24 Burst results for "Shalini"

Rinse and Repeat: Louisiana Residents Brace for Another Major Hurricane

NPR News Now

01:01 min | Last month

Rinse and Repeat: Louisiana Residents Brace for Another Major Hurricane

"In the gulf region are bracing for hurricane ida which is projected to make landfall as a category four storm tomorrow afternoon on the southeastern louisiana coast. It's now a category two storm with maximum sustained winds of one hundred five miles per hour. Shalini chat lonnie from the gulf state. Newsroom reports in louisiana governor. John bel edwards says. It's time to take the storm very seriously for just the second time in the history of the hurricane. Risk reduction system in new orleans. We will fully activate that system tomorrow morning. Edwards is mobilized the entire louisiana national guard and requested resources from fema and other emergency responders and other states in neighboring mississippi governor tate reeves is also getting prepared. We know also that there is going to be the potential of search and rescue missions. We have federal teams as well as our local teams in our state. Teams that are positioned. Alabama's governor has issued a state of

Hurricane Ida Southeastern Louisiana Coast John Bel Edwards Gulf Region Shalini Louisiana Lonnie Tate Reeves Hurricane New Orleans Edwards Fema Mississippi Alabama
"shalini" Discussed on The Chalene Show

The Chalene Show

06:08 min | 2 months ago

"shalini" Discussed on The Chalene Show

"Reaching out to other people to look further into this is because i care about other people's safety i care about those people who reach out to me and said i've written tons of reviews and they keep getting deleted about this particular doctor and the horrible experience i had and i am not going to repeat them because they're going to here say even though i haven't said his name the things that i've heard have happened are just there are the things they just unbelievable. I know you guys have heard those other podcasts about crazy malpractice lawsuits and doctors conduct's and in this behaviors. And you think to yourself. Is this really even possible. That is the same thought. I've been having all week as i've been reading these messages from people who were like something has to be done. I've tried i've reached out. I've written reviews they disappear. You have a platform. And i can't believe it's the same doctor you have to do something. And so that's why. I have to be very careful about the way. This is handled. And please know that this podcast is my experience but there's more happening and of course contacted the medical board. I've reported my own experience. I have shared with them. The contact information of the people who've reached out to me and i will keep you posted again. If you're concerned that this doctor could be your doctor you need to go on. yelp sort. The yelp reviews from lowest to highest read the lowest reviews. You will read accounts that are so simone. What i've just described. You'll be like this. is this doctor. You will know you will know. And lastly for this episode. I want to end with just a reminder of all of the things that i personally did wrong all of the times where i had the opportunity to listen to myself and go like this doesn't feel right and i dismissed that voice. Were you think to yourself. Is there something wrong with me. I the problem is my fault. Is it me who's being approved. I being picky might be in particular my being a pain in the but am i being high maintenance like then you people pleaser kick in like. Oh you don't want to embarrass this person. I don't want to inconvenience them. I don't want to make them feel awkward now. I'm worrying about this. Other person other people and i had so many opportunities where every one of my red flags were going off like the sirens were sounding and i kept quieting them. I was quoting them because it felt inconvenient to stop the whole thing. It felt like i might lose money. It felt like i might embarrass the doctor. I might embarrass the pa. I might embarrass myself. And frankly i'm really really lucky. Because i could have lost my life. You know what i mean. Plastic surgery any type of surgery is very serious. And there's always a risk that you could have a very serious outcome including leading up to death and the fact that i didn't take it more seriously disturbs me and i i have to share the story and it's embarrassing to think that i always tell you guys. I'm confident i'm strong. People don't intimidate me. But i wasn't. Tim dated i felt that power differential. And it's hard not to when you're standing vulnerable and naked in front of three. Very you know large strongmen. But that's no excuse. Because if i had said we're calling off the horses or whatever you call like we're calling off the bed we're calling off whatever. The surgery is not happening. it wouldn't have happened. it's all they could force me to do it but i didn't do that. I second-guessed myself. And i just don't want you to ever do that. I want you to know that if you don't feel comfortable with a surgeon whether it's elective or non elective surgery like you have to have surgery to save your life but there's something that doesn't feel right about that situation than you need to be your own advocate. There's nothing more powerful and more spot on than your intuition. You know when you feel safe you know when you feel comfortable yes you can do all the research you can read the reviews you could check and see if this person has the affiliations that they claim they do and this doctor did everything checked out except the one thing that didn't check out was my gut instinct. My gut instinct was. I don't like this person. I don't like him. i don't trust him. I don't think he has my best interest. I don't think he's listening to me. I think he has his own objective. I think he's trying to up. Sell me. I think he has a spiel and he's running through it and instead of listening to my intuition i decided that all because i'd checked off all those other boxes that my gut instinct didn't matter and it does in yours does to this is over if you or someone you know has treated or had a similar experience with this particular doctor in southern california and i i know for a fact that from what i've described you will know if it's the same doctor you will one thousand percent no. I'm going to put our phone number below in our show notes and you can reach out to us there. Please do me a favor. I really do want to help anyone. Who's looking for assistance and needs to have a place where they can be heard and need to make sure that can see their messages. So while i love it you guys you know. Text that number. Let's this week if we can just really make sure that that message is reserved only for those people who really believe that. This is the same doctor that treated with and they need to be heard. They have something that needs to be resolved or or they have something to add to the story. I mean you can share that in that number there or you can email us and you can do so anonymously if you want you can email the shalini show at g. Mail dot com the shaheen show at g mail dot com and by all means if something has happened that you believe violates a standard.

yelp simone pa Tim southern california shalini
"shalini" Discussed on The Chalene Show

The Chalene Show

03:31 min | 2 months ago

"shalini" Discussed on The Chalene Show

"We've looked at little homes. We've considered having people come into our home and all the things and this is just the best decision for us. And i feel really good about it. I don't know if you can tell. But i do. I feel really good about it. Because i know it's what we need it just so many times in the last week my husband's like shalini. I can't do this one more day. I can't and i really respect that. And that was a promise if you've been following along that's the promise we made to each other when we moved him in in january and we're here where it's affecting his health. It's affecting his mental health. His physical health my mental health. And everyone loves bob. Everybody loves bob. But you know we can't provide for him six hours of continuous activity. We've tried and we've done. I think a really great job. And there's no question about that but they're just days you just can't and i hate those days because it's just hard anyways. I feel very confident. I don't feel guilt at all about this decision. I feel like it's such the right place. I will be there all the time. I'm telling you. I visited several times already. And i'm in love with every single resident. Like i love them. They're the cutest people. Just i know that my life is meant to my next season in some way shape or form. The purpose is related to alzheimer's and dementia. Because i just have such a heart for these people so we've gone through all the protocols baba's been assessed and he's going to be living at the belmont. Apparently there's another gentleman there. Who is bob's age. Who is a former heisman trophy winner and i think that's kind of neat. I'm just really impressed with everything that they do like. I just you know i'm you guys know because you've been listening how involved we are in all of this and trying to find the right place for him has been really challenging even in the few places where we've had them do an assessment for bob. They're just like wow. It's tough because if you look at him physically and what he's able to do physically you would think he is doing much better than he really is but like on a cognitive scale. He scores really really low very low. So that's a good thing about now. Here's the one thing that's kind of interesting. We thought we wanted to do this. Kind of in a slow transition and everyone that we've talked to has said bad idea. It's going to be painful for you if you do it. That way and he will never truly come to trust and you know really lean on the people at the facility and make friends if you do that. They've asked us to stay away for at least a week. And we've come up with the narrative if you wanna call an ethical lie the narrative that we know he's going to accept than we've been planning the seeds of that and there's a very good chance that he will be making that move next week. And how do i feel about that. I feel a little bit of guilt saying this that i feel some relief. I feel some guilt saying that you know. And that's all i know. Things have changed because in the past media saying that would have made me ball my eyeballs out like just me thinking about bob being anywhere other than with us would just make me cry but i feel so differently about this place and that's a good.

bob alzheimer's shalini dementia baba
"shalini" Discussed on Doctormommyspeaks Parenting

Doctormommyspeaks Parenting

02:35 min | 9 months ago

"shalini" Discussed on Doctormommyspeaks Parenting

"Accepted acceptance. They'll come with awareness. That was really nice. Such a simple small just to begin with small takeaway. But i love it and i am actually hoping people to listen to this and bring about this small change in their lives. Thank you so much shalini for dispelling so many myths about fragile like syndrome. And i'm your parents are going to benefit from this. Thank you so much. I it was good pleasure doing stuff and i'm amazed and i'm so glad with the questions you. They were quite hospitable. King and I do hope this fought got g to out do many beat the and i would have lead anyone and everyone who heals. This card is the alleged if it was peo- chai with autism them to read about so john excel the family. You will be empowering them and of course don't forget the high effects absolutely so a guys. Intellectual disability is not uncommon. Every one in three thousand two thousand kids ends up with either one of the diagnosis downs autism fragile x so thinking that why should i need to. I don't know anybody who has this or my child doesn't have it. It doesn't end there. You can connect with the fragile leg society of india on instagram facebook and their website. The links will be mentioned in the show notes below. You can also support them either by avair of this condition spreading the word on social media or by donations. So that's it for today until then stay. Halley stay happy. That's it for today. Do subscribe to my podcast so you will be notified. Episode is online. You can find us on instagram. Facebook twitter and lincoln as dr mommy's speaks. Don't forget to like and review our podcast. Wherever you listen it will help others to find this podcast and you can visit our website. Dr mommy speaks dot com pfoa slash podcast for all our show notes and any resources mentioned by me on my and while you're at it don't forget to subscribe to our newsletter onto len happy parenting..

