essential workers check you out of the supermarket pack your online orders to deliver your groceries they've been thrust onto the front lines some have even died from the corona virus now they're demanding more protective equipment expanded sickly even better pay by walking off the job in protesting outside stores we're dealing with multi billion dollar companies here and we're we're a very very small group and individually speaking when it comes down to try and address issues yeah each company will lease works for the grocery delivery apps checked which is owned by target he organized a walk out and shift workers in April one of many protests in recent weeks by delivery warehouse and retail workers he says today's strike is about bringing all these different workers together to show how much they have in common it's just a beat profit over people for the most part and that is where the disconnect is because at the end of the day the work force in the work labors are the ones that are helping the company become who they are as the pandemic puts low wage work in the spotlight so least another organisers are hoping to seize the public's attention and galvanized a new wave of labor activism across a broad range of companies they come from traditional organizations like Walmart fed ex whole foods target the new gig economy apps like Instacart and Shipt and fast growing Amazon warehouses I know that most of these companies are among NPR sponsors it's unclear how many people will participate today the company's in response say they welcome input from workers they have increased pay and stepped up health and safety measures however Amazon accuses labor groups of being irresponsible by making false claims about the company it says protesters don't represent the majority of

Amazon NPR Shannon Bond Walmart Instacart
"shannon bond" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:03 min | 6 months ago

"shannon bond" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This day is may first international workers day around the world it is traditionally a day to celebrate Labor Day workers from Amazon and Walmart and target and other companies organizing mass protests they say the companies aren't doing enough to protect them NPR's Shannon bond has more the hashtag for today's protest is essential workers day those essential workers check you out of the supermarket pack your online orders to deliver your groceries they've been thrust onto the front lines some have even died from the corona virus now they're demanding more protective equipment expanded sickly even better pay by walking off the job and protesting outside stores we're dealing with multi billion dollar companies here and we're we're a very very small group and individually speaking when it comes down to trying to drag issues give these companies Willis lease works for the grocery delivery apps checked which is owned by target he organized a walk out and shift workers in April one of many protests in recent weeks by delivery warehouse and retail workers he says today's strike is about bringing all these different workers together to show how much they have in common it seems to be profit over people for the most part and that is where the disconnect is because at the end of the day the workforce and work labors are the ones that are helping the company become who they are as the pandemic puts low wage work in the spotlight so least another organisers are hoping to seize the public's attention and galvanized a new wave of labor activism across a broad range of companies they come from traditional organizations like Walmart fed ex whole foods target the new gig economy apps like Instacart and Shipt and fast growing Amazon warehouses I know that most of these companies are among NPR sponsors it's unclear how many people will participate today the company's in response say they welcome input from workers they've increased pay and stepped up health and safety measures however Amazon accuses labor groups of being irresponsible by making false claims about the company it says protesters don't represent the majority.

Amazon NPR Shannon bond Walmart Instacart
"shannon bond" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:03 min | 6 months ago

"shannon bond" Discussed on KCRW

"This day is may first international workers day and around the world it is traditionally a day to celebrate Labor Day workers from Amazon and Walmart and target and other companies organizing mass protests they say the companies aren't doing enough to protect them NPR's Shannon bond has more the hashtag for today's protest is essential workers day those essential workers check you out of the supermarket pack your online orders to deliver your groceries they've been thrust onto the front lines some have even died from the corona virus now they're demanding more protective equipment expanded sickly even better pay by walking off the job in protesting outside stores we're dealing with multi billion dollar companies here and we're we're a very very small group and individually speaking when it comes down to trying to drag issues give these companies Willis lease works for the grocery delivery apps checked which is owned by target he organized a walkout of shift workers in April one of many protests in recent weeks by delivery warehouse and retail workers he says today's strike is about bringing all these different workers together to show how much they have in common it's just a beat profit over people for the most part and that is where the disconnect is because at the end of the day the work force in the work labors are the ones that are helping the company become who they are as the pandemic puts low wage work in the spotlight so least another organisers are hoping to seize the public's attention and galvanized a new wave of labor activism across a broad range of companies they come from traditional organizations like Walmart fed ex whole foods target the new gig economy apps like Instacart and Shipt and fast growing Amazon warehouses I know that most of these companies are among NPR sponsors it's unclear how many people will participate today the company's in response say they welcome input from workers they've increased pay and stepped up health and safety measures however Amazon accuses labor groups of being irresponsible by making false claims about the company it says protesters don't represent the majority of workers.

