35 Burst results for "Shale"

$7.5 Billion Tax Payer Dollars for Electric School Busses?

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:37 min | 3 weeks ago

$7.5 Billion Tax Payer Dollars for Electric School Busses?

"Why are senators and congressmen that represent red states? That have massive oil and natural gas production, going along with the following. The infrastructure package will spend $7.5 billion for electrical vehicle charging stations, with which the administration says is critical to accelerating the use of electrical vehicles and to curb climate change. It would also be available for a $5 billion of purchase for electric school buses and hybrids, reducing reliance on school buses that run on diesel fuel. So, for the representatives from states like Pennsylvania, like Brian Fitzpatrick, or from West Virginia, like David McKinley, or from North Dakota, why is there a support of an agenda that will destroy the oil and natural gas production from the Marcellus shale? To the Balkan, isn't that a major job producer in your state? Modernizing the electric grid. By the way, this makes Pete Buttigieg, one of the most powerful people in Washington, D.C.. You are giving him a $1.2 trillion as the head of the Department of Transportation to allocate towards his green energy cronies as he sees it as he sees fit. Of $1.2 trillion of additional spending on top of the trillions of dollars we spend every single year on top of the stimulus packages we've passed in the last 12 months. Is that what we went and elected Republicans to go do?

Brian Fitzpatrick David Mckinley Pete Buttigieg Washington, D.C. West Virginia North Dakota Pennsylvania Department Of Transportation
"shale" Discussed on Switched On

Switched On

05:26 min | 5 months ago

"shale" Discussed on Switched On

"And then the question is do you produce a lot. Put all your capital into increasing supply or do you keep production flats in just generate returns. The third option would be detained capital and transition it to some other energy source or some other type of growth for the company. And i think that's a question that especially some of the bigger more financially sound of these companies are starting to think a bit about. We're starting to see pressure on and you can see this obviously at the highest levels with exxon having the Activist investor pressure now to change their board japan thinking about things the some of the bigger independence like occidental. Pioneer are also starting to talk about what their emissions are. Um what their plans are for sort of the longer term lower carbon future and they've made investment in go ahead sorry exactly that they've made investments and things like a carbon capture. They're doing things like emissions tracking which makes sense. You have biden newly-elected in a new focus on emissions and then you have sort of the demand picture you can't escape to right. We just published our the electric vehicle outlook for enough and it's showing an even faster adoption of electric vehicles globally than we anticipated before so it looks like people. Peak oil demand is going to start edging even closer and so especially when the outlook for oil is looking more and more tenuous. The question comes if you are doing this long term strategy of financial returns. Do you just ride out. The oil wave is decline slowly. Or do you try and actually pursue other industries okay. These aren't just little debate. Caesar existential questions is is pretty heavy stuff and i think in the electric vehicle outlook that just came out. They said they can pretty confidently call peak new automobile or new internal combustion. Engine vehicle sales What four years ago i believe. So that's a you know indicator of what's to come for oil. I mean yeah. Wow okay existential..

exxon four years ago Pioneer third option Caesar occidental japan
Che Guevara as an Icon

teikirisi

02:00 min | 7 months ago

Che Guevara as an Icon

"What is one of the most popular images symbolizing revolutionary and radical politics. That you can even think of for me. It's definitely that image of che guevara wearing a beret looking off into the distance. Are we going into this topic of il-chang give out so the year is two thousand nine and met my very first college party and i'm sherlyn you know relaxing all cool not playing some bebo and some guy walks in with t shirt and immediately. It caught my eye because number one. Cuban and number two. It's gigolo at number three. it's a white guy wearing a chicken. I don t shirt and it wasn't very different from any of the times that i saw ceva anywhere else but suddenly some white kid walking into a party wearing a t shirt had me feeling things that i had never felt before when it had seen shale at his image that grew up seeing china's image almost everywhere growing up in miami. You not really presented with people who are very different from your upbringing so growing up with a bunch of cubans. It never occurred to anybody to put j. o. On a t shirt and walk around with it carmen. And i were both raised. Cuban americans in miami where the perspective of tshuva i would say is generally that. This man was very violent figure in the revolution. It's the very first time. I think that i was confronted. With the fact that somebody else might have a different idea of what this image stands for. So get into the image. The image i'm talking about. I'm sure you've seen countless amount of times. It has been said that it is the most reproduced photograph of the twentieth century. And it is the image of chiang about looking off into the distance very serious. He's got long hair and he's wearing a beret with a single star in the middle. The image is called gabrielle at equal or heroic warrior. Yup well i have never translated that. And now as i'm saying it in english it's even

Che Guevara Bebo Chang Tshuva Miami Carmen China Chiang Gabrielle
"shale" Discussed on Homes and Hops

Homes and Hops

04:19 min | 9 months ago

"shale" Discussed on Homes and Hops

"There was there was some weird things going on there with Things being allowed to come in and so people just drove by that plaza gently with not even looking in there. Because i knew there was nothing in there and then we opened up in their royal. Docks is also in that Plaza they're kind of catty corner from us so they're doing some really great things out there they're gonna it's a it's a door district now out. Yes so we're waiting for the good weather to come in so that we can start doing some things with dora We've been in that location for a really long time. But people say i didn't even know anything was in there because there's not been anything in there for ever and i tell them all the things that are in there and they're like we didn't even know what you gotta drive in there and check in his eyes lane strategy chicken but breweries are known now as an anchor. Yes so which is which is fabulous. I mean not to knock any bars or anything out there but bars are never considered an anchor store. Breweries have hit that level of grocery store. A whole foods moving. And whatever it be be. I mean which is such. It's it is. It's an honor. Prestige that brewers that. Who would i mean in all honesty. Who would have thought..

anchor store dora anchor
A look at the global oil market

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

01:43 min | 9 months ago

A look at the global oil market

"Get ready for it. Here's what's happened to the global oil market in the last twelve months in trader argo removed. From what is called tango to backwardation a backward dated market. That's energy consultants. Stephen shark and to explain. In regular people terms the contain go market happened when crude oil demand and prices plummeted after the pandemic hit then in the fall the global economy came out of covert hibernation and needed more oil and gas demand. Now is beginning to outstrip supply. There's a lot of optimism about a vaccine the economy's globe opening up which has driven prices up. Alex ramos at rice stat. Energy says that's good news for shale oil producers in the permian basin of texas and new mexico one of the most terrific than one of the most affordable sources of oil nowadays globally so with all of the efficiencies that we've seen in drilling and fracking essentially all areas of the permian are commercial and very profitable at sixty dollars but more oil pumping profitably out of the ground. Doesn't necessarily mean and other boom time in rig workers jobs and pay that's because there's been massive consolidation accelerated by the pandemic says analyst. Michael orlando at econ. One research. we saw a record number of bankruptcies in the oil and gas sector in twenty twenty and we were going to see a contraction in employment. The industry cost reduction in the industry. Employment in oil and gas drilling is down about five thousand since before the pandemic and down about seventy thousand since the peak in two thousand

Stephen Shark Alex Ramos Argo Permian Basin Michael Orlando New Mexico Texas
"shale" Discussed on Oil and Gas Startups Podcast

Oil and Gas Startups Podcast

04:44 min | 10 months ago

"shale" Discussed on Oil and Gas Startups Podcast

"Been long enough. It's too soon. I mean he hasn't been the coach for like like longtime For all the folks out there. I'm actually quite happy to see you know in and doing well. And since they don't play in the sec. I root for. I mean something's gotta give give alabama since you know a little bit of a headache so many next year we'll say well r. c. slocum like The first president bush has reputation. Got better after he was New guinea become a painter real gw. Or or what he's a. He's an evangelist. He's still employed by the university now. He's no doubt he's he's a good man. I just thought that was a pretty good one. I know how how last names can be used to Appropriate to make fun of someone to says pretty good. So hey colin. We touched on her second ago. How is what's your experience when you're a young company and you barely half year guys probably has spent more time away from the office and the have ever been in your office just because a covert and and all that. So what's that been like to for you guys. How have you adapted for covid when it first became kind of a reality lions probably mid march when i realized like oh my god we're going to have to like we're gonna have to shutdown roth slight. We're going to have complete. We already had zoom also tools. That make things a little easier for us But then i was thinking about like what's going to happen to our customer opportunities like we had a number of opportunities with light smaller private equity backed companies. That were you know that wanted to buy our software to help search for you know for new assets just imploded. That whole market just imploded for probably two quarters so we were fortunate in the sense that we we we released. What i think is are blockbuster. Product in january of twenty twenty right so and that products took a huge amount of effort out of the process of designing your your capital capital allocation development plan. So we were very fortunate that really releasing the exact right product at a time when that became the most important thing for oil companies to salt last year even with covid we our revenue by over one hundred percent year over year which we actually were just just reviewing with our board of the novi board yesterday our numbers for the year i was just look at it on my cat. It's one of our board members. Made the comment you. It's like psycho vid never happened with you guys. And i think it's because we we probably would have done a lot better. Had covert not happen right but but a lot of sort of efficiency and all the things that are tooling brings to our software brings to the table A lot of that suddenly became. Non optional became mandatory and smart smart companies chose to use use that time to to invest with us. And so we. We didn't have to lay anybody off. you know we. We stopped hiring for a little while. That probably two quarters and then we were doing so well. Revenue wise we started irene again In q four and now we've we've you know we've hired a sales account executive Marketing person he's made more hires on the rnd side we pirated devops person etc etc. So we're right back on on target for another you know. Sixty or seventy percent revenue growth this year. So we feel. We feel pretty good about that at the moment. Well that's exciting and certainly wish you all the best of luck with that. I think you're certainly onto something. And personally i'm gonna be excited to watch your growth so john really appreciate you coming on today tim. Any final thoughts for Mr ludwig nothing is you know. It's great to hear your approach to this love. Here that you're growing i think not many companies through d- can talk about what a twenty twenty turned out to be for them so i'm really happier that about you guys and really hope it continues really want to follow you guys through this so really appreciate you coming on and thanks a bunch for avenue..