shalini Facebook today facebook twitter instagram speaks india Halley two thousand kids three thousand King one john excel lincoln com Dr
"shalini" Discussed on Doctormommyspeaks Parenting

Doctormommyspeaks Parenting

07:13 min | 9 months ago

"shalini" Discussed on Doctormommyspeaks Parenting

"And yours we. We've gone so much support from every division People like you who stake in the effort to support that and bring this out to the community that it's it's really amazing. Stangl thank you so much so that also brings me to the question. You mentioned that of females usually end up. Having a floodlit issues guinea shed some more light on that as to how it manifests in females and how. It manifests show so Seen have more female guide yours optimization and less main schedules demonization and oh having a the gene does have its own manifestations defectors nets look at the female who is that guy for the cementation Twenty percent of women who carry the office in and jones have no ovarian dull and that translates into for the problem. So you will see. These women will have Llovei didn't solve a low air match a high. Ssh that flown too early menopause miscarriages and they usually end up going for flights the detroit that we are so what we are trying to say. Is that if a woman has no for the or low ovarian resolve and a low air match for nor i don a patent reason. It's a good idea to death before jumping into the treatment. The reason for this is having the opening. Mendoza imitation patio. False agi that's a sensory off the irs. Is going to go down so that very high chances that my supposed. I is enough female and is a big. John that is the cycle is assessed. The woman might have a shot with the condition in the have had been who've gone to five years ten years five. Yes and they have ties with jackson that my jason. It is traumatizing. So what we are saying is if there's a woman who has a flood this she'll she knows she has ovarian dissolve and louis m edge even if there's no family. She offended exited. The that the in the fatty before jumping into an iv f or any Men get tested. falk edge. I in case you are positive your Pot of she would change. Because you need to be aware that if you go this you you might have a child with the condition You might want to look at an option of fiji. Leave the bill now and you have the end. You're tested point planting them. You can look at options of donor or donor embryo. And it's all about empowering the forces with information and letting them make the choice absolutely for the listeners air match and fsn hormones that are responsible for the lately and then levels have to be high spor for one to be able to conceive and in fragile alexis. The levels go down which translates into a low ovarian reserve. And you might face difficulty. In conceiving that was pretty inciteful Thank you so much So come into fridge. I lexus idea of india. How did it get conceptualized. And what was the idea behind it. Gigantic society of india in two thousand. Three all only to be a fought a system for families who already sat shooting affected. All that means it's family was affected. They would call us. We would run to damn The of course not every family has assigned back down so once. They're given the diagnosis. It's not easy for them to them. All the medical jargon can we would break it down to them give them example. Explain to them. I think the first few hours goal in trying to get them get them to stop feeling guilty about giant. Absolutely you know doing analyze yet knowledge that information we saw difficulty sort of bad. And you finally get an answer. The child's condition by then you don't accept accepted yet so so right from explaining to the family What is it. How is it impacting. This is what other things you can do at home do has changed and yourself. The good shouldn't message. I don't ob- visual. No no we eat selling than lease support their learning visually. They go to school but at home. What are we doing children with. I have high levels of anxiety so we kind lease about how they can keep better. Dicey law course me. Guide them to they're right Doctors and the righteous forces that e we Connect to families in the same city to exchange utilises and head and this went on for the few wheel and then we came across families. Children acted with syndrome and features infected. And that wasn't as shock so we had to expand Not only to support trend is affected by to spread awareness. We said we need to spread awareness on this condition because this condition can be controlled. Families can take an informed decision for the next show so be moved on to Creating awareness about Amongst the medical should on the see We've had a lot of conferences. Seminars workshops last deal with the isp launch guidelines in india. That's high your time Sorry so the abc union academy of fiji traditions of our listeners is the most organization for all the doctors in india so Having the guidelines as an to tool book the if you feel any clear pot as to what needs to be done with the child and they'll head of Intervention medical intervention town sitting except draw..

five years John Stangl ten years Twenty percent india jackson Three jason two thousand first abc union academy Llovei five hours traditions Mendoza
"shalini" Discussed on Fancy Free Podcast

Fancy Free Podcast

06:37 min | 11 months ago

"shalini" Discussed on Fancy Free Podcast

"Okay it's time to talk about life hats. Do you have a life hack for the listeners. You don't think maybe goes back to what i said before my like half my my life hack is almost the opposite of a life hack and it's really learned to take the time to do things i think we're always in a rush to get something done always in a rush to finish next project and you know i found that sometimes when you partner with time like you just leave behind for a little bit of time. The answer comes in it comes better than you could have done it if you had rushed through. Yes that is such a good point. I've definitely noticed that in my own life that we just my my parents just built their house and some of the delays were the biggest gifts in disguise. Yeah up with something. They absolutely loved which they wouldn't have had time to dream up. Had there not been a delay that is so good. I think the my life hack is learned to become times friend universities racing against time but like sometimes it really just takes time to do it only time can do you know yes tincture of time. That's actually a phrase in medicine in medicine and patients hate it but some all what we need right here right now is to the tincture of time. Love that and you know what. I am a rush rush. Go go to do ten things at a time type of person and it really creates a lot of anxiety and and if i remember to breathe deeply an act if i actually i'll actually physically slow my body language down and like if i'm folding the laundry all think just think about folding the laundry and has home quiet. Slow body language. It's amazing how that can just bring your anxiety down and bring your focus in. And this is something i learned in my forties but man if i could have learned it in. My twenties have really been helpful. No absolutely i've just i've learned. I think it's you know there's a saying youth is wasted on the young. Yes i agree. It takes time to learn. The time is your friend. It truly takes learn until you're more out of time. I love it. What have you been loving lately that you think the listeners would love to. I think i've really been doing tiktok. I think you know my sister has been on it so we all kinda went down the rabbit hole of watching talks but i find dishes such a great schumer platform and something that just started for all of us after the pandemic. I think it's you know. Tell people to get on there for good laughs and Just be aware of the tiktok rabbit hole just to read it for yourself. Because he'll need it. Yeah you guys. If you happen to not have heard the episode where. I talked to shallow sister sheena. It is incredible. I will link to it in the show notes tell me about the hashtag boxes over baskets so boxes over baskets a campaign that were running for the spread the joy foundation super excited and the idea behind it is for corporations instead of giving corporate gifts out then can try giving a joint box. The hospital child instead took instead of giving you a basket to this company that can be we send a certificate saying hey. You've donated a box to a child in the hospital during ed and i don't know if you're aware of this but many children during covid are required to go to the hospital without even the parents present like i just can't breaks my management like checking your ospital leaving. Oh no. I absolutely love this idea. Because i hate the idea of spinning a bunch of money on a bunch of stuff. I love this because this is tangible. It's so wholesome and helpful and really eye opening. And i just love it for so many reasons. Okay tell us exactly how we can participate in boxes over baskets. Oh that's so sweet. Joann thank you so much. For your enthusiasm to participate in boxes or baskets you can reach out to me directly and my email is shawnee at spread the joy dot org and i think joanne can put it in the show notes as well. Yup it's very simple. You just reach out to us and let us know how many boxes you're would like to donate this year. Two children on the behalf of your corporation and behalf of your corporate clients and we will do is we will make certificates and mail them out your email them to you. Whatever you prefer which says that you know in your honor. So many boxes have been delivered to so-and-so hospital jennifer children during cove. Ed you know the reason we really liked the campaign also is because it's very sensitive at a time like this right so many people have lost their jobs and corporations that did well drink. Ovid feel so. I want to be sensitive in their kid back. It's a really nice guy. New conscious of what's happening around us to show empathy love and joy for these children that aren't doing as well and to celebrate with them in a small way. I think it is so so good. I'm so excited about that. I love it. I think you tell my listeners. All of the places where they can find you so supremes find me. If you're looking for my company is called open. The joy dot com opie e. n. t. h. e. j. o. y. Dot com if. You're looking to volunteer for the foundation or to get involved in any way or if you're interested in the boxes over baskets campaign check us out at spread the joy dot org s. p. r. e. a. d. t. h. e. j. o. Y. dot org. So that's probably the best way to reach out and find out about our companies if you want to reach me directly just email me by email. Xolani s. h. a. l. i. n. i. at spread the joy dot org awesome. Okay so this is actually really timely for people who are looking for unique christmas gifts. Yeah absolutely oh my gosh shelley. You are so much fun. You've one of the rare guests who actually made my nose run. Because that's what happens. When i laugh really hard. I have my cleaning your in the leon maybe four people now and your number eight hundred eighty five. On my linked in profile manage jarrett's north rhine truly fancy free. I bet oh my gosh. Thank you so so much for being with me today thank you..

The Injustices of AI

Science Friction

04:55 min | 1 year ago

The Injustices of AI

"You are about to meet to Gutsy. multi-award-winning film directors with stories that connecting contrast to incredible confronting crucial films where artificial intelligence is being used in the service of good bad and possibly plein rotten. Lucia terrorism. Sleeve those. WHO ITS MUSCLE IS INSERTED GAVE David France director of the documentary. Welcome to Chechnya went underground to document the current persecution imprisonment, torture murder of lgbt people in Chechnya and the. Going rescue mission to get them out to safety. Kid Dot as facial recognition mis identification, and then you start. To search, this is an innocent child. System is becoming mechanized shall nation Thanh Director of coded bias documents the rise of this called Algorithm, ick Justice League. There are fledgling movement with this mission to rescue us from the insidious crepe of biased computer algorithms into pretty much every aspect of our lives. Now, they films both feature at this year's Melbourne International Film Festival and they join me from a Balmy summer in New York. City thank you for having us. Absolutely thanks for having us the injustices in these films. Real and raw and happening in the world right now, and there's this. Shopping, and shocking sense of urgency in both of these films for both of us. Why are these films that you were compelled to make? Now what drove you to these stories David? This is a story about an ongoing genocidal program in the southern Russian republic of Chechnya a conflict which we were all informed about in a series of articles published in a newspaper. In Russia back in two thousand, seventeen, it produce headlines around the globe. It was a horrifying revelation of a campaign to round up and eliminate all lgbtq people living in the. Chechen republic it generated our government leaders around the world were outraged by it and demanded justice. But the story immediately fell from headlines and what I discovered some months later was that it the the crimes themselves had not stopped. And in fact that ordinary Russians were responding to this in really heroic ways I spent eighteen months embedded in his underground network this underground railroad of people who were actually physically rescuing individuals from. Hiding them. Tending to their physical wounds in their psychological ones and trying to get them out of Chechnya if and to relative safety and other parts of the world the access you got. WAS INCREDIBLE THE TRUST In Janet easing credible Shalini what about you boss is this absolutely riveting vital interrogation of the wine which machine learning algorithms are effectively shaping lives in the most potent and yet most secret ways. Why will you compelled to make this film? Well, I think all of my work deals with how disruptive technology makes the world lesser more fair. And when I stumbled upon the work of joy Leney and Cathy O'Neil the author weapons of mass destruction I sort of stumbled down the rabbit hole of the dark side of big tack and came to realize quite shockingly. that. You know these computer systems that we give our implicit trust to and entrust with such decisions like who gets hired, who gets health care how long a prison sentence on someone may serve. have. Not Been often vetted for accuracy or for racial or gender bias, and that comes across in the making of this still where. Joy Leney is just trying to make something like a snap chat filter were right? And put a mask on her face and stumbles upon the fact that commercially available facial recognition doesn't see dark faces are women accurately she's

Chechnya Joy Leney David France Thanh Director Melbourne International Film F Ick Justice League Director Russia Chechen Murder New York Cathy O'neil Janet Shalini
Let It Roll: The Subversive Side of Classical Music

Rock N Roll Archaeology

08:40 min | 1 year ago

Let It Roll: The Subversive Side of Classical Music

"Some. Let it roll. Let me host Nate Wilcox. They will have the pleasure of welcoming back Ted Gioia to discuss again his book a subversive history of music. Today we're going to talk about a section of the book focusing on what we probably call classical music European concert tradition and starting off with chapters like musicians behaving badly so it's kind of a different take on classical music ted. Welcome back to the show right. Thanks for having me back. It's a pleasure and I wanted to do this because you know we talked about the book before and and it's it's a paradigm shifting book for me. It's one that really expanded my mind and and clarify things that have been wrestling with and you put it into words brilliantly and it it helped me focus on the whole scope of the show but the section in particular was one. I skipped over last time because I considered outside the breadth of the show which has covered things like the history of rock and roll music and Pop Music in the twentieth century. And I realized reading this book and do more research that the history of popular music as a business really goes back to the renaissance while absolutely on a lot of the behavior patterns of the musicians as well date back to that people often ask me what I learned researching this book and it was many years of research. But one of the quickest summaries. I have is. I found out that the music of might time and the music I grew up with which was jazz. Blues and rock and roll really the musicians back in the glory. Years of classical music weren't all that different and we have a tendency to sanitized that whole record to treat these people with great esteem. But they were just disruptive in many ways more disruptive than later rock musicians so. There's a lot of things that we take for granted in the current day that in fact for justice vibrate noticeable two hundred years ago. Yeah and you talk about this phenomenon that repeats throughout the history of music in the book which is a transition from disruption to respectability from outsiders to insiders and so often musical. Innovations are driven by people on the outside of the system but then there as they succeed as they impact the popular consciousness. They're pulled in to the inside. Sometimes they themselves become insiders other times. They're co opted. You know postmortem talk about that phenomenon. Logan that's right and we're very familiar with this in our own lifetime. We've all seen it when I was growing up The the Beatles and the Rolling Stones Bob Dylan. These dangerous. Figures feared by the establishment. But nowadays Bob Dylan is Nobel. Laureate Mick Jagger Sir Mick Jagger Paul McCartney Sir Paul McCartney and even the most extreme examples I mean take hip hop. Nwea the FBI tried to shut down the record label when they came on board nowadays. That same record has been enshrined in the National Archive of historic recordings of Congress. You have the Smithsonian out there putting together an official Smithsonian Guide to hip hop with fifty hip hop professors. Very idea about professor would have seen the contradiction in terms but they got fifty of them putting together this Canon of hip hop song. So we know about this from our own life and we've seen how these styles has been a good sized what we don't realize the same thing happened hundreds of years ago. The classic example is Bach. You Know Balk is considered now the poster child for respectability classical music is great composer. Who composed for God and country devout booth and run it Cetera et CETERA. You go back and do his own times and you find. That balk grew up with juvenile delinquents. Went to a school famous for gang. Culture was mentored by one of the worst gang members all his early jobs. Disciplinary problems At a young age to spend a month in jail He was called to task for cavorting with a young lady in the organ. Loft had prodigious beer-drinking every possible violation of rules and discipline he exemplified. None of that is is remembered nowadays. He's just the Lutheran composer so this recurring. We could talk about other composers. But there's one point I do WanNa make though I raise these issues in my book. Not because I'm trying to be gossipy or salaciously and it makes for great reading to read all these sexy anecdotes. I have the point. I'm trying to make though is these. Figures could not have created disruptive music they invented if they hadn't been disruptive in their own lifetimes you know almost all the commentary on Bach. We have from back then people complaining about him. You know people complaining about how show he was. He was called the task before the city council had to submit a written document explaining why he was using such new progressive and strange musical techniques. So this thing is conducted disruption in their private life and the disruption. Their music is connected. And that's why well upon it because if you don't understand that you will never understand the evolution of music and going back a little further. You talk about a couple of composers from the Italian renaissance. Who went way beyond Bach in terms of violations of social norms? I'm Talkin about two particular Rotella Mayo Trump Esino and Carlo Jesualdo and bothered these guys. Were involved in love. Triangles that resulted in murders committed by them. Oh this is right. It's interesting if you start with the music of these two individuals trauma Chino and swallow. Its gentle music and they will have songs. These pretty gentle love songs. Mandra goes in front of us but in their private life they were violent angry people and both of them not only did they commit murders but it was obvious to everybody that they were guilty and they were never punished and this is interesting because it shows you that. Starting around the renaissance it became the norm or musicians to go outside the norm. They were allowed indiscretions that other people were not and in fact. I'm convinced in both those instances their fame and reputation was increased by committing murder. I think people felt well. If this guy is such a passionate lover that he he he. He kills somebody in a fit of jealous rage. Who you know. There must be a similar intensity of passion in the song and we laugh at that. But that's the same way. People look at rock bands and the sex pistols. And we've seen this in our lifetime. If the musician out of control we suspect there must be a certain intensity in the music as well so it all came back to that time I mean just one more example I find this fascinating people that want to understand what it was like to be an artist during the Renaissance. The most famous book. They read the autobiography of Benvenuto Cellini. He was a renaissance artist famous as a silversmith sculptor but he was also a musician played the flute and he wrote his life story. And it makes fascinating reading but I went through that book page by page and I just marked off every time. Shalini committed a violent crime and and I think I came up potentially with at least fourteen. Violent crimes committed in his life. And this is not including the the the just the vandalism or the varsity these are actually violent crimes where he murdered somebody or beat them up and none of them was punished for he was. He was actually put in jail couple times. It was only because of arguments with his patrons over payment and artworks and my favorite anecdote from the whole book comes from a conversation when someone would approach the Pope instead of the jubilee. WanNa hire this Guy Shalini. You know he's committed murder and all this and the pope said you don't understand for people like Ben to Chile. Different rules apply that came directly from the mouth of the Pope and the renaissance. And this was a new idea and I would say we still live with this idea to even though even in the midst of the metoo movement and all the scandals. They're still this expectation that great musicians with by their own rules and they violate rules and and For good or bad that's part of the whole Agassi Western music.

Murder Bach Bob Dylan Ted Gioia Nate Wilcox Mick Jagger Smithsonian Rotella Mayo Trump Esino FBI Benvenuto Cellini Chino Sir Paul Mccartney Shalini Logan Sir Mick Jagger Paul Mccartney Vandalism Congress The Beatles Professor
This Too Shall Pass and it Aint That Bad

The Chalene Show

07:15 min | 1 year ago

This Too Shall Pass and it Aint That Bad

"To the Shalini. Show Jelena's a New York Times bestselling author celebrity fitness trainer in obsessed assist with helping you. Actually we're not going for a ride. We're just sitting in my car. Thanks for being here and keeping me company. I've got a nice Warm Cup of coffee. He and I got ready a little early today. So I've got like an extra twenty minutes and I was just sitting here going over my day my push journal and I thought you know what I've got something on my mind. I WanNa talk to my my lifers about this one and it's really the idea that life is hard like well and sometimes life is good and easy and we don't always recognize nuys when it's good an easy. It's funny how that is right because you've ever given birth. If you have kids you gave birth to those kids. You know what I'm talking about like you quickly. We kind of forget the painful uncomfortable pieces and you consider having more sometimes but what I really wanted to talk to you about. Is it kind of that idea like talking about the perspective that eventually everything gets better the this is life and today actually yesterday I should say yeah it was yesterday. I was going through this big box of photos. I mean photos from when Britain. I all the way back to when we were just. I married newlyweds. Pictures from our wedding pictures from when Brock was first born and then when he was a toddler Adler and all the birthday parties and then Sierra being born in I do apologize. If you're listening I don't know what the deal is. There just are not as many photos of Sierra. I guess that's at Second Child Syndrome but in my own defense. It's also when like we started taking digital photos and so once everyone one-star doing that. We stopped printing photos. Are you with me like how many thousands and thousands of photos do you have on your phone right now. Div Not printed them like remember remember. How every single week? I don't know if you're old enough to remember this but we all used to go to costco or CVS or the drugstore like probably like once a week and you get this big giant pack of photos autos and it was so weird because you didn't know what you're going to be getting because you took the photos but you didn't have a digital camera to look and see like if the photos were going to be good or not you just picked up this huge stack of real photos. It's so strange that was like a minute ago and it was over. The course of Sierra's lifetime. We just went straight up digital so there aren't as many photos of her poor girl. Love you girl but anyways as I was going through those photos Brett was gone for a couple of days. I was like sitting on the floor and I'm going to these photos and I was really thinking about what was going on lives during those times times like looking at a phone going like. Oh Yeah Whoa I remember. I remember who was there that night. I remember getting a fight earlier that day. I remember remember the argument. I remember vying that skirt. I remember buying that dress like you know what I mean. All those memories were coming back to me but I really started for some some reason thinking about some of the more trying times over the course of the last twenty twenty five years and as I was looking to these photos otas thinking about some of those tough times. I was reminded that in those moments I remember feeling like would would never get better that it was so painful and so horrific in so uncomfortable. Whatever it was right because there's all these different stages there's just never you can't imagine it being incredibly different? I looked at photos when we were in our first Home together and thinking about how how many months we had to work to afford one window treatment. We had this one kind of bigger window in our downstairs area and I had a personal training client at the time who is a decorator and she had these like ornate beautiful window uh-huh treatments and just remember going. Oh Man let's have her designed one beautiful draperies like this beautiful ornate window treatment and and like we had a scrape up every penny to do that and and it felt like such an extravagant thing and I just remember thinking like what would it be like if we could do like all of our windows you know not just have this one night it was now we just have one window but like there's one area where we had like one big tall window anyways ways I remember feeling like will never be out of debt like will we ever have a savings. Will we ever have that time of the month roll around when and we have to pay our mortgage will we ever feel like it's not painful right and then and then I'm looking at more photos and remembering when things dig a little bit easier but but then I remember like then. I'm looking at times when the kids were little and just feeling so overwhelmed and so alone and feeling like Oh gosh this is so oh hard into my doing this right and it's so stressful and I just remember crying and crying because Brock would never stop crying crying when he was a baby and people say the rudest things like. Oh your babies Koloki because they're picking up on your energy you know that you see how it was blame and just remember so many of those struggles and then you know going through additional photos and seeing people who were in my life for a period of time who you know there are good and bad bad times and I remember like the really bad times. I remember like having relationship problems with like a person person who's like no longer in my life and to think about the grief that I was feeling in that moment and then to think like wow. I haven't thought about them in fifteen years breath that time in my life that person became all consuming then every time I I looked at another photo and thought back on what we. We're feeling at that time I would just take a deep breath and the sense of calm just kept coming over me as a reminding myself that nothing's permanent like everything gets better the worst of the worst pain and tough times and challenges. Eventually it gets better eventually. You are better for it. Nothing stayed the way it was. We made it through everything you have made it through everything. No matter how dark the the pain is it you feel right now no matter how much despair you feel and how sad you might be and how devastated stated you may feel this is GonNa pass things are GonNa get better. Your pain is not permanent

Sierra Brock New York Times Costco Child Syndrome Jelena Fitness Trainer Nuys Britain Brett Adler
Giving Yourself Permission to do Big Things

The Chalene Show

11:23 min | 2 years ago

Giving Yourself Permission to do Big Things

"Hey there welcome to this edition of of car smart Friday on the Shalini show which seatbelts on we're going for a ride welcome to the show lean show Jelena's a New York Times bestselling filling author celebrity fitness trainer in obsessed with helping you live your life so today I am answering your questions and these are really fun question so I posted this up on my instagram stories and I promised I would give you your answer. Some of these are really deep but I'm excited to talk about the stuff off by the way these are questions all pertain to like being successful or like going for it so the first question was why I do you think that people are afraid to go after their dreams and I think the reason why people afraid to go after their dreams is probably obvious it's either. They don't think they're anof. They don't think that they are big enough important enough smart enough that they're going to fail. L. And nobody wants to look stupid. Nobody wants to be vulnerable and that way and so. I think it's interesting that people don't go for their dreams. I think it's even more interesting when people don't have dreams or what. They say that they're dreamer. Their goal is it's like dude. You're already like that's just going to happen happen. It's like saying my goal is to someday be fifty one years old like that's GonNa Happen. You know what I mean like so often. I asked people like you know. What do you WanNa do like how how much money do you WanNa make or what would you like to build. How would you like to feel or look at things that there are already on pace for. That's not a goal. I mean that's not something that pushes you. That's not something that stretches you. When I'm talking about dreaming I mean giving yourself permission to dream think about something that feels elusive that feels difficult that feels far far away like Brenton I when we we're making our vision kind of like our five year plan if you will and we were doing this as part of a mastermind group remember the sunny. Do you remember orange when you're talking about three percents percent Yep. We're this mastermind group that we've formed where we invited the very first mastermind we did. I think this like two thousand nine we invited small group of people from different industries but all you know business folks but different stages like to the gals had like a a spray tanning business they were starting together and there was a psychiatrist and an inventor of physical therapists sutter capital of Yeah Yeah Venture Capitalists. It was Kinda cool. It was cool. It was really cool but anyways we did this exercise together as a group and we all wrote down what we wanted our lives look five years from that moment and Britain I wrote our own and then we were kind of comparing notes and one of our mutual dreams was to live on the ocean like live on the ocean or I should say on if near the ocean ocean your abuse like a Beach Beach House right. I don't know that was picturing living on the ocean but I was picturing living like you know I could see it where I look like a walk to the beach and yes and like frankly those homes here in southern California just to give you some perspective the same house that you were to buy like in a nice neighborhood neighborhood but off of the beach on the beach. It might be another add five million dollars. Would you say that about right. Maybe four million it depends on how big houses but yeah typically if you're moving towards the ocean you have a few of the ocean on the ocean. You're looking at you know four to six months in southern California yeah in addition to like that's minimum yes. Oh picture your average size house in southern California. You know how expensive that is and now take another four to six million on to the normal price they just because on the ocean so when we said that when we put that in our five year plan plan like that felt very dreamy. It didn't feel like it was for sure GonNa Happen. Were ready for it in the next year or two. That's for sure right and you know I said this today. I put that on paper but I am not an ally and tell you. I thought that was GONNA happen in five years. Here's how I create a dream and it's that would be super cool. I think it's within the realm of possibilities but I don't know that it's likely that's what I call a dream a dream emerson like I don't know if it's like that likely to happen. I can see that it's possible. That's a dream and I think too many of us too many view. You say okay well. Here's this dream but you know it's very likely if you just put a little bit of effort into it to come up with a dream that's really exciting is is to put something on paper that you like that would be freaking on freaking believable and a little scary and scary yeah to get to that point. It's GonNa. There's GONNA be some risk involved and there's GonNa be some a strategy and you really have to think about it. I remember those three percent or meetings that we had to Kinda correct a couple people because like you said earlier they put down goals or crazy things can happen if I were like. Wait a second you're already doing. It's like the next year like it's almost like when you write down tattoos that you WanNa do tomorrow and one of them's brush your teeth yeah. It's a a small. It's not even a drink. It's a small goal. It's not even dream so so there you go so the next question was what is the difference between between well okay with this kind of a local. She gives a little backstory and says she regularly self sabotage ourselves so she said I am trying to figure out whether I have fear of failure fear of success okay so I don't know the answer and I do think they're different. Someone who has fear of failure. Oh year typically in not always most situations you have either really critical parents errands or critical people around you and so your fear of failure is that you just want to be accepted and loved and when you messed up you didn't feel those things as a child usually sometimes fear of failure though is because you have so much success around you they you're afraid to fail because then you again you won't belong so. I think fear of failure is our desire to belong desired to have significance and we think if we fail sale that will be lesser yeah I like rejected or we won't be loved. We won't be accepted. I think that's what we're fear. Failure comes in and fear of success different. Fear of success in my estimation is someone who when they think about being successful that means a comes with more responsibility expectations demands change. Jim People are afraid of change that if they are also I think fear of success sometimes is that people think well if I'm successful of a lot of eyes John. Me and then people will know that I'm fried so can be some imposter syndrome imposture soon for sure and if I get too big I've been up too many eyeballs on me in somebody. If not many people are gonNA figure out like it's not real yeah so nope if you think about both of those things right or fear of success and fear of failure in either case you just want to be accepted and you want to be loved and appreciated you. WanNa be enough so the way you get around. Both of those is knowing that how other people feel about you has nothing to do with your worth earth. It has nothing to do with your value. You are enough. You're worthy and you are significant because you're you your child of God so get over that and I also think the only way that you can fail is by doing nothing. That's how you fail and the only person you'll fail feeling you're feeling is you're failing yourself all right next question. Shalini I really we have some big dreams and goals but I don't want to let go of the security that I feel and that security or my quote golden handcuffs are hold me back from doing my own thing okay well. I get that and I don't know if this is from a guy or Gal I can't tell from the username but security is another natural human desire like we all want to feel safe so that's normal. It's natural and I don't know your situation but when we want security it's oftentimes because we want to keep other. The people save two so my recommendation is because you mentioned golden handcuffs so I'm assuming that means. You have a well paying career. There are job or position. Maybe it's even a well paying business. You don't love and you want to go do something else. Here's my best advice. You frigging do it but don't quit that thing that provides your security. Is that what you're gonNA say hundred percent okay. What were you gonNA say Dabble. If you have some crazy like if you're you're not happy with what you're doing. I'm going to throw this out there but you're making a great income or you. Are you know you're providing for a family and it's just not in the cards but you know you're not happy but you have this like it to do something amazing or you know or different or something like that or you just have a great great idea then dabble in it trade out because you know what it might not be. It's that whole thing. The grass isn't always greener type of thing and it might be one of those things things. Were you start dabbling and you're like okay. I'm glad I didn't go this way because this would have been a disaster. If I were to quit this great thing so dabbling it see how it feels and then just go slowly because you don't always have to just jump all in to something that's so dip your toe in that's right absolutely Salihi in and you can dip your toe and realize this ain't that thing but I I at least I have the security of my job and I know this going way back but when we first I were married I was working as a paralegal and Brett was off playing football and actually at this point when we were first married to play football all right yeah true but actually when we first got married you were done playing football on uh-huh and I was working as a paralegal and I knew I decided my mind. Oh this is not my thing. I do not want to be an attorney. I thought I wanted all my life to be an attorney and I take them to L.

California Shalini Football Attorney Instagram Beach Beach House New York Times Jim People Jelena Fitness Trainer Brenton Britain Sutter Brett Five Years Five Year Five Million Dollars Fifty One Years Hundred Percent
"shalini" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"shalini" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"Vandalism or if just so it's sometimes it's, it's really baffling some people wondered how how. The heck did Google find that or same name issues have often gotten confused panels like when Benjamin Reese, who's an English professor at Emory University got confused with another another Benjamin race who was born in France. So there's a who the French cartoonist. So there's all kinds of ways you can get know get messed up. Based on your story. It seems like getting a Google to make corrections is difficult. Especially a couple of folks, you mentioned, who are listed as dead who were not dead. Yes, it can get really difficult. Google says that it committed to verifying things fast. And, but it deals with a lot of there's essentially a couple tools that it's offered people who have much to get them fixed. One of this tiny almost on find a little button that says feedback, and if you click on it, you can try to start editing stuff. Unfortunately, many of the people, I talked to say they were sending feedback for months, sometimes years and not, not every getting a correction galoshes thing year ago, that's supposed to be so you can get verified by Google so that you prove that you are, who you are. And this panel is about you now that requires you sending a lot of personal stuff to go, which includes your selfie with a passport or driver's license to Google or sometimes. One the, the woman who is trying to get her ex husband scrubbed with told by Google employees may have to send in her divorce papers. There's it can it can get really personal and private quickly. And but during that process go verifies you and once you're verified via radically. They elevate your feedback end and correcting Sasser, but some people have talked to have had a lot of problems even getting stuff fix after they got verified. I rating, thanks for lean Shalini, Rama Chandran reporter at the Wall Street Journal twenty one minutes now in front.

Google Benjamin Reese Vandalism Emory University France Wall Street Journal Sasser professor Rama Chandran reporter Shalini twenty one minutes
"shalini" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"shalini" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"They can be difficult to fix. It's a story by Shalini Ramachandran reporter at the Wall Street Journal, Shalini, explain, well, basically, what Google done over the last several years is it's tried to make its search more easily digestible by creating these panels, which are algorithm done that are about people. Thanks, but when it's when it was, like Marie Curie. George Washington, you're sorta. Yeah. That's an easy way to figure out who they are. And what they are up to, but over the years, their knowledge Pennells have become have started incorporate kind of not very famous people because their understanding of how you're connected to those, and that has has increased. And so a lot of not very famous people have Google themselves to find. The panel on the right side of their search landing pages. That's very wrong. And they've had real trouble trying to fix it and have found that a lot of business opportunities that may have fallen through or have getting a lot of weird questions when opera singer was saying that he spent fourteen months trying to scrub her ex husband off of her panel, so that can get personal. How does how do the panels get incorrect in the first place? Google pulls in the information from various sources on the internet. So it's unclear it's all algorithms weekly done. So it's not a human cheating, their incubating them. Nothing is vetted. For accuracy before it goes up on the Google landing page unless you're a political candidates or health disorder, but that's not even. But every everything else is not betted. And so incorrect information can come from Wikipedia.

Google Shalini Ramachandran Marie Curie George Washington Wall Street Journal reporter fourteen months
"shalini" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

04:13 min | 2 years ago

"shalini" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Food and deals for Father's Day. We'll have a rundown for you in about twenty minutes. Google's algorithm. Wraps up people places and things into boxes that the company calls knowledge, panels, the panels gather information from Wikipedia and many other sources on the internet. The panels wants popped up for important. Historical figures out other famous people. Now, they appear for all kinds of people. And when they contain significant mistakes, they can be difficult to fix. It's a story by Shalini Ramachandran reporter at the Wall Street Journal, Shalini explain basically, what goes over the last several years is a try to make it. Search more easily digestible by creating these panels, which are algorithm done that, you know, are about people places and things. But when it's when it was like Marie Curie, George Washington to. Yeah. Yeah. That's an easy way to figure out who they are. And what they are up to, but over the years their knowledge Pennells has become have started. Incorp. Great kind of not very famous people because their understanding of how you're connected to those, and that has has increased. And so a lot of not very famous people have Google themselves to find a panel on the right side of their search landing pages. That's very wrong. And they have had real trouble trying to fix it and have found that a lot of business opportunities have that may have fallen through or have. They've getting a lot of weird questions. One opera singer was saying that he spent fourteen months trying to scrub her ex husband off of her panel. So it can get personal. How does how does the panels get incorrect in the first place? Google pulls in the information from various sources on the internet. So it's unclear it's, it's all algorithm medically done. So it's not a human seating there and creating them. Nothing is vetted. For accuracy before it goes up on your Google landing page unless you're political candidates or a health disorder, but that's not even be, but. But every everything else is not vetted. And so incorrect information can come from Wikipedia vandalism or is just so I it's sometimes it's, it's really baffling. Some people have wondered how, how the heck did Google find that or same name issues have often gotten confused panels, like on Benjamin Reese, who's an English professor at Emory University, got confused with the Niger another Benjamin race who was born in France. So there's who the French cartoonist? So there's all kinds of ways you can get, you know, get messed up. Great based on your story. It seems like getting a Google to make corrections is difficult. Especially a couple of folks, you mentioned, who are listed as dead who were not dead. Yes, it can get really difficult on Google says that it's committed to verifying things fast. But it deals with a lot of there. There's essentially a couple of tools that it's offered. People who have knowledge panel, fifty get them fixed. One is this tiny almost own findable little button. That says feedback. And if you click on it, he can try to start editing stuff. Unfortunately, many of the people, I talked to say they were sending feedback for months, sometimes years and not, not every getting a correction, Google, watch this thing, a year ago, that's supposed to be so you can get verified by Google so that you prove that you are, who you are. And this panel is about you now that requires you sending a lot of personal stuff to goodwill, which includes your selfie with a passport or driver's license to Google or sometimes. One the, the woman who is trying to get her ex scrubbed was told by Google employees you may have to send in her divorce papers. There's it can it can get really personal and private quickly. And but during that process gogo verifies you. And once you're verified, theoretically, they elevate their feedback end and correcting faster. But some people, I've talked to have had a lot of problems even getting stuff fix after they got verified. Thanks, Shalini, Shalini Ramchandran reporter at the Wall Street Journal twenty one minutes.

Google Wall Street Journal Shalini reporter Shalini Ramachandran Wikipedia George Washington Marie Curie Pennells vandalism gogo Emory University Niger Benjamin Reese Shalini Ramchandran France professor twenty one minutes fourteen months
"shalini" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

04:11 min | 2 years ago

"shalini" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"Have a rundown for you in about twenty minutes. Google's algorithm. Wraps up people places in things into boxes, that the company calls knowledge, kennels, the panels gather information from Wikipedia and many other sources on the internet, the panels once popped up for important historical figures, and other famous people now they appear for all kinds of people, and when they contain significant mistakes, they can be difficult to fix. It's a story by Shalini Ramachandran reporter at the Wall Street Journal, Shalini explain what goes done over the last several years is it's try to make it. Search more easily digestible by creating these panels, which are out horrifically done that, you know, are about people places and things. But when it's when it was like Marie Curie, George Washington. Yeah. That's an easy way to figure out who they are. And what they are up to, but over the years, their knowledge panels have become have started incorporate kind of not vague famous people because their understanding of how you're connected to those, and that has has increased. And so a lot of not very famous people have people themselves to find a panel on the right side of their search landing pages. That's very wrong. And they've had real trouble trying to fix it and have found that a lot of business opportunities have that may have followed through or have getting a lot of weird questions when opera singer was saying that he spent fourteen months trying to scrub her ex husband off of her panel. So it can get personal. How does how do the panels get incorrect in the first place? Google pulls in the information from various sources on the internet. So it's unclear it's all algorithms weekly done. So it's not a human cheating incubating them. Nothing is. Vetted for accuracy before it goes up on the Google landing page unless you're political candidates or a health disorder, but that's not even but every everything else is not vetted. And so incorrect information can come from Wikipedia vandalism or is just so it sometimes it's, it's really baffling. Some people have wondered how, how the heck did Google find that or same name issues have often gotten confused panels like Benjamin reach, who's an English professor at Emory University got confused with another another Benjamin race who was born in France. So there's who the French cartoonist, so there's all kinds of ways, you can get all get messed up based on your story. It seems like getting a Google to make corrections is difficult. Especially a couple of folks, you mentioned, who are listed as dead who were not dead. Yes, it can get really difficult. Google says that it's committed verifying things fast. But it deals with a lot of there's essentially a couple tools that it's offered the people who have much to get them. Six one is this tiny almost on find a little button. That says feedback and click on it, you can try to start editing stuff. Unfortunately, many of the people, I talked to say they were sending feedback for months, sometimes years and not not every getting correction. Watch this thing year ago that's supposed to be so you can get verified by Google so that you prove that you are, who you are. And this panel is about you now that requires you sending a lot of personal stuff to which includes your selfie with a passport or driver's license to Google or sometimes one, the woman who is trying to get her ex husband scrubbed with told by Google employee team. They had to send in her divorce papers. There's a. It can it can get really personal and private quickly. And but during that process go verifies you and once you're verified, be radically day elevate their feedback end and correct faster. But some people, I've talked to have had a lot of problems even getting stuff fix after they got verified. Thanks for Leany Shalini Ramchandran reporter at the Wall Street Journal twenty one minutes.

Google Wall Street Journal Shalini Ramachandran reporter Leany Shalini Ramchandran George Washington Wikipedia Marie Curie vandalism Emory University Benjamin France professor twenty one minutes fourteen months twenty minutes
"shalini" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

04:10 min | 2 years ago

"shalini" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"You in about twenty minutes. Google's algorithm. Wraps up people places and things into boxes that the company calls knowledge, panels, the panels. Gather information from Wikipedia and many other sources on the internet. The panels wants popped up for important. Historical figures other famous people now they appear for all kinds of people, and when they contain significant mistakes, they can be difficult to fix. It's a story by Shalini Ramachandran reporter at the Wall Street Journal, Shalini explain. Well, basically, what goes done over the last several year is, it's try to make it. Search more easily digestible by creating these panels, which are algorithm ethically done that are about people places and things. But when it's when it was like Marie Curie, George Washington, you're sorta. Yeah. That's an easy way to figure out who they are. And what they are up to, but over the years, their knowledge panels have become have started. Incorporate. Kind of not very famous people because their understanding of how you're connected to those, and that has has increased. And so a lot of not very famous people have Google themselves to find a panel on the right side of their circulating pages. That's very wrong, and they've had real trouble trying to fix it and have found that a lot of business opportunities have that may have followed through or have getting a lot of weird questions when opera singer was saying that he spent fourteen months trying to scrub her ex husband off of her panel. So it can get personal. How does how does the panels get incorrect in the first place? Google pulls in the information from various sources on the internet. So it's unclear it's, it's all algorithms weekly done. So it's not a human sitting there and creating them. Nothing is vetted. For accuracy before it goes up on your Google winning paid unless you're a political candidate or a health disorder, but that's not even but. Every everything else is not vetted. And so incorrect information can come from Wikipedia vandalism or if just so I it's sometimes it's, it's really baffling. Some people have wondered how, how the heck did Google find that or same name issues have often gotten confused panels, like on Benjamin Reese, who's an English professor at Emory University, got confused with the Niger another Benjamin race who was born in France. So there's a who the French cartoonist. So there's all kinds of ways you can get all get messed up grant based on your story. It seems like getting a Google to make corrections is difficult. Especially a couple of folks, you mentioned, who are listed as dead who were not dead. Yes, it can get really difficult. Google says that it's committed to verifying things fast. And, but it deals with a lot of there's essentially a couple of tools that it's offered people who have knowledge panel to get them fixed. One is this tiny. Almost on findable little button. That says feedback, and if you click on it, you can try to start editing stuff. Unfortunately, many of the people, I talked to say they were sending feedback for months, sometimes years and not, not every getting a correction Google ISIS thing, a year ago that's supposed to be so you can get verified by Google so that you prove that you are, who you are. And this panel is about you now that requires you sending a lot of personal stuff to Google, which includes your selfie with a passport or driver's license to Google, or sometimes, when the, the woman who is trying to get her ex-husband's, scrubbed was told by Google employees, he may have to send in her divorce papers his, there's it, can it can get really personal and private quickly. And but during that process, gogo, verifies, you and once you're verified, theoretically, they elevate your feedback end and correcting Sasser. But some people I've talked to have had. A lot of problems even getting stuff fixed after they got verified. Thanks, Shalini, Shalini Ramachandran reporter at the Wall Street Journal twenty one minutes now in.

Google Shalini Ramachandran Wall Street Journal reporter Wikipedia George Washington Marie Curie vandalism Sasser Emory University Niger Benjamin Reese France professor twenty one minutes fourteen months twenty minutes
"shalini" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

02:16 min | 2 years ago

"shalini" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Fire from a sales standpoint. And free food and deals for Father's Day. We'll have a rundown for you in about twenty minutes. Google's algorithm. Wraps up people places in things into boxes that the company calls knowledge, panels, the panels. Gather information from Wikipedia and many other sources on the internet, the panels once popped up for important historical figures other famous people now they appear for all kinds of people, and when they contain significant mistakes, they can be difficult to fix. It's a story by Shalini Ramachandran reporter at the Wall Street Journal, Shalini explain what goes done over the last several years is it's try to make it. Search more easily digestible by creating these panels, which are algorithm ethically done that, you know, are about people places and things. But when it's when it was like Marie Curie, George Washington, you're sorta. Yeah. That's an easy way to figure out who they are. And what they are up to, but over the years, their knowledge panels have become have started. Incorporate. Kind of not raid famous people because their understanding of how you're connected to those, and that has has increased. And so a lot of not very famous people have Google themselves to find a panel on the right side of their search landing pages. That's very wrong. And they've had real trouble trying to fix it and have found that a lot of business opportunities that may have fallen through or have their getting a lot of weird questions when opera singer was saying that he spent fourteen months trying to scrub her ex husband off of her panel. So it can get personnel. How does how do the panels get incorrect in the first place? Google pulls in the information from various sources on the internet. So it's unclear it's, it's all algorithm, Eighthly done. So it's not a human seating. Darren creating them. Nothing is vetted. For accuracy before it goes up on your Google landing page unless you're a political candidate or health disorder, but that's not even be. But. Every everything else is not vetted. And so incorrect information can come from Wikipedia vandalism.