Amazon NPR Shannon bond Walmart Instacart
Racial Slurs And Swastikas Fuel Civil Rights Pressure On Zoom

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:37 min | 7 months ago

Racial Slurs And Swastikas Fuel Civil Rights Pressure On Zoom

"In Zoom meetings racists slurs and hate speech. Keep showing up today. A civil rights group is meeting with the company to demand. Do something about that. Npr Tech correspondent Shannon. Bond has the reporting but first let me know. Zoom is an NPR sponsor Rashad Robinson I encountered the term zoom bombing on social media. We started seeing people posting things and Particularly knee and others aren't at color of change in what they were. Experiencing Color of change is a nonprofit that advocates for racial equality and Robinson is its president. People were tagging him in reports of Zuma tax because so many of them involve racist slurs and harassment. Black Lemay having a church gathering and have people come in drawing You Know Genitalia and calling them. The Edward Robinson's group and others found evidence of organized campaigns out in the open on twitter and Instagram as well as message boards popular with the far right there people shared links and passwords to coordinate attacks on unsuspecting zoom users. This all comes as zoom is being increasingly used for online school Passover Seder town halls. Now Color of change says zoom must take more responsibility. You know we want them to release a specific plan to combat. Racial harassment on the platform among Robinson's list of demands. A chief diversity officer who would focus on how technology impacts bowl normal people also better security and he wants a formal apology to victims in a statement. Npr Zoom says it takes security extremely seriously and it looks forward to the discussion with color of change but other groups are renewing alarms to the anti-defamation League has traced to attacks to a known white nationalist both involved virtual events held by Jewish groups. As more and more people are spending time at home. So are the extremists who are looking to find ways to leverage the technology to harass people. Oren Segal runs the anti-defamation League's Center on extremism. He spoke during a presentation. The group gave Zoom bombing. These are moments where people are trying to find community trying to find opportunities to create normal discussion with colleagues with friends with family. And that's why this is particularly disturbing law enforcement is watching Michigan. Prosecutors worn hacking videoconferences is a crime and there could be jail time in recent weeks. Zoom has taken steps to make it harder for intruders to get into meetings the company blocks Ip addresses of attackers when people report harassment. But critics say it should be more proactive given these are problems that plague so many tech platforms zoom CEO Eric. Yuen appeared on. All things considered where he was asked whether he should have anticipated such attacks by harassers. I never thought about this seriously. That answer reflects how you en envision zoom in the first place it was designed for business meetings but now it's having to grapple with what happens when society at large logs on even more troubling this new form. Virtual harassment doesn't end with zoom meetings themselves. Joan Donovan Studies Online extremism at the Harvard Kennedy School's Shorenstein Center. A lot of these folks are taking video or taking screen shots and then sharing them in other places. So we're seeing the artifacts of Zimbabwe. Show up on Youtube and on takeoff and another video sharing platforms and that happens. It's hard for zoom or any single company to end the vicious

Rashad Robinson Harassment NPR Oren Segal Anti-Defamation League Passover Seder Town Zimbabwe Bond Black Lemay Youtube Yuen Harvard Kennedy School President Trump Shannon Joan Donovan Twitter Shorenstein Center Officer
Gig Workers Would Get Unemployment Safety Net In Rescue Package