Sixty yesterday last year mid march january today seventy percent colin next year ludwig this year over one hundred percent two quarters first twenty twenty alabama john one of our board c. half year
"shale" Discussed on Oil and Gas Startups Podcast

Oil and Gas Startups Podcast

06:47 min | 10 months ago

"shale" Discussed on Oil and Gas Startups Podcast

"Welcome to tripping over the barrel a series that highlights the unique personalities within the oil and gas industry in the stories they have to share with your host and lead storytellers t lo and dr function stein. Body we've got john ludwig with us today. Who's going to talk to us. Tim about how shale development is a statistical. Play what it's like to be. A florida gator in the oil patch. And all about the various stints that he's had both inside and outside of the industry. You know john a little bit better than guys. Expensive time together. So why don't you kick this off. Yeah actually i was going through our roster of alumni of the show. Course this is the first florida gator which is good but gone through the roster of the show. I think this is the first time we've had. We've had founders of companies but this is the first one that's a real technology founder. I mean bear. We had berry on and he was he. Did you know it was really a data. Play little bit technology now. John's coming in and it's it's truly a tech play. It's going to be pretty cool to to talk. About course he's been on Digital wildcatters a couple of times before so this this is going to be pretty easy for him but john started up novi labs what it two thousand seventeen sixteen. What was that. John even earlier neck. Fourteen and fifteen fourteen relating to going until the middle of fifteen was cool. So so tell you what. Why don't you go ahead run us through a little bit of your bio because it's not the normal path to oil and gas as we're finding no one takes a normal path oil gas it turns out. But how did you get into the oil and gas business. That's an interesting story even when you start out When you start out going to college in florida there's not a lot of oil and gas exploration going on down there. It's not too. Many people are looking for that as a as a career bed. I started a a technology company in like nineteen ninety seven and like a lot of tech companies in the nineties. We we flew to prominence. Had a great couple of years as the general economy was just in just awesome back at that time and we went public ninety nine and we had an office in were based in boulder and we had an offer we also had an office in houston so as we started building our office in selling our software restarted gaining a foothold in oil and gas and i started to kind learn. You know some of the problems that only gas companies taste the most poignant of which was trying to get their data organized in a way where you could see sort of like a signal you of the well. Men try and use that as a launch pad sort of find every piece of information that was hidden in all the various databases and back in systems in sap all that stock so so in the process of trying to sell oil and gas companies web content management software we ended up being in the integration business. Meeting we had the integrate data about their wells into into lots of other systems and ultimately some of that data to land on the web which is which is kind of what they would be would be hiring us to do so so way back in ninety nine and two thousand. We hooked up with anadarko cabinet gas like a whole bunch of crap. I just kinda started learning the workflows. Learning the business. And i really started. I like the business a lot so much. So that when the downturn for tac happens in two thousand and our business in colorado wasn't doing quite as well I actually moved to houston and really built. Built an entire business around oil and gas companies. At that time they were they were doing okay. Financially in we just sort gained a foothold in went from there so kind of started by putting together well header information systems and then over the years i worked For my own company. That i started lots of other Light systems integration companies. I just kinda learned the industry from a perspective. So it's not. It's not part of my formal education. I'm i'm actually in economist. Statistician by background But it was really when i started at at hess and kinda started there in two thousand twelve when they really started ramping up. Their shale operations in balkan. An kind of i saw the amount of capital that was going into that and i became super interested in sort of combining my economic statistics backgrounds. With the way that decisions were made about deploying a massive amount of capital. And that really became the impetus or really the spark for for the idea that ultimately became arm became novi. When we started the company was pretty cool. You don't hear many people moving from boulder houston that's not the normal normal path for for migration but and i got another little comments kind of funny. A friend of mine told me this. He works a hill corp. And he's he asked me once and this is when i was at spot fire because we did the same thing you know everybody seems to go to anadarko. I write back in the early. Two thousand seem like they buying every piece of technology and he he. He comes to me one day and he goes. How come all you guys when you come in to talk to us. You all want to talk about what you're doing anadarko. And he said how much money do they have up there a lot. Apparently there's literally they were the starting ground for you know spot fire. That was our first one a gas place and linear. I guess that might have been your i kind of a oil and gas business. Well it was just kind of interesting that everybody kind of paraded through anadarko there for a couple years data hounds. A no. it's it's it's pretty cool To have boulder and houston represented which is really what our podcast is right here in east boulder county timson. What the eastern part of the massive houston metroplex so. I obviously major cultural differences. John the two places. What was that like for you to make that move from boulder in in the early two thousands to head down to houston certainly had to train your winter parka. For some tank tops. But i tell me a little bit about sort of the shift in culture and how everything was from that front. You i I liked texas immediately. I i had never really spent time in texas Other than other than a very short. Stint in college in south padre which. I don't remember much of.

john ludwig houston boulder houston dr function stein john balkan south padre Tim Two thousand John colorado two places first both first one texas Fourteen two thousand twelve two thousand florida
"shale" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

05:24 min | 11 months ago

"shale" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"Part of your weekend with us What's good about manure, landfills and sewage. They could be funneled into pipelines and delivered to power plants in homes where they can be burned alongside shale gas for heat. Ryan December of the Wall Street Journal is written about this trash gas and joins us now, Ryan, How does this work? It sort of has a natural way of happening. It's you know, just organic matter. Organic waste decomposing and that produces methane in the fumes. You know when you pass the store plant or a landfill or Arm with the big manure, Lagoon or whatever that's creating nothing, which is the same thing that we spend a lot of money drilling holes in the ground for And you know it. It burns the famous shale gas. But companies are really into doing this right now, particularly utilities and the owners of gas pipelines because they don't have a lot green to talk about in this sort of new, environmentally conscious era, particularly with investors. And You know, the power grid has had wind wind power, solar power all these things to sort of talk about its green future, and it's in this imp equipment is infrastructures. Value and utility going forward and a green energy economy and pipelines haven't really have anything to talk about in this taking this methane that normally seeps up into the atmosphere and as a greenhouse gas Trapping it and turning it into something useful that could be burned and transported to our homes and power plants by their infrastructure. You know, it's given them something to look forward to into power in the new green energy, or you know what people think it will be the green energy economy of the future. Certainly I'm not a scientist, but it sounds like it is a complicated process. Yeah. You know, it sort of happens Naturally. They sort of encouraged it in these. They call him anaerobic digesters. They're basically like big stomachs. They might throw some bacteria in there. They might. You know the Smithfield Foods, which is the biggest pork producer in the country. They grow special prairie grasses around their farms, and they'll sometimes mo those and take the clippings and Adam to the manure when they need more fuel. One of the big old big old projects that does this is where I live in North Brooklyn at the sewer plant. There's big domes, If you ever you know, on the highway driving to the airport in New York, you might pass by these big, onion shaped domes on the waste water. Treatment plant. You know, a lot of this stuff sort of happened. Naturally, it's sort of a matter of Capturing it, And that could be a simple at a dairy farmer. Hoggett Farm is putting a big tarp over the manure lagoons. Sometimes it's more complicated. You build like a big sort of bubble or dome that you put Oil, groceries or or any sort of food, waste product or sewage into but you're basically just turning into a big stomach and connecting it to the gas infrastructure. There's a little bit of processing to sort of Take out the carbon dioxide and other impurities, just like there would be in a shell well, but it's It's really, um You know when you consider sort of the expense and the rocket science that goes into drilling and getting a shell well, like hydraulically, fractured shale well to work. It's probably a lot simpler than that. We're speaking with Ryan December of the Wall Street Journal. Ryan, Can this fuel be used for all the same things that other fuels are used to power? Absolutely, And you might not even notice that it might be in your data stream. Now it's indistinguishable after processing from the stuff that comes out of the ground, the sort of proverbial dinosaur Dinosaurs that we burn as fossil fuels. It's the same same thing. Just just nothing. So Yeah, There's people that you know, have turned down their stoves this morning to cook breakfast or Are charging their iPhones or taking a hot shower on but there's probably depending on where they live in the country. There's probably a small amount of that gas is coming from one of the sources. Use it and expensive process. It is. It is now It's Zez. Sort of depends how you look at it. You know if you're a multi billion dollar utility or giant pipeline company. It's sort of your day to day business to run a pipeline upto like some, you know gas well, that might be in the middle of nowhere. And so it's not that expensive for them and out of the ordinary for them to run a line to a farm to a landfill to collect that cat. But it is a big expense on the flip side. If you're a farmer or a landfill, or you know any of these other, you know, I mean, useful water plants, Wastewater treatment plant. You know these? These are businesses and things that don't really thinking like the hundreds of millions of billions of dollars so Getting the utilities and the pipeline companies on board. Can really take what pretty old, you know Technology. And and make it more commercial. Ryan December of the Wall Street Journal. It's 21 minutes past the hour up ahead how to get the most out of your $600 relief check. What's hot for business this week. It's staples. Small prices. Big savings. Help your business go big with.

