2 Burst results for "Shankar Vadim"

"shankar vadim" Discussed on Hidden Brain

Hidden Brain

07:21 min | 4 months ago

"shankar vadim" Discussed on Hidden Brain

"Groups offer us a sense of belonging and they can bring out the best in us by the flip side of most in groups. There's an out when we come back. Hala group identities divide us and what we can do to harness the power of groups to build a better world. You're listening to hidden brain. I'm shankar vadim. This is hidden brain. I'm sean covey danton. We've seen how groups can pull us together. Give us shared cultural touch points and become an enduring source resilience and comfort in our evolutionary past. Our group identities were an important source of protection. You would think that forced this. Powerful would also have downsides throughout human history. We've seen numerous examples of how group loyalty is can spill over into tribalism and xenophobia and lead to war and genocide in their new book the power of us the psychologist. Jeff van bevill and dominic packer explore. How group identities pull us together and how they tear us apart the also look at how we can apply what we have learned about the signs of group identity to build a better world jay. You've had remarkable story of two brothers in southern germany. They were cobblers and together ran the dassler brothers shoe factory around the time of the second world war. The brothers had a falling out. What happened next. So these brothers it was world war two nineteen forty three and the one brother addy. He and his wife climbed into the same shelter as his brother. Rudolph's family and addy said. According to legend the dirty bastards are back again. And we don't know if he was referring to the allied warplanes who are coming to bomb them but rudy apparently interpreted this as an insult intended for himself and his family and so it triggered this decades long feud between these two brothers. They ended up breaking up their company and creating to a shoe companies in the same town and that might have been the end of it right but what happened is it. Infected the psychology of all the townspeople and so people on one side of the river of the town identified with addy and the other side identified with the shoe company by rudy and it became known as the town of bent next because people would walk around town looking down at the ground. See what shoes people were wearing. And if you were wearing shoes was from the other company you went date them. You wouldn't be able to go in those stores Marriage was discouraged with people for the wrong shoes. In fact the feud went right to the grave so these two brothers are literally buried at opposite ends of the town cemetery and this might seem like this is a small story is just a little town in germany. But these companies the to shoe companies that were launched by them are now known as adidas which was founded by adi puma which was founded by rudy. These are the biggest companies in the world. And this feud affected the psychology of everybody because these shoes became a signal about group membership and lead to discrimination so when i look at the united states or other countries i feel there are endless. Examples of how a group loyalties. Divide us the conflict between the dassler brothers to me. It seems absurd. The german the about cobbler's they both make sports shoes for having say surely they have so much in common but of course when we find ourselves in the grip of deep divisions they don't seem absurd at. What explains this cap. The dassler brothers demonstrate something really deep about human nature how easily we form groups and coalitions and this has been observed in every culture on earth. That's ever been studied and to these people in this town. This doesn't seem absurd. This seems deeply important in central to their life and who they are. And i think that's the thing. Psychologically is whatever conflicts are driving your own life seem real and the conflicts of other people halfway around the world might seem absurd but it's very much the same psychology that seems to be at play it all of these types of situations so many americans increasingly believed they don't just disagree with people on the other side. But that people on the other side are inherently evil are untrustworthy as a social scientists who study is group. Identity you know. Where are we on the spectrum between healthy disagreement and civil war. What i've noticed is there's an increasing trend towards polarization. That's linked to out group hate more than in group love and this is where politics in the us and many places around the world looks much more like sectarianism because it's connected to our morality and what happens then is people on the in group are good but the oak really is evil. And you'll do anything you can to stop them. You'll even support an in group. Member vote for leader. Who you don't like or don't respect our donorstrust simply because you can't let this evil up group take control and so this is now a driving factor kind many people and their decisions to vote volunteer. Donate money you've conducted studies into how these group level disagreements spill over into our personal lives. How how do these political loyalties divided families at holiday gathering's thanksgiving research suggests that our thanksgiving dinners are getting shorter by roughly half an hour over time. If you're interacting with family members in a place where there's going to be disagreement politically. It becomes intolerable and people. Just don't stick around for dessert basically. It's affected a dating. So i ran a study with a radio station. In new york city at trump's inauguration and we found the biggest form of discrimination we observed to simply that people refuse to date somebody who voted for the other party. And so now there's in fact dating websites dedicated specifically to your political preferences. Serious there's gluten their rettendon now. I don't know if it's called that there's one that's like if you're for trump fans only and stuff like this. Yeah so we talked earlier about how our group loyalties and identities shape are very perceptions of reality. I wanna talk about this idea in the context of group conflict You've conducted some interesting studies looking at yankees fans What do you find in terms of their perceptions when it comes to their their enemies The red sox. Yeah so one of the greatest. Sports rivalries in the country is between the new york. Yankees and the boston red sox. And we've been able to run some studies at yankee stadium with red sox and yankees fans and what we found is that yankees fans had distorted judgments of how close fenway park in boston was so we give them a map and ask them to draw where they thought boston was and they thought it was much closer to new york than it. Actually was. you asked non-fans. They were pretty accurate in estimating. How far away. Fenway park was but they're not threatened by this group in the same way the yankees fans are and so they're not distorting their perceptions in the same way and so this is something that is adaptive to people as if there's a threat and environment you gotta get ready to act and seeing it as closer can sometimes trigger that reaction.

Hala group rudy shankar vadim sean covey danton Jeff van bevill dominic packer dassler brothers adi puma germany addy Rudolph jay adidas united states yankees red sox trump new york city fenway park yankee stadium
"shankar vadim" Discussed on Hidden Brain

Hidden Brain

02:51 min | 4 months ago

"shankar vadim" Discussed on Hidden Brain

"This is hidden brain. I'm shankar vadim. When nelson mandela became south africa's first black president in nineteen ninety four. He had big dreams for his bitterly divided country we enter into covenant that was billed society rain bonus at this and the world. He spent a lifetime fighting the racist apartheid regime including more than a quarter century in prison. He was a heroic figure already. By that time. But many white south africans. They saw him as a criminal terrorist. This is psychologist van. Able as president of the united south africa nelson mandela or madiba as he was known to his supporters needed to find a way for the people in his rainbow nation to see themselves as south africans. I other petitions might have turned to speeches and policies madiba turned to sports offside by he used the rugby world cup which was being hosted in south africa and dreamed apartheid-era south africa had been banned from competition and the south african team was known as the springboks and they were beloved by the white south africans and despised by the black population. But what mandela did was. He went out onto the podium. Not just as the president but as a fan he had the green springboks passengers and he used it as a way to make a statement that we're one team were one country. Now and he took a symbol of oppression and use it as a symbol of togetherness presidents to the captain. The springboks team captain francois. Tr remembers the moment. Madiba walked into the team's locker room before the finals against new zealand. He said Good luck boys and they turned off and my number was on his back in the day was i couldn't sing the anthem because i knew would cry. I was just so proud to be south africa. That the match was a nailbiter. It went into overtime. South africa ended up winning fifteen to twenty across the country. Black and white south africans cheer together in triumph paid off nelson. Intel is cheering. The whole of the stadium ceo flags nelson mandela. Knew that getting enemies to cheer for the same sports team was only a start much work. Remain to heal the wounds of apartheid but his intervention reveal how psychologically astute leader can find ways to create connections among people even bitter enemies this week hidden brain how group identities bring us together tariffs apart.

madiba south africa nelson mandela shankar vadim united south africa Madiba rugby mandela francois new zealand nelson Intel