NPR's Business Story of the Day

02:48 min | 7 months ago

Gig Workers Would Get Unemployment Safety Net In Rescue Package

"Very few people are taking Uber's or booking airbnb is right now and millions of Americans are losing income because of that now in normal times. These folks aren't considered employees of a company so they can't claim unemployment benefits but the new relief package from Congress will temporarily adjust that here's NPR tech correspondent Shannon Bond Ed bells main source of income. Is His San Francisco home? He rents out his in laws on AIRBNB. Airbnb as my gig using our site hustles. Business was booming until the pandemic Lush Euro. I had Approximately ninety percent occupancy ninety percent of the days Rocky Clyde in March I had zero Balas one of millions of people in the GIG economy whose livelihoods have been abruptly ended by the corona virus. Emily Coleman has been driving for Uber in Denver since two thousand sixteen. She's a fulltime student and uses the platform to supplement her income from an internship but now she stops driving because she's worried about spreading the virus. Michael was like five hundred dollars a week. So I'm out. Yeah about what two thousand dollars a month right now? Many people these days are like bell and councilman cobbling together. A several sources of income to get by but like other self employed people gig workers normally are not eligible for unemployment insurance if they lose those income streams. Venus is a labor law expert. At the University of California hastings the platform companies have maintained that these individual drivers Grocery delivery people are small businesses in and of themselves and so the companies themselves have refused to pay into the unemployment insurance fund. Now GIG workers may be getting some help. The economic relief package passed by the Senate on Wednesday allows self employed people to apply for unemployment benefits that they normally wouldn't qualify for labor experts. Say The government needs to give guidance on whether workers can claim partial benefits if they have several jobs and lose one of them or if their hours cut some states allow that the package also let some of the self-employed access disaster loans for small businesses. Lee Thomas is an airbnb host in Queens near. Jfk airport his bookings dried up as travel has come to a standstill. We are suffering cancellations. The governor taking that these are hard working people that suffered from nothing of their own doing Ed Bell. The San Francisco airbnb host is hoping for an interest. Free Loan to keep them afloat this year most of all. He says he needs help quickly. I need money in my pocket and with Least about red tape. The bill means a lot. More people will be seeking government assistance in the coming weeks and it will take time for them to get help

Airbnb Ed Bell Self Employed San Francisco NPR Emily Coleman Shannon Bond Rocky Clyde Congress Lee Thomas Michael JFK Senate Queens Denver University Of California
Google Employee Tests Positive For Coronavirus; Company Expands Travel Restrictions

All Things Considered

00:52 sec | 8 months ago

Google Employee Tests Positive For Coronavirus; Company Expands Travel Restrictions

"A Google employee and Switzerland has been diagnosed with corona virus NPR's Shannon bond tells us the tech giant is among a growing number of American companies restricting employee travel as the virus spreads Google says the employee was in ferric office for a limited time and didn't show symptoms while there it says it's taking precautions and following public health advice it's Eric office remains open Google didn't give any details about where the employee is now or their condition the company is restricting travel to Iran parts of Italy South Korea and Japan it had already prohibited travel to China where the outbreak started meanwhile Amazon is restricting all nonessential travel after previously restricting all travel to China companies are also pulling out of events Google canceled its global news initiative summit in April while Facebook called off its biggest event its F. eight developer conference

Switzerland Shannon Bond Google South Korea Japan China Amazon Facebook Eric Iran Italy
U.S. Attorney General Barr: Should Facebook, Google be liable for user posts?

All Things Considered

00:53 sec | 8 months ago

U.S. Attorney General Barr: Should Facebook, Google be liable for user posts?

"A major legal protection for tech companies is under fire from the nation's top law enforcement official Attorney General William Barr questioning whether online platform should remain free from responsibility for harmful content here's NPR Shannon bond thanks to section two thirty of the communications decency act tech companies like Facebook and Google are not liable for most content users post on their sites but there are growing calls for that protection to be pared back at the justice department in about the law Attorney General William Barr said things have changed in section two thirty was written no longer are tech companies the underdog upstarts they have become Titans of US industry critics say the law shields companies from accountability for disinformation terrorism and child exploitation the justice department is reviewing the law as part of its wider probe of big tak Shannon bond NPR news San

William Barr Facebook Google Justice Department SAN Official Attorney Shannon Bond United States NPR
"shannon bond" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:15 min | 10 months ago

"shannon bond" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Not interested in the motion to dismiss I thank both sides of you to be heard they believe the president needs to be heard for the first time in a fair setting democratic leaders must also name the house managers who will present the impeachment case in the Senate trial president trump meanwhile heads to Wisconsin tonight for a rally in Milwaukee NPR's Mar Elias and has more as the democratic presidential candidates debate in des Moines president trump will be in Wisconsin a must win state for him even if he lost Michigan and Pennsylvania if he won every other state he won in twenty sixteen including Wisconsin he'd win a second term Wisconsin is full of the white working class voters that make up trumps loyal base and he will tell them that he has delivered on a good economy but at least in Wisconsin one of his promises has not been met two and a half years ago the president announced with great fanfare a plan by the Taiwanese company Foxconn to create thirteen thousand manufacturing jobs in Wisconsin but those jobs have not materialized yet Mar alliance in NPR news Washington company apple is disputing the U. S. government's claim that it has failed to help in the investigation into a deadly shooting at a navy base in Florida last month and beer Shannon bond reports this is part of the conflict over privacy and public safety US Attorney General William Barr said on Monday that apple had not given quote any substantive assistance in the investigation into the Pensacola shooting in a statement the iPhone maker says it rejects that characterization apple says it is turned over many gigabytes of data from the shooters accounts to the government that includes iCloud back UPS account information and transaction data the FBI has asked apple to help to get data from the shooters to I. phones which are locked apple's previously rejected such requests the company says enabling law enforcement to access encrypted data on its devices would also open the door for hackers to threaten user security Shannon bond NPR news San Francisco you're listening to NPR news from Washington this is W. NYC from New York good morning I'm Richard hake.

NYC NPR Pensacola US Attorney Shannon bond Washington des Moines Milwaukee Senate Richard hake New York president San Francisco FBI William Barr
"shannon bond" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

01:58 min | 1 year ago

"shannon bond" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Washington you're listening to NPR news the national transportation safety board says a fatal crash involving an uber self driving car was called by distracted test driver as NPR Shannon bond reports NTSB also says uber's inadequate safety policies also contributed to the collision last year in Arizona the board's findings come a year and a half after a self driving car that over with testing struck and killed a lane Hertzberg as she was crossing the street at a public hearing the board said the probable cause with the safety driver who is supposed to be monitoring the road as well as the software that was driving the car the safety test driver was distracted by her cell phone investigators said over took a week approach to safety and failed to adequately oversee it safety drivers NTSB chairman Robert somewhat said the findings have wider implications any companies crash affects the public confidence anybody's crash is everybody's crash over says a deeply regrets this crash and is made improvements to safety Shannon bond NPR news San Francisco and New York to jail guards responsible for watching Jeffrey up staying the night he hanged himself in a cell last August are now charged with falsifying prison records a grand jury indictment alleges Tobin awhile and Michael Thomas were browsing the internet and sleeping when they were supposed to be checking on a sting every thirty minutes have sting was a convicted sex offender who is being held on sex trafficking charges which he denied Wall Street stocks closed mixed in trading Tuesday the Dow lost a hundred and two points the nasdaq rose twenty I'm sure a Stevens NPR news in Washington support for NPR comes from the little market offering artists in made goods and home decor with the commitment to fair trade a nonprofit founded by women to empower female artisans and marginalized.

Tobin Stevens NPR Robert somewhat Shannon bond NPR Michael Thomas Washington Jeffrey New York San Francisco chairman Hertzberg Arizona NTSB thirty minutes
"shannon bond" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:09 min | 1 year ago

"shannon bond" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This ad you realize if you read beyond the headlines that it's not true but if you only read the headline you might think it's true so describe this out for us sure it shows a picture of president trump shaking hands with mark Zuckerberg in the oval office it says breaking news mark Zuckerberg and Facebook just endorsed Donald Trump for reelection you're probably shocked and you might be thinking how could this possibly be true and then the address on to say well it's not sorry so we should reiterate here Facebook ins are covered have not endorsed president or in or any other candidate but the one campaign started running this ad on Thursday are you concerned a lot of people all over the country and Facebook actually approved the ads you as you said it's been out for a few days even though it's got a lot of publicity so this didn't just accidentally slip through some automated approval system now worn says that proves her point although I've seen some comments on Facebook saying it's not really a lights just a parity in Facebook is fine with parity's but explain to us why is she running this ad yeah I mean I was with Warren has been a relentless critic of Facebook and she says she's made an odd that still liberally falls to highlight this fact that Facebook allows political candidates to essentially lie in their ads so this actually came up because of another misleading political at the trump campaign was running this ad across social media and on TV making false claims about Joe Biden and the Biden campaign complained but Facebook didn't take it down it says it doesn't factcheck political speech as a matter of course that's the problem that Warren is raising she says by taking money for these kinds of ads Facebook is choosing profits over quote protecting democracy when I was getting ready to talk to you I was reading about Facebook's policy on when it will or won't reject ads or downplay ads and it's confusing and it's controversial what are the rules governing this area yeah it is confusing so what Facebook says is we are actually doing anything different than what broadcast television there's actually an FTC rule that says broadcast stations half to error political ads they can't block them based on what they say the difference is for cable networks and people might have seen that CNN refused to air the trump ad it says its own policies for what it airs Facebook has that discretion but they're saying they consider themselves to be like the broadcast network and so they're not going to censor political ads it seems like Facebook is framing this as a free speech issue but how much of this is driven by ad revenue at his Facebook possibly looking the other way because advertising is so lucrative that's a good question now Facebook says political ads are actually just a drop in the bucket for them in that company sold fifty five billion dollars worth of ads last year and and clouds are just a single digit percentage of their total but it's also clearly reluctant to drop political advertising altogether so I think this is really about Facebook feeling it can't win if it starts pull policing political speech the presidential election is obviously more than a year away how do you see this playing out over the coming year and beyond okay spending more money online we know this and Facebook is in a particularly important for them is the place to advertise you can reach so many people there Facebook made a very clear though it's not going to tell politicians what they can or can't say and it's gonna keep selling these ads so I think there's clearly a continued risk will be once again a place where misinformation spreading that's N. P. R.'s tech correspondent Shannon bond Shannon thank you thanks and we want to note that Facebook is among NPR's recent financial supporters you're listening to All Things Considered from NPR news this is Katie reading news I'm Jeremy Siegel Pacific gas and electric says it's restored power to all of its customers who were affected by the utilities in massive planned outages Ginny began cutting power to more than seven hundred thirty thousand of its customers on Tuesday evening amid predictions of gusty winds and dry conditions that could fuel wildfires late last night the utility announce it restored service to everyone affected by the blackouts which were unprecedented in size spanning from parts of the bay area all the way up into the Sierra foothills and the site of the deadliest and most destructive fire in California's history kick you would use Laura Clive and has been reporting in that area in Butte county and he joins me now to talk about how residents there have been coping Hey Laura Hey so obviously from P. genies perspective this is an effort to prevent another disaster like we saw last year in paradise the campfire which killed more than eighty people down here where I've been reporting in the bay area there's been a lot of frustration about how widespread these power outages have ban what's it been like up there where you've been reporting it's been a lot of mixed feelings so feeling like okay where were you a year ago I wish you'd done this a year ago so we had a whole town and community at the same time now if some people have said this feels like over compensating tension off the power for this long and it's impacting us in real ways in needing to throw away groceries and in disrupting businesses one woman Stacy Pineda said that the she lost her home in paradise in the fire and now she's living in an RV and she's angry I'm not happy there's got to be some middle ground and it's not only affecting the accounting no matter where you go using these impacting people because of this major fire it's all over California that they're impacting people they need to upgrade and repair their systems where it's safe enough to operate and I think that's where they're feeling right now and another thing that you hear there is a lot of mistrust nobody knows if it was too much or if it was exactly what needed to be done and I know a lot of people have been sort of hinting that that the state government that legislator should step in and and do something about this I know governor Newsome has made some comments about this a lot of people of sort of directed some of their frustration towards him what he said about the shuttle's governors and started out this week saying this was necessary reality is.

"shannon bond" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"shannon bond" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Creation and the distribution of content that may not be an issue with disney on fox one last quick question for those of you who are following the vote of the federal communications commission today alex rights from tampa how much could disney have factored into its decision what's happening now with net neutrality has it thought about that at all or is it still too early for them to have a notion of how this might affect their future content delivery and the competitive environment shannon briefly i that's a great question i mean we do we don't know yet with the end of the presumed end of net neutrality what that will mean especially since disney is pushing towards a streaming strategy where they are going to be delivering content directly to consumers said it's definitely going to be a question and we'll see them have to react to that as that decision out rolls out any idea what the time line for this deal might be shannon how long are we looking at we're looking at probably at least a year to a year and a half for regulators took to look this over i mean they've they've they've pinpointed that the deal the companies don't expect the deal to close before the end of next year and just as another sign of how intertwined all these media companies are drew wants to know when can we expect the simpson's land at the disney properties drew there is already simpson's at universal studios that's how interst intertwined all of these companies are but we will keep an eye on that little simpson's at disney that could be interesting shannon bond covers the media for the financial times shannon thanks for talking to thanks for having me next up we will shift gears from something financial to something political and presidential aj bane is the author of the accidental president harry s truman and the four months that changed the world we'll be speaking with him about parallels between president truman and president trump that's just ahead i'm joshua johnson glad to be with you you're listening to one egg from waam you and.

disney tampa the deal media companies simpson universal studios shannon bond aj bane president president truman joshua johnson four months
"shannon bond" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

02:29 min | 3 years ago

"shannon bond" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"This preceding our next question is also from the call shannon bond with the financial times hey had taken the call i'm i'm just wondering about tour of the time line you're seeing i mean what it what do you expect how long is this going to take um what's that what are the next steps um and you know at what point does it become a situation where you really need to cairo office well the doj filed the lawsuit today and they now have the obligation to stand ready for trial because we are and we are going to ask the court for the earliest possible date uh this is not a case that's going to drag on for months and months and months this is a case we're prepared to go to trial as soon as possible and hopefully that will happen as quickly as sixty days joy petrocelli or way with it but uh the doj would be hardpressed now that they filed this lawsuit v telling the court that they are not ready to go to go to trial on this case a we expect them to be ready because we are as i said in my opening comments weeks we're going into this to win so in terms of think about cutting losses as natural cabby larry we have a very good case revealed very confident in our case and we intend to win our final question will be for tara jeffries from bloomberg uh thanks for his email questions that um you know this this youtube you video content distribution other competitive concern uh make a teensy less inclined to agree to a joint ventures uh or future and he kind of future ventures with content companies mobile i would suggest you that this wall suit has the whole world questioning what they will can and cannot do this throws a a huge a degree of uncertainty to anybody contemplating joint ventures anybody contemplating mna and that's one of the key concerns about this to take suddenly without any notice and just upturn fifty years of precedent on a transaction like this can have nothing but a freezing affect on commerce in general and so i i think that is the significance of this lawsuit has been brought by the department of justice so with that again we appreciate everybody up participating in joining us and uh thank you.

shannon bond doj tara jeffries cairo department of justice fifty years sixty days
"shannon bond" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"shannon bond" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Boy andrew new orleans you're on with gretchen carlsson and shannon bond high andrew hi tom uh my question was pretty directly into the moment ago it was why more individuals don't really try and challenge you your situation instead of taking the federal macron's be or i have no real mellowed legal system young quote we may um what other options under if there any found could complete lu situation i mean it except for getting eight out ripped some form of mission of yeah i even if it's a private admission i mean shannon uh is is the world the all this sewn up is it at a harvey weinstein s company miramax or the winston company was everybody they're under arbitration agreement was did everybody of india is signed an locked away we now understanding is that at least some of the employees at the lansing company m u including who are still there you do have had confidentiality agreements that they've signed you know i think i mean t to answer to degree dancer andrews question i mean a look at his the women who is accused harvey weinstein are in a lot of cases yes they are now famous actresses and that many of them you talk about that this happening and gwyneth paltrow been example early on in their career many of them aren't famous actresses many of them are employees of the company and so again the tainting aggressions point you even if you are able to pursue even if you aren't bound by some sort of arbitration agreement and you're able to pursue a a public case at your resources are really limited compared to the power of not just a wealthy individual but a wealthy corporation yang they're locked him gretchen or just call you for another minute what's the legislation that you're pushing the people should keep an eye on that they want to take an interest in this.

shannon bond miramax winston company india harvey weinstein andrew gretchen carlsson gwyneth paltrow