35 Burst results for "Shannon Bond"

"shannon bond" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:03 min | 2 months ago

"shannon bond" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Need to send clear message that Russia should be isolated Russia should be held accountable for what they are doing That's ambassador oksana Marco rova Facebook's parent company met up says it's uncovered hacking and disinformation campaigns targeting Ukraine here's NPR's Shannon Bond Meta says hackers linked to Belarus tried to take over accounts of Ukrainian military personnel and public officials while fake accounts in Russia and Ukraine posed as journalists All in an effort to spread disinformation undermining Ukraine Nathaniel glacier leads security policy at meta There's been a lot of speculation and interest on whether there are covert influence operations targeting public debate in Ukraine and to what degree we're seeing cyber hacking groups targeting individuals in Ukraine This is cases where we're seeing both of those things Glacier says the two campaigns were small in scale and caught in the early stages Meta pays NPR to license NPR content Shannon Bond NPR news The Vatican is offering to help negotiate an end to the Russian invasion of Ukraine the number two official at the Vatican tells several Italian newspapers it's willing to facilitate dialog with Russia last Friday Pope Francis went to the Russian embassy to the Holy See to meet with Russia's ambassador He called for an end to the fighting and a return to negotiations Now futures are down 429 points this morning This is NPR news from Washington The U.S. Supreme Court will hear arguments today in a case challenging the Environmental Protection Agency's authority to limit carbon emissions from power plants The case is being brought by 19 states mostly with Republican governors and a number of coal companies the high court agreed to hear the case even though there is no current EPA plan to deal with carbon output from power plants President Biden has said he wants to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 50% by the end of the decade Many people.

Ukraine NPR oksana Marco rova Shannon Bond Meta Nathaniel glacier Shannon Bond Belarus Pope Francis Facebook Glacier Russian embassy Environmental Protection Agenc U.S. Supreme Court Washington Biden
"shannon bond" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

01:58 min | 9 months ago

"shannon bond" Discussed on NPR News Now

"We use code. It's just chicken right here. We real smoke. Sizes has sizes. Whatever they just getting started. It was a spontaneous post hurricane party. On the streets of new orleans. John burnett. Npr news this is npr. The pandemic propelled videoconference companies. Zoom says growth is slowing as offices and schools reopen. Npr shannon bond reports the company which is a financial supporter of npr is facing questions from investors over. Its post pandemic future them. Sales topped a billion dollars for the first time. Ever in the second quarter. But the company's stock price dropped more than ten percent as investors braced for slower growth during the pandemic many people turned to virtual meetings for work school and everyday life. But that's changing. Most of us are probably Socializing in person now doing you or things like zoom happy hours. And that's what we're starting to see. Some of the challenges chief financial officer. Kelly stucco burg says zoom is seeing the biggest impact among small companies with fewer than ten employees and individuals. Who pay for its meetings. She says doom still seeing strong demand from big companies which account for almost two thirds of its revenue shannon bond. Npr news this is npr. The chinese government is clamping down on how much time kids can play online video games. Beijing announced today people under eighteen will be allowed to play the games no more than one hour a day and only on fridays weekends and holidays. Chinese officials say it's aimed at battling teen video game addiction on wall street today. The dow lost fifty five points to close at thirty five three ninety nine. The snp rose nineteen points. I'm barbara klein npr news..

Npr news John burnett shannon bond npr Kelly stucco burg new orleans chinese government zoom shannon Beijing barbara klein npr news
Lina Khan’s FTC Takes a First Step Toward Expanding Antitrust Enforcement

All Things Considered

00:51 sec | 11 months ago

Lina Khan’s FTC Takes a First Step Toward Expanding Antitrust Enforcement

"Chair Lina Khan presided today over the first public meeting of her tenure at the agency. NPR's Shannon Bond reports. Con is already facing big challenges. In her first month in office, Lina Khan says Going forward, the FDC will hold regular open meetings as a democratic institutions. We have a vital responsibility to connect our work to the people we serve. At this meeting, commissioners voted to give themselves more power to crack down on unfair monopolies. Was a party line vote won by Khan and her fellow Democrats. Con is already in an intense spotlight since being named FTC chair last month. A federal judge has given the agency 30 days to rewrite a blockbuster antitrust lawsuit against Facebook. After ruling the government failed to make its case, and Amazon is calling on Khan to recuse herself from matters involving the company. Because of her past criticism. Facebook and

Lina Khan Shannon Bond FDC NPR Khan FTC Facebook Amazon Government
"shannon bond" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:36 min | 1 year ago

"shannon bond" Discussed on KQED Radio

"So, for example, if you go toe Apple's website right now and look at one of these new iPad prose, it says it's available starting in the second half of May. But you know, I tried to go through and actually put one in the cart in order it and it says it won't be delivered until late June or even early July. You know, that's quite a wait for this. And that's because Apple says, it's running into this problem that is bedeviling supply chains across the world. There's a big shortage of chips right now, and ships are those little Electron IX inside so many products that we use every day, right? Not just our phones and our laptops. Also video game consoles, even our cars. Is a huge problem for Apple, and certainly every other person in the industry, isn't it? That's right. I mean, Apple says, this issue. It's going to cause their sales in the next couple months to be about three or $24 billion less, and they would be, you know that sounds like a lot of money. That is a lot of money. Actually, for Apple. That's not that huge amount of money. They're still expecting strong growth. But the point is, the growth could have been stronger because There has just been huge demand over the past year for Ipads computers. They just been selling like crazy during the pandemic, Apple says. Over the last nine months, Mac sales were the highest they've ever been. And even you know, just this week it reported blockbuster sales and record profits in the first three months of the year. So so profits are still strong. But this is I mean $4 billion bump in the road is not small change. Well, you know, it's it's interesting here because for Apple, it's actually largely so far been able to avoid this chip shortage. It's known for really managing its supply chain quite well, but this morning shows even Apple is not immune to these problems in the global supply chain. And why is there this global chip shortage? It's really demand right. So over the past year, people have been stuck at home. Many people bought new computers. They bought new monitors for work in school. They also bought new TVs and PlayStations and appliances. You know, companies and schools had to invest more in Elektronik, STO make remote working classes happen. And then there's this other factor, which is cars. So these days, cars have hundreds, even thousands of chips in them. They track and control everything from tire pressure to the entertainment system to the safety features we rely on That last summer car sales, you know, went down dramatically when manufacturing shut down, But then they recovered much more quickly than anyone expected, including the chip makers. So on the one hand, there's more demand. On the other side of the equation. There have been supply issues, including manufacturing disruptions from the winter storms in Texas and a big fire at a factory in Japan. Anybody have any ideas and how long this shortage might last in the supply chain? Apple CEO was asked about this Tim Cook, he said. It's really hard to give an answer about that. Other CEOs we've heard from in the past couple weeks have been pretty pessimistic, Ford warned. It's going to get worse before it gets better, Nokia said. This shortage could drag on for maybe another year or two. Now chip makers in Taiwan where many of these chips are made, they're boosting production, but it's gonna take time to rebuild inventory. These are complicated pieces of equipment to make their done in these specialized fabrication plants. So for all of these companies and all of those customers out there, it's going to be a waiting game. NPR's Shannon Bond Thanks so much. Thanks for having me. Sequence and sparkle women's gymnastic uniforms as much part of the sport is flips, but some female athletes say leotard sexualized is them tomorrow On weekend edition Sunday with Lulu. A few gymnasts, an ankle length unit charge kickoff change in the world of sports. Tuning by telling your smart speaker to play NPR or your member station by name. Thank you ships. Ted's great circle. Is one of the most anticipated novels of the spring. Time when so many of us have been cooked up. Her novel ranges around the world and over a century from Alaska to the South Pole over the open skies of the Pacific in the Battle of Britain. Shipwrecks Plane crashes shattered romances World Wars Lake superior Scotland, Montana and holy Wood. It tells the story. Actually, it tells scores of stories that intertwine the life scenarios of Marien Graves. Dauntless fire who happened to be a woman. And was once more or less orphan with her twin brother, Jamie 1914, shipwreck and actress named Hadley Baxter, who betrays her in a film a century later. Thank you. Ships dead author of the bestselling novels astonish me and seating arrangements joins us from Los Angeles. Thanks so much for being with us. Thank you for having me. I'm just breathless trying to set up the novel. Um How did you keep all of this? In your mind? The characters places epochs. Details. Um, somewhat unsuccessfully. At times. It was definitely an overwhelming task, and I started without a plan. I just said to kind of dive in and start writing. So I rely actually pretty heavily on writing software called Scrivener. It allows Meteo break the book into a lot of different documents. But it makes it easy to rearrange the pieces into sort of see all of what I have at one point Mary and becomes a Bush pilot. In Alaska happens to be during one of the many air hearts well publicized flights she makes herself known as Jane Smith. I'd like you to read a section with utterly luxuriant details about her life in the sky. James Smith is a real Alaska flyer. Now she shuttles between cities and towns. Out to Bush Villages and encampments and lonely cabins. Bringing mail food, fuel dogs, dog sleds, newspapers, motorcycles, explosives, wallpaper, tobacco door knobs, You name it. She fires men out into the back country who strike it rich and others who drown or freeze or get eaten by bears or blow themselves up. She flies corpses wrapped in canvas sacks. Once a corpse smells so bad, she lashes it to the wing. Once a woman gives birth and her plane once she lands on the frozen surface of the truck, CeeCee to rescue the passengers of a ship locked in ice. Somewhere, she picks up a Russian word Polina for the patches of open water in the CIA's where whales come to breathe. The landscape is secretive and harsh and impossibly immense, and she borrows some of its inscrutability for itself. It's disinterest in human goings on Unfriendliness is another form of camouflage. Mm hmm. Why is such a scintillating spirit trying Tolo, Camouflage yourself. A to this point in the novel, Marianne has fled an extremely unhappy relationship, our marriage with a prominent bootlegger, and so she has assumed a new identity and a new location and is trying to lie low. Millionaire heart is glimpsed from a distance. She was, I guess, by millions of people around the world in those days to what degree did her story and her legend figure in your inspiration for this? She was certainly part of my earliest inspiration because I'm really intrigued by this question of what's the difference between disappearance and death. Um, practically speaking, they're often the same thing in a millionaire hurts case. I think it's almost a certainty. She crashed into the ocean and drowned. But Because there's no trace as there wouldn't be. It's sort of fertilized decades of all these different theories and ideas, and so I wanted to sort of come at at that question without making my character too much like Erhard herself. Some of the most graphic and gripping scenes you set in Little America three. A research station. I looked it up. It really existed. I had no idea. But you had to recreate it in your imagination. How did you do that? So this was one of Richard Byrd's expedition bases and in Antarctica on the Ross Sea, actually built on the Ross Ice shelf floating, I shove I read his accounts of his expeditions and what I could find by other members of them, and there's some photographs..

Tim Cook James Smith Hadley Baxter Los Angeles Alaska Jane Smith Texas Erhard Mary Richard Byrd Japan Shannon Bond $4 billion Taiwan Marianne South Pole early July Apple late June CIA
A Pandemic Winner: How Zoom Beat Tech Giants To Dominate Video Chat

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:59 min | 1 year ago

A Pandemic Winner: How Zoom Beat Tech Giants To Dominate Video Chat

"Roughly one year ago. I heard colleagues referred to a meeting on zoom. It was one of those passing references where people assume you already know what they mean. But i didn't. I literally never heard of the brand within a few days. Of course i knew as did millions of others who likely had not known before. Zoom is by no means the only way for a video meeting but the company has come out ahead during the pandemic zoom is among npr's financial supporters. And we cover it like any other company. Npr's shannon bond has the company's pandemic story chief financial officer kelly steckel berg vividly remembers one specific date. Last spring march fifteenth. Last year was the day when everything changed. Its like we woke up and almost overnight that demand grew exponential demand from companies. Trying to keep running after sending everybody home. School setting up virtual classrooms then. The floodgates opened here at npr weeded stories about fitness classes. Moving to zoom. You're going to need a broom towel. Happy hours complete with drinking games. We figured out rules for virtual beer. Pong one of our producers watched her sister get married over zoom. You may now feel your ballot. Chests by april zoom meetings were attracting three hundred million participants a day thirty times the amount just a few months before zoom was an upstart and it was going up against products from giants like google and microsoft which are both npr supporters. So how did zoom beat these heavyweights real richness to simply way easier. Jason freed is ceo of base camp. A company that makes remote work software. He told me over his preferred app. Skype he's been working remotely for two decades. He says zoom made sending a meeting link as easy as sharing a youtube video open room. You get a you moral you. Send the url around people. That's it unlike. Other video meetings people you invite to zoom. don't have to log in or download. Software freed says that simplicity meant even though. The app was intended for companies. It was really easy for everyone else to use to but zoom was so popular and convenient. It had a downside. The fbi warning about zoom bombing intruders has started crashing zoom meetings because security was so lax townhall school classes. Aa meetings. were all targets. Dennis johnson knows all about this last march. He was defending his doctoral. Dissertation on zoom in front of family and friends with an unknown attacker scrawled racial slurs genitalia on the screen. A year later johnson still avoid zoom when he can every time. Somebody called me. Dr arteaga On so it just like a nasty taste in my mouth. Researchers uncovered other security and privacy flaws zoom told users meetings were fully encrypted when they weren't the company admitted shut down the accounts of activists in china after pressure from the government. Zoom went into damage control mode. It put everything except privacy insecurity on pause for three months and it reached settlements with federal and state regulators investigating the issues. Stucco burg's zoom. Cfo says the episode was a wakeup call. It was a humbling experience for all of us but we learned a lot through it and we have come out on the other side at a stronger a better company with a stronger and more secure platform now. After a year of daily life and major milestones conducted over zoom what happens when people get vaccinated and can go back to seeing each other face to face. Daniel ives as an analyst at wedbush securities there could be a roaring twenties type field. Whose covid where people are just gonna wanna get out and just almost a pent up demand but he says zoom has made such inroads into our lives in the past year. It's here to stay so they're still time to learn how to use the mute button

Shannon Bond Kelly Steckel Berg NPR Dr Arteaga Dennis Johnson Skype Jason Microsoft Stucco Burg Youtube FBI Google Johnson CFO Daniel Ives Wedbush Securities China Government
Biden Administration Gears Up For A Showdown With Big Tech

Morning Edition

03:26 min | 1 year ago

Biden Administration Gears Up For A Showdown With Big Tech

"Up for a big showdown with Big Tech. He's reportedly hiring too outspoken critics of Amazon, Facebook and Google for influential roles in the administration. They've both pushed for the government to get much more aggressive at reining in these tech giants even break some of them up. NPR Tech correspondent Shannon Bond has been following this, Shannon. What are these critics? A big tech that Biden is bringing on board? Who are they? So Biden has reportedly getting ready to nominate antitrust scholar Lena Khan to the Federal Trade Commission. And just last week, he added a lot of pressure Tim Wu as a tech policy advisor, who has advocated for breaking up Facebook and Scott, It's really hard to overstate just how big a deal these names are intact policy circles. They both have these very progressive views about monopolies and competition, and now they're potentially moving into these very influential roles as the government is investigating and suing the tact Giants. So we worked on tech policy in the Obama administration. He now says he thinks the tech giants have helped create a new gilded age, much like the robber barons did with their railroad and oil monopolies. Khan is just 32 years old. She made her name when she was still a law student for reading this groundbreaking paper about Amazon, and she's become the face of this approach that sometimes jokingly called hipster Antitrust. Okay, I think you're going to need to explain his hipster antitrust a little bit more. No con is critical of the current way that the government deals with monopoly power. You know, this is idea that the rules are really focused on when consumers like you and me get hurt. When we have fewer choices, we have to pay more for products and services. Tom says, you know, in the case of a company like Amazon. That doesn't address concerns that focus on other harms like those to the independent sellers who rely on the platform to make money, and she thinks Amazon should not be able to both operate this marketplace and cell is a competitor in that marketplace. Here's what she told NPR back in 2018 about the bind that puts sellers in that dependence means that Amazon gets too often call all of the shots. And I think that is often I'm quite harmful because that means Amazon can extract more and more from these cellars and that can affect the quality. And Khan has already been influential in Washington. She was advising this Big House panel on antitrust last year. They did this investigation. It found Apple, Amazon, Facebook and Google all have really unfair powers monopolies. And we should note that all four of those companies are NPR supporters. I mean, this approach is just so different from even a few years ago, compared especially to the way the Obama administration Treated big tech cozied up to Big Tech when Biden was vice president. That's right. I mean, I think cozy is exactly the description for the relationship the Obama administration had with Silicon Valley. You know, it wasn't that long ago, these companies were celebrated as innovators. But you know things really have changed. Of course, the Trump administration was hugely critical of these big companies. It sued Google and Facebook for antitrust violations that something we're expecting the Biden administration to continue and we're seeing criticism of tech from both sides of the aisle. Of course, there are some people from the Czech world taking positions with the Biden, an administration that happened under Obama. But you know the choice of people like Lena Con and Tim Wu, I think signals a tougher stance toward Silicon Valley and that the era of scrutiny and skepticism what we call the tech clash is far from over the tech clash.

Amazon Obama Administration Big Tech Biden Giants Shannon Bond Lena Khan Facebook Tim Wu Khan Federal Trade Commission Government NPR Google Shannon Scott Big House TOM Trump Administration
Facebook Takes A Hard Line Against Proposed Australian Law

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:52 min | 1 year ago

Facebook Takes A Hard Line Against Proposed Australian Law

"Facebook has abruptly cut off news to and from a continent. Facebook is blocking users in australia from sharing or reading news stories there several parts to this australian. Publishers cannot post links to their own stories. Ordinary citizens in australia cannot post links to any news stories and in fact people anywhere in the world cannot post news stories that come out of australia. The decision shocked australia news outlets in a huge change for social media in australia. Facebook has blocked news content from being shed on its platform from facebook has taken a stunning step of banning australian uses and publishes from viewing or sharing news articles on its website. What's going on here we've called. Npr tech correspondent shannon bond. I and before we begin we should note that facebook. It's a financial supporter of npr. We cover them like any other companies shannon. Good morning. good morning steve. What caused facebook's move well. Australia is weighing. This proposed law that would force tech companies like facebook to pay big publishers. For linking to their stories this law is trying to address this long running criticism from media companies you know that facebook and google. Npr sponsoring these big tech platforms. Have just sucked up so much of the advertising revenue media outlets around the world. Have these concerns that that's really hurt. The news business news websites just can't compete for advertising with tech giants which are so big so dominant and of course are an important channel to readers. I just wanna know what you're telling me. The law is not even law yet. It's something that's on. Its way to becoming law. And so it's almost a kind of negotiating tactic or lobbying effort. That facebook is said. We're gonna cut you off now right. I mean this fight has been brewing for months. This proposal is expected to become law soon and facebook is just saying it's not going to play with with the rules. Australia is setting which would require platforms to reach deals with publishers to pay for content facebook. Says this law quote fundamentally misunderstands. Its relationship with news outlets view. Is that news that lets choose to post on. Facebook and ultimately publishers benefit more than facebook does and we should say that as this is rolled out. Facebook has acted pretty broadly in terms of blocking things some australian government pages including a fire and rescue agency. Even the weather service had their swipe. Yesterday even facebook's own facebook page was blank in australia. Because it's restoring these pages that have gotten inadvertently caught in the filters are is facebook's response any different than other companies that might be affected by a rule requiring payment in order to to post links. We'll right so the other company could've crosshairs. Here is google which has taken a very different approach. Google had previously also threatened to shut down in australia. It's now reached deals with several big publishers. There most notably it three year global. Deal with newscorp which owns the wall street journal as well as several australian papers. I see. That's notable because newscorp is run by rupert murdoch. he is australian. He's a powerful force in media and politics there. He's been lobbying for years for the tech companies to pay for news content and he has thrown his considerable support behind this law once his companies to be any chance of a like this in the united states. Well i think that's the big concern here and why we're seeing facebook accident act like this. You know it doesn't want to capitulate australia fearing that. Could set a precedent elsewhere and we've heard from lawmakers in canada and europe who say they're open to this approach just last week another. Us tech giant microsoft said it supports version of the australian law and the us. And i think there is concerned that this is something that could we could see here. But you know even if it's just in australia this has big consequences when it comes to. We know that's a problem for facebook. You know it's talked about promoting accurate information. But now people in australia can't post you know. Reputable news stories to counter false claims

Facebook Australia Shannon Bond NPR Tech Giants Newscorp Google Shannon Steve Rupert Murdoch The Wall Street Journal United States Europe Canada Microsoft
Facebook 'Supreme Court' Orders Social Network To Restore 4 Posts In 1st Rulings

Marketplace

03:42 min | 1 year ago

Facebook 'Supreme Court' Orders Social Network To Restore 4 Posts In 1st Rulings

"Facebook has created its own sort of Supreme Court. It's an oversight board that has the final say on some of its hardest decisions over what users can and cannot post. Today. That board issued its first rulings it ordered the social network to restore several posts that it had removed for breaking Facebook rules. NPR TECH correspondent Shannon Bond joins us now to explain Hey, Shannon. Hey, Elsa. So we should first note. Facebook is among MPR's financial supporters. All right, So Shannon tell us a little more about some of the cases this board considered. Yeah, there were five and total announced today. And in each of these, the board was reviewing post that Facebook had taken down for violating policies against things like hate speech, nudity and harmful misinformation about covert 19. And when you dig into the details of these rulings, you know, enforcing these rules is really complicated. And ultimately, the board overturned. Facebook's decision to remove in four of these first five cases, huh? Okay, so give us a quick example. Right. So in one case, Facebook had removed a post from a user in Myanmar, who had suggested there was something wrong with Muslims and Facebook says this broke its rules against hate speech. This is an especially fraught issue because, of course, Facebook has been criticized for its role in the genocide of the country's Muslim minority. The board looked at this and said, You know, if you take into consideration the full context this post was pejorative. But the board didn't think it crossed the line into hate speech. And so it said, Facebook needs more justification. If it's going to take down post like this. And the board told Facebook to reinstate it Now Facebook has agreed to abide by these rulings and the post is already back up. Wait. So who is on this board? Exactly? Admit up of 20 international experts. They're mainly and things like law and human rights. But there's also a Nobel peace Laureates and journalists and even the former prime minister of Denmark. It was created by Facebook last year, and it's funded by Facebook through an independent trust. And do you think these decisions give us any clues as to how the board sees its overall role? I spoke to Evelyn Do ek Harvard Law School lecture has been following the board very closely. These five cases even though it's only five cases out of the thousands or millions of decisions that Facebook makes in awake are a true shot across the bow from the oversight board to Facebook. She says. It's a shot across the bop bow because the board is taking aim directly at some of Facebook's policies and enforcement, you know, warned about the extent to which the company relies on artificial intelligence that says those systems need more human oversight. It emphasized taking context into account, and it wants Facebook to just be much more clear about its rules on policies like health, misinformation or Dangerous groups. You know, Elsa, we know Facebook has this immense power over what it's billions of users composed. Now it's created this board and from what we've seen today, the board has ambitions to be a real check on that power. You know, it's kind of flexing its muscles so interesting. Well, what I did notice is we did not here today about Facebook's decision to suspend former President Trump after The whole insurrection at the Capitol in January. 6th. What do we know about the board's review of that case? Right. Facebook reviewed the Trump suspension to the board last week. This is the case everyone has their eyes on. Of course, right. It's a huge deal. The board is opening up for public comment tomorrow, and it has about three months to make a ruling, And ultimately it's going to be up to the board to settle this very fraught debate over whether Trump should get his account back, so we'll stay tuned. That is NPR's Shannon Bond. Thank you, Shannon. Thanks, Elsa.

Facebook Shannon Bond Shannon Elsa MPR Ek Harvard Law School NPR Supreme Court Myanmar Evelyn Denmark President Trump Donald Trump
Trump Has Been Silenced On Social Media

The Takeaway

03:14 min | 1 year ago

Trump Has Been Silenced On Social Media

"A lot about Big Tech and certainly the past few days show just how powerful these companies are. First, Twitter and Facebook suspended President Trump's access to his biggest online megaphones. Then Apple, Google and Amazon cut off parlor, a social media site popular with Trump supporters and joining us now to unpack. All of this is NPR's tech correspondent Shannon Bond. Hey, Shannon. Hey, Elsa. All right, so we should first know that Facebook, Google, Apple and Amazon are all among NPR's financial supporters. All right, So Shannon, what do you think He's pretty aggressive moves. Tell us about Silicon Valley right now. Also, you know when Facebook and Twitter cut off President Trump it really put the spotlight on something I think we've known for a long time. But I just seeing so starkly, Which is how much power these big tech companies wield because we conduct so much of our lives online. So there were the examples you mentioned. But also others that go beyond the question of speech really, to the bottom line stripe and papal cut off the ability of the president's campaign and his supporters to raise money and take payments. The e commerce companies, Shopify shut down an online shop connected to Trump that sold merchandise like Make America Great again. Hats and another shop owned by the Trump Organization that sold things like golf accessories and So these decisions they're raising some really big questions. What are some of those questions? Well, maybe the biggest one is all about access. So Amazon Apple Google. They have a lot of power over kind of what we think of more of the infrastructure of the Internet. In Apple and Google's cases, they you know, they decide what APS can go into the APP stores. So They decided this weekend to block parlor, the alternative social media site that Trump supporters had flocked to And that means it's much harder to get parlor on your smartphone, which is, of course, where most people use Social media, and then even more significantly, Amazon kicks parlor off its Web hosting service, so it's gone dark. You can't access it all today. Parlor sued Amazon. And basically, you know, we're really realizing seeing very tangibly Just how much power Big tech has to decide which companies which brands which businesses can effectively exist online, Okay, sure. That is a lot of power. But isn't all of this bound to But these companies even under more scrutiny going forward, Yeah, I think that's absolutely fair, and I spoke with Ben Weisner at the American Civil Liberties Union piece of the same thing. He's really concerned about these individual companies. Power. Here's what he told me. And it may be that by exercising their right their constitutional right to decide who can use their products right now they're going to bring a different kind of regulatory focus down on them about whether we should have let these companies get this big in the first place. So you know, this isn't gonna go away else. I mean, remember these companies they're already under a lot of scrutiny. Facebook and Google are facing any trust investigations. Now we have Congress promising new investigations here, so I think the spotlight just continues. Well, I mean, turning to President Trump. He got off. He got cut off from Twitter and Facebook now parlor. It was a momentary alternative, but that's gone. Now, where will trump go? You think that is the big question? There are plenty of upstart sites that want him. He might even start his own outlet. I think, Elsa, it's safe to assume he's not getting off of the Internet for good. I

President Trump Amazon Donald Trump Apple Shannon Bond Google Facebook NPR Shannon Twitter App Stores Elsa Trump Organization Shopify Silicon Valley Ben Weisner Golf America American Civil Liberties Union Congress
Google Hit With 2nd Lawsuit Testing Its Monopoly Power  This One Over Digital Ads

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:44 min | 1 year ago

Google Hit With 2nd Lawsuit Testing Its Monopoly Power This One Over Digital Ads

"Ten state attorneys general allege that. Google abused its power the geez. All republican accused google of abusing its power specifically in digital advertising. The justice department and some of these same states were already suing google for allegedly stifling rival search engines google is among npr's financial supporters. But we could see them like any other company so npr. Tech correspondent shannon. Bond is here on the lawsuit shannon. Good morning hi steve. Where does this alleged abuse of power an online ads. Well this is a big business for google of course and behind every ad you see on your phone or computer. There's this complicated chain of technology that makes it show up In the say that google is the biggest player in every link in that chain. Here's how texas ag. ken paxton. Who led the investigation. Put it if the free market baseball game. Google positioned itself as the pitcher the batter and the emperor so in the game of advertising. They're saying google calls the shots at access. The empire and it also plays on both sides helping publisher sell their ad space and helping advertisers by that space shannon. I just have to stop a moment to observe fact. It's my duty to point this out. Ken paxton is the texas state attorney. General who just grabbed headlines a few days ago by filing a spurious lawsuit over the presidential election. The supreme court batted away that false lawsuit without even hearing the case. Paxton has also under indictment also under a whistle blower investigation. So that is the attorney. General leading this google lawsuit. Is this lawsuit any less bogus than his previous big case. I mean there certainly is is a cloud over paxton but see this. Google case looks really strong to me. It's not fact free. There's a lot of evidence. This investigation has turned up remember. It's involved several states and more. Broadly there this concern about google's power in advertising and searches bipartisan. Okay so when we stick then to the sources that are that are actually credible here. How do the experts say that. Google abused its power. Well they say. Google is overcharging advertisers and boxing. Out its competitor's but steve it's also interesting in loss there's one competitor that they say google treated differently. That's a which is also an npr sponsor. The lawsuit accuses google of essentially colluding with facebook. Cutting illegal deal to manipulate the online ad market. That's an explosive charge. So the states are asking for a jury trial they want google to pay damages and be forced to change its ways including possibly making structural changes like selling off parts of its business. Although there aren't specifics there in this complaint okay so the allegation is the super. Big players played nice with each other but not with other people how google and facebook defend themselves. Well google says these claims are meritless. It says prices have fallen for ads ad and it says that's evidence of a competitive market and facebook declined to comment on this lawsuit. But you know both of these companies are just under so much pressure and scrutiny right now just back in october. The justice department sued google over. Its search business last week. The ftc and more than forty states accused facebook of crushing rivals in social media. What do these lawsuits suggest about the politics. The political situation facing the tech industry. Well you know just a few years ago. These companies were really golden. They grew an unchallenged ways but regulators and politicians are finally waking up to this power that they have and challenging it. And this isn't even the last shoe to drop google. We're expecting another lawsuit from other states including some with democratic attorney general very soon about search and how whether it favors its own products shannon. Thanks so much thanks. That's npr tech correspondent shannon bond.

Google Ken Paxton Shannon NPR Texas Ag Justice Department Steve Paxton Bond Facebook Baseball Supreme Court Texas Boxing FTC Shannon Bond
Airbnb plans public share sale despite pandemic

All Things Considered

00:50 sec | 1 year ago

Airbnb plans public share sale despite pandemic

"Airbnb has found for a stock market listing MPR's Shannon Bond reports, the home rental company revealed a financial picture that reflects how the pandemic has up ended the travel industry. Regulatory paperwork made public on Monday. Shows of all the ups and downs Airbnb has weathered the first nine months of this year stood out its losses more than doubled to almost $700 million sales shrank to $2.5 billion. But Airbnb says business is turning around. People are booking stays close to home, and some who can work remotely are renting homes for longer periods. In the three months from July to September, the company turned a profit of $219 million. Airbnb was reportedly valued at $18 billion earlier this year. Well, the company has not said how much it hopes to raise by selling stock. It's public offering is expected to be one of the year's

Airbnb Shannon Bond MPR
"shannon bond" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:12 min | 1 year ago

"shannon bond" Discussed on KCRW

"$200 million in support of Proposition 22, making it the most expensive ballot measure campaign in California history, and it worked. Voters overwhelmingly approved the measure for Joe Denise, who drives for Uber in San Francisco. That's a relief. This is a job that I make over $100,000 a year doing and I have complete and total freedom and flexibility to do that releases view is one, the companies say A majority of drivers share, Ronnie says flexibility. Is the most important thing to him. We know going in. This is a trade off. I'm treating salary. I'm training for a one k. I'm trading insurance to the ability to do this wind and where and how I want to do it. But Some people are better off being employees. Not many. But not all drivers agree. Drivers are being taken advantage of and prop 22 really, just gonna tempt you were left legalize it. Jerome Gauges, a lift driver in Los Angeles who worked on the campaign opposing the measure. He and other opponents say the company's emphasis on flexibility is a distraction, since nothing in the state labor law requires them to set schedules for drivers. Now drivers now more than ever need, toe organized and improve our working conditions. Labor groups fought hard against the ballot measure. They say the company's heir trying to get special treatment so they can avoid paying hundreds of millions of dollars in benefits. Like other employers. Cage says the election results are a blow, but the work of organizing will continue. My pride is hurt. But one thing that has been inspiring me is the energy In this grassroot level effort to fight you. Berlin and the ballot measure is not a total loss. It does mandate. The companies provide some new benefits for drivers, including a stipend to buy health insurance and guarantee of some pay. Organizers say they'll keep pushing for more protections and they're looking beyond California toe. Other states that are facing off with uber and lift over whether drivers are employees. Shannon Bond, NPR NEWS, Berkeley.

California Ronnie Cage Joe Denise Jerome Gauges San Francisco Shannon Bond NPR Los Angeles Berlin Berkeley
Ride-hailing, delivery giants win fight against labor law

The Takeaway

02:53 min | 1 year ago

Ride-hailing, delivery giants win fight against labor law

"Celebrating a big win in California voters. They're overwhelmingly chose to let the ride hailing companies continue treating their drivers in the state as independent contractors, not as employees. NPR Tech correspondent Shannon Bond joins us before we begin. We want to note that uber and left are among NPR is financial supporters. Shannon, I want to start with what this means for the drivers of these companies. Right. So there are hundreds of thousands of drivers here in California, and it means they won't be getting standard employment benefits from thes companies. So things like health insurance paid sick leave overtime pay. Now the state had passed a law extending those benefits to give workers But Californians have now voted to exams. Huber lift and similar acts from the law. However, under the ballot measure that voters just approved Companies will give some limited benefits to drivers, so things like subsidies for health insurance for some drivers, accident insurance and some guarantees about pay. This creates a major essentially exemption to New California law. Is there any word from state officials on that? Well, the state lawmaker who wrote this labor law, she said she and her allies would continue to fight for worker protections. You know that what we're really looking for us to hear from the state attorney general's office? They didn't have any comment, while election results are still being certified, but The attorney general and prosecutors and three big cities here has sued lift in uber earlier this year, trying to force them to comply with this labor law so that this doesn't mean that legal battle is over. But it means that any outcome will be far more limited because of how voters have have chosen Are there any takeaways here about how people should view this industry? Well, you know what? I talked to drivers about this. This ballot measure. Their support or opposition, in many cases hinged on concerns about flexibility. So many of them say they want to choose when and how they work. And the companies have warned that if they had to make drivers employees they would set schedules. They might employ a lot fewer drivers. I think that concerned a lot of people. But really the biggest lesson in this whole battle has been the power of money. So uber lift and food delivery app. Gord Ash, They spent more than $200 million promoting this ballot measure. It was the most expensive campaign over a ballot initiative in California history. You know, here in Berkeley, you know, I was flooded with texts. I got mailers at my house about it. The companies used their APS to lobby drivers and passengers. You know, they put out these claims that the measure was good for drivers. They warned that there would be higher fares longer wait times and like I said, before, you know if they would employ fewer drivers if they had to make the driver's employees And you know all of that money they spent it really seemed to have worked. Californians voted to approve this ballot measure, and it was money well spent for these companies. That's NPR. Shannon Bond. Thanks Thank you.

Shannon Bond NPR California New California Shannon Gord Ash Berkeley
"shannon bond" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:03 min | 1 year ago

"shannon bond" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Beautiful years. Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden took his campaign to the key state of Iowa, only four days left Minister Americans already voting. There is more going to vote. By late Tuesday night. I believe when you use your power the power of a vote, we're gonna change the course of the country and quite frankly, the world. Both candidates are also campaigning today in Minnesota in southern California Governor Gavin Newsom has unveiled a new high speed corona virus testing love Jackie 48 from member station KPCC reports the lab is aimed a doubling California's testing capabilities. The new $25 million lab will be able to process to 150,000 HK over 19 tests Kids daily with results sent to patients in less than two days. Diagnostic company Perkins Elmer has been contracting to run the lab. California Governor Gavin Newsom says the contract significantly drops the cost of each test. We are taking the average cost of 100 50 and bringing it down by roughly 1/5 and creating a competitive environment where people continue to now look for cheaper ways of providing something that in the past They frankly had no choice. Newsome said. The new lab will help handle the increase in tests as flu season approaches since Kobe 19 and the flu have similar symptoms for NPR news. I'm Jackie 40, A in Los Angeles, Facebook has limited some Hashtags and is taking a break from suggesting that people joined certain groups ahead of Election Day. NPR Shannon Bond reports. The moves are the latest efforts to limit the spread of conspiracy theories and misinformation. Facebook is limiting distribution of post tagged save our Children, a phrase that has been co opted by the baseless Q and on conspiracy theory. People who search for the hashtag are being shown links to credible resource is about child safety. The Cuban on conspiracy has spread widely on social media this year, and the platforms are now trying to stamp it out. Facebook banned all Q and on accounts, pages and groups earlier this month. Facebook is also temporarily halting suggestions that users join any political groups or any newly created groups In the run up to election Day. The company's critics say those recommendations can fuel misinformation and even radicalized users. Shannon Bond. NPR NEWS This is NPR news in Washington. Live from the news. I'm Raquel Maria Dylan. San Francisco is pausing some re opening plans after an increase in coded 19 case numbers and hospitalizations. Mayor London Breed announced that plans to increase indoor capacity in restaurants, places of worship and museums. Are being put on hold and indoor pool's bowling alleys and gym locker rooms won't be able to open next week as planned. Breed says San Francisco is in a good place compared to other major cities, but officials want to be cautious. The last thing we want to do is go backwards. The last thing we want to do is tell a business Or a school or some place that they can open and then tell them that they have to close. San Francisco has ramped up to test 5000 people per day. The city has a less than 1% positivity rate. We'll have more on this story at our 5 30 news interview with UCSF stopped Dr Bob Walker today. Matt Mahoud, the head of a business lobbying group. The Silicon Valley Organization, has stepped down after his group posted a racist attack ad against a candidate running for San Jose City Council. The image depicted a group of black men on a street filled with tear gas and the caption quote. Did you really want to sign onto this? Another San Jose City Council member said he'll Jimenez says the SDO ran similar attack ads against him during the 2016 campaign darkening my face putting picture of me above patrol lights to send. I think very clear signals to my residents were very diverse to say, essentially brown person crime,.

Facebook Governor Gavin Newsom San Francisco California Shannon Bond NPR NEWS Joe Biden San Jose City NPR San Jose City Council Iowa Jimenez Perkins Elmer KPCC Raquel Maria Dylan Los Angeles Newsome Kobe
"shannon bond" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:18 min | 1 year ago

"shannon bond" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Alabama and Georgia. David Griffin lives in Atlanta, where the remnants of Zeta took down a tree in his yard. Three hitting the exterior wall made all of the dishes crash into the kitchen, so everything from damaged tripping up power is still out too many homes and businesses across the south. At the height of the storm, more than 2.5 million people were without electricity. Saito was the third hurricane to hit Louisiana this year. This is NPR news from Washington. Wall Street futures are down sharply this morning amid investor concerns about tech companies, including Apple. The company says sales of its iPhones in the latest quarter were off by the steepest amount in two years. They fell nearly 21%. In addition, Facebook is warning 2021 could be a tougher year with continued uncertainty over the economy and the Corona virus pandemic. Facebook is a financial sponsor of NPR. The FBI is continuing to investigate coordinated cyber attacks on some hospitals in the US as NPR's Shannon Bond reports. Some experts believe the attacks originated in Europe. Hackers are using malicious software known as ransomware to encrypt files and lock up online systems. The Attackers then demand millions of dollars to restore the data. The FBI and other agencies say hospitals and health care providers should take precautions to protect their networks. Ransomware attacks are on the rise targeting school district's local governments and even law enforcement in recent years. Experts at the cyber security firm Fireeye say the latest attacks on hospitals were carried out by criminals in Eastern Europe seeking financial gain. They say these attacks are especially worrying because taking hospital network off line could affect patients care. Shannon Bond NPR news The FAA says a single engine plane that crashed and exploded in suburban Las Vegas yesterday was on its way to Northern California. At the time both people aboard were killed. Authorities say that plane had taken off minutes earlier from the North Las Vegas airport. I'm Dave Mattingly. NPR News in Washington. Support for NPR comes from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation committed to.

NPR News NPR Facebook FBI North Las Vegas airport Saito Shannon Bond Alabama David Griffin Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Europe Las Vegas Dave Mattingly Washington Zeta Atlanta Louisiana
"shannon bond" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:57 min | 1 year ago

"shannon bond" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Of tree hitting the exterior wall. It made all of the officials crash into the kitchen, so it's done everything from structural damage tripping up Power is still out too many homes and businesses across the south At the height of the storm, more than 2.5 million people were without electricity. Saito was the third hurricane to hit Louisiana this year. This is NPR news from Washington. Wall Street futures are down sharply this morning amid investor concerns about tech companies, including Apple. The company says sales of its iPhones in the latest quarter were off by the steepest amount in two years. They fell nearly 21%. In addition, Facebook is warning 2021 could be a tougher year with continued uncertainty over the economy and the Corona virus pandemic. Facebook is a financial sponsor of NPR. The FBI is continuing to investigate coordinated cyber attacks on some hospitals in the US as NPR's Shannon Bond reports. Some experts believe the attacks originated in Europe. Hackers are using malicious software known as ransomware to encrypt files and lock up online systems. The Attackers then demand millions of dollars to restore the data. The FBI and other agencies say hospitals and health care providers should take precautions to protect their networks. Ransomware attacks are on the rise targeting school district's local governments and even law enforcement in recent years. Experts at the cyber security firm Fireeye say the latest attacks on hospitals were carried out by criminals in eastern Europe seeking financial gain. They say These attacks are especially worrying because taking hospital network off line could affect patients care. Shannon Bond NPR News, The F A A says a single engine plane that crashed and exploded in suburban Las Vegas yesterday was on its way to Northern California at the time both people aboard were killed. Authorities say that plane had taken off minutes earlier from the North Las Vegas.

NPR Facebook Las Vegas Shannon Bond FBI NPR News Europe Saito Louisiana Apple Washington Fireeye US Northern California
Tech CEOs Square Off With Senators Over Online Speech

1A

00:47 sec | 1 year ago

Tech CEOs Square Off With Senators Over Online Speech

"The CEOs of Facebook, Twitter and Google clashed with senators at a hearing today focused on what people cannon cannot close on their platforms. NPR's Shannon Bond reports the company's face sharply different questions from Democrats and Republicans. Republicans on the Senate Commerce Committee accused the tech companies of bias against conservatives and they grilled Twitter and Facebook over decisions to put warning labels on misleading posts by President Trump. Democrats, on the other hand, pressed the executives on what they're doing to curb hate speech, false claims about voting and other harmful content, and they accuse their Republican colleagues of politicizing an important debate over online speech. There was little discussion of the hearing stated topic whether to change a long standing law that gives thes tech companies legal immunity for what their users

Facebook Twitter Senate Commerce Committee Shannon Bond NPR President Trump Google
Facebook Stops New Political Ads To Try To Limit Misinformation

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:21 min | 1 year ago

Facebook Stops New Political Ads To Try To Limit Misinformation

"All right. As we have noted, we are just one week to go until the official election day that means election season will be over and it's only at this point that facebook has decided to put a. Stop to political ads on its site. Right. But there is a twist here worth mentioning this ban only applies to new political ads about candidates and issues. That means that older ads that have already been published might still appear in your feet. FACEBOOK is the biggest beneficiary of political AD spending online but it says it's making this move to limit misinformation about the election and just a note here facebook is financial supporter of NPR. We've got Shannon bond NPR's tech correspondent with us this morning. Hi, Shannon. Hi Rachel. All right. If we scroll through facebook today, what's GONNA BE DIFFERENT? Well not a whole lot. So you'll still see ads about the election about it on the ballot if they were running already. So if you saw an ad yesterday, you could see that same ad again today, and in fact, campaigns running these ads can distribute them as far as wide as they choose, they can change their their spending. The can change their targeting they just can't change the message facebook says, it's doing this because they're just may not be enough time in these final days of the election to contest any new claims that are made and ads. I mean. So what facebook is doing with a week out I mean it's not exactly a profile in courage here I mean. What they're doing really going to have that much of an impact. Well, you know just part of the puzzle, not the whole picture. They're just a fraction of all of the political content that you're confined on facebook I. mean think about President Trump he has a huge facebook following. He can post new attacks on Joe Biden up to and through Election Day Biden can do the same they just can't pay to promote those messages. Okay. So put what facebook is doing into a broader context if you could how does it compare with rules that other tech companies have in place and not just talking about twitter but also Tiktok Youtube Yes. So the biggest contrast is with twitter and TIKTOK. They have both banned political advertising entirely those decisions those companies made last year Google which owns youtube and is also NPR sponsor does allow political political ads but it doesn't let campaigns do the kind of micro targeting that facebook does. So you know if I'm on facebook I, might see one of. Ads My husband might be sitting right next to me on his phone or his computer and see totally different ads being and Rachel despite all of these differences, these tech companies, they're really concerned about this election about the potential for unrest or even violence, and that's why they're putting. So many new rules into place even as people are already out there voting. And we are going to get a break from online political ads after election day facebook, and Google, or both temporarily banning all ads about the election or politics or issues after the polls close for some period of time I mean listeners in battleground states or states were you know the racist close? No. This they're just inundated with political ads right now especially on TV, is there something about ads on facebook that we need to treat with more caution than the ones we see on television I, mean critics of facebook would say yes. FACEBOOK LADS, as we said, can be targeted much more individually than TV ads. They also just look more like regular facebook posts. So it's not always immediately clear. You're seeing an ad, but you know this is really all up to facebook at the end to decide what it wants to allow.

Facebook NPR Twitter Rachel Shannon Google Donald Trump Joe Biden Official Youtube President Trump
Arkansas AG On Google Antitrust Suit: 'I Don't Want What Google Says Is Best'

NPR's Business Story of the Day

06:49 min | 1 year ago

Arkansas AG On Google Antitrust Suit: 'I Don't Want What Google Says Is Best'

"The Department of Justice is suing Google accusing it of being quote a monopoly gatekeeper for the Internet Google's worth about a trillion dollars, which is very big and the DOJ says it's abusing its dominance over smaller rival companies Google's chief legal officer Kent Walker Calls Lawsuit Deeply. Flawed in a statement eleven republican state attorneys general join that suit including Arkansas AG. Leslie Rutledge who's with me now, and before we start talking I, want to note that Google is a financial sponsor of NPR Good Morning Ms Rutledge. We're good morning. Thanks so much for having me on today of course state attorneys General I should say were investigating Google what is the most compelling evidence that investigation uncovered that says to you what Google is doing is illegal and we should sue the company. Look correct when people google something they believe that it's free to Google and that they're going to get the best products I Brought up to them on that search engine. But what we have found through those investigations is that Google has manipulated those search engines. They have a exclusivity contract essentially when you buy an apple product and automatically defaults to Google, and when you type something into noodle and populate, you may not be getting the the best products or the best services to you. Rather you're getting what Google you to she, and that's what is so concerning is that they control ninety plus percent of the market space in the search engine world. I'm going to get to the point you're making about default in just a moment but the. Thing that I am very curious about have you gotten specific complaints from your constituents in Arkansas saying Google is making it hard for me to do X. Y. and Z in a way that illegal. But we received thousands of complaints every single week I some about search engine, some about robocalls, and so I don't have those in front of me unfortunately right now. But yes, we receive complaints about people not being able to find perhaps their products not being populated your winds, my product my services can't on page ten of a Google search when it clearly most popular product and it should be on page one. Okay. Let's move to the question of it being the default search engine. So one of the main arguments in favor of Google, the argument that Google would make is it is free in the sense that I am not paying anything when I, you know Google my name, for example, which I try not to do it it is the best. That's Google's argument. And if you want to change your search engine Google says, here's how you do it. In fact, in their statement, responding to the lawsuit actually have instructions on how to change a search engine from Google to say Beng why don't you buy that? It is bad but fault and the reason why we don't produce because again, they control ninety percent plus of beat the market space in this area and so it's not hard to shut out competition when you've already shut out competition and people go has now become a verb it's not simply a noun, it's not simply a suburban so people use it to describe even if they were using being or some other search and they will say, well, let me Google that and they might go to blame. They're not going to say let me bring that and it has. To, be a verb I I get what you're saying, but that's not a leak. That's not illegal but the deceptive trade practices and that's why we're bringing this antitrust lawsuit. Stating that. and. Pushing out the competition where there can be no competition is illegal and that's why we've worked with the Department of Justice Attorney General Bar in these other ten states to bring this suit against Google we want Americans to have the best products. The Best Services I know if my two year old daughter gets sick at night and I'm searching, I'm googling if you will to find a pediatrician or how to help her I, want the back Stalker and the best medication I don't want what doodle says as best I want the actual best and that's what every American wants. When they look for something, we don't want something three just because. We want the best it's free. The lawsuit talks about the need for quote, structural remedies but then it doesn't offer any details. What are the structural remedies that you envision? Are you talking about breaking apart parts of this business? Not, necessarily, no not at all I think it's allowing more competition to come in. There are so many new and innovative models for research emerging. But in order for those models to have a chance, we need google to break it stranglehold over the Internet. So it doesn't mean breaking apart the company it means you're breaking apart the stranglehold breaking apart that ninety plus percent and the market place. You Google doing something voluntarily which many businesses would argue. that. It is not in their interest and they shouldn't do it. Let me ask you. About something about who's joined this suit. So it's eleven republican state Attorney General No Democrats just yet as I understand it historically Republicans. Have not been in favor of many types of government regulation of private business. The trump administration often is not what makes this particular case different but we would. Strongly encourage our democratic colleagues from across the country to join these efforts I know that we've been conversations with him. So this doesn't necessarily have to be partisan effort. We would love to be a bipartisan effort a and yes, we're Publicans we are not. Fond of over regulation by government, how you have a companies or big tech companies. Are Shutting out competition or who are impacting individual some free speech rights and yes, we will step in and that's our job as the chief law enforcement and the chief legal officers of our respective states and working with the Department of Justice. Are you considering signing onto any similar lawsuits against other tech giants? So facebook apple and Amazon Spring to mind. Well, it has making starting in recent weeks months with what we're seeing from big tech companies who are blocking speech on their platforms speech that it's not necessarily violent or destructive, but rather speech if they do not agree with and so we want all Americans whatever plant they're using the of the exercise, their free speech, and to be able to use these platforms and to not be shut out simply for political reasons. As you know in right now we're approaching the number thirty election. Many people are already voting absentee or early voting state and. Signs some big tech companies blocking speeches become very concerning. It is something that we were talking about on a national level. I. Will say that we would need to look a bit further for evidence for that as our tech correspondent Shannon bond has pointed out Leslie. Rutledge Attorney General for Arkansas. Thank you so much. Thank, you have a great day.

Google Department Of Justice Arkansas Leslie Rutledge Attorney Chief Legal Officer DOJ Kent Walker NPR Beng Shannon Bond Facebook Amazon Apple
"shannon bond" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:09 min | 1 year ago

"shannon bond" Discussed on KCRW

"Center. This is all things Considered from NPR News. I'm Elsa Chang Facebook said today it is banning all content that denies or distorts the Holocaust. That is a big reversal. CEO Mark Zuckerberg has long said the social network is a place for free speech, even if that speech is offensive. NPR Tech correspondent Shannon Bond is on the line with us now to offer more details, and we should note that Facebook is among NPR's financial supporters. Hey, Shannon. Hey, Elsa. So tell us a little more about this new policy. I mean, how did Zuckerberg's thinking on this change? Yes, I understand that we should go back to 2018. He gave this interview to Recode. And he said that while he personally finds Holocaust denial deeply offensive He said. Facebook shouldn't take thes post down just because they're factually wrong. Here's what he told them. I just don't think that it is the right thing to say. We're going to take someone off the platform if they get things wrong, even multiple times. And really, in the way that Zuckerberg frames this, You know, it's his ideas. Facebook is a place for people to exercise free speech, and the company's shouldn't be the arbiter of truth. He says that over and over This approach, of course, has caused a lot of controversy and criticism. Zuckerberg even had to go back and clarify he wasn't defending Holocaust deniers. So today in a Facebook post, Zuckerberg now says his thinking has quote evolved over how his hand company handles Holocaust denial and that balance between free speech and harm Interesting. Well, what about the timing of this policy change? I mean, why is Facebook taking action now? You think Well, Facebook says this is, you know really about what's happening in the world. They point to data showing a global increase in anti Semitic violence. They also referenced this study of younger Americans that showed almost a quarter say the Holocaust is a myth or exaggerated or they're unsure about it. They say that's an alarming level of ignorance. And there's external pressure. This summer, a group called the conference on Jewish Material Claims against Germany organized a social media campaign..

Elsa Chang Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg Facebook NPR News Shannon Bond NPR Germany
"shannon bond" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:19 min | 1 year ago

"shannon bond" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The oil production in the Gulf has been taken off line in anticipation of the storm, and it will take some time to assess how much damage the storm may have caused. As the pandemic continues to keep demand for oil down any increase in oil prices widely expected to be temporary. Camila Domino SKI NPR news Twitter is once again tightening its rules against misinformation over concerns about voter intimidation and manipulation. Pure Shannon Bond reports Twitter users can expect to see more prominent warning labels on the platform that will make it harder to see and share false claims. Misleading posts from politicians and other users with big followings will be hidden behind a warning screen and it will be harder to share those posts. The company will also nudge users to read credible information before Retweeting a post with debunked claims. Like Facebook, Twitter is under pressure to stamp out election misinformation. Both companies have announced a cascade of new rules in the past few weeks, but they've been largely reluctant to remove posts entirely unless they call for violence or try to intimidate voters. Shannon Bond, NPR news Wall Street higher by the closing bell. You're listening to NPR news live from news. I'm terrorist. Siler. Forecasters say more warm, dry and occasionally windy weather will arrive in large parts of the state next week. That means it Renewed chance of P Genie power shut offs is Dan Recchi reports historically, October marks the height of Northern California's fire season. The danger is heightened by periods of strong northeasterly winds warm, often gusty breezes that dry out vegetation already starving for moisture. The National Weather Service says that kind of weather could arrive next week. PG and E, which preemptively turns off power to areas with a high risk of wildfire during strong wind events, says it's monitoring the forecast closely, but so far has no plans for blackouts. The utility carried out to public safety power shut offs last month, affecting nearly half a million residents in about two dozen counties. I'm Dan Breaking the news around. 200 students from UCSF are working to get the vote out in key swing states for the November election targeting voters that may not have come out in years past..

Twitter NPR Shannon Bond Gulf Dan Recchi UCSF National Weather Service Siler Facebook Northern California
Social media amplifies conspiracies ahead of 2020 presidential election

Morning Edition

03:25 min | 1 year ago

Social media amplifies conspiracies ahead of 2020 presidential election

"So we may be calling it Election day. But there might not be actual results for days, if not weeks in the presidential race, and that's because of all the mail in voting. Right. And during this waiting game, there is some kind of fear that people will start spreading conspiracy theories, especially on social media. Facebook and Twitter say they are well aware of this. They don't want their platforms used to undermine the democratic process. What are they going to do about it? So before we chat about this, we do want to note that Facebook is among among NPR's financial supporters on Let's turn out. NPR's Shannon Bond, who's been looking at all of this is in San Francisco. Good morning, Shannon. Good morning, David. So you're talking to social media companies about these fears? What are they telling you? Well, you know, they've been thinking about the election and misinformation for a long time, looking back to the lessons of 2016 when Russia used social media to try to manipulate voters, and also you know that things like the 2018 midterms other elections around the world. A lot of this planning takes the form of these threats, modeling exercises, So the companies you know, come up with different attacks and then game out how they would respond. You'll Roth, who leads site integrity, a Twitter gave me some examples. A high profile figures account gets taken over to the possibility of a large scale spam or bought attack to the risks of foreign interference like we saw in 2016. This time, As Facebook's chief operating officer, Sheryl Sandberg, told all things considered this week. You know, these companies were concerned about what happens not just before the election, but also after November, 3rd Both Twitter and Facebook say they're now going to be cracking down on post that say, For example, voting by mail is somehow fraudulent post that advocate violence to disrupt the transfer of power or premature claims of victory, and they'll do that by either labeling are removing We should say that some of these kinds of messages on DH spreading doubts have come from none other than the president of the United States himself. I mean, does that fact complicate things for these companies and what they could do? All right. We heard this again from President Trump this week at the debate. He's suggested he might not accept the results of this election. You know, In the case of Facebook, this company has come around pretty reluctantly to the idea that they might have to somehow moderate what the president says. And of course, we've had elections before where we've had to wait to find out who won remember back in 2000, the Bush versus Gore fight that dragged on for more than a month after Election Day, but disinformation expert Clint Watts says, you know we live in a different world now. Yeah, There's some angry lawyers and Bush versus core, but Is pretty tame compared to today. And of course, there wasn't Twitter or Facebook 20 years ago. It's true, and I mean you cover these companies. Twitter Facebook. Are they up to this? I mean, if this becomes a real mess Well, you know, this is not just about the rules that they're making its about whether they enforced thes rules and enforce them consistently. And frankly, the track record isn't particularly great. You know, Facebook specifically has come under a lot of criticism. For just not doing that not enforcing things evenly. Just this week. The Biden campaign called Facebook quote the nation's foremost propagator of disinformation about the voting process. Because it's chosen toe label and not take down a post by Trump attacked voting Now Facebook insists it applies its policies fairly. But you know, to answer the question. We just don't know if the social networks can hold the line after the election.

Facebook Shannon Bond Donald Trump Twitter President Trump NPR Sheryl Sandberg San Francisco Roth Biden David Bush Russia Chief Operating Officer United States Clint Watts
Is Russia interfering in the 2020 election? Yes

All Things Considered

05:26 min | 1 year ago

Is Russia interfering in the 2020 election? Yes

"Officials say Russia is at it again trying to disrupt the U. S election and give President Trump of boost through hacking and spreading falsehoods on social media, Just like in 2016. This time, Russia may not have to work as hard. Clinton what studies disinformation at the foreign policy Research Institute. Russia doesn't have to make fake news. They just repeat, you know what conspiracies air coming out of the White House and the administration. Americans, including the president of the United States are raising the possibility of violence, spreading falsehoods about the election online and casting doubt on the whole process to discuss the dangers. Foreign and domestic. We're joined by NPR, National security correspondent Greg Marie and our tech correspondent Shannon Bond. Good to Have you both Here. Hi. So Greg, let's start with you. Is Russia the only foreign threat or just the biggest right now It's the biggest foreign threat and the national security officials and analysts who are studying this a really, absolutely clear. Russia is the main foreign threat. It wants to help Donald Trump win reelection in China and Iran or the other countries that are also mentioned, but at a much lower level. Now there's a big difference. This time the national security establishment, private researchers and the media are all much more prepared for this kind of disinformation. This time, far more eyeballs are looking for fake social media accounts planted stories. Just to give you one example in the 2018 midterms. The National Security Agency sent cyber teams to Europe to shut down the Russian troll factory that had been involved in the 2016 elections. Soas Faras, We know no foreign campaign has gained any real traction. But is it possible that the 2020 playbook is more advanced and sophisticated and maybe escaping the notice of people who are looking for the kinds of things we saw in 2016? Definitely a possibility. Microsoft put out a big report. They said. It's the same Russian agency military intelligence that's added again, but they are using a different tactics. They were using a lot of pots and automated social media accounts last time. This time, they're going to great lengths to hide their tracks. They're trying to hire Americans who unwittingly will write stories for websites. So yes, the playbook has changed. So Shannon tell us about what's happening in the United States. What are you hearing from tech companies and the experts who study this? Well, they're very alarmed. I spoke with your wrath. He's in charge of sight integrity, a Twitter and he puts it really succinctly. The people who know the most about how to mislead Americans are other Americans. So what security researchers are warning is that you know the atmosphere is just so right for disinformation. Right now we're living with so much uncertainty and that opens the door for bad actors to undermine confidence and voting in the election results because of the changes that are happening during the pandemic. There's also worries that bad actors could use fears about coded to discourage voting, and they're really concerns about extremist groups that could use social media to incite violence. And this also creates opportunity for foreign actors to amplify this information that Americans are spreading like those baseless claims that we keep hearing about voting fraud from President Trump and domestic disinformation is more challenging in some way is for the platforms, then foreign meddling. No, if they're going to take action against somebody like the president that inevitably become sort of a political football. Those calls could be much tougher for Facebook and Twitter to make then taking down Russian bots, and we've seen some of that in the last few months. Tell us about what these companies are doing. Yeah, well, they're doing a lot more than they used Tio. Both Twitter and Facebook have new rules against misinformation about voting. Against casting doubt on results or making premature claims of victory in the aftermath of the election, especially Twitter, stepped up labelling posts from the president. That's something we just didn't see them do really, until the last few months. They also say they're working together their monthly meetings with the industry and government and law enforcement agencies to discuss these threats and their responses, and both companies say they have gamed out Mohr extreme measures that would stop really world risks like voters, depression and violence, but they don't give us a lot of details on what those might be. Can we say yet how that's going Well, Critics say Facebook especially is still just too slow at this. It doesn't label or remove posts in many cases until after they've spread widely. The Biden campaign sent Facebook a letter this week condemning it for not just taking down Trump's false claims about voting. It called Facebook quote the nation's foremost propagator of disinformation about the voting process. Facebook says it applies its rules impartially, and we should note that Facebook is among NPR's financial supporters. You know what I hear again and again about social media platforms. This isn't just a question of are they setting the right rules? It's how are they enforcing those rules? And meanwhile, Greg, the president of the United States, is repeatedly questioning the legitimacy of the election and saying things about voting that are just flatly false. How is that shaping this discussion? Yes, this has had an impact. The Russian goal for years and years has been to undermine the credibility of the U. S political system. And now we have a president declaring at campaign events that mail in ballots aren't credible that this is the most corrupt election in U. S history. It's a sharp contrast from what we hear from officials like FBI director Chris Ray. You say Election systems have been hardened, tested and retested, and it will be extremely difficult to tamper with votes as we enter this final month.

Facebook President Trump Russia Twitter United States Greg Marie Shannon Bond NPR White House U. S National Security Agency Clinton Microsoft Policy Research Institute Europe FBI Chris Ray
Zuckerberg, Chan invest $300 million in election infrastructure

All Things Considered

00:55 sec | 1 year ago

Zuckerberg, Chan invest $300 million in election infrastructure

"Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and his wife are donating $300 million to promote safe and reliable voting in November. NPR's Shannon Bond reports the funds will help recruit poll workers. My protective equipment and assist local officials. The donation from Mark Zuckerberg and Priscilla Chan is going to a pair of nonprofits working to ensure voting is safe and election systems are secure in a Facebook post. Zuckerberg says he's concerned about challenges to election infrastructure from the cove in 19 pandemic. He says he wants to make sure that officials have the resources to guarantee every vote will be counted. This book has faced criticism for the way its platform has been used to spread disinformation, including from Russian trolls during the 2016 election. The company says it's cracking down on false information about voting and elections this year, and it's pledged to help four million people register to vote. Shannon Bond. NPR NEWS SAN

Mark Zuckerberg Shannon Bond Facebook NPR CEO SAN
Former Uber exec charged with trying to hide massive hack

Morning Edition

01:58 min | 1 year ago

Former Uber exec charged with trying to hide massive hack

"Executive at Uber is accused of concealing a massive hack that exposed the data of 57 million drivers and passengers. He was fired and now faces criminal charges. NPR's tech correspondent Shannon Bond reports and just a note here Uber is an NPR financial supporter. When Joe Sullivan learns that hackers had stolen huge amounts of data from uber back in 2016. He didn't tell regulators, law enforcement or the public. Instead, federal prosecutors allege, Uber's chief security officer tried to hide it. Here's US Attorney David Anderson, who filed the charges against Sullivan in federal court in Northern California. We expect prompt reporting of criminal conduct. We expect cooperation with our investigations. We will not tolerate corporate cover ups. We will not tolerate illegal hush money payments to keep the incident under wraps. Prosecutors say Sullivan arranged for uber to pay the hackers $100,000, and he had them signed non disclosure agreements, saying falsely that they never stole any data. That payment was made through Uber's Bug bounty program. Many tech companies have similar programs offering rewards to so called white hat hackers that test their systems for vulnerabilities. But Anderson says this payment was not a bug bounty. It was a cover up. The problem isn't with the legitimate bug bounty. The problem is that this house money payment was not a bug bounty best. The problem. Whoever did eventually disclosed the breach and fire Sullivan, but not until a year later. Two men pleaded guilty to the hack last year. Now Sullivan is charged with obstructing justice and concealing a felony. A spokesman for Sullivan says there's no merit to the charges. He says it was up to Uber's legal team to report the reach. Huber says it's cooperating with the investigation. If he's convicted, Sullivan could face up to eight years in prison and $500,000 in fines. Shannon Bond. NPR NEWS, San

Uber Joe Sullivan Shannon Bond NPR Npr News David Anderson Executive Huber Us Attorney Northern California Officer SAN
Former Uber exec charged with trying to hide massive hack

Morning Edition

01:57 min | 1 year ago

Former Uber exec charged with trying to hide massive hack

"Executive at Uber is accused of concealing a massive hack that exposed the data of 57 million drivers and passengers. He was fired and now faces criminal charges. NPR's tech correspondent Shannon Bond reports and just a note here Uber is an NPR financial supporter. When Joe Sullivan learned that hackers had stolen huge amounts of data from uber back in 2016, he didn't tell regulators, law enforcement or the public. Instead, federal prosecutors allege, Uber's chief security officer tried to hide it. Here's US Attorney David Anderson, who filed the charges against Sullivan in federal court in Northern California. We expect prompt reporting of criminal conduct. We expect cooperation with our investigations. We will not tolerate corporate cover ups. We will not tolerate illegal hush money payments to keep the incident under wraps. Prosecutors say Sullivan arranged for uber to pay the hackers $100,000, and he had them signed non disclosure agreements, saying falsely that they never stole any data. That payment was made through Uber's Bug bounty program. Many tech companies have similar programs offering rewards to so called white hat hackers that test their systems for vulnerabilities. But Anderson says this payment was not a bug bounty. It was a cover up. The problem isn't with the legitimate bug Bali. The problem is that this house money payment was not a bug bounty best. The problem. Whoever did eventually disclosed the breach and fire Sullivan, but not until a year later. Human pleaded guilty to the hack last year. Now Sullivan is charged with obstructing justice and concealing a felony. A spokesman for Sullivan says there's no merit to the charges. He says it was up to Uber's legal team to report the breach. Huber says it's cooperating with the investigation. If he's convicted, Sullivan could face up to eight years in prison and $500,000 in fines. Shannon Bond,

Uber Joe Sullivan Shannon Bond David Anderson NPR Executive Huber Us Attorney Northern California Officer Human
Former Uber Security Chief Charged With Paying 'Hush Money' To Conceal Data Breach

NPR's Business Story of the Day

01:56 min | 1 year ago

Former Uber Security Chief Charged With Paying 'Hush Money' To Conceal Data Breach

"Former top executive at Uber is accused of concealing a massive hack that exposed the data of fifty, seven million drivers and passengers he was fired and now faces criminal charges, NPR's tech correspondent Shannon bond reports, and just to note uber is an NPR financial supporter when Joe Sullivan learned that hackers had stolen huge amounts of data from Uber, back in two thousand sixteen, he didn't tell regulators law enforcement or the public instead federal prosecutors allege Uber's chief security officer tried to hide it. Here's US attorney David Anderson who filed the charges against Sullivan in federal court in Northern California, we expect proper pouring of criminal conduct. We expect cooperation with our investigations. We will not tolerate corporate cover ups we will not tolerate illegal hush money payments to keep the incident under wraps prosecutors say Sullivan, or for Uber, to pay the hackers one, hundred, thousand dollars and he had them signed nondisclosure agreements saying falsely that they never stole any data. That payment was made through Uber's Bug bounty program. Many tech companies have similar programs offering rewards to so called white hat hackers that test their systems for vulnerabilities. But Anderson says this payment was not a bug bounty? It was a cover up the problem isn't with a legitimate bug. Now, the problem is that this hush money payment was not a bug valley best the problem overdid eventually disclose the breach and fire Sullivan but not until a year later, two men pleaded guilty to the hack last year. Now, Sullivan is charged with Obstructing Justice and concealing felony a spokesman for Sullivan, says, there's no merit to the charges. He says it was up to Uber's legal team to report the breach Uber says it's cooperating with the investigation. If he's convicted, Sullivan could face up to eight years in prison and five hundred thousand dollars in

Uber Joe Sullivan David Anderson NPR Shannon Bond Us Attorney Executive Northern California Officer
"shannon bond" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:09 min | 1 year ago

"shannon bond" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"You know, we no social media and in this day and age is already critical to reaching voters with a pandemic. It's even more clear. This is a campaign going to be fought online. NPR Tech correspondent Shannon Bond, Shannon. Thanks a lot. Thanks. 75 years ago. Today, an American warplane dropped the world's first atomic weapon. It exploded directly above the Japanese city of Hiroshima, instantly killing tens of thousands of civilians. That nuclear air strike and a 2nd 13 days later in Nagasaki, led to the Japanese surrender and the end of World War two. NPR's David Well no reports. What was justified, then is being questioned today and a note. This story includes a graphic account of the aftermath of the attack. President Harry Truman was returning from an Allied Nations conference in Potsdam, Germany, where a demand for Japan's unconditional surrender had been refused when he recorded this message to the American people. On August 6th, 1945 short time ago, an American airplane Dropped one bomb on here, Oshima! And destroyed its usefulness to the enemy Human then described the terrible new weapon that had obliterated 2/3 of Hiroshima. It is an atomic bomb. It is a harnessing of the basic power of the universe. It's explosion at 8 16 on a Monday morning created a gigantic 900 foot wide fireball 500,000 degrees hot In that moment, I saw that bluish white flesh. In the windows. Setsuko Thurlow was a 13 year old in Hiroshima. That fateful day. Three years ago, she told NPR how she crawled out of a collapsed building to find dark objects approaching her. It was human beings fried by the blast there, covered with blood, burned and blood and swollen. Flexible hung him from their bones, part of their bodies from missing and someone carrying their own eyeballs in their hands and that they collapse. Their stomach burst open Thurlow's campaign for decades against nuclear weapons. Earlier this week, she sent President Trump a letter Nuclear weapons, she wrote, are not a necessary evil. They are the ultimate evil. Russell gawking, Bach witnessed the Hiroshima bombing from a very different perspective. Before his death in November. He'd been the last surviving member of the US crew on that mission passed four years ago What his thoughts were, as he rode on a warplane named necessary evil. Achenbach told voices of the Manhattan project. We had to go out and kill every one of them. We were at war. They started it. Your turn to finish it. Every day we see lots of lives. Both of our military and their military. Four years ago, Barack Obama became the first American head of state to visit Hiroshima's peace memorial. He offered condolences but pointedly did not apologize. Mere words. Do not give voice to such suffering. But we have a shared responsibility look directly into the eye of history..

Hiroshima Setsuko Thurlow NPR Barack Obama President Harry Truman Shannon Bond President Trump Bach Nagasaki Oshima Potsdam Allied Nations David Well Japan Germany US
"shannon bond" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:30 min | 2 years ago

"shannon bond" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Correspondent Shannon Bond has more on the steel. Harry Campbell runs a blogger for his fellow Uber and Lyft drivers is called the Rideshare guy. But these days, it might be more accurate to call it the food delivery guy. All of our talk content on the blogging on the YouTube channel is all food delivers. Everyone will issue no signing up are trying to understand it and earnings potential. That's because ride hailing is in trouble. Lots of people aren't going to the office or taking trips, so they're not taking ubers. But they are ordering takeout from restaurants. Orders for uber eats food delivery doubled during the second quarter compared to a year ago. In the same three months, demand for rides plunged 75%. Here's how uber CEO Dara cast Russia, he explained the deal to Wall Street analysts, consumers and restaurants have been shifting towards Delivery before Koba 19 But the pandemic is accelerated These trends rapidly attracting new customers and restaurants. But this deal is not going to save uber from bleeding. Cash, food delivery is really competitive. There are lots of APS to choose from out there. So uber and its rivals spend a lot of money on discounts to attract customers. The idea behind buying post meats is to get even bigger, sober can take on the number one food delivery app door dash. That's good news for customers wallet, says Dan Ives, an analyst at Wedbush Securities. I think it's going to be cheaper from the delivery in the near term because you're going to see Your dash who breeds going after market share and in the mean way they're going to get there is on lower costs. But Campbell, the driver and blogger, says more APS meant better options for drivers. You can kind of compare the various offers. You can see who's offering the best bonuses and you kind of hold each company accountable. And he says drivers are already feeling squeeze what many really wanted to transport people, not food. That pays more money. Shannon Bond. NPR NEWS, San Francisco You're listening to all things considered from NPR news. One of the most competitive elections in tomorrow's New Jersey primary is the race to decide which Democrat will challenge. Republican Congressman Jeff Andrew, The onetime Democrat made national headlines late last year when he met with President Trump in the Oval Office. And declared he was defecting to the GOP. You have my undying support. Thank you, ma'am, and always him, by the way. Same way. Thankyou. I'm endorsing him. Okay. W M DS Nancy Solomon reports on the race that has turned into a proxy war over the South Jersey Democratic machine that got van drew elected to Congress in the first place. The first strange thing about this race is that the outsider is a member of the Kennedy family. Amy Kennedy is 1/4 generation Jersey shore native who's married to Patrick Kennedy, the son of Ted and nephew of JFK. She's got national connections and money. But she's also got the local touch. Her parents taught public school in Atlantic County for 40 years. You know, having the mayor of that beacon who Supported my run. Also be the teacher whose classroom was next door to my mom's for 30 years. You know those relationships. Are what people trust. The other top candidate in the Democratic primary is Bridget Callahan Harrison, a professor of political science who's also local. Although she works at Montclair State University at the northern end of the state. She announced to run the week of Andrew's defection and immediately received the endorsement of seven crucial foot soldiers in the South Jersey Party machine. New Jersey Senate President Stephen Sweeney and the chairman of six County party committees in the district and for a lot of us that made us suspicious because We kind of saw that pattern with Jesse Andrew Angela Bardo is a sign language interpreter and local activist in Cumberland County, who hasn't for gotten the 2018 race the party boss George nor cross endorsed fan Drew. Before he'd even announced he was running for Congress. And we kind of felt like they did that to us again that they went ahead without including our opinions and preemptively endorsed. Another candidate before we actually have to have a good look at everyone who was running so Bardo and a network of progressive organizations are supporting Amy Kennedy, and they believe she has a chance to beat the machine. The second Congressional district stretches across the southern end of New Jersey with the bulk of the population clustered along the Jersey shore from Atlantic City to Cape May. It voted for Trump in 2016 and Obama twice before that. Neither Kennedy nor Callahan Harrison want the campaign to be about the Norcross machine. Callahan Harrison, a longtime political commentator and author declined to request to be interviewed after I disclosed the story would partly focus on her party backing. Kennedy prefers to talk about the betrayal of Jeff Andrew and her opposition to Donald Trump. Right now we need to be focused on what's happening and how people are suffering in this district. And it's a time when I think a lot of people are struggling not just with their physical health and the economy, but the anxiety and stress of this moment. Cupid 19 is changing politics as usual. Ben Dork in a professor Rohan University, says primaries are usually swayed by the party faithful who show up in low turnout elections. But ballots were mailed to every registered voter, making it much easier to cast a vote and tougher to predict the outcome. No one is quite sure because the more random registered Democrats may now vote. Which up and whatever model, you might have that so no one is really sure what's gonna happen here. There's not a lot of daylight between the candidates positions. Which has made some voters pay even closer attention to endorsements. Senator Cory Booker has endorsed Callahan. Harrison Booker took a lot of heat last year when he attended a fundraiser for his presidential campaign hosted by George Norcross. Who's been in a power struggle with Governor Phil Murphy. Late last month, Murphy endorsed Kennedy, a source close to the governor says he agrees with progressive activists like Sue Altman of New Jersey working families..

Amy Kennedy New Jersey Bridget Callahan Harrison Jeff Andrew Shannon Bond Jesse Andrew Angela Bardo Harry Campbell President Trump Congress George Norcross NPR NEWS YouTube Patrick Kennedy Kennedy family South Jersey Party Senator Cory Booker Harrison Booker Phil Murphy Atlantic County South Jersey
"shannon bond" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:04 min | 2 years ago

"shannon bond" Discussed on KCRW

"Some are acting just for this month of July. Others for longer and the boycott includes Facebook's property, instagram. Cos they're pressing Facebook to do more about malicious content. Facebook We should notice among NPR's financial supporters, though we cover them just the same, including criticism of the company, which we're hearing this morning from NPR Tech correspondent Shannon Bond. Good morning. Morning, Steve and we should note the advertisers are pressing Facebook because they're under pressure. Who's pushing him? A coalition of Abassi groups is urging these advertisers to pull their money from Facebook. One of those groups is color of change. There are civil rights organization and I spoke with the president Rashad Robinson, He says. Facebook has given its critics no other choice. This failure to address these problems have given those of us in the civil rights community as well as corporations on Ly one path, and that is the path of having to pursue this boycott. So the coalition is making 10 demands of Facebook, ranging from giving advertisers their money back if their ads appear next to content that gets removed to cracking down on lies from politicians do all 300 The companies that are dropping Facebook for awhile, support all the demands. There's a real mix. Some do support the demands, but some others like Coca Cola and Target, say, yes, we're going to pause and reconsider our Facebook advertising, in some cases, all of their social media advertising They say they're not officially joining this boycott, and I think what's going on there is these companies feel pressure there. These huge protests this reckoning over racism we're seeing in this country. Companies feel pressure to show they're doing something. They also want to put some distance between themselves in this campaign, so they're more free to make their own decisions about whether and when to resume advertising on Facebook. Well, how is Facebook, responding? Facebook says it invest billions of dollars in keeping its platform safe. And just yesterday, it said it banned hundreds of accounts and groups connected to the boogaloo movement. That's a loose network of far right extremists, and that's the kind of thing advertisers want to see the company doing here's what Facebook's top spokesman Nick Clegg, told CNN on Sunday. Facebook. We have absolutely no incentive to tolerate hate speech. We don't like users don't like it advertises understandably don't like it. Clegg pointed out that over 100 billion messages are sent on Facebook's platforms every day, and so, you know, the company tries to crack down. It's not perfect. You can't remove everything. Last week, CEO Mark Mark Zuckerberg did announce some policy changes. Facebook is going to put warning labels on post from politicians like President Trump. The briquettes rules, and that's a huge reversal. But when Zuckerberg made that announcement, he did not mention the advertising boycott at all. Well, can I just ask? You've mentioned a couple of times here that for many companies, this is a temporary departure there coming back. How dependent? Are they on Facebook? Well, you know, Facebook has a huge stable of advertisers. I mean, it's whole business's advertising. But for many of these advertisers, it's just not really a choice to leave Facebook, Facebook and other social media groups. Let them reach specific communities at a fraction of what they would pay to, you know, buy a commercial on broadcast television. You know, a really good example I think is one of in one of the biggest spenders right now is the Biden campaign. You know, Joe Biden has been very vocal lately and criticizing Facebook. He's calling for changes. He says the company needs to crack down moron hate speech. But you know when NPR asked his campaign if it was going to stop advertising on Facebook, the spokesman told us quote with less than five months until election Day. We cannot afford to see these platforms to Donald Trump and his lies. It's a quote NPR's Shannon Bond. Thanks so much. Thank you. Russians are voting today on more than 200 amendments to their constitution. They're being asked to give a simple yes or no answer to all. Here's why it's so high stakes. One of the amendments would allow Vladimir Putin to stay in power for another 16 years. NPR's Lucien Kim is in Moscow. The Russian constitution is strangely specific about presidential term limits. It says. No person shall serve more than two consecutive terms. Thanks to that wording, Vladimir Putin is now in his fourth term after taking a break and serving as prime minister. Some Russians wondered if you try that again in 2024. They got their answer in March with this sub novel only Institute. A member of parliament proposed a constitutional amendment resetting Putin's presidential term limits but deviated civilian Bilbo has emotion, Putin told parliament it might be a good idea, but only if he got the blessing of the constitutional Court and the Russian people. Political analyst Masha Lipman says Putin wanted a national vote because it lends him legitimacy. It is very important to him to have this popular endorsement. Even if it is a forest, even if it is a travesty off popular will the amendment letting Putin stay in power was tacked onto a raft of changes enshrining Russians, faith in God in the Constitution. Banning gay marriage and elevating the status of the Russian language. Sure enough. The amendments were rubber stent by Russia's parliament and the constitutional court. But then the Corona virus hit Russia and Putin reluctantly had to postpone the vote. Originally scheduled for April, he was forced to eat gold to the power of the virus, but he never concedes the pressure. I think this is a unique situation, which he had to yield. Now the vote is going ahead. Even though Russia has the world's third highest number of Corona virus infections. The Central Election Commission says all health and safety precautions are being taken with temperature controls, masks and gloves at polling stations. TV ads have shown Russian celebrities saying why they plan to vote for Putin's amendments.

Facebook Vladimir Putin NPR President Trump Shannon Bond constitutional Court Russia Mark Mark Zuckerberg Abassi Nick Clegg Joe Biden Steve Rashad Robinson Coca Cola Central Election Commission CNN
"shannon bond" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"shannon bond" Discussed on KCRW

"This day is may first international workers day and around the world it is traditionally a day to celebrate Labor Day workers from Amazon and Walmart and target and other companies are organizing mass protests they say the companies aren't doing enough to protect them NPR's Shannon bond has more the hashtag for today's protest is essential workers day those essential workers check you out of the supermarket pack your online orders to deliver your groceries they've been thrust onto the front lines some have even died from the corona virus now they're demanding more protective equipment expanded sickly even better pay by walking off the job in protesting outside stores we're dealing with multi billion dollar companies here and we're we're a very very small group and individually speaking when it comes down to trying to drag issues yeah each company will lease works for the grocery delivery apps checked which is owned by target he organized a walkout of shift workers in April one of many protests in recent weeks by delivery warehouse and retail workers he says today's strike is about bringing all these different workers together to show how much they have in common it's just a beat profit over people for the most part and that is where the disconnect is because at the end of the day the work force in the work labors are the ones that are helping the company become who they are as the pandemic puts low wage work in the spotlight so least another organisers are hoping to seize the public's attention and galvanized a new wave of labor activism across a broad range of companies they come from traditional organizations like Walmart fed ex whole foods target the new gig economy apps like Instacart and Shipt and fast growing Amazon warehouses I know that most of these companies are among NPR sponsors it's unclear how many people will participate today the company's in response say they welcome input from workers they've increased pay and stepped up health and safety measures however Amazon accuses labor groups of being irresponsible by making false claims about the company it says protesters don't represent the majority of workers Shannon.

Amazon NPR Shannon bond Walmart Instacart
"shannon bond" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"shannon bond" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This day is may first international workers day around the world it is traditionally a day to celebrate Labor Day workers from Amazon and Walmart and target and other companies organizing mass protests they say the companies aren't doing enough to protect them NPR's Shannon bond has more the hashtag for today's protest is essential workers day those essential workers check you out of the supermarket pack your online orders to deliver your groceries they've been thrust onto the front lines some have even died from the corona virus now they're demanding more protective equipment expanded sickly even better pay by walking off the job and protesting outside stores we're dealing with multi billion dollar companies here and we're we're a very very small group and individually speaking when it comes down to trying to drag issues give these companies Willis lease works for the grocery delivery apps checked which is owned by target he organized a walk out and shift workers in April one of many protests in recent weeks by delivery warehouse and retail workers he says today's strike is about bringing all these different workers together to show how much they have in common it seems to be profit over people for the most part and that is where the disconnect is because at the end of the day the workforce and work labors are the ones that are helping the company become who they are as the pandemic puts low wage work in the spotlight so least another organisers are hoping to seize the public's attention and galvanized a new wave of labor activism across a broad range of companies they come from traditional organizations like Walmart fed ex whole foods target the new gig economy apps like Instacart and Shipt and fast growing Amazon warehouses I know that most of these companies are among NPR sponsors it's unclear how many people will participate today the company's in response say they welcome input from workers they've increased pay and stepped up health and safety measures however Amazon accuses labor groups of being irresponsible by making false claims about the company it says protesters don't represent the majority.

Amazon NPR Shannon bond Walmart Instacart
"shannon bond" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"shannon bond" Discussed on KCRW

"This day is may first international workers day and around the world it is traditionally a day to celebrate Labor Day workers from Amazon and Walmart and target and other companies organizing mass protests they say the companies aren't doing enough to protect them NPR's Shannon bond has more the hashtag for today's protest is essential workers day those essential workers check you out of the supermarket pack your online orders to deliver your groceries they've been thrust onto the front lines some have even died from the corona virus now they're demanding more protective equipment expanded sickly even better pay by walking off the job in protesting outside stores we're dealing with multi billion dollar companies here and we're we're a very very small group and individually speaking when it comes down to trying to drag issues give these companies Willis lease works for the grocery delivery apps checked which is owned by target he organized a walkout of shift workers in April one of many protests in recent weeks by delivery warehouse and retail workers he says today's strike is about bringing all these different workers together to show how much they have in common it's just a beat profit over people for the most part and that is where the disconnect is because at the end of the day the work force in the work labors are the ones that are helping the company become who they are as the pandemic puts low wage work in the spotlight so least another organisers are hoping to seize the public's attention and galvanized a new wave of labor activism across a broad range of companies they come from traditional organizations like Walmart fed ex whole foods target the new gig economy apps like Instacart and Shipt and fast growing Amazon warehouses I know that most of these companies are among NPR sponsors it's unclear how many people will participate today the company's in response say they welcome input from workers they've increased pay and stepped up health and safety measures however Amazon accuses labor groups of being irresponsible by making false claims about the company it says protesters don't represent the majority of workers.

Amazon NPR Shannon bond Walmart Instacart
"shannon bond" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:15 min | 2 years ago

"shannon bond" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Not interested in the motion to dismiss I thank both sides of you to be heard they believe the president needs to be heard for the first time in a fair setting democratic leaders must also name the house managers who will present the impeachment case in the Senate trial president trump meanwhile heads to Wisconsin tonight for a rally in Milwaukee NPR's Mar Elias and has more as the democratic presidential candidates debate in des Moines president trump will be in Wisconsin a must win state for him even if he lost Michigan and Pennsylvania if he won every other state he won in twenty sixteen including Wisconsin he'd win a second term Wisconsin is full of the white working class voters that make up trumps loyal base and he will tell them that he has delivered on a good economy but at least in Wisconsin one of his promises has not been met two and a half years ago the president announced with great fanfare a plan by the Taiwanese company Foxconn to create thirteen thousand manufacturing jobs in Wisconsin but those jobs have not materialized yet Mar alliance in NPR news Washington company apple is disputing the U. S. government's claim that it has failed to help in the investigation into a deadly shooting at a navy base in Florida last month and beer Shannon bond reports this is part of the conflict over privacy and public safety US Attorney General William Barr said on Monday that apple had not given quote any substantive assistance in the investigation into the Pensacola shooting in a statement the iPhone maker says it rejects that characterization apple says it is turned over many gigabytes of data from the shooters accounts to the government that includes iCloud back UPS account information and transaction data the FBI has asked apple to help to get data from the shooters to I. phones which are locked apple's previously rejected such requests the company says enabling law enforcement to access encrypted data on its devices would also open the door for hackers to threaten user security Shannon bond NPR news San Francisco you're listening to NPR news from Washington this is W. NYC from New York good morning I'm Richard hake.

NYC NPR Pensacola US Attorney Shannon bond Washington des Moines Milwaukee Senate Richard hake New York president San Francisco FBI William Barr
"shannon bond" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:09 min | 2 years ago

"shannon bond" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This ad you realize if you read beyond the headlines that it's not true but if you only read the headline you might think it's true so describe this out for us sure it shows a picture of president trump shaking hands with mark Zuckerberg in the oval office it says breaking news mark Zuckerberg and Facebook just endorsed Donald Trump for reelection you're probably shocked and you might be thinking how could this possibly be true and then the address on to say well it's not sorry so we should reiterate here Facebook ins are covered have not endorsed president or in or any other candidate but the one campaign started running this ad on Thursday are you concerned a lot of people all over the country and Facebook actually approved the ads you as you said it's been out for a few days even though it's got a lot of publicity so this didn't just accidentally slip through some automated approval system now worn says that proves her point although I've seen some comments on Facebook saying it's not really a lights just a parity in Facebook is fine with parity's but explain to us why is she running this ad yeah I mean I was with Warren has been a relentless critic of Facebook and she says she's made an odd that still liberally falls to highlight this fact that Facebook allows political candidates to essentially lie in their ads so this actually came up because of another misleading political at the trump campaign was running this ad across social media and on TV making false claims about Joe Biden and the Biden campaign complained but Facebook didn't take it down it says it doesn't factcheck political speech as a matter of course that's the problem that Warren is raising she says by taking money for these kinds of ads Facebook is choosing profits over quote protecting democracy when I was getting ready to talk to you I was reading about Facebook's policy on when it will or won't reject ads or downplay ads and it's confusing and it's controversial what are the rules governing this area yeah it is confusing so what Facebook says is we are actually doing anything different than what broadcast television there's actually an FTC rule that says broadcast stations half to error political ads they can't block them based on what they say the difference is for cable networks and people might have seen that CNN refused to air the trump ad it says its own policies for what it airs Facebook has that discretion but they're saying they consider themselves to be like the broadcast network and so they're not going to censor political ads it seems like Facebook is framing this as a free speech issue but how much of this is driven by ad revenue at his Facebook possibly looking the other way because advertising is so lucrative that's a good question now Facebook says political ads are actually just a drop in the bucket for them in that company sold fifty five billion dollars worth of ads last year and and clouds are just a single digit percentage of their total but it's also clearly reluctant to drop political advertising altogether so I think this is really about Facebook feeling it can't win if it starts pull policing political speech the presidential election is obviously more than a year away how do you see this playing out over the coming year and beyond okay spending more money online we know this and Facebook is in a particularly important for them is the place to advertise you can reach so many people there Facebook made a very clear though it's not going to tell politicians what they can or can't say and it's gonna keep selling these ads so I think there's clearly a continued risk will be once again a place where misinformation spreading that's N. P. R.'s tech correspondent Shannon bond Shannon thank you thanks and we want to note that Facebook is among NPR's recent financial supporters you're listening to All Things Considered from NPR news this is Katie reading news I'm Jeremy Siegel Pacific gas and electric says it's restored power to all of its customers who were affected by the utilities in massive planned outages Ginny began cutting power to more than seven hundred thirty thousand of its customers on Tuesday evening amid predictions of gusty winds and dry conditions that could fuel wildfires late last night the utility announce it restored service to everyone affected by the blackouts which were unprecedented in size spanning from parts of the bay area all the way up into the Sierra foothills and the site of the deadliest and most destructive fire in California's history kick you would use Laura Clive and has been reporting in that area in Butte county and he joins me now to talk about how residents there have been coping Hey Laura Hey so obviously from P. genies perspective this is an effort to prevent another disaster like we saw last year in paradise the campfire which killed more than eighty people down here where I've been reporting in the bay area there's been a lot of frustration about how widespread these power outages have ban what's it been like up there where you've been reporting it's been a lot of mixed feelings so feeling like okay where were you a year ago I wish you'd done this a year ago so we had a whole town and community at the same time now if some people have said this feels like over compensating tension off the power for this long and it's impacting us in real ways in needing to throw away groceries and in disrupting businesses one woman Stacy Pineda said that the she lost her home in paradise in the fire and now she's living in an RV and she's angry I'm not happy there's got to be some middle ground and it's not only affecting the accounting no matter where you go using these impacting people because of this major fire it's all over California that they're impacting people they need to upgrade and repair their systems where it's safe enough to operate and I think that's where they're feeling right now and another thing that you hear there is a lot of mistrust nobody knows if it was too much or if it was exactly what needed to be done and I know a lot of people have been sort of hinting that that the state government that legislator should step in and and do something about this I know governor Newsome has made some comments about this a lot of people of sort of directed some of their frustration towards him what he said about the shuttle's governors and started out this week saying this was necessary reality is.