Ryan December Wall Street Journal Smithfield Foods New York Hoggett Farm scientist North Brooklyn Adam producer
Trump Rule Allows Natural Gas Transport By Rail In Dense Areas

Environment: NPR

03:33 min | 11 months ago

Trump Rule Allows Natural Gas Transport By Rail In Dense Areas

"The us produces so much shale gas it needs to find new markets overseas. The trump administration has approved moving a liquefied form of the gas by rail. But some say that is too dangerous. Susan phillips of member station. whyy reports on a route. That would be one of the longest in the country. The guests will go first to a new plant in northeast. pennsylvania where refrigeration units will chill it too negative two hundred and sixty degrees fahrenheit. That's how it goes from a guest to a liquid. The part of the plan that scares a lot of people is the transport two hundred miles by truck or rail through some of the most densely populated areas of the east coast to a planned export terminal in new jersey. Vanessa keegan lives nearby with her family including three year old. Theo thank you want to take a picture. Okay you gotta get mommy ipad. We take another picture right. Era go railcars. Full of highly flammable liquefied natural gas or lng would roll about a block and a half away from keegan's home a daycare center sits right at the company gate so they want special permits to transport them right there. That train track. You could skip on down to in about a minute and a half and that terrifies me. This project is part of a larger push to export natural gas last summer. The trump administration changed long-standing federal policy to allow rail transport of ellen g anywhere in the country fifteen states including pennsylvania and new jersey challenged the move saying it puts people's lives at risk in this rust belt reason of new jersey. The export project does have support from building trade unions and powerful state lawmakers including assemblyman. John bursa kelly. He says grandfather worked at a former dupont plant on the site of the planned export terminal. That's will create jobs as it once did contribute to tax base as wants to be an important economic driver for people to make a living in fear families. I says safety issues should be raised and addressed but he says railcars carry much more hazardous materials through the region every day. Ray mentzer is a chemical engineer at purdue university who spent his career on ellen g projects for exxon mobil he says specially designed containers have a good safety record but he says transporting the guests through densely populated areas increases the risk if there's a leak. It's not flammable until it's vaporized but it's going to bait rise pretty damn quickly and then it's going to seek an ignition source. Believe me it will find an ignition source. Pretty darn readily mentor says. A vapor cloud would definitely catch fire. If i was at a town meeting and i lived there i would want to know. Just what routes are you going to us right now. The exact roots are unclear. Multiple attempts to reach the developers of the project. New fortress energy went on answered if the overseas export terminal gets built. None of the guests will go to power new jersey homes instead the state is planning a large coastal wind farm off atlantic city to help new jersey reach the goal of all clean energy by twenty fifty

Susan Phillips Ellen G Vanessa Keegan New Jersey Whyy Pennsylvania John Bursa Kelly Theo Keegan East Coast Ray Mentzer Dupont United States Exxon Mobil Purdue University Atlantic City
Why The Oil Industry Doesn't Fear Biden

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:47 min | 1 year ago

Why The Oil Industry Doesn't Fear Biden

"To learn more on the surface. The oil and gas industry is losing a friend on january twentieth. Donald trump the departing president gave fossil fuels his loud support. President-elect biden supports efforts against climate change yet. Some in the oil and gas industry are feeling cautiously optimistic. Npr's camille mosque. Explains why you might have heard that biden's win could mean the end of the oil industry. President trump warned it. Would some climate activists hoped it would and in the final debate biden himself said this transition from their own industry. Yes it is a big statement and that would be a big change over the last decade. Us oil and gas production has boomed. The shale revolution turned the united states into the world's top oil producer. A lot of that remarkable growth happened. During the obama administration and trump promoted the jobs in prophets that resulted but emissions from burning oil gas and coal are the biggest contributors to climate change. Which is already starting to have devastating effects around the world. So how could biden tackle those emissions step one might be a ban on new drilling on federal lands and private loans. It's a different story. They do not have the power to your sake. Somebody in south texas. You can of drill anymore. Rene santos's with snp global plattsburgh says that that kind of a ban would be significant but not the end of the industry is also expected to restore some environmental regulations. Which again won't eliminate all gas. The big question mark is what a climate bill look like her personal. Don't think it's going to be sensitive radical unless you know the more liberal side. All the democratic party gets a lot of influence which are so we see right now. It does not appear to be the case. Climate activists and scientists have called for ambitious action. That might be impossible to push through congress if republicans keep the senate so for now. This doesn't seem like a doomsday. Scenario for oil gas. I don't think it's a wholesale assault on the oil industry. It's just not going to be in favour like it was under president. Trump halima croft is a managing director at arby's see capital markets. She says the biden is serious about climate change but also doesn't plan to do away with fossil fuels. We actually wrote a note over the summer about the biden. Energy plan called hugging the mid line. Not just because. I left the ladas but we really did see this as an effort to sort of the neo. All the oil and gas industry sees room for some compromises and negotiations which might raise the question. What about biden's big statement about transitioning away from oil and gas jin. Snyder is a director at in virus. Which provides data's oil and gas companies. She says that was hardly breaking news. To insider's they know that a global transition happening a move away from fossil fuels is underway at the society level regardless of the administration biden also said quote. We're not getting rid of fossil fuels for a very long time. Snyder argues a president who manages a gradual shift. Away from oil might actually be better for business. The gut reaction is that this isn't good news for the industry but we're actually cautiously positive and politics aside right now. Oil producers are facing a more immediate struggle. The

Biden Camille Mosque Obama Administration Donald Trump Rene Santos NPR Trump Halima Croft United States SNP Democratic Party Arby Texas Senate Congress Snyder
President-Elect Biden's Plan To Change Energy Policy Faces Challenges

WSJ What's News

04:05 min | 1 year ago

President-Elect Biden's Plan To Change Energy Policy Faces Challenges

"Energy and climate policy will be among the top priorities for president. Elect joe biden's administration but there will be some challenges. Biden is facing the prospect of a divided congress and competing demands from the energy industry and environmentalists. Joining me now to talk more about how the administration will navigate all that is wall street journal energy policy reporter. Tim pogo hi. Tim thanks for being here. Hi thanks for having me. So tim tell us broadly what we know. So far about president elect joe biden's energy policy. He's shooting big headline is two trillion dollar plan. That focuses heavily on infrastructure. He's trying to get power plants and the broader economy to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The stated goal is to eliminate them across society by twenty fifty and so the big spending plan would help jump start that pay for things like going to low emissions mass transit expanding around the country paying things for like for new transmission to connect wind and solar power generation to demand markets. All across the country so in its biggest iteration it is in many ways a moonshot. So now you write that. This is likely to face challenges on several fronts. Let's start with the energy industry itself and states that rely especially on coal and oil for example. What are their major concerns. Well the major concern. Is that the oil industry in particular is a huge employer and you saw this on the campaign trail the supplies to gas production as well. Shale drilling is huge not just in traditional states like texas and oklahoma but it has grown a lot in in places like pennsylvania and ohio and it feeds into industries like steel in in ohio and pennsylvania and michigan in sand in wisconsin and minnesota. The concern is that if you move away from the oil industry too quickly to go to to lower carbon sources of energy that you put all those jobs at risk and so it's not just the states where a lot of those jobs are but it's unions in particular we're talking big parts of the biden coalition of the democratic party constituency. That want this to happen. In a measured way that does recognize the transition needs to happen to slow global warming but doesn't put the huge parts of the us economy tied into the oil and gas industry at risk of devastation. Very soon can you parse out for us where biden stands in relation to more progressive environmental policies. Like the green new deal. Biding this tribes a thread a needle. Here he's adopted the elements of progressive environmental policy that that combine climate policy with a jobs program essentially one of the reasons that he wants to do this. Two trillion dollar plan is that it focuses heavily on infrastructure spending. You know that in theory should people put people to work building new transmission lines building transportation infrastructure Plans to help out the auto industry to help them sell more low emissions vehicles. So that part he has adopted but where he has bristled because of pressure from moderates and even from republicans is in in you as i said earlier are quick push to basically get rid of the oil and gas industry or to put a lot of government pressure on them to shrink their markets in favor of electricity and especially low emissions electricity. Like wind and solar. And so. that's you know that's where the rub comes in There there's a lot of pressure on him to maybe the infrastructure works. Maybe we can do this spending but anything that seems more a punitive against the oil industry. I think of eliminating a lot of the tax breaks. They get there is a reluctance from even major parts of the democratic party to push forward with policies like that

Joe Biden Tim Pogo Biden Pennsylvania Ohio Congress TIM Oklahoma Democratic Party Wisconsin Minnesota Michigan Texas United States
Business is booming for plastic companies as demand for plexiglass surges

The Daily Dive

09:20 min | 1 year ago

Business is booming for plastic companies as demand for plexiglass surges

"One of the interesting things about the coronavirus pandemic is that it sparked a need for more plastic demand for everything from facials, gloves, takeaway food containers, and even bubble wrap for online shopping has gone up and with that demand is severely set back the effort to recycle this happening is big oil companies are investing hundreds of billions of dollars to create new plastic and companies that have made pledges to use more recyclable materials are even in a tough spot as new plastics are far cheaper than using recycled plastic for more on how the pandemic has accelerated the trend of creating more and not less plastic trash. We'll speak to Joe Brock special correspondent at Reuters. Before the pandemic, we had a plastic crisis and I think that there is an awareness about that. It's killing marine life. It's it's leaking toxins into drinking water in some of the world's poorest countries. Then the pandemic hits and we have this flood of new plastic containers from three takeaway. Bubble wrap because more people ordering in as they were stuck in lockdowns as well as the the lifesaving PPA, the mosques and the gowns and the bodybags, which is understandable but also you have this double whammy. Plastic recyclers are suffering like every other industry under an economic meltdown and they are unable to recycle the plastic and the price of oil from which plastic is made drops dramatically, and that means that new plastic becomes very cheap and we cyclist cannot compete with that new plastic. So you've got this sous Nami new plastic arriving on the scene we site closed. Struggling, and so this dynamic can only lead to more plastic waste. I. Think that's a very important thing that a lot of people don't realize or they forget right away as that plastic really comes from fossil fuels, oils and and petrochemicals, and as you were mentioning, you know to make new plastics these single use plastics. It's so much cheaper now than using recyclables. Companies that have pledged to use more recyclable materials in their packaging and whatnot, but they just can't keep up you know new plastics just cheaper for their business models and all of this can become a driver of climate change. Correct and I think this is something which has been overlooked toll misunderstood during the climate change debate not only plastic made from fossil fuels oil derived products and gas issues. A growing area for struggling oil and gas companies. People are driving more electric cars than moving to cleaner fuel. These oil and gas giants need to use up this oversupply of shale gas. In the US they've got dwindling opportunities to use this one area they put into is making new plastic for the developing world where there's a rising middle class in parts of Asia and Africa. The problem comes that these are the places who are feeling the plastics crisis the worst. So as oil and gas company suspending about four hundred, billion dollars to increase production of plastics to use up cheap oil and gas. These countries have no way of processing dot plastic. So with already a waste crisis, more supply coming online no way to deal with it what do you think's going to happen? And the oil and gas industry are planning to spend about four hundred, billion dollars over the next five years on new plans to make the raw materials or these new plastics virgin plastics as they're called through Reuters surveyed twelve of the largest oil and chemical firms around the world to see what they're doing about this waste. Really they're just spending a fraction of the money that they're making on sales to devote to working on waste. So you've got campaign groups on you know some politicians in some government sank the oil and gas industry we KINDA. Coat. We need to reduce plastic production and what the oil and gas industry saying his. Don't worry we've got this covered we've got a solution we are investing in recycling infrastructure. We are helping poor countries to deal with their waste, and that's where I'll story really came from. We wanted to check that claim on what we found was the pledges made by the oil and gas industry are fraction of best spending on increasing plastic production, and they will have minimal impact on reducing plastic waste. So I think that that's a key point I understand because as the oil and gas companies tell you that they are fixing plastic waste crisis. It's important to interrogate those figures and I think that's what we've thoughtfully achieve with the story. I wanted to talk a little bit more of the effects of the pandemic. As we said in the beginning, you know face masks gowns, the P.. P. That we need to protect ourselves. That's also a big thing that's going to be feeling a lot of the waste you mentioned in your article China US twelve times more face masks than they did in earlier months in the United States, they generated entire years worth of medical wastes in two months at the height of the pandemic. So this is a lot of stuff that we're going to be seeing. The effects are going to be with us for some time. Yeah I think that's right I. think that's where it's worth separating the issue here. I don't think anyone is saying that plastic is not an incredible material with multiple uses and that it helped industrial organizations to make planes lighter may cause lights I think the issue here is single use plastic on the fear is this pandemic will exacerbate that trend of single use plastic. So although people might need mosques a need gowns and these are essentials if companies were to take this opportunity to increase the use of plastic single use plastic, then it's GonNa add to the waste problem and that's something we've seen with oil and gas lobbies who since the pandemic is hit. Written to lawmakers in the US to say that single use plastic is safer than other materials. Now, scientists have found that that's not the case. So you have to question whether the plus the pandemic is being used by certain vested interest companies that they want to capitalize on this to increase their profits. I think when a lot of people think about plastic waste and the huge problem, they definitely think about our oceans plastics make up about eighty percent of the marine debris and we've seen the big problems. We've seen the Great Pacific Garbage Patch you know which is just a bunch of plastic and netting and things like that. So I think a lot of people are really focused on that when they hear about plastic problem, but I mean it's really ranges all over the place. Yeah absolutely, and I think this is a problem which affects everyone. It affects humanity and I think that you see you see it in the oceans and certainly in parts of Southeast Asia, which is considered one of the biggest toy destinations in the world of Pristine Beaches Turquoise Asians you've got these waterways completely clogged with plastic fishing communities devastated where they live to be a risk as you mentioned, each plastics in the Pacific and elsewhere, but it's not just in the ocean it's clogging up rivers. It's affecting communities where they rely on food supplies where plastic waste is. So you know this is an issue that impacts everybody and should be an issue which everyone wants to help fix. We talked a little bit about the efforts from the oil and gas companies to limit plastic waste. But one thing that I did not know I found very interesting that the world's top three plastic polluters for two years running now are Coca Cola Nestle and Pepsi Pepsico. Obviously, they have a lot of plastic packaging. Their bottles are made the bottles that hold the soda in are made from plastic, and they're constantly setting goals to use more recyclable plastic in their products and not meeting those standards and it goes back to what we were saying at the beginning it's just cheaper to use new plastic than it is to use recycled stuff. Coke and Pepsi and Nestle and the other big consumer goods coming committees giving up a a consistent message they wanna fix this problem they want to use more recycled products but when it comes to meeting those targets that consistently Mitch the Knicks over decades and then they set new talk. Now, what they're saying is we don't get the recycled material. Now they cannot get the recycled material at the right price it cheaper to buy new plastics. Now, how you're GONNA get movies like material will you need a very advanced recycling system and that's what we're highlighting in this story the investment in that respect infrastructure is simply not there the oil and gas industries Coke Pepsi, they say they're investing in it, but then investing a fraction of what they're spending on advertising on new production. And this is a competitive industry when you go into the store and you look at the bottle of coke bottle of Pepsi bottle of another brand, the price of the packaging is significant in not product and you don't want your product to be increasing because you're using more recycled plastic. So the proof in the pudding we've seen that they've made these promises before and they've missed them. So I think we need to keep checking and keep saying they're gonNA meet those promises in the feature.

United States Reuters Lockdowns Joe Brock PPA Nami Southeast Asia Pepsi Knicks Asia Coca Cola Nestle Nestle China
You won't believe these beauty finds

Breaking Beauty Podcast

03:59 min | 1 year ago

You won't believe these beauty finds

"Okay. Carleen. So let's start with buzz. What do you have? Okay. What's really piqued my interest in the world of budget beauty? This season is the inky list. So a lot of you will know the inky list as a great you know inexpensive skincare line kind of reminds us of the ordinary and they're now venturing into haircare. Think it was in late September they first launched in the UK and the US and it's like eight to ten products. So it's quite quite vast. It's launching into Canada at the end of October and big news if you're Canadian listener as well, the inky list just launched. On Sephora DOT CA mid October. So you'll be able to find like more of the products you're looking for more readily available. So this whole line takes a skin care approach to scalp care for sure I know when it first launched at culp beauty in the UK the first product of lie off the shelves from what I'm told is the salicylic acid exfoliating scalp treatment to treat flaky scalps, and so that's interesting. Of course, we know salicylic acid is great for acne. So they're kind of taking that approach. Now when I tried that product I'll be honest I, got really literal with it It's kind. Of feels like a water basically meant to use one to two drops on your palm and then apply it to your Scalp I. Use one to two drops and like put it right on my hair line and it just instantly was like dot sucked in I was like Whoa what about the rest of my scalp So I, don't know maybe that's like great for for guys with no hair I don't know but the product that I had more success with and I do feel comfortable recommending for a lot of different hair types is the shale oil nourishing hair treatment and this product is nine. Ninety nine in the US as I said, it's it's not in Canada yellow probably come in at around twelve bucks. It's a small bottle. It's fifty mills and it looks like they're skin-care it's black and white except this one's more of like a hairsprayed tin container and then it has a white pump on the top and you really don't need much when you disperse it this one unlike the salicylic acid scalp treatment, a lot of it comes out at one time. So I have thin hair but a lot of it are used to pumps at I. think it might have been a little too much I. Would go back and only use one if you have highly textured hair coyly or hair I you know you depending on how long it is. You might WANNA use twofold pumps. Now, a lot of people are familiar with Sheahan Shea butter I'm to use on hair what I like about this product is it's like a water like I said so it has shale oil in it. It doesn't feel like it's coating your hair and even like a lot of hair oils that are at their, you know they're so thick and you put this can you describe again I might have missed it. How do you use it like what stage you absolutely in? No, you didn't miss it because I didn't say What I did, you can use it on wet or dry hair, but I would use it much like you'd use a hair oil. I used it when my hair was like three quarters of the way dry when I was almost done blow drying et I'd I'd put this in kind of more like a finishing product I guess but like I said it just it really is meant to be more of a dry oil. So it just doesn't have that that consistency where you like you're GonNa get a lot of build up with it. So yeah, I think. This is a hit and I, think for a lot of hair types, they're gonNA really enjoy like the moisture and the hydration and the softness that you get from it without it being like a heavy duty product that's good and I think that's a really good product heading into the winter as well. Absolutely. I mean just just firmy I get so much static in the winter that would be a styling product that I would probably like to use. Yeah. Because it's giving you that of protection where your hair is not gonna be all fly a totally

Dry Hair United States Canada UK Sheahan Shea Culp
ConocoPhillips agrees to buy Concho Resources in big shale bet

Balance of Power

00:20 sec | 1 year ago

ConocoPhillips agrees to buy Concho Resources in big shale bet

"Deal in the shale industry since the collapse and energy demand earlier this year, Conical Phillips has agreed to buy control resources for $9.7 billion in stock. Take over will create a heavyweight driller in America's most prolific oil filled the Permian Basin of West Texas and New Mexico. Global

Conical Phillips Permian Basin West Texas New Mexico America
ConocoPhillips buying Concho in $9.7B all-stock deal

Houston's Morning News

00:18 sec | 1 year ago

ConocoPhillips buying Concho in $9.7B all-stock deal

"The largest shale industry deals since the collapse and energy demand earlier this year. Kanako Phillips agreed to buy control resource is for $9.7 billion. The pandemic induced oil price crash and lackluster global economic recovery have accelerated the push for consolidation across

Kanako Phillips
Paul Cater on Flow, Rhythm and Awareness

Just Fly Performance Podcast

04:24 min | 1 year ago

Paul Cater on Flow, Rhythm and Awareness

"All right. So I'm going to ask you this because you just a few minutes ago but I think it's definitely worthy of telling again. But you know we were just talking about running in adverse. are being a weather and stuff like that and how that impacts the workout. But I know you a little story about running down from a mountain and being in a little bit of fight and flight or fight or flight What was what was going on there? We were in hike in in Colorado one of the fourteen and fourteen thousand foot. Peaks. it was all. They're all on a silver mining or something in. Few Iron Tools in reminiscent of the the mine and I thought. I the? History first and foremost. Undergraduate days. I'd appreciate it history and. Take some of this home so. L. The thunderstorm. Came at around. Four o'clock in I and lightning was striking everywhere. I think one of the greatest training memories ever. was running down probably three miles just downhill down shale. Rocks. Cooks and crannies down this trail surely exposed mountain. Top Man. That was. One of the moments my life I was super dialed ignite. I was fully engaged with a body mind. Spirit. I would get struck by lightning. Yeah so I. I I enjoy those natural elements when I trained you know. For the wider flight nexium whether it's pretending you're getting chased by A. Sabertooth tiger getting or actually get struck by lightning. I think there's something to that creating that experience training. We can learn from. That's what I was. That's what I was. GonNa. Ask You. That's how I was going to go with that because I think that. The best training sessions I've been in not just trained but also just experiences team sport. You know it's like you lose the self a little bit and it's just about the moment and how what better way to be in the moment than the being kind of a situation where your life isn't a little bit of danger. Of being struck by lightning you gotta run. I've been in not too many of those that I've been in one in particular in my memory and I, I remember thinking man if if all training was had some of this or not all but even once in a while, you're outputs are just like so much higher. And it brings a really different element in so I do big said he had you find yourself thinking about that sometimes where you have a training session or does that just the general idea? Does it cross your mind in the environment you're trying to create you can't allow sure think every day I think you. Have to ask myself did you create an experience? in the. Maximum awareness and within within the scope of what the goal. At adopted goals that day? Die Create inexperienced that supports that. And you know without without having it be. A maximal. The adrenaline situation because I think. or saying earlier that. These kids specially. Get these. Third Gentleman Junkies they've they have to have this massive height Ra- music with musical element. which I I didn't use very important but. Or? Everything's. Also, walls all the time. So I think. Creating experience of both. Deep introspective. Meditative state all the way to the. Collective experience of competition. And You know there's a whole spectrum there you have to decide where in the day you're GonNa work on that spectrum or within the session or Yeah. So that's a huge consideration every day. So are you creating experience? Where you WanNa go

Colorado
Chevron Agrees to Acquire Houston-Based Noble Energy

Sean Hannity

00:33 sec | 1 year ago

Chevron Agrees to Acquire Houston-Based Noble Energy

"Panda panda Maket Maket major major deal deal making making in in the the energy energy sector. sector. It's It's the the biggest biggest deal deal to to be be announced announced in in the the industry industry since since oil oil prices prices plunged plunged in in March, March, crushed crushed by by Corona Corona virus virus shutdowns shutdowns and and a a face face off off between between Saudi Saudi Arabia Arabia and Russia. Chevron acquiring Houston based oil and gas producer Noble Energy in a roughly $5 billion all stock take over This will expand Chevron's present in top U. S. Shale fields in the Southwest and also give the California based corporation assets in the Mediterranean and West Africa. Lillian

Saudi Arabia Arabia Chevron Noble Energy Lillian U. S. Shale Southwest West Africa Houston Producer Mediterranean California Russia
Energy companies abandon long-delayed Atlantic Coast Pipeline

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:40 sec | 1 year ago

Energy companies abandon long-delayed Atlantic Coast Pipeline

"Pipeline project that was set to run across Virginia will not be happening line would have extracted natural gas from shale fields in West Virginia. And tunneled under the Appalachian Trail serving customers in Virginia and North Carolina. Environmental groups filed lawsuits and work was stopped in 2018. Now Virginia based Dominion Energy in North Carolina's Duke Energy's say there's growing legal uncertainty for large scale energy projects. Dominion now says it's selling its other natural gas pipelines last week had finished the first phase of what will be the largest wind farm project in the country.

Virginia West Virginia North Carolina Duke Energy Appalachian Trail
Deadly Discussions

Deadly Discussions

05:34 min | 1 year ago

Deadly Discussions

"Welcome to daily discussions on your heart is a Karasin Today on the show? We have Leandro get her to pronounce his surname light because that's difficult for me, before we get started a liked acknowledge that judicial landowners whose Land Brew Code, which is the wrong people of the Kulin nation so welcome to the shy, Leandra. Thank you. Thanks for having may is act. Now before we started. Can you please pronounce your surname? His name is Leandra in Mycenaean. Is GEICO MONGOL? It's pretty much fanatical, said a gay. Come on up. Yeah well as it sounds. And where is your mom and is that surname related to? Say I am a yellow woman from northeast Omland in my family older around million can be. My sister lives in roaming getting. I'm said Oh my mobile from there. I'm I'm the. Papal so that's my language group and. Yeah my my last name is a human name my. Name is Leandra, Jewelry Gift Mungo. Your right, yeah, bitter mouth! Jeff the rat on old documents for government stuff. Semi Medicare. Cod is like just one like this nice space like it's all just. You old lettuce on kind of. Whenever I've been pulled over. I guess You know random bobby. Tayo at UVA. People who. Look Bank. People always like what is that from from like? I just this country. Regional. Yeah. Young Lou. Famous? Generally people without the mole is will gross young. Yeah, so he's young woman. then a way to put me on the spot and I'm gonNA. Go Blank then of. Beautiful Magnolia. And then there is. one of our swimmers named after Rodway Hicks, Yup, and then there is. David Google. ACT UP. There are. Not Let me. Let me. And so we'll get to your living. Baker play. Banca boys brought. Claiming Baker Boys. Rats! Tonight just. So that's awesome, and so you grew up on country or did you grow of country or where best serve the fast? He is my life. Yes, I was born in Nulla, Mboya Guards, NS. Chris couple years yet I grabbed them country and then moved away. Sydney lived in Cape York for a little while Hammer. Throw a little while, and then yes, settled in woolen garments. White, said Hey. Yeah. Yeah sometimes I am. Did that confused with town? So when people say Cape York I think Capetown for some reason that it sounds like every. Interesting. so you went to Sydney? What I do sort of move across the Sydney again. So I think it was about. Three or four? Then we moved to Willin Gong for a little bit. MOMS wrecking while and then moved up yet. kept lived in Cullen a few years. And then from there to camera for a couple of years and then which was. Unite Complete different last Dosso in Kirkland. Coming home for lodge didn't wish as a school uniform. And then went straight to icy, cold camera and I was like. What is of this? Army went to Campbell Shales like Oh this is camera you know is not what I expected. And so being away from country were able to keep language, tax or young lewd language is yes I'm not I'm not I'm not fluent, but I do understand some language and yet definitely so I'm one of seven I'm the baby of seven kids and. Yes I definitely unit still strong connections to talk time with my family, and from yeah, we just got back from a trip. Thing yet. Backup harm, which is sir, good? it was a bit crazy because everything going on, but it was yeah, it was good. Yeah, was it Rahm while we're talking about on country was any cases. Up In a land that bowl. What was? The response coronavirus. Yeah It was actually. Once, you were said that was all buyers. Security laws say obviously we had to quarantine because we crossed the border, and that was something that new but we will going for family. Reasons was essential traveled

Leandra David Google Sydney Baker Geico Cape York Leandro Mboya Guards Kulin Omland Rodway Hicks Rahm Willin Gong Kirkland Tayo Bobby Jeff LOU Capetown Nulla
Oil prices fall on doubts over output cuts, surging U.S. diesel inventories

BTV Simulcast

06:12 min | 1 year ago

Oil prices fall on doubts over output cuts, surging U.S. diesel inventories

"Oil they're retreating from the three month high OPEC plus unity is being threatened by law already sealed over compliance when it comes to production cutbacks meantime US data is casting doubt on the strength of demand recovery as well let's bring in a J. T. D. energy services services director director John John Driskell Driskell joining joining us us with with more more John John thanks thanks for for joining joining us us you you know know the the stunning stunning rally rally seen seen in in crude crude for for Brent Brent basically basically we we touched touched briefly briefly about about forty Bucks and basically we come back from seventeen dollars just a month ago how far can we go in this group rally right now is a more upside thank I would prefer my optimism if you could surge to forty dollars but it was short lived and a lot of the momentum behind me was based on the signals we're receiving about the poem OPEC meeting which is supposed to be held on the ninth of June on the whole idea was what the deal would be one point seven million perilously close with each step further because if someone's exactly between the Saudis and the Russians quickly with extra mushrooms and in fact the wooden bowls the meeting criminals who made a lot of sense everybody to talk about it resolve it for you that way you could send a signal to customers who July here's what was beautiful and moving forward but several we have this a breath only yesterday that the also in the meeting was called off it's going to be postponed or rescheduled for later and so when the focus is on the so called lawyers the I could be wrong a link has extra money Julia wait I think what you have to do is to look at his murder trial collated and market demand hopefully recovers you can see how much more intense competition the crew members markets will be the lord Collins of the sponsors like major area all right group because of the length of the title what is the market need to hear from OPEC plus here sensually it isn't what the Saudis are proposing where we need to extend those curves up to three months or the Russians have a point here that you know as economies re open demand is picking up again maybe we just need to extend for one month all the employees of the service call center there are yeah and is returning we've been doing a lot of bottom fishing he's cool crisis caused by third base I stopped the Russian Urals we're sorry Colaco who took the controls and soon a surgeon physical the marvelous okay we can copy paper for he's still on the conservative side Merkel I'm still on the ground because through the end of the year so one of us needs to do which is the one more knowledge was terrible it fell apart Michelle back walks on the meeting it's gonna be a stronger sense of compromise with the realism that allows us to be school because for the nine point seven five scored five it'll be civil read more the latest things are opposites one month and that's underwhelming the same term it's understandable they need to crack down on the on the outliers who who are over producing you couldn't see three months of a local court you can only spend the visual agendas of the Russians get excited about blasphemous because the physical demands well don't get too excited don't cha think well let's suppose he cooled stainless phone for at least three months just chill size shale production is bad given that oil is about thirty a barrel and how will this play out in terms of supply and prices world world has gone coming off any we'll exporters immediately he prefers home girls with a cream cold credentials and others call on political I hope we can achieve a permission from the court last week that's because some people have been through a number of cities also cross off of almost two million also day and that's been strictly voluntary medicine driven by economics that yeah this is on the rise produces from even going well so there's some concerts since Christmas thirty five forty dollars this is going to provide a signal with some shale producers to relaunch could actually set headline says Sarah E. O. G. because we were sure sure Sir we have to restart from some of the help is if you look at the pretty close all the loopholes on the shelves BP's ensure ground he announced moments across multiple expenditures from hopefully some room because it's difficult to protect their digital mobility social okay transaction size for this in the case of chevron overlaying all star I mean those people experts also growing expenditure are not going to be fun to go through with this song keep expectancy continues to drop off in breast reduction reducing other non OPEC countries like Norway announcing massive cuts in this morning so it is fun to show producers I don't know if that's what they're going to switch back on the magically restore production I think going forward it to the end of the year because he got a little off before

Opec
Oil prices rise ahead of OPEC+ meeting on output cuts

Houston's Morning News

00:15 sec | 1 year ago

Oil prices rise ahead of OPEC+ meeting on output cuts

"Parsley energy is turning oil wells back on just weeks after shutting them off evidence of the shale industry's agility in responding to rising crude prices parsley is one of the first and biggest drillers in the Permian basin to announce a reversal of production

Permian Basin
OPEC Chief Optimistic That the Worst of Oil Crisis is Over

BTV Simulcast

02:36 min | 1 year ago

OPEC Chief Optimistic That the Worst of Oil Crisis is Over

"Up OPEC and its allies are rapidly cutting production and seeing signs that demand for crude is starting to recover OPEC secretary general Mohammad Barkindo told Bloomberg that he's hopeful the west of the old crisis is over but is he right we asked Coliseum standard chartered economist for me not tacky I'm Pakistan eleven of excess supply best oil markets hi speed in an eighth grade was indeed unprecedented we actually estimate that the average around twenty one point three million barrels per day and looking ahead we think that the oil supply drops will likely close by July so we're seeing positive signs that the Marlins would likely grow old and die reply from OPEC's stock would continue to fall especially with the addition and **** announced by Saudi the UAE the UAE and Kuwait are you certainly has accelerated this process but even when the snow on balance restored in July there are still several headwinds that are likely to be fractured week markets would still be faced by the head when the high inventor used hi OPEC's spare capacity and also the need to re incorporate non OPEC output output which has so far been temporary be sufficient so there is a risk that if prices value too far and too fast especially if we see WTI breaks thirteen dollars and a sustained minor this could cause the return of some U. S. wedding after a very short period of second and yet when we look at that car good morning to you when we look at the U. S. side of the scenario JP Morgan thought one and a half million barrels will come off the U. S. side by G. that's not actually taking effect the shop in effect is that and you've got conical continental in several taking seven hundred and fifty thousand files also is not the biggest tail risk is that shale reasserts itself more virulently perhaps in the market positions it's certainly part of the equation and it's certainly a risk especially if we need prices rise quite fast and you already have some reports that current prices are causing the return of some U. S. flags after only a very short period of second generation network considering but also the fact that we are dealing with an overhang and and the battery is under OPEC's spare capacity all of these three factors together might keep prices depressed for the rest of the

Opec Mohammad Barkindo Bloomberg Pakistan Marlins UAE Jp Morgan Coliseum Standard Kuwait WTI U. S.
OPEC slashes oil demand forecast again, sees biggest hit this quarter

Bloomberg Markets

05:30 min | 1 year ago

OPEC slashes oil demand forecast again, sees biggest hit this quarter

"You know what area of the market that we haven't talked about is frequently recently as oil because it stabilizes it recovered from that incredibly low level right now crude traded on the NYMEX trading at twenty five dollars and forty two cents but a real push pull here especially as OPEC releases a report that basically says that production can be cut even further to meet the curtail demand in a pandemic era Juliett Lea is been covering all things oil for us again writing incredible Bloomberg opinion columns as well on the oil market you can always catch them on Sundays Julian joins us now there is this push pull Julianne where you've got a bit of signs of recovery with some maybe some tentative signs of a drawdown in the Cushing storage fields with respects to inventories mean other side you have shale producers that are actually starting to bring wells back online where are we in the supply demand dynamic we're in a very delicate position at the moment you're absolutely right we all starting to see very tentative dare I say positive signs even in some of the particularly the U. S. state terror and and some of the the information we're getting out of China in terms of driving picking out the the weekly report from the A. L. A. the book was published about helping our goes die shows enough taking good moment but you know we have to put that in perspective the eight still below seventeen million barrels a day that's about where it walls twenty five years ago so we you know we no way near out of the woods that was it he said this the scoring Cushing stocks at Cushing there was also a very small role in nationwide commercial crude oil inventories but you have to balance that against the fact that there was almost two million barrels of crude putting to the strategic petroleum reserve and a loophole the the the the nationwide still holds all of crude oil and refined products went off again some Julian on the supply side of the equation several weeks ago we had OPEC obvious Saudi Arabia and Russia agreed to I I believe almost two million barrels per day cut in auction is there any signs that that is in fact holding yeah they're also in cities holding I mean we all starting to get into the first trickle of information we've had some students ten day production figures out of Russia which shows that it has gone a long way towards meeting what it promised to do in terms of output because we all seeing export levels from some of the big middle eastern countries falling quite significantly Saudi Arabia looks to be doing what he said it would do and I and yesterday went even further saying that it would cost an additional million barrels a day on top of what is already promised for June that would take its production down to little a little lesson seven the whole million barrels a day from you know twelve million barrels last month these are very big accounts and they all happening what's happening outside of the OPEC plus group please he's a little more difficult to see immediately we have seen some big holes in U. S. production but one thing the the I think analysts is struggling with if you read the company earnings reports it suggests that the production call by could alternately be as big as three million barrels a day if you look at the weekly production numbers with less than a call for backup of the moment and and then he said wait wait starting to see told because of some companies beginning to to raise output again as prices have crept up to about twenty five Bucks a barrel yes Julian just real quick here I'm struggling to understand the source of the uptick in demand that will bring it back to levels that we saw pre corona virus the shipping levels down with airplanes on expecting volumes to return for years where is the driver of consumption well the driver is the driver I will pay the city's you know eight eight gasoline demand that he's picking up most significantly well I don't think the the you know we we necessarily suggesting that demand is going to get back to pre fires levels you know anytime soon we all we all seeing really the photo shoots at the Monaco thirty these Damone problem private motorists people who perhaps all getting back to work but all roads leading public transport in order to get a job so we seeing more people using because we see even higher than normal levels of congestion on Chinese city streets we seeing signs of an increasing congestion elsewhere as well but it's still early days early days Julian Lee thank you so much for joining us Julian Lee is an oil strategist for Bloomberg news trainings on the phone from London like I just for me please I'm just you know that gasoline prices are down that's great but I just might not driving so I mean I can simply take advantage of that so began to see how that plays out over time as oil continues to trade at

"shale" Discussed on World Oil's Shale Water Management

World Oil's Shale Water Management

08:34 min | 2 years ago

"shale" Discussed on World Oil's Shale Water Management

"We will move between twenty two and twenty five depending on the location. That's an interesting comment as well. Is this trend. Towards trying to keep these parent-child wells were separated so there's less interference is yes we have seen. We have seen a lot of the companies that announced over the last six months that Increasing the distance between the wealth. That is not as some of the some of the work that will be doing some of the work that will be doing in twenty twenty on the. Waterside is better trying to understand how the water oil ratios and water. Production Dynamics change right between parent and child wells. Do they change at all? I mean I mean the right next to each other. That's why parent and child so isn't Isn't it similar from one? Well to the next well on the same had. We expect that there's going to be some differences in what invasions between I apparently John Wells. We've only seen that as a difference between the vintage of wells. Some of the older wells producing ness water than the new walls. But we would like to do a bit of a deeper dive to understand those Those drive us. Of course there's going to be when aspect is designed the amount of water Foot IS INCREASING OVER TIME. And you have gone up more flow back but that's not the only reason that we are seeing because we see the volumes that are coming back a much higher than but flo back audits Interesting interesting and so you guys will have more of that to report on next year right I mean. How long does it take to put something like that together? Today's right complexity. Yes for us to develop the water away shows. It took us a good five months of work so it was not like something out of a box. Yeah five months. Wow Man. That's that's that's incredible but I guess there's a lot of testing to make sure that you know however you're calculating it actually reflects reality as well right because you can go back to that so that's really handy. I mean that's amazing that you guys spend that much time and by you guys I mean would mak right. I mean that would Mac spent that much time going back and making sure. Everything's good for their clients. Nice just to wrap something up. I wanted to touch on on. Cameron's points about inventories. I think it's really really important for the sector. Basically what we're seeing in the market is that upstream assets are only being valued on PDP basis right now meaning that investors are only ascribing value to flow in production wells. That are already online. And so if we get to a situation where we're no longer valuing upside and inventory water. Investors are GONNA have to look at these metrics on the same token so when our conversations that we have with clients were? We really stressed the importance of getting the window. Oil Ratios right on the existing production. Obviously it changes by by bench and what county. You're in and so going forward. We we think there's a potential for a little bit of a slowdown and you know. Some more difficulties and matching the bid ask spreads the oil price stays where it's at and you have the current valuation dynamics with the MP's the way that they are and all the the ducks out there. Those all fall into a Pud category as well right. So there's a huge variable kind of hanging out one hundred percent yes. So what is the story on ducks? Tell me something about ducks right now. I've heard all kinds of things like oh the duck count because I mean I don't know there's some official government duck count right. That doesn't really exist in. I don't know they're out there right. I mean ducks are out there. And I think it was thirty or forty months in a row and the Permian. The duck count increased month over month and basically you just you had you had a steadily. Rising RECOUNT AND RIG efficiencies. Were getting better and better. So you're able to drill more wells and last time and you couldn't you couldn't you basically couldn't have the fractures on site to be able to bring all those wells online at a single time. See this huge inventory of wells that have been drilled not completed and so going back to our point this all kind of ties together because this could actually be a good thing for the industry. We've had all these ducks that have been sitting there and that we're trying to you. Know pull back the reins on our cap ex spending rather than have a rig. Stay on site. You can just start to tap into some of your ducks right. So it could be a catalyst for for keeping production where it's at and hopefully continuing to see the increase in water volumes. That that we need to get some of these deals done but you. Interestingly I mean just recently there was some research from Some big names in the industry where they were saying you know they think is bs because no company would spend the money to drill a hole and then not complete it that they wouldn't just leave that out there that everything that was drilled was getting completed so we don't think that. I was true especially for multiple reasons. I is a lot of companies believed that price would rise back a lot faster so they kept existing count existing numbers of online and then they continue just drumming. The second is it's also sometimes very difficult to let go. And then we contract that rig especially you have done a lot of improvements with Recru- annual always what will the same true and you have an optimizing over time so just getting ring up. That rag is an issue if you need to restart later from scratch. Sometimes upright US prefer actually continuing to draw even in the law advice and avoiding that they're a lump and that's going to be more efficient overall in the long term. Of course I need to make tough decisions to let rigs go when oil price is going to be low for a long time. But here's a here's a question for you. Are these uncompleted wells or they or they open hole wells. I don't think you can. I guess you could plug it open hole well and re re re enter later but if you're GONNA be able to run the casing. Yeah yeah okay so as well as a case. I'm just the just not cooperate it so they've never perforated the well and never fry the well over. Dutchman. String got it. Okay and do you know put Martinez before we close out do you know? What percentage of the cost is that Compared to the completion drilling and casing the well is what is it? Fifty percent of the cost. I mean is there another fifty percent to go in and clear lead it or drilling is about forty percent and completions about sixty percent of course on while design so in theory if all these ducks do exist and they weren't getting complete alone the way then. We don't have to drill anymore. We can still bring on production absolutely. I fully agree with Evan. That a lot of those wells will be competed. So ducks will be competed. But now the question is going to be. How many of those ducks can actually be competed? Because some of those ducks have been sitting there for a long time and the question is still going to be economic justice. Frac and that's going to be based on that's going to be case by case basis as well. Yeah I think one of the things that we've done I would MAC is. We've taken a differentiated view. From what the IRA tells us in their in their joint productivity reports so we we basically keep a running tally of effective ducks and the way that we do that as we basically say that any doc is that that's been sitting there for at least two years we. We don't consider it a candidate any longer so they drop off after two years. Yeah Okay Yeah. I certainly agree that we think docs will will continue to get completed going into two thousand twenty all right interesting. Well thank you guys all very much for being here today. We really appreciate it. Thanks for joining us from the great white north must be very cold up there now for sure. We just had a really cold spell here real real cold spell here in Houston as well but I know you guys must have been freezing up there right. It wasn't actually too bad was actually the same temperature as Houston. So get out kid out. What are you talking about? We were as cold as it was in Canada. It was like low forties year man as crazy. Well hopefully. It's definitely get warm around here outside today. We've got about seventy two degrees Fahrenheit. So it's it's definitely getting back to decent temperatures for us but everybody have a great Thanksgiving too because we'll get back together after Thanksgiving right so all the listeners. Evan Matiz Cameron guys all have a great thanksgiving. We'll we'll talk to you soon. Thanks Tim thank you..

Evan Matiz Cameron John Wells Houston Production Dynamics Canada Mac official Tim Recru Martinez Frac
"shale" Discussed on World Oil's Shale Water Management

World Oil's Shale Water Management

11:41 min | 2 years ago

"shale" Discussed on World Oil's Shale Water Management

"Three Twenty nineteen financials but only five point nine multiple on twenty twenty forecast in Nevada. So we can see that They're expecting a huge increase over the next year. That can probably only be due to a big contract in the pipeline like a big expectation on water increasing. Yep so how was that? Compare House Fourteen Times compared to what we were talking about last time because some of the multipliers were really big right earlier on Earlier in the year we saw the multiples used to be on ten as we discussed last time but have been dropping drawn seven on the latest deals so those are on historically bid. We still see that that's very high multiple but if you're looking at forward a bid we see that the it's a much it's much law so it's five point nine today. This is what we have been expecting are on seven into past okay. Okay so so that. That was a good deal. That and that was a good A good buy for that. Yes while we need to find out if they can actually deliver on the expected Ebitda increase in the next issue to me that would be a thirty two million annualized down to three between nineteen expecting expecting to increase a bid to forty four million to hunt you for on an annual spaced and that would increase more than double to eighty almost double to eighty three mentioned in twenty twenty and mit. Is I think I think I think we need to probably just explain to the audience here. In general when you're thinking about comparable deal transactions. Why would why would one company get a higher valuation than another company? Are there any factors that you kind of look at when prescribing premium? Yes and when we're looking for premium to be looking is what type of contract signed by pipeline. If for example a company has a huge contract and but pipeline by of course are willing to pay a lot more of course we need to look at what is the type of contract. And how big is the contract? What are the terms and conditions? Is it an indication a minimum volume commitment so how certain volumes and when we're looking at who is a counterparty as well if you do a deal with one of a major? It's not the same as doing deal with one of the smaller operators. I'll tell you what logistics operates mostly in the Delaware Basin right where Devon Yuji allocated. Of course they have contracts with a lot more operators but they also have some small operations midland and in the ROCKIES has while they're in total to have about sixteen as WBZ's with over three on a thousand bows off disposal capacity and have permanent a lot more. That's going to bring that just wasn't acid over half a million per day. Here's a question about that. That Midland Company. This was on point. Gravity that deal. Yeah you're talking about how they were targeted these deeper formations. Was that a deliberate decision that they made to take advantage of the head or was it. More consequence of these are the wells available. Listen to us. And so it was more serendipitous that they're targeting a less utilized layer. I think it's a combination of both because I think in a perfect world you would always drill shower wells beaten because you know. They're they're half as much of the cost but are standing firm on point. Is that although? They cost twice as much they've done. Enough Reservoir mapping where they're they're really happy with the actual quality of the Rock and those deeper formations. And so sometimes it'll be able to take thirty forty fifty thousand barrels of Water Day. So they've kind of find a way to to make the economics work. We also had that a lot of those water midstream. Companies only get contracts if they do not drill in the Senate address formation so it's usually D- conditional under contract to drill deeper formation because as operators are very much afraid that if say continue pumping more water in the shallow dot com trade issues for that own gelling. Yeah exactly exactly. Because that's a big deal with the seismicity. We should talk about that sometime to you. Guys I mean we can get those guys on from like three or something where there. There's seismicity modeling stuff is just mind blowing to me. Yeah because you know they were just like you know. I don't know if I told you this before. But I had seen their thing and this show the reports of seismicity right and then all of a sudden in one year it just spikes up and then stays high error after that and I was like well. That's an obvious issue right there. What what happened right there. And he goes well. They just deployed more sensors because they saw that there was seismicity happening and they were like. Oh Yeah let's find out what's going on and said he deployed a bunch more sensors so of course there was more there to be found. I mean when you have more sensors out there you're gonNA find more. That's what the railroad commission told us was their number one objective for nine thousand nine hundred thousand up Jim. I would agree with that on the smaller earthquakes. You know like the smell of the small ones that difficult to like the the small trembles. But when you're talking about this big earthquakes even if you have a few Seismic phone that would have recorded those and those are going up as well. Are they the big ones going up to you? It's not just adding Moammar windows. Phone thanks is a seismic equipment. Just helps you. Basically monitor the smaller ones that you usually will not detected over longer distance but for bigger ones you can still You should still be able to detect even with a few yeah. Yeah exactly and I didn't see that information. I just total number of reports right. Which is that one but I guess severity is the real question. Because you can't feel it. Who cares well for most people right? You WanNa you WANNA give a summary of owls assets. Soon I'll has multiple segments. The first is to have a disposal capacity in the Delaware Basin Midland Iraqis. Most of the operation of course isn't Northeast Alah Basin or where you have like in the county where you have given your g and others. They're competing in that area lot with mosquitoes. Stone got acquired by NGO but some of also a mom and pop shops and via upright lead as deputies. They have also a one hundred miles of pipelines in that region that is connecting also deputies additionally they also own some freshwater whites that used to sell water to some of those operators and finally they also have some water treatment and recycling capabilities to really try to go into nextwave off recycling water and be selling not water. Yeah that's that's for sure so that would make sense because it's based on future income basically right the prices based on on future income. Is that the in house. Certain incomes are going to be right. Okay and what about the second deal? What was the second deal on? Point Anti gravity. Yeah Yeah Yeah Yeah. Yeah so this one happened earlier in November and on point to those who may not know they're actually the MIDLAND BASINS LARGEST THIRD PARTY DISPOSER. And so they have seventeen activist. Wd's about five hundred thousand barrels a day of active disposal capacity. And so you know so. Much of the focus is always on the Delaware Basin but on point is very sizable asset base and in speaking with their management. Speaking to people around the industry. It struck me as interesting. That on point has been so laser focused on their core assets which sit in Midland in Howard County. So there's really never been an appetite for them to chase growth to go into growing basins. They they like their asset base in the Midland Basin. They have long standing relationships with some of their existing customers and it's become a really attractive asset and so the deal metrics weren't disclosed but what we do know is that gravity picked up the seventeen. Swt's and there's another four hundred thousand barrels a day of potential capacity. That could come online in the future through permits and I think another interesting part about this deal is that a lot of the permits or for deeper disposal formations. So the reason why this matters is that especially in the Midland Basin. The sanders formation is getting pressured up. And so there's been a little bit of friction between the EMP's and the water disposers and so by basically avoiding the shallower formations and getting exposure to the deeper formations. It's a bit of a hedge against future operational challenges so we we like that about the deal right right and that's an important thing. We should talk about that in depth sometime about the depths of the different disposal areas of different places where you can pump that back down because we have a great graph for that. We'll do that next time. We'll do that next time. Okay we'll use that will give them that graph with a with a lower regions and stuff and we'll talk about that a little bit because aside from the deals we need to talk about the other trends that are moving things now and of course. The price of oil is big trend so And that definitely has an effect. So Evan Matisse give it gives a little breakdown on that. How's that affecting this kind of lower for longer price thing affecting us? Yeah so we have seen. Is that I'd price has been So bit stuck in the mid fifties and we have therefore what. My cousin Lutheran lowered the price forecast. Because we see that those prices are not increasing at least not in the short term as as fast as we expected. The other part of this is that obviously as as companies have started to roll out there. They're twenty twenty cap ex guidance. I think we're kind of baking in anywhere from five to fifteen percent year over year. Drop in spending in twenty twenty so they how much how much did you say? Five to fifteen holy cow Yeah so obviously. Since this shale revolution has just been up into the right right. Is that growth capital? And but I I think obviously with with the need that investors are basically forcing the MP's to start to generate free cash flow rather than just focus on on production growth and so long story short we think with the contraction in emp spending. There's a potential for your number of wells drilled two dropped and so all of this could have ramifications on how we think about water volume growth right because new wells mean more water coming on line one of the things that is making a difference in these different shale places the the inventory mix of the pods versus a PDP's proved undeveloped. What does that look like here with? These deals so we had talked about how the development forecast impacts of course. You're you're produce water forecast as well as your drilling laugh as well because Juju Catholics restriction to Auburn numbers of remaining locations. And that you might be running out you're gonNA have of course fewer wells and therefore you. You're not going to get as much water. I mean one thing that we had always talked about when we did some Some produced what forecast is or just forecast is we have always been on a bit. More conservative on how many wells could be dwelled in a certain section for example some banks it was talking about forty almost fifty wells in a section..

Delaware Basin Midland Basin EMP Midland Company Water Day Nevada MIDLAND BASINS Northeast Alah Basin Midland Senate WBZ ROCKIES Devon Yuji railroad commission Wd Stone Swt
"shale" Discussed on World Oil's Shale Water Management

World Oil's Shale Water Management

16:39 min | 2 years ago

"shale" Discussed on World Oil's Shale Water Management

"He had a very interesting take on the development of automation in episode one. So you need to go back and listen to that one and then follow up on this one so if you haven't heard it go back to that one. Come back to this one but nate. Thanks for coming back and talking to us again. Thank you so today. We're going to talk about specific uses of automation in the system. Last time we talked about general automation. Now we're talking about a specific use case that selected us with their clients to help them out. So yeah one of the things that I mentioned in our previous discussion. Was We do some electrochemical work now where we put in sensors to monitor water quality for the customer? And so it's not just. How much water can you deliver to me win? It's how much water and of what quality and I may not always have a touch point on the quality. Control that water you tell me to go over here and transfer this water. I transferred the water but there is some sort of life cycle that water especially in dry areas like the permian almost always whether or not the transfer has is involved in that life cycle. We're GONNA move it. And we have the most exposure to it as far as the full volume in in breadth of whatever that water sources. And so we're actually uniquely positioned to QA QC that water and so with the advent of all of this automation and communication equipment. Being in the field and available. It was a pretty obvious step to start doing some electrochemical. So we've seen I mentioned O. R. P. Our last discussion. We'RE DOING PH. We measure temperature which for different processes that can be important or doing conductivity. We're doing tedious we've done. Tss just for different different strokes for different folks people. They have different things. They're concerned about their particular chemistry. And their technology going downhill and they've also got their own concerns with their water. The other thing that we find ourselves doing is kind of doing process confirmation for the recycle companies. So you'll have a recycling company. They'll be moving large volumes of water into a pit or to an ast or group of tanks will be transferring out of that to the site and we we have multiple different ways to kind of monitor that water as we move it we can either deploy sensors into the pit the ast of the tanks or we actually have spool pieces that we put into the transfer line in areas. We have nice lamour flow. You put them a little bit a little ways away from the pumps that you don't have a lot of turbulence and stuff like that so you can get good readings on your sensors. We have specially built high alloy very resistant. Hassle Oy in high in stainless steel pieces that generic connections for sensors and we can place those in line observed the data locally pushed the date up to the cloud. Feed that to the customer. And kind of do that. In a on a real time basis and allow them to see water quality change over time with their processes. We can report that back. They can compare it to what they're getting at the actual recycled facility because some of those metrics will change after we feel residents time in the pit. Of course that kind of stuff also a lot of times we see obviously blending is really common as well so you may have a recycle flow and a freshwater flow that you're augmenting it with the post. Blend analysis needs to be done because the one plus one does not always equal to right. You've got to see what you got as a final product after the blending on that end we actually have a technology that we developed quite proud of and I think there's there's others in the industry that have similar setups but I believe we've done a pretty good job product and we've also quite a lot of money in doing it but we call it our our automated proportioning system and that functions. I mentioned blending. If you have a situation where you need to use both produce water and freshwater you may have really good quality control on both of those individually but once you blend them. They're going to be reactions. That occur things are going to precipitate out that kind of thing. And so you're GonNa WanNa know what that looks like after the blend to know what your final product is reaching the site right right. You're to want to know that in real time it's part of your process control so the blending unit allows us to in automated trailer-mounted package bring in the freshwater line. You bring in the produce waterline. It has flow meters and a full sensor suite on each of those legs it comes up into a blending section where we thoroughly blends the water so you settle it out. It has a long run. So you get nice clean flow. And you've got another sensor suite there. It has its own onboard logic controller. It's designed to operate with automated pumps. So you can actually throw. It can actually throttle the incoming flows to achieve a desired output. Oh Nice Okay. Yeah or you can. It can run multiple ways you can. We've actually had it run on conductivity so you tell me you want conductivity of X. I bring into two different water streams of fresh and a produced as you move through the produce water stream especially in pits. That aren't or tanks. That are very very thoroughly mixed. They stratifies so you're you're tedious or conductivity or salinity change through the depths of that. Pitt as you move through the water column we can actually adjust the flow rate on the fly of the two incoming streams that you get a very consistent output and and depending on the situation that's applicable other times. They know they've already done chemistry. They've already blended a bunch of time. They WanNa they just WanNa have a very specific blend rate that they can trust and literally walk up and see. We have a human machine interfaces some screens. You can actually look up there and confirm what's going on you know that everything's everything's on the up and then they want to record all the data so in it's just a very convenient package you put it out there. You've got all your electric data recorded and sent to the cloud and you can always swing by in your truck. Look at the screen and see exactly what that looks like. So that's impressive so tell me that. Seems like if you're gonNA use a blend you'd have to have something like that to check to the final quality of it. So what did they do before? There were sensors and automation. How did they deal with that? You did a lot of very careful chemistry. I mean there's obviously ways to do it but it was much more. It was much more of an inexact science and it was more laborious. You War. You're having to do a bunch of samples. Mix THEM AT DIFFERENT RATES. Mix Different proportions. So you'd say all right I want you to take this produce water. This freshwater blended ten percent twenty percent thirty percent online see where you start to precipitate out would how things change in an estimate where your sweet spot is going to be and then tried blend on that. Now you go and take after the fact readings down the line. Maybe in the FRAC tanks maybe at the blender depending you know who who and how it's being done but by the time you read it there. You've already got the water that's out of. Spec right in your radio your radio radioing back to tell them to make some change but you may already have hundreds or thousands of barrels of water that are out bounce so it could be done but it's just not as exact. It's better to you know blend on spec right there on on the spot and everything all in one and and so. We're actually expanding that. We've we've had really good traction with that in past couple years and I think we're building more of than this year and more of them next year so it's been well received. Yeah so it's in use out in the field right. Is it my having a continuous blend? That helped because in my mind and I'm not technical so this could be wrong but if you know exactly how the waters blended in the quality of the water then that can affect your chemistry program downstