17 Burst results for "Shami Bundle"

"shami bundle" Discussed on Nature Podcast

Nature Podcast

08:01 min | 2 months ago

"shami bundle" Discussed on Nature Podcast

"Next this week reporter ali jennings has been finding out how strange discrepancy between a theoretical result and one measured experimentally has got physicist redoing. Some to see if it's stumbled into a whole new world of physics. The standard model describes the elementary subatomic particles and most of the fundamental forces that make up the universe it is currently scientists best accepted theoretical description of the quantum will and how these particles and forces interact with each other so when there's an experimental result that the standard model can't explain quantum physicists. Get excited because that could mean that these new physics out there to discover step four would the mule. Immune is a subatomic particle similar to the electron and both generate a magnetic field one aspect of the moons magnetic field. The magnetic moment was measured experimentally. Back in two thousand and one and he is where it gets interesting. The experimental result was not what previous theoretical calculations based on the standard model predicted and physicists. Have been trying to find out why said a previous calculations have been doing for many many decades. This is zoltan photo from penn state university in the us. He and his colleagues had a paper out in nature last week where they recalculated the mu owns magnetic moment using a different theoretical approach and they concentrated on improving one area of calculations that physicists had previously found difficult to accurately entertain so if you look at the calculation for the magnetic momentum to me and you look at the aero r- essentially will. They're coming from the strong interaction. The strong interaction is the fundamental force that holds together subatomic particles cold patrons hammons can momentarily pop in and out of existence near immune and they're strong interaction can affect the mules magnetic moment up until now the most precise theoretical calculations of this effect have been based on data taken from other experiments but zoltan has a different approach. He and his collaborators designed a computer model to simulate hammons interact with moons but the model. He's based entirely on theory and to build it. They had to work out how the world functions at a subatomic level. So what we d. We put the word on a mash on a space time. Great recorded lettuce and be solved. Underlying creations on these space-time that this and you can sold it for these had onic contribution to demands magnetic men and and that's what we did zoltan composite to whether full costing to help predict the weather aircraft fly around measuring variables like temperature pressure and wind speed at specific points on a grid. Those measurements are put into a computer and can be used to calculate the coming weather but instead of temperature and pressure zoltan variables are in the subatomic particles and forces interacting with the moon and there are a lot of them. So it's about a couple of billion variables and you calculate how these variables interacted cheddar. The complexity is enormous. And if you want to reach an and uncertainty which is compatible with the uncertainty experiment. Dan it's really a tremendous burke so zoltan and his collaborators simulated a tiny slice of the subatomic world based entirely on the underlying quantum theory. They then use this to predict the magnetic moment of the mule on. This is the first time that this kind of calculation has been done to such a fine margin of error and if they knew. Theoretical prediction was different from the experimental measurements. Then new kinds of physics could be on the horizon but that's not what they found or result was surprisingly much much razor today experimental result so result suggest that there is probably nothing beyond the standard model. I asked him how he felt about that. If you're asking me then yes. It's a little bit. Pity that the it is not a new four. Sorta new interaction what found but if nature decided that there is nothing new in the moon's magnetic movement. Then let it be when i first heard about it. I thought it was a huge bummer. This is nature's senior reporter for the physical sciences. D'avray castell vecchi. The standard mobile always wins. Will there's no hope for new physics but of course it's a bit more complicated than that. In fact last week there was excitement. Over a new experimental measurement of the moons magnetic moment that new result would have reinforced the difference between the experimental and theoretical measurements where it not sultan's new calculations so how does the physics community feel about sultan's things. I think that people are taking a wait and see attitude because you know it's only the first time that the calculation with lattice has been done with sufficient precision and there's a lot of other teams that are working on cross-checking yet but they also say. There is very puzzling that the result would be so much different from the conventional way of calculating in other words how could the previous theoretical calculations of the museums magnetic moment be so different from zoltan new calculations given that. They're both based on the standard model. One possible explanation could stem from the way. Experimental data is used in the previous calculations if there are a new kind of physics laws that affect the economy data. Then you may not be interpreting it correctly when when people take experimental data and plug it into calculations they do it based on this model. But if there's something wrong with the mold and you know all bets are off. So zoltan result doesn't shut the door on new physics. There may well be other subatomic particles waiting to be found and of course the standard model still has a number of problems. For example it cannot explain gravity or dark energy dark matter. So there's a lot of reasons why physicists expect the standard model ultimately to either fail or need some expansion. People know that there has to be something else there. So don't give up on that brand new physics. just yet that was allie jennings speaking to elton photo. From penn state university and davide castle kosovac of nature. You can find linked to zoltin paper and as news article all going on in the world moons in the show notes and that is all for this edition of the nature podcast before we go this time to give a shoutout to a new film. That's up on the nature video youtube channel. We have a new animation all about krona virus variants and the science behind them. We'll put link that in the show notes so do checking out and as always you can reach out to his on twitter. Where at nature podcast. All you can said there's an email where podcast at nation dot com. I'm mike patrick show and i'm shami. Bundle thanks for listening.

allie jennings mike patrick ali jennings youtube two thousand last week twitter Next this week D'avray castell vecchi nature first time first one aspect both Dan today sultan a couple of billion variables penn state university step four
"shami bundle" Discussed on Nature Podcast

Nature Podcast

03:41 min | 8 months ago

"shami bundle" Discussed on Nature Podcast

"Thanks for sharing spotlight on that one show many for my story. Today while we heard at the top of the show about the diabolical I am clad beetle and I've got a story that was reported in science about another seemingly indestructible animal that taught grade, our new podcast, the indestructible animal podcast I'm I'm very here for this I loved Hardy Grades Todd degrades a great. They done this time. We'll before what they've done. Let me just some targeted facts their. Animal's lester too long and. They can seemingly survive anything you throw them you can dedicate them totally dry them out Todd Greystone K. put some more on them off they go. Again, you can subject them to freezing temperatures to super hot temperatures. Todd autographs don't care. You can expose them to the vacuum of space. Todd degrades don't care and adding to that list of extraordinary feats of endurance. Is another superpower? Some of these tardy grades seem very resistant to UV light right at all I mean I got in the sun and as UV, light. So impressed should I be we'll geno what as an absolutely first statement what I will say is the this isn't GonNa. Any owed UV lights because when it's really really intense, it can be used to sterilize things. You know it can be used to kill bacteria and viruses. I myself have used it in the labs sterilized pieces of equipment and that's what we're talking about in this instance and some talk rays have resisted being absolutely battered by this ultra strong UV light is this discovery accidental or scientists outta whose job is to see what todd degrades can survive whatever they. Throw them. I think you might be right in this instant. I'm explain what happened here then so some researchers in India exposed different species of tardy grades to UV light and to a strength that killed bacteria and roundworms after five minutes. So pretty strong. This UV light was lethal to one species of Taty grade after fifty minutes. Pretty good. They're pretty strong as always. But this one reddish brown species just survived like, no, no impact at all and kept doing. So as the researchers opt the strength of the UV and is this a evolutionary adaptation that they've got? Yeah. It seems to be the research vote in this work from the Indian Institute of Science there reckon that this could be an adaptation to withstand the really high levels of UV that are that are in tropical southern India where this species was found, fats was found on some moss on a concrete. Wall which I really really like and how does one actually make oneself more resistant will in this case, this new species and appears to be a new species has this pigments and and this pigment absorbs UV light and turns it into harmless blue light. So that's what sort of protect them. So they have this going to inbuilt you the shield and when the researchers took this pigment and used it to coat Sagan's worms these worms themselves survived twice as long under strong UV, it's it's such a neat. Thing Oh, that is clever and sounds like hippy useful for like some cream. If not many other applications is a very pale man who can get sunburned at night I am very much looking forward to whether that be the case but let's leave the briefing up for the time being thank you as always Shami and listeners. If you'd like to know more about both of the stories we discussed, you'll find links to them in the show notes and that if you even more stories like this but delivered. Straight to your inbox, then make sure to sign up for the nature briefing and once again, head of the show notes or you'll find a linked to do. So that's all for this week. But before we go just time to tell you about an immersive article featuring videos and photos, which looks at how farming and food supply in different parts of Africa have been affected by the COVID nineteen pandemic head over to the show notes for the lake. I'm Shami Bundle on our Benjamin Thompson thanks for listening..

Todd Greystone K. Animal India Shami Bundle Indian Institute of Science Benjamin Thompson Sagan lester Africa
"shami bundle" Discussed on Nature Podcast

Nature Podcast

03:20 min | 9 months ago

"shami bundle" Discussed on Nature Podcast

"That could help to protect areas where these fires are happening right. So I'm picturing something cute and Furry in a firefighter outfits won't show me I. Know You love a cute animals story and you're almost there although I don't think these animals are wearing uniform. In, this case the story centers on the North American beaver and I've seen their handiwork close up when I was in Canada, they built these amazing dams and form these poems and areas of wetlands with streams trucking along Beavis. And if you know saving the landscape from fires than bonus but how exactly can you prove that billion DM essentially helps with wildfires won't previous what sort of aftermath over giant fire in the state of Idaho in two thousand eighteen and it showed that there was quite lush areas left after the fire on these. Matched with where the beavers working and now ecologists have taken that even further and they've been looking at wildfires sense to thousand in five American States and the used satellite images to sort of see what the state of the vegetation wasn't. It sounds like you can actually see beavis handiwork from space, which is kind of amazing. Wow. The team did they look at kind of the plant verdicts? I guess before during and after a fire and what? They showed is that you know the areas where the beavers had built these kind of Lund's these areas, of course, saturated and sort of the wet vegetation didn't burn but it's not necessarily just about stopping fires. The research showed these verdant areas provide a refuge for animals that couldn't escape the fire and in reptiles, birds, small mammals, and even farmed animals like cattle, and they could go to these areas to hide from the fire if they couldn't run. Away, and so is this good news is, is everyone gonna be more pro beavers. Now sort of making sure that they've got plenty of habitat eleven the research that did this work said that is this animal thing that that's key these areas don't help the woodland grow back and quicker come. It doesn't matter whether the be was there or not but they say that the beavers could help maintain cost-effective natural fire resistant areas rather than having to. Sort of engineer or build them well, I think that totally counts as a cute animal story. So I appreciate that Ben on I'm really glad that the people are realizing the benefit of the Beatles will show. You're very welcome and listeners. If you'd like more stories like these, then make sure you check out the nature briefing and we'll put a link on where to sign up and links to the stories we've chatted about in this week's show notes. That's all for this week. But just before we go, there is time to highlight to not one but two animations we've got for you all about vaccinations they look at how vaccines work and how they're made useful facts to know as labs around the world race to test grown of ours vaccines that pot a nature milestone all about nation, and we'll put a link to the videos and the milestone in the show notes I'm Shami Bundle. Benjamin. Thompson. Thanks for listening..

Beavis Shami Bundle Idaho Canada Lund Beatles engineer Benjamin Thompson Ben
"shami bundle" Discussed on Nature Podcast

Nature Podcast

04:32 min | 1 year ago

"shami bundle" Discussed on Nature Podcast

"Was Alfred tally from the University of Western Australia. You also heard Marcel. Nalen from the max-planck-institute in Germany. You can check out most paper over in the show notes. Will you also linked to amuse abuse article written Alfred last off? It's time for a quick chat about some other non corona science stories out there nick and I have been browsing the nature briefing th the past few weeks thoughts niches daily. Pick of science news and stories and Nick. Won't you WANNA share this time so I've been looking into a new preventative treatment for HIV? So at the moment if you are high risk of getting HIV what you'll do is you'll take a combination of two jokes everyday but that's really hard to stick to and it can mean that you lied cell phone if you forget or you miss a dose or something like that and so what this is is. It's an injection that you take once every two months and not be enough to protect you from the virus well going from once a day once every two months would be a massive lifestyle change and and what kind of people is this to benefit what I guess it would benefit those people who are most at risk from hr so that might be sex workers in might be people in relationships with people who are HIV positive. Who you know. They don't want to run. The risk and there were certain groups of individuals such as men who have sex men the fire risk than over groups. So those be the type of people that it'll be full but as you say it'd be really great to be able to switch from taking in two things once a day two something every couple of MOMS will be much easier to stick to and that's a hope of the researchers and so this is something that they're still trialing is looking hateful yes. This is doing clinical trials on the most say hasn't been pay reviewed as of yet and also try was being a bit disrupted by the coronavirus outbreak. But it looks good from what they've shown so far and the incidence of HIV in the volunteers is the same as those people taking the current treatment. We should the drugs and so it looks like it could be a good potential treatment. Brilliant while we'll keep an eye out for the results of those trials then my story this week is about bacteria love area and it's about bacteria that apparently hanging out in rocks all over the place well under the surface of the ocean deep within the oceans in the Rock in the Earth's crust. Some way there's no light there's really barely any food and you wouldn't be expecting to find life those bacteria. They seem to just get everywhere. Don't I swear like there is no place that they can't exist but I do wonder as you said? There's no there's no food. What exactly are these bacteria living on? Well it's not obviously completely unknown that reaches can exist without sunlight and photosynthesis of course deep sea. Vents are a little Fountain of life deep below the surface of the ocean and some of the bacteria in rock on the oceans could be sort of getting food. That sort of slowly makes it way through another possibility is some of them might be getting food from well essentially radio-activity in the rocks providing that energy that they they're able to convert into a Powell's even with so like radio activity And things like that. The company a low of energy down there for them to use. So what exactly? They doing? Well a lot of them seem to be living and growing. Just extremely slowly. That's one of the researchers in this. Quantum magazine article talks about the maybe being a single cell living for one hundred thousand years before defining for reproducing Potentially completely different rate of life than are sort of surfaced focus would have been able to comprehend and then studying the might actually be interesting because if these back area can survive with just rock and water that might give us clues about where to look for life on other planets and walk of life. That could be well. I guess slow unsteady really does win the race. Thanks about show many listeners. If you'd like more short snippets of science just like that. We discussed but instead T mo inbox that make sure you check out in nature briefing with linked to that in the show notes along with links to the articles that we discussed. That's all for this week. If you want to get into contact with us then you can find us on twitter where at Niche podcast or if you are more email inclined than recover to where put cost at nature dot Com. I'm Shami Bundle. Earn the count. Thanks for listening..

HIV Alfred Nick Germany University of Western Australi Marcel twitter Shami Bundle Quantum magazine Powell
"shami bundle" Discussed on Nature Podcast

Nature Podcast

09:13 min | 1 year ago

"shami bundle" Discussed on Nature Podcast

"Week. The ancient hominids in your DNA and the origin of an unusual object at the edge of the solar system. I'm Shami Bundle. I'm nick how I open the show. How the genomes of modern humans can tellas about our past. You probably a little bit neanderthal. Once upon a time you may have considered that insult these days. A lot of people are familiar with the idea that all humans outside of Africa controls a little bit that in a room two percent these now extinct hominids and scientists able to take advantage of that fact to more about neanderthals. And one way you could do is you can see a lot of modern humans and because our ancestors when they left. Africa met and exchanged with these. Nfl looking at a lot of symbols. You can actually reconstruct what an antelope population black. This is lowered. Pskov Abiam from a Titian with an interest in ancient this week in nature to get a better understanding of on the end the folk cousins. He and his colleagues have been looking at Genomic data from twenty seven thousand Modern Day Icelanders. The samples were collected by the collaborators. Accompany Code Decode. So how did he use modern-day night workout with me on the phones? Were like will I? You have to find the entrant bits of DNA hidden in our genomes to do that. You could start with the genome sequences of ancient hominids and then matched them up with the sequences of modern humans but this assumes that any DNA that doesn't match isn't ancient which may not be the case besides good-quality ancient genomes. Let's face it pretty hard to come by. So laureates used a different strategy. What we do here is that we say we don't use any nanotech genomes but be used the expectations that we have about what these fragments would look like like one. They're very different from other human factors and toured. There should be fairly long by looking for these characteristics. Lower rates could identify what regions of the DNA would likely from an ancient home. And then he could go about working out wed. They were from but finding similarities with existing. Ancient genomes actually learned quite a few things from sequencing this many individuals one. We do find Nantel fragments but we also surprisingly found the newspaper fragments. Around three percents of all the ancient parts of the genome appear to be denise in urging the Denisovans another branch of ancient hominids are generally considered to have lived in Asia compared to the more Eurocentric neanderthals. In fact to these remains have only been discovered inside Syria and the to baton plateau so e might wonder how niece of DNA ended up in modern day ICELANDERS. Well Joan. Copper. A computational geneticists who wasn't associated with. This work was intrigued by this finding but he wasn't especially surprised over the past couple of years there have been enough Studies showing that. These are group's moved around quite a bit and that there were other events of interbreeding for example between neanderthals Denisovans and other places. So it's it's not so surprising to me that We're seeing here. The potential after effects of another such interbreeding event it appears that ancient hominids quite readily spread the genes around but Jones says that this study shows the strongest. So far that denise. Dna is in fact in Europeans for lower rates. He thinks they might show the ancient. Humans were a lot more widely than previously thought so that might have been analysis population in the middle somewhere when Dennis came over all of which is even more interesting like that could have been at the light compilation all the way in the Middle East which greatly expanded range where we think these events lift lower and his colleagues did want to just use these samples to learn about ancient hominids. They also wanted to ask how ancient bits of DNA Yada fall off a wise might be impacting modern. Humans we fought. That would actually be quite a significant amount of NAFTA genes. That did something but it turns out that most DNA that we got from. Nana's house doesn't have a huge effect. Now Larry did funds effects but according to their analysis that went very small. Joan isn't so sure though what researchers are looking for is associations between gene variants and physical traits and things that the criteria lawrence used to determine those associations with too strict also Jones latest research suggests that Judah Human interbreeding these associations may not be direct. We discovered an interesting pattern that in many cases the NFL variant was not causing the association but other variants that came into modern human populations through interbreeding but had actually been present Ancestoral population and then lost in human populations for causing the association. And so it's sort of a complex thing where interbreeding with neanderthals introduced these causal genetic variants but those genetic variants were not created in the N. Tall they were present in a population. That was ancestoral to both neanderthals and modern humans in the Andhra tolls gave them back. Whether or not. These ancient genes are having an effect on modern humans. Larry could still use them to gain insights about what neanderthals themselves with like the title through -tations neanderthal fragments. Half competitive human factors is different and these type of differences. You can actually explain by a different generation time in the NFL's so in this case on average models were old and the fathers were younger compatible humans lower. Its hopes that many more insights come out of this huge data set. And he's excited for new archaeological finds to help us build a better picture of Human History Homo Sapiens and otherwise as what's clear to both lows and John is that human history is far from straightforward. Like we we tend to think of population said being separate like. Nana's house leave Africa and then the Amazon Europe the Nissan Atia After candidates no mixing between his populations. But that's certainly seems not to be true well. Rideau of antitoxin humans meeting of course. But now there's also Denisova meeting with Monday non-africans so in that sense an SBA That's quite bad Germany. Genera history is much more complicated than we previously thought that was Larry Sculpt from University of our who's in Denmark and the max-planck-institute in Germany you also heard from Joan capra from Vanderbilt University in the US. Lo It's paper is out now. And as linked up in the shadows later on we'll be finding out about pad asteroids at the edge of the solar system right now though it's time for the research highlights ready this week by Don Folks. Looking perfumer off to shave might be the finishing touch. You apply as you get ready for a halt date but maybe that isn't limited to humans as a team of researchers from Japan found that Lima's also up the smell game to attract mates male Lima's produce floral scent glands on their wrists that they use to attract females much like a lefevre applying collude. The Lima's wanted to make sure any prospective mates melt them coming so they rubbed passing glance over their tails so off the fragrance even fervor. The sentence was made up of three. Faira modes compounds to animals amidst communicate with each other. I got closer to mating season. The levels of the fairminded emitted from this clans increased changing aroma from bitter and livery to floral and fruity find that fragrant research. I for current biology could learn about you from the objects you've lost on long journeys depending on what you take with. You perhaps know much but we might get an idea of what route you a traveling. The same idea has allowed research as to reveal an ancient viking trained by uncovering a trove of artifacts from a glacier a team from the UK collected hundreds of artifacts including horseshoes arrows and.

Nfl Larry Sculpt Joan capra Lima Africa denise Nana Jones Shami Bundle Germany Middle East Pskov Abiam Japan Asia baton plateau SBA Titian
"shami bundle" Discussed on Nature Podcast

Nature Podcast

05:04 min | 1 year ago

"shami bundle" Discussed on Nature Podcast

"Illnesses that we see in people were listeners as always go to the website national com slash news for all the latest on the corona virus outbreak. For a second story. Though we're looking at here review in predatory journals and Richard before we get into that what exactly is a predatory journal said predatory journals are journals that basically publish any manuscript you send them because they want to collect the author fees and they don't provide quality checks. They might provide long term archiving in other words. They'RE PREYING ON ACADEMIA. That's a very informal term and actually defining whether a journal is predatory or merely under source and low quality is extremely difficult. But the key thing is that the predatory Janis is usually quite deceptive or non transparent about what it's doing so as you say the no always conducting these quality check so it seemed almost surprising that that is an out of peer review is going on here. Apparently there is and this story is about hundreds of academics who say that they are doing pay reviews for predatory journals and this was discovered by people looking at a website coupons where scientists composed records of their peer review and this may sound surprising because y with the Predatory Journal. Even ask for purview in the first place well one suggestion is that this might be kind of figleaf. They're kind of doing it to pretend they're during review another suggestion is that perhaps these predatory journals where reviews taking place might be mis classified and here we get into the question of what is such a journal. This study looked journals. Called Predatory on a blacklist made by firm called Kabul's and cowbells says that it caused journals predatory for holistic deceptive practices like not being transparent about who the editors things like that so just possible that a journal. Could doing peer review? But still be cold predatory on this list and in fact ten percents at least of the journals on this list do appear to be doing peer review according to what's being said on his website at least so what might be the harm than in these journals conducting this or pay review. Well the potential harm is really a huge waste of time for the scientists who are presumably. Doing these reviews now. It should be said that we very much about what's going on here because these reviews ruled totted up by an algorithm that was working off this list of journals looking at the website and counting up our their reviews being claimed for these journals. But the study doesn't talk about which journals they are. It doesn't talk about who the individuals are so we don't know for sure the contents of the reviews or whether the individuals spent much time on the Trevi's or even whether the reviews happened all day. Pablo says it does verify that claimed vs did actually happen usually asking for emails from authors or from editors now I actually looked at the site and I actually emailed some of these people who said that they were doing reviews and I did get some replies. Back one researcher in Germany said yes I did review for a predatory journal and they completely ignored my review but then he said well you know that that does happen sometimes with established journals as well to be fair another person in Cambridge. Uk said. I thought I was going to improve the quality of the papers because I saw these papers not very good but again everything I said was ignored so now. I'm not going to do anymore. So there is a kind of question about all these academics being tricked or what actually was found about these academic was that many of them are inexperienced haven't published much younger and they are often from countries in Africa or the Middle East. According to the study so another suggestion is that these academics think that just by reviewing for as many titles as possible will bolster that academic credentials. Because you can point to your own a pair of hearing activity and say reviewed for loads of journals so until they actually look at the reviews themselves or they contact you academics. One by one. It's not entirely clear. What's going on but the Study Authors D say? This is a colossal waste of time and funders and institutes should tell people. Thank you think about not publishing in journals. Also think about not reviewing for them as well well listeners to read more about this head to Nashville com slash news. And that's where you find all the latest on corona virus as well so it's left is to thank both of my guests nation. Richard thank you both. Thanks thank you very much. And that's a wrap for another show but if you're interested to see as well as hear more about that tiny bud trapped number then. Don't forget to check out the video made by yours truly over at YouTube dot com slash nature video channel. I'm Shami Bundle on. I'm the cow. See you next time..

Predatory Journal Richard Pablo YouTube Shami Bundle Trevi Janis Africa Middle East Uk Kabul Nashville researcher Cambridge Germany
"shami bundle" Discussed on Nature Podcast

Nature Podcast

01:51 min | 1 year ago

"shami bundle" Discussed on Nature Podcast

"To start running Out of time and money draw and they don't trust you down Jason Tap but then it is no johnny is the rule. Their weekly reported reported. J. Down the time to it did make some Jay. That was I e the snowman with EXPI- Noah Baker and Anna neagle and performed by Kim Coleman keep an eye on our twitter account out nature podcast for the headaches next up on the show. It's time for annual quiz now longtime listener. The show will know that I love to Don my sparkly quiz show host jacket and ask. It's the questions but this year the torch won't maybe. The jacket has been passed on to the one the only Shami Bundle cue the music. Welcome to this year. Science News Holiday.

"shami bundle" Discussed on Nature Podcast

Nature Podcast

02:28 min | 2 years ago

"shami bundle" Discussed on Nature Podcast

"Interesting thing, the original study, investigated link between stronger doses of Anna Sasha with earlier death in older. Patients on it ruled out that link, but the second independent discussion said, actually, the trial on, which the study was based did not include enough patients to make that conclusion about death. So why might this be a good tool to help this reproducibility growing sus? So reproducibility experts who have looked to this approach say that it's actually a really positive approach. And the reason is that many efforts in reproducibility Mesa. Look at methods and results sections. They look at papers explaining each part of the method section pro-police, they can be replicated by others and things like that. But so far that has been little focus on discussion sections, but the people who are running the trial say that that's really important part because of bias spin on the over interpretation of. Results. And what has been the response of researchers say not everybody thinks that it is positive way forward, one person that we spoke to said that this type of independent discussion would inevitably draw on the same people who are already all st- to review papers on they suggest that Abacha solution to trying to get rid of this type of bias is to enforce existing rules that are laid out in all the guidelines for John wells, for example, to make studies weaknesses Clara unto avoid speculation and discussion sections. So this example was in the non aesthetic journal, and we're going to see this in over gino's more widely. Yes, the may, it's just being trawled and one journal. And it's very much the push of the litter this journal. We Dino yet, whether it will be picked up by the fields and other Johnny's, but certainly the people involved in the trial and reproducibility specialists say it is something that other fields should. Consider. Well, another one to keep an eye on then nation. Thanks for joining me listeners. For more on those stories head over to nature dot com slash news. That's all from the podcast for this week. But you might be interested. In a new video, we've got on our YouTube channel. It's a tale of three lizards and what happens when you introduce a new top predator. Go to YouTube dot com for slash nature video channel for that. I'm Shami bundle. I'm Nick how seeing next time..

non aesthetic journal Anna Sasha Johnny YouTube Abacha Dino Nick gino John wells Clara
"shami bundle" Discussed on Nature Podcast

Nature Podcast

04:23 min | 2 years ago

"shami bundle" Discussed on Nature Podcast

"So those are the reasons that scientists are so keen not to have the. This new deal scenario happen. And so many scientists attended this March calling for people's vote what might happen next. Well, that's the million dollar question posed six in the UK seems to be moving at a mile a minute. At the moment, we are still watching to see where the politicians might accept this deal, which was forced by Theresa May. And e you officials which has been really divisive among capon Titians a neighbor acted a couple of times approving that deal which allow the UK to leave the European Union in an orderly fashion, but polish ins are trying to find alternative arrangements that might be more satisfactory. None. Of course, they're all the people who have been calling for a people's vote, which is a second referendum that could have a remain option. Either UK doesn't leave the European Union that these rule options are all up in the air. And there is just no certainty about whether this will go well collaboration between the UK and the European Union has been central to this discussion for next story. Though, which took about a different collaboration. What's going on here? Yes. We've got this really unusual and interesting agreement between North Korea's top university on an institute and et les. That will see the exchange of students lecturers, and how will this collaboration work say this agreement will allow physicists from this university? The cabinet will song university in Pyongyang to come to the institute for advanced study in Trieste Italy to be trained in the field of neuroscience. Now, it sounds a little old physicists being changed in nearest assigns. But this arrangement has come about because UN sanctions against North Korea aimed at suppressing the nation's nuclear program for bed. Scientists around the world from training North Korean researches and physics, but they are allowed to train them in other fields. So what are unique sets up then. Yeah, it's very rag kind of agreement, and it's been approved by the Italian foreign ministry. It covers all types of collaboration in research in fields related to kogo tive neary science on its followed for five is. Okay. Well, how did this come about in the first instance say three years ago when these sanctions against North Korea were put in place, an Italian newspaper reported that though a full physicists who were studying at the institute for advanced studies now that wasn't allowed under the sanctions say the leaders these institutes arranged for these shootings to change the topics of PHD's from physics to other topics that would be allowed under the sanctions two of these students. Went to study neuroscience on the other to change to studying mathematics on the agreement to suit of grey now of this situation, and has now kind of formalized this process. So it makes it easier for students from North Korea to come to this particular institute. So that's the sets up then what what are people involved saying about it? The really interesting thing about this is that the people. On bass side of this agreement those initially and those North Korea really excited, and they're really happy to be able to make this kind of exchange and to build this expertise for students in North Korea. So the head of the department of physics at Kim Il Sung university says that this agreement is totally independent of politics, and it's only to do with science and that anything that motivated by and the leaders at the institute for advanced study say that that really happy to be able to help these students in the this arrangement husband fits north only for science diplomacy, but also to help others to gain expertise in these fields that they wouldn't otherwise be able to have it seems like good news there, then, but what about sort of moving in the other direction are telling scientists going to be going North Korea anytime soon. Yes, is a by the agreement uninfected some researches from actually have already gone to North Korea on this agreement will make it much easier for that to happen. Great stuff will thank you for joining me. Initia- listeners had over to nation dot com slash news. For more on these stories nuts over this week's show. But if you enjoyed this podcast, why not tell you friends about it? Tell you about it just done everyone about it. In the meantime, we'll be back next week with more from the white weld of science. I'm Shami bundle Benjamin Simpson. So you're next time.

North Korea UK European Union Theresa May Kim Il Sung university Italian foreign ministry Pyongyang capon Titians UN Benjamin Simpson Trieste Italy million dollar three years
"shami bundle" Discussed on Nature Podcast

Nature Podcast

03:46 min | 2 years ago

"shami bundle" Discussed on Nature Podcast

"Nick. Hi is good to be here were it's great to have you here. And Nick, tell us what's your special subject? Well, then I'm into all things B's semi PHD was all about looking at how pesticides influence bees ability to tolerate cold. And also how they over winter right while I'm sure there'll be lots of but Unity's to talk about that in the future. But today, you're going to be telling us about something completely different the world of massive chemical, libraries, and that's coming up in a bit. In the meantime, what do we have I on today's show? Well, Ben this week in nature. There's a paper out about a new kind of crisper protein and this caught the eye of Crispin Shami bundle. She decided to give nature reporter Heidi lead foot Ecole to find out what this new protein is how it fits into the story of Christmas so far and where the field of gene editing might be going his Shami. So crisper is a genus editing technique that's become really popular in the last few years. You kind of hear about it everywhere. And people always Chris bring listen Chris bring that finding ways improve crisper. And now there's this new paper out from Jennifer Dowden university of California Berkeley, along with various of her colleagues about a new crisp enzyme that. They've been studying, but before we sort of talk about what this new discovery is could we may be have a bit of a account Shaw for on on what crisper is exactly and go over some of the basics of how exactly it works as a gene editing tool. Yeah. Sure. So crisper systems are found in nature. They're they're used by microbes to defend against invading DNA. So in a virus enters the cell and starts to make copies of its genome. If the microbe has some sequence of that viral DNA stored in its genome in what's called a crisper array, then it might be able to recognize that foreign DNA, and then direct and ins, I'm to it to to slice it up and. Render it sort of inactive. So the bacteria has a little library says if you see this DNA viral, go destroy it. And the reason everyone's really excited about Christa and using it for gene editing is that particular ability to recognize bits of DNA specific sequences. Yeah. That's right. Well, so microbiologists are excited about it. Because it's just cool. Microbial immune system in it, so complex in neat. But most people are excited about it. For for the reason that you mentioned because researchers have figured out how to harness these systems, and then to put them to work and other cells human cells. So that gives researchers relatively easy way to to make changes to DNA at particular sites. And we've actually go a three animation on the nature video YouTube channel, it's it's really cool it so it shows representation of the so-called crisper cuss nine complex, which is made up of a guide Aurigny. And that's the recognizes this specific DNA sequence whatever that might be. And then there's also the cast nine enzyme, and that's the thing that cuts the Danna, and it's cutting we which is the important bit for both the Tyrian immune system and for scientists using it for gene editing. Right. Yeah. That's right. So it cuts the DNA at that specific site where you know, you tell it to to cut and then after that DNA repair systems in the cell come in. Pair it and you can rely on those systems to either sort of make a small deletion that site, maybe disable, gene, if you wanted to knock it out, for example, you can also try to manipulate it. So that the DNA repair system inserts in a little sequence that you want in there. So Chris has nine is the main sort of system I've heard about that films about, but I it seems that Cass nine sort of molecular scissors isn't the only cutting enzyme that's part of Crispus systems that we know of so microbes have evolved all sorts of different variations on this Christopher system..

Chris Crispin Shami Jennifer Dowden university of Nick Nick. YouTube reporter Ben Shaw Christa Heidi Danna Aurigny Cass Christopher
"shami bundle" Discussed on Nature Podcast

Nature Podcast

03:40 min | 2 years ago

"shami bundle" Discussed on Nature Podcast

"So you won't get a raise. And I went well too bad because I would've liked to raise. But at least. That's the way it is. That's really good tonight and much has been made to the fact that you are an associate professor, professor. And I think you said you'd never apply is that right now. I really wish I just had. I had colleagues that were saying why aren't you apply and you should be applying? And and I it said, okay, I'll probably do it next year and to get a bit. Meta of you know, I started these questions why apologizing I can about the very fact that you're a woman how is it felt over the past few days on spring so many questions on that topic. I do hope that we do get to the point. We all hope we get to the point where this just becomes not disgust anymore. I mean, so hopefully soon there's enough women and enough people colored enough people, you know, every every group out there feels that they get the recognition they deserve. And then we don't have to talk about it anymore and any suggestions on how we can reach that point. I that what advice to two youngest scientist. Or even to to the no battles to to to make the system. What better I think we've been pushing for a lot of years, and I do feel like women's lib was talked about a lot in the seventies. And I certainly always felt that you know, as a woman, I could do whatever the heck I wanted, you know, and maybe a lot of women who felt that got out there and did it, and maybe we let it slide. Again, certainly this is a moment in history where the women around the world aren't letting much slide anymore. So I think things are changing again fairly quickly again questions whether we can consistently keep moving forward until it's all done and don't eat now have an incredible platform from which to speak being a Nobel laureate. And how how'd you plan to use that? I don't know. That's kind of a scary thing because I am somebody who just talks a lot without thinking. And people have been quoted me back, and I went to I actually say that did I actually say that. So that's got me a little scared. We'll have to practice not to say the first thing that comes in. To my mind, and how has your life changed since becoming a Nobel laureate on cheese day completely? This is just a completely crazy. And you know, I got to talk to the prime minister of Canada for the first time ever. And he was very nice about it. Because I said this is like your life all the time. And he said, no, I don't always get to speak to a Nobel laureate. Wow. Well, enjoy it get's hectic, but congratulations again much. The final piece in this year round up was chosen by Shami bundle in this case. She's going right back to the start of the year. So I'm chosen eight pulled pace that fatally. Remember, it was from all the way back in January, but it was actually about memory. So I did that. And it was just some really fascinating science. The we ended up talking about you're going to hear it a minute all about how to actually manipulate memories. Which is something that really I thought should be in the realm of sci-fi. Have you seen that foam tunnel? Sunshine of the spotless mind, they go in they delete memories. This is about research is doing something vaguely similar, but in mice. So without further ado from our weapons of January show, his Chaumet learning about the shape of memory. So there's a feature out in nature this week about memory it asks what does a single memory look like where is it stored in the brain, which cells are involved, and what determines its particular shape? I got in touch with a neuroscientist who's working on these questions..

associate professor scientist prime minister Canada
"shami bundle" Discussed on Nature Podcast

Nature Podcast

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"shami bundle" Discussed on Nature Podcast

"Nature podcast. I'm Benjamin Thompson so listeners here we are in the last full week of twenty teen. And I thought that this was probably the right time to have a little look back at some of the stories we covered on the podcast this year. But rather than pick these stories myself, I asked a few of our regular reporters to choose their favourite podcast peace and to tell us why they enjoyed making it later in the show you'll hear from Lizzy Gibney and Shami bundle. But I know Abakar tells us about his twenty eighteen podcast highlight the piece that I've chosen is from back in June. And it stuck with me. I think because I got the opportunity to combine only some really interesting science, but also some mystery and culture as well, which I don't often get the chance to do or certainly don't do as much as I'd like. So there was a study in nature plants, which was investigating these ancient bizarre gigantic trees could bow. Bob's. And I love Babs. I think that really incredible things. So that stuck out to me quite quickly. When I saw the press release, but on reading the paper, it became clear that from my perspective. There was lot more than I might expect from a botany study. There was scientific mystery as very real and sometimes quite worrying consequence to what was being said in the paper, which you'll hear in a minute and reporting it to me and all kinds of directions. So from the economic impacts of about trees due to the folklore surrounding them and the importance of them too, many African peoples across the continent and one of my contributors witness consi- even recorded a song with his family on his phone and sent it to me via WhatsApp and end up in the piece. It was a wonderful experience to me, I learned a lot. And I hope you enjoy it..

Bob Benjamin Thompson Abakar Lizzy Gibney Shami
"shami bundle" Discussed on Nature Podcast

Nature Podcast

04:35 min | 2 years ago

"shami bundle" Discussed on Nature Podcast

"And you. Can sing at home. That was unto us. A child is born performed by the goals. Quiet at the Simon linked boy school the lyrics will by Shami bundle. And it was directed by Emily Renshaw kid. Stay tuned. We'll have more songs coming up later in the show. I'll eat. Tis the season. We're all be taking a very long train journeys to see my extended family who oversleep I love dearly, obviously. But what are you going to do on these audience journeys stong another TV series? You'll never finish distractedly peck at your phone until the battery light flashes. Stan listlessly of the windows the bleak midwinter races post on actually was thinking about maybe reading the book. Yes books could shown, but which one there are so many well that is a fair points. But luckily, I was joining the studio earlier this week by somebody who has picked few of favorite signs books of twenty eight teen. It's time to talk signs books, and who better to talk about them than Bob Kayser nature's books and arts editor so twenty eight teen in Bob, and you have covered hundreds of books has it been a strong year for science related reading? It's been a huge here. And that makes it incredibly difficult to win a down the ones that you really love will you've chosen three of you will favor books. Twenty-eight teen. Bob was the first one. Okay. So this book is by the scientists in Patricia Fara, and it's called a lab of one's own. So she takes a really interesting tack towards the whole history of suffrage ISM in Britain and also in the United States. She looks at all through a science lens. This is bowl djing with stories of women who many were either scientists or they were students have science who struggled in the nineteenth century to be accepted to to even have the opportunity of studying in university. And of course, they were denied degrees. Really? Decades after of so some stories of some early pioneers. Then exactly so far gives us the back story. She gives us the women science who were leading the way in who were out there sometimes on the streets protesting, she takes us through the process of the first World War, and she illustrates the aftermath which was a very mixed bag. So for instance, she isolates an amazing story. There was a physiologist called Mabel pure for his Gerald. And at the age of one hundred in nineteen seventy two she was finally awarded her degree. This was three quarters of century after she studied ridiculous. There was also Dorothea Pertz. She worked with Francis. Darwin who's door was in son? He was about NIST, and she published papers and lectured at Newnham college. But she was never formally recognized. So you can imagine the kind of tremendous frustration. Shen that women felt at that time. So this is clearly a history book, but does it sort of compare and contrast and look at some of the issues that are going on now to degree. I mean, this is definitely history. So far is concentrating on the difficulties at universities that were experienced by these early women's science students. She states that the battle was lost. And we see that we see countless reports of how difficult women in many fields of science still find it. So, of course, advances have been made. And of course, progress is there, but just not where we should be with women in science. Well, let's move on your second pick Bob on. It's about neuroscience. Now, I have certainly used the phrase the brain is the most complex machine in the universe that we know about..

Bob Kayser Patricia Fara Dorothea Pertz Emily Renshaw Mabel pure Simon NIST Stan United States editor Newnham college Britain Francis three quarters
"shami bundle" Discussed on Nature Podcast

Nature Podcast

02:14 min | 2 years ago

"shami bundle" Discussed on Nature Podcast

"This suggests the eastern talk decapa is melting much faster than people originally thought, it seems rather we get some good news rentals go then this doesn't sound like it news what specifically has been going on. Well, people thought the east side of out to co was relatively stable. But since the early twenty tens the height of the glasses falling by about half, a meter year crooks, okay? Well couple of questions for me here. I mean one we thought about eastern thoughts which kind of broad wet wet specifically looking and and so how does one go about measuring the height of glass, if you not just with with meter rulers that say so your first question, the researchers specifically looking at area code Vincennes bay, which has focused is in it. And how. How did they do it? Well, they use data from two satellites one by NASA another one by the European Space Agency, and they use this data to create a three D few of the surface of each Lassie looked like and how they thick and thin Daiva time they found that in the nineteen nineties the glossier shrunk while they shed some ice. But then I bulked up again in the two thousands, and then from twenty ten they started to thin again on this is the no point five meters. With only seeing yes, I mean, it does seem like there's been a little bit of variation. There are up and down. But where do we think this is going next? Well, a lot of this comes down to the temperature of the water around eastern talk Takata and that changes every year can be based on factors like wind speed and direction or whether the seal is in the city, but in general climate, scientists think that the warm waters are gonna make the way closer to eastern Takata more regularly in the future, and that probably doesn't buy too. Well, for the classes, nor did not Holly. Thank you. Joining me on listeners if you'd like more to science news head over tonight's dot com slash news. And that's it for this week's show, but you have to tune in next week because we have a holiday show, I'm very much looking forward to that to me too. But listeners Wadi white for that if you'd let see will Houston performing a bit of magic here in our studio head over to fade at major podcast will find him in gift form. Yeah, I've seen those gifts that crazy. I'm showing must have manipulated the video is all magic. And it's all amazing. I'm Benjamin Thompson, and I'm Shami bundle.

Takata Benjamin Thompson European Space Agency NASA Wadi white Lassie Houston five meters
"shami bundle" Discussed on Nature Podcast

Nature Podcast

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"shami bundle" Discussed on Nature Podcast

"Vulcanologists have been plumbing the debts of sin, Helen's to form the best picture yet of the infamous okay, knows internal while plumbing her just set off a series of controlled explosions around the mountain and trace the shockwaves as they moved through the ground. These seismic waves slowed as they pass through a patch between three and a half and fourteen kilometers below the surface. Now, seismic waves move more slowly through hot material. So that suggests that this is the volcano magma chamber. The slowest movement with between four and six kilometers down suggesting that that's where the most multi-role is a mast that research is hot off the press in the journal geology. Each day Americans consume more opioids than people in any other country and each day of a hundred Americans die from opioid overdose. The increase in deaths from opioids which includes both illegal drugs like heroin and prescription. Painkillers is so large that the American Center for disease control in for Ventian described it as an epidemic. Shami bundle has been finding out about the complex factors involved statistics show that in the US over the past few decades prescriptions, I appearance have increased as have the number of deaths caused by appeal. It's it might seem like a simple link, but understanding and stopping this ongoing crisis in the US is anything simple..

US Helen Painkillers heroin American Center Ventian fourteen kilometers six kilometers
"shami bundle" Discussed on Nature Podcast

Nature Podcast

05:22 min | 3 years ago

"shami bundle" Discussed on Nature Podcast

"The news chance still to come at the end of the show where we'll find out about the mathematicians the picked up this year's fields medals now, though, Shami bundle is here. This week's research highlights. The island of flurries in Indonesia became famous in two thousand and three after the discovery of a remarkably small extinct human species nicknamed the Hubbert. Ever since the fossilized remains of homo Floridian cysts were found. Scientists have wondered whether the hobbits genes could live on in certain local people of unusually short stature. Now the question is bounce it genetic analysis of these modern homo sapiens has revealed no trace of hobbit DNA. Instead, the short height of the island is may have evolved in response to the same evolutionary pressures that created the original hope it tens of thousands of years ago, read more insights. It's maybe no surprise that microbes mingle, the metro which one's present and where do they come from the team in Hong Kong, studied the bacteria found on handrails in the city's mass transit railway system. They found that during morning rush hour, each railway line crop biota, characteristic of the neighborhood. It served, but by the evening, bacteria from the whole city had mixed together that what helps eliminate the ways in which crew Beal species, antibiotic resistance, genes spread around a city, find out more in cell reports. In the nineteen fifties, a pair of Russian scientists by the name of Dmitry believe, and let me Trute started an experiment. They wanted to create a population of tame foxes. The focus came from four farms all over eastern Europe. Although farmed these animals haven't lost their natural aggression towards humans, believe and Trute gradually began selective breeding choosing FOX's with the least aggressive traits. The experiment has now been running for over fifty years and has created FOX's with a range of traits from tame animals, which wag their tails and dotes on the humans to folks specifically selected for aggressive behavior and to kick over from the university of Illinois in the United States has taken a particular interest in the FOX farm experiments. She wants to understand more about the genetic basis of aggressive and tame behavior and the FOX's provide an entr. Regaining model. No Abakar quarter up to find out more why researchers interested in studying the folks Gina in what is about it that spectacularly interesting to them. Because this particular population of FOX's each was selected and say, DO for friendly, sponsor human sin for recipes phones to humans and really want to figure out what's going on and they genome the make them to behave so differently. And how long has this Russian folks from experiment been going on for nine nineteen sixty nine. And so now the folks that are getting, would you classify those as fully domesticated, klutzy Silas, pets? They different live, don't show any aggression to people, but at the same time they never selected to adapted to leave in human houses, right? It's it's kind of difficult physical to house break them, I would say domesticated, but they are not necessarily pets before your study. What was known about the genetics of folks behavior in particular when it comes to aggressive and tame behaviors, these great, it'd be the study since they'd be hit. It is rated. That different from the here, this folks aside genetically determined, but it's very limited ability stock should understand what kind of genetic differences make FOX's to behave that they the doctor to do some Monica genetic FOX's in two thousand, and they were able then defy regions on for thermos homes, the him onto Butte through FOX behavior. But we were very bold. We included tens and hundreds of genes, and they couldn't really say which particular gene may have a second behavioral. What does it have you done in this particular study a fifth of all the assembled the folks genome, and then they used as a friends for all full full enough studies in the seeking. Then individuals from h relation theme, aggressive in conventional Farber depletion, which is kind of unsettled pollution for bowls. They when aggressive the CD. Regions in genomes of focus from this deeper relations actually differentiate them in competition. This makes the identified one hundred and fifty regency each since the dividend shared is relations. And you know, some of family not doing anything seduction behavior, but. I think that many, many of them actually, indeed late for behavior. Tell me a little bit about the gene assemblies. What do you think the front runners the tame behaviour?.

FOX Trute Indonesia Hong Kong Dmitry Gina Silas Europe university of Illinois United States Farber Butte Monica fifty years
"shami bundle" Discussed on Nature Podcast

Nature Podcast

01:49 min | 4 years ago

"shami bundle" Discussed on Nature Podcast

"That was a report from noelbaker signs of all things nature multimedia will have noticed that in recent months shami bundle who was directed to narrated many films for nature video has started to cohost the nature podcast more regularly and so naturally we wanted to hear what her favorite piece has been i found it pretty easy to pick my favorite podcast piece i made that have been some fun one says prestart slugs one time ago wander around the natural history museum dinosaur galleries talking about taxonomy bought my favorite package ever is this one because it features and adorable toddler trying tweet a biscuit and my friend phil complaining of ice pitch eight for the record fell has yet to finish his pitch to the human brain isn't really wide to think about the future we put things off till tomorrow we cross that bridge when we come to it owns to investigate the cognitive bosses that affect how we think about our own future lives but first let's exposed the not too distant future with custom and his son tobias ascend eyewitness liza language one best yet i leave it here he and if you want you can either skate okay lot bought if you leave the desk yet and don't eat it well lady than when they elgalila native who this year as humans we live for the moment let's start k so you can decide on what is what we will get ready it sometimes hard to focus beyond the here and now especially when there's a delicious is getting front view.

shami phil tobias