Google Shalini Ramachandran George Washington Marie Curie Wall Street Journal vandalism Wikipedia reporter Darren fourteen months twenty minutes
"shalini" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

03:40 min | 2 years ago

"shalini" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"And free food and deals for Father's Day blubber rundown for you in about twenty minutes. Google's algorithm. Reps up people places, and things into boxes that the company calls knowledge, panels, the panels. Gather information from Wikipedia and many other sources on the internet, the panels once popped up for important historical figures other famous people. Now, they appear for all kinds of people, and when they contain significant mistakes that can be difficult to fix. It's a story by Shalini Ramachandran reporter at the Wall Street Journal Shalini. Explain what goes down over the last several years is it's try to make it. Search more easily digestible by creating these panels, which are algorithms, we've done that are about people, thanks, but when, when it was like Marie Curie George Washington, you're eating idiot of figure out, who they are, and what they're up to but over the, their knowledge panels have become have started incorporate kind of not very famous people because their understanding of how you're connected to those and dead and has has increased. And so a lot of not very famous people have people themselves to find a panel on the right side of their search landing pages. That's very wrong. And they've had real trouble trying to fix it and found that a lot of business opportunities that may have fallen through or have getting a lot of weird questions when opera singer was saying that he spent fourteen months trying to scrub her ex-husband off of her panel. So it can get personnel. How does it the panels get incorrect in the first place? Well, Google pulled in the information from various sources on the internet. So it's unclear it's don't algorithm. Mickley done. So it's not a human incubating. Nothing is vetted. For accuracy before it goes up on the landing page unless you're political candidates for a health disorder, but that's not even but every everything else is not vetted. And incorrect information can come from Wikipedia vandalism or if just I it's sometimes it's really baffling. Some people have wondered how, how the heck did Google find that or same name issues have often gotten confused panels like Benjamin research, an English professor at Emory University got confused with another another Benjamin race who was born in France? So there's a who the French cartoons. So there's all kinds of ways you can get, you know, get messed up based on your story. It seems like getting a Google to make corrections is difficult. Especially a couple of folks, you mentioned, who are listed as dead who are not dead. It can get really difficult on Google says that it committed to verifying things fast. But it deals with a lot of there's essentially a couple of tools that it offered people who have no panel to get them. Six one is this tiny almost on find a little button that says feedback if you click on it, he can try to start editing stuff. Unfortunately, many of the people, I talked to say they were sending feedback for months, sometimes years and not, not every getting a correction to Google wash this thing year ago, that's supposed to be so you can get verified by Google so that you prove that you are, who you are. And this panel is about you now that requires you sending a lot of personal stuff to Google, which includes your selfie with a passport or driver's license to Google. Or sometimes one the, the woman who is trying to get her ex husband scrubbed was told by Google employees you may have to send in her divorce papers. There's it can it can get really personal and private quickly. And but during that process, gogo, verifies, you and once you're verified beer, radically, day, elevate your feedback end in correcting faster. But some people, I've talked to have had a lot of problems even getting stuff fix after they got verified frustrating. Thanks, Shalini Shalini, Rama Chandran reporter at the Wall Street Journal twenty one minutes.

Google Wall Street Journal reporter Shalini Ramachandran Marie Curie George Washington Wikipedia Shalini Shalini vandalism Emory University France Benjamin research Benjamin Rama Chandran professor twenty one minutes fourteen months twenty minutes
"shalini" Discussed on 103.5 KISS FM

103.5 KISS FM

04:44 min | 2 years ago

"shalini" Discussed on 103.5 KISS FM

"The phone, brand new got that next the entertainment report coming up as well. What's in their end Shalini on stopped her very last Vegas show. So fan to do what I will tell you. That's coming up in a few end we kind of forgot about the Monday Iranian so embattled, but this is the winner and it was like pick and I love meeting. New music. Chris Martin on the vocals. He's called heaven, and it's on kiss. Good morning. Glad you're here. The. Catches. Back. The sink. Just. Jess. Once. Why did they get blown off? We'll find out now in waiting by the phone with red and Enjie. What's going on with Brian? How're.

Chris Martin Shalini Brian Enjie
"shalini" Discussed on The Chalene Show

The Chalene Show

03:21 min | 2 years ago

"shalini" Discussed on The Chalene Show

"Book or one three one method book dot com. And by the way, the link is in the show notes when you do that all you have to do is enter your order number. And I'm going to give you something I've created as a bonus for those of you who are doing that. Because again, like, I wanna show my appreciation. So I've done something for you. And what I've done is created a virtual coaching program based around mindset because let's face it. If you want to transform your health if you want to become a nutrition expert for you, it's gonna take more than just learning. That information you're gonna have to change your mindset, and I know that and I want this to be transformative. So to do that, I wanna help you change your mind, and you can do that you literally can shift your mindset now on a coach you through that process. So what I did specifically to honor to be of service to those of you who pre. The book is I've created the series and you'll get it for free when you enter your order number. So that's all I'm asking for for my birthday. That's how you can do an active service for me. And in return, you can allow me to do one for you if you'd like to wish my husband, happy birthday, his love language is words of affirmation and physical, touch, and I don't I keep your hands off my man. Are we clear thank you? Okay. But you can definitely give him the gift of words of appreciation. So I've also put below in my show notes, the episodes that Brett has done solo on the Shaheen show regarding finances regarding keeping passionate alive and your marriage and a few others. All you need to do is just read Emma review, write a review on the lean show and let the world know or let Britain know, how much you loved his episode that would make his birthday because every time one of you writes to him on Instagram, or Snapchat, and you let him. Know how much an episode helped you like he loves that as much as I do. So that's it and PS please don't feel like you need to do any of the above. Just listening to this podcast is a gift. The fact that you spent time with me today is a gift, and I need you to know, I'm blessed. Just the fact he listened all the way to the end is a gift, and I love you. You are the bomb dot com. This edition of the Shalini show is brought to you by one three one movement. Stop dieting, save your brain, save your gut live longer feel better stop going on a diet or following somebody else's rules and figure out what it means to have your own diet Vigo to method that actually serves you that helps you to be a better version of yourself. Let go of all of this craziness and confusion that surrounds diet and understand the science the science of one the study of one joy. Join the one three one movement today, we're taking back the word diet and gain what we are rightfully entitled to which is our health you deserve. Not just to look amazing. But to feel amazing. I'd love you to learn more about my personal journey. And why this is a true passion for me. I invite you to learn more by going to one three one movement dot com.

Shaheen Brett Emma Shalini Britain Snapchat
"shalini" Discussed on The Chalene Show

The Chalene Show

02:19 min | 2 years ago

"shalini" Discussed on The Chalene Show

"Welcome to this edition of the Shalini shell where today we're talking about wine. Now, we're talking about wine because you've been whining about it. Not really. But I did get a ton of questions after the episode. I did an alcohol, which by the way, if you missed that episode where I talked about the types of drinks that you could indulge in. What was the best or lowest sugar type alcohol, if you're going to have a cocktail what's the truth about health and drinking red wine and so much more? How does it affect your training? How does it affect your hormones everything you would need to know about alcohol and your body is an episode? I will link to that in our show notes. But the number one follow up question. I got was with regard to sugar free wine because I mentioned it in that episode. I mentioned that I had discovered from listening to another. Other podcast or in the health category. Dave Asprey, I listened to his bulletproof episode about a company called dry farm wines that imports wines from Europe that are sugar free. So I discovered these wines, and by the way, I'm not a wine drinker, but I discovered these wines and they've been a game changer and a mention them briefly in that episode, and I got little like just bombarded with questions, and I'm definitely not the expert here. So I thought what a great opportunity to bring the expert on. So today. My guest is Todd white Todd white is a health evangelist, and he's also the founder of dry farm wines. Todd is a serial entrepreneur like many of us, and he discovered or developed founded if you will this business of importing wines in an effort to solve his own problem. He's switched to the Keita. Genyk diet was trying to figure out how he could drink wine and still stay within ketosis. And discovered that the winds here in America. The least of the problem was the sugar and omega. You know, what I'm not going to spill the beans. Or should I say, I'm not going to spill the red wine. But if you're one of those people who listens to my podcast on your commute, and you usually make it through twenty or thirty minutes. I just wanna make sure you don't miss this really cool bonus that Todd mentions at kind of the end of the whole interview where he promises you're gonna love.

Todd white Shalini ketosis Todd Dave Asprey founder Europe America thirty minutes
"shalini" Discussed on The Chalene Show

The Chalene Show

03:13 min | 2 years ago

"shalini" Discussed on The Chalene Show

"Dream life before I go much further. If this is the first we've ever tuned into a selene show. I wanted to check out the show notes because cluttered and disorganization is something that I believe holds so many people back in so many areas of their lives, whether it's diet or starting that project that you want to start building that business repairing your marriage like building a wing on your home. Like, there's so many things that we just put off because we feel overwhelmed and one of the number one reasons why we. Feel overwhelmed is because of clutter. So in my show notes, you will see references to the most important previous Shalini, show episodes. I'd like you to listen to to help you declutter. You can also check out my Instagram. It should lean Johnson. And under my story highlights. I have highlights there that offer. My very best tips to help you declutter. But in this episode, I want to address something that every one of struggles with and that's letting go so if you are the kind of person who is borderline hoarding or you just struggle, and you know, that you need to toss out the quilt that your grandmother made you or maybe just don't own to do or maybe you just feel so guilty about your desire to throw away this box of trophies. But you just can't because your guilt ridden. Whatever the reason is we all have too much stuff and the less stuff. We have the more space. We have in our brains and in our life. Lives for the things that we're trying to attract. So let's talk about the six reasons why so many of us struggle to let go of things will the number one reason is because it has some kind of sentimental value. I'm laughing because I'm thinking about a conversation. I had this morning with my good friend. Dr Michaela we were working out. And we were talking about this subject. And she said, let me ask you a question could a pair of jeans have sentimental value. I said, well sure, I mean, do they obviously they do or you wouldn't have brought it up. Why would you keep them? Even if they have a sentimental value. Explain to me why you would keep up era jeans, and she said, well because it just every minds me of a particular time in my life, and I wore those jeans. I said, okay. Let me ask you are. They in style right now. She said, no, I said number two would they still fit you? She said, no said number three. Are you a better person today than the person you were when you could fit into those jeans and win those genes were? In style. And she's like, yeah. Completely. I said all right. My final question is is there any chance you've got a picture of yourself, maybe in those jeans or at that period of time in your life. And she said, yeah, I said, well, then you don't need to hang onto the genes to remember the time. So sentimental reasons is one of the number one excuses that we make when we know we need to get rid of something. But we want to hold onto the memory. But here's the deal memories. Are in our mind, we don't usually need something physical to trigger the memory. In fact, like an aroma can trigger a memory, a photograph can trigger a memory things that don't take up space and clutter your life.

Dr Michaela Johnson Shalini
"shalini" Discussed on The Chalene Show

The Chalene Show

03:07 min | 2 years ago

"shalini" Discussed on The Chalene Show

"This is the Shalini show Friday edition, car smart. And I'm jacking this not really I was asked to do this. And it's my pleasure to be here to give you guys my input advice on intimacy Shalini that last week and she asked me to do the same this week. Her only ask was that. I don't listen to last week's episode that I just do it on my own and come up with some, you know, tip suggestions, just kind of like some different ways that we keep our intimacy going and. Sure enough. I have some thoughts on that. And I would love to share those with you. And so here we go. I think probably if I had to start out with one thing, I really thought about this a lot, and I kind of want to start off with one that she leaned does remarkably well in does it in the right time because I think if you do this first one too much almost becomes white noise in that's complementing complementing, your partner, your spouse on some things that they do amazing. It might be the way they look it might be the way they took care of something. But I mean, a great compliment goes so far, and it just drives you so much closer to your spouse partner and Schlink doesn't amazing job with this in like all areas like she'll complement me on something that I might have done for work. That's kind of goes noticed like, you know, something that's like invisible everybody else. But she knows that Hewitt wanna do it in you know, I just muscled through it and got it done. And whether it was to make an uncomfortable phone call or if it was. Just taking the time out to make sure that our finances were an order or putting together all of our stuff for the end of your taxes. And it just stuff that she's like, I don't wanna do that. But he's doing that for us inner fam- inch e periodically. You know, send me a message or just tells me verbally or handwritten note or card, or what have you just like all the things that she appreciates that I do in terms of, you know, for us for the family for the business, and it's a compliment. And so that's huge. And you know, she doesn't other areas to she'll do it parenting. You know, like, you're always teaching your kids something, and it doesn't take a lot. I mean, if you're married, and you have kids and just to drop a little note. And just gosh, our kids are doing so well, and they just had such a great role model with you. And the way you teach them certain things. It's just I mean, it's just a compliment. It doesn't have to be every day. It's just it's when you notice in something touches, your heart. That's when you should do it. When you feel it touch, your heart. Of course, Schlei. Will complement me after twenty three years of marriage twenty four this March, and she'll complement me on physical things to she'll tell me how we'll keep this PG. But she'll complement me on things that I'm doing like if I'm working really hard in a gym. Or if I'm taking care of myself, or if I'm doing extra little things like going to infrared or getting some therapy done or just whatever she'll complimenting on like. Wow. This part of your body's looking really good..

Schlink Hewitt Shalini partner Schlei twenty three years
Taylor Swift Gives Free Tickets to Police and Firefighters After Officer's Death

24 Hour News

02:17 min | 3 years ago

Taylor Swift Gives Free Tickets to Police and Firefighters After Officer's Death

"Newsmen a two firefighters are. Dead some thirty seven thousand people had to scramble to escape the flames of a wildfire that roared into reading California with little warning overnight Aaron Clark says she found her parents. Outside their home which was destroyed shortly after father. Got out I don't know how many minutes after He left the house that it went in but. He said he could see the fire As he was leaving at least one hundred twenty five. Homes are gone fire officials fear more homes will burn before they get the blaze. Contained it has, been a hectic ten days for the staff at a NCAA in house in El. Paso Texas an, immigration shelter. Being used to reunite parents and children separated at the border earlier this year volunteer Shalini, Thomas has many were there for less than a day, before heading off to the airport the airport Got had as, many as. Little as three families and as many as many as ninety one families in what I'm, Tim Maguire A sister and brother in Colorado. Are being praised for returning a wallet with about seven hundred dollars inside, thirteen year old Hailey and her six year old brother Reagan when key brought the wallet to the front door of a home, in Aurora security video shows a robotic voice telling them to leave a message Haley says they found a wallet outside a car and they were returning it so that no one, would take the money Haley tells k. DVR TV they were riding their bikes to a water park. When they found the wallet she says they didn't need the money and thought it would be a good idea to return it the homeowners. Say the wallet belonged to their son Plans to build a natural gas pipeline that would cut through national forests will have to be put on hold an appeals court has. Sided with environment Taylor swift is hoping to help ease the pain of a Massachusetts city in mourning over the recent loss of, a police officer Weymouth mayor Robert. Hedlund says swift donated a significant number of tickets to the town for. Her shows this weekend in Foxborough those tickets were them distributed amongst city police officers Sergeant Michael chestnut was shot and killed while, investigating a car crash July fifteenth Saint person is also suspected of killing bystander bureau Adams Hedlund said there were enough tickets to send every police officer firefighter and extended family to, the concert and then some he thanks for the gesture on behalf of the town of the extra..

Haley Adams Hedlund Taylor Swift Officer Aaron Clark Ncaa Foxborough Tim Maguire California Sergeant Michael Chestnut Paso Texas Massachusetts Colorado Hailey Aurora Shalini Reagan Thomas
Amazon shares hit record high as profit tops $2 billion for first time

24 Hour News

02:20 min | 3 years ago

Amazon shares hit record high as profit tops $2 billion for first time

"Wildfire I'm Tim Maguire the AP newsmen to. Firefighters are dead, some thirty seven thousand people had. To, scramble to escape the flames of a wildfire that roared into reading California with little warning overnight Erin Clark says she found her parents. Outside their home which was destroyed shortly after her. Father got out don't know how many minutes after He left the house that it went up in. Flames but he, said he could see the fire As he was leaving at least one hundred. Twenty five homes are gone fire officials fear more homes will burn before they get the, blaze contained it has been a hectic ten days for the staff at Annunciation house. In El Paso, Texas an. Immigration shelter being used to reunite parents and children separated at the border earlier this year volunteer Shalini Thomas has many were there for less than a day before heading off to the airport or the airport me. Dot had as many as little as three. Families and as many as nine as many as. Ninety one families in, one day I'm Tim Maguire Amazon is that with its q two earnings report and as a Ps Mike Kemp and tells us, getting closer to passing, apple as the world's most valuable company revenue. From online shopping in cloud, computing push, Amazon's quarterly profits past. Two, billion dollars for the first time. Amazon second revenues soared thirty nine percent but missed analysts, expectations however investors still sent Amazon shares up More than three percent in after hours trading in the past year the company stock is up nearly, seventy two percent Amazon, now is moving into healthcare and building up. Its physical presence as it, cements customer, loyalty through its smart. Devices, and prime membership I'm Mike Hampton Puerto Rico saw a record one point two million. Cruise ship passengers this past fiscal year the territory's still trying to recover from, 2017 hurricane Maria and an economic crisis Puerto Rico's governor says the visits generated an estimated one hundred fifty two million overall for the island which, is still struggling through an eleven year recession he. Says the number of visitors from cruise ships in the last four months hit records as well with nearly one hundred thirty five thousand. Passengers in June One of HBO's most. Popular.

Amazon Tim Maguire Mike Hampton Puerto Rico Erin Clark Annunciation House El Paso Shalini Thomas HBO Mike Kemp DOT Texas California Apple Maria Seventy Two Percent Thirty Nine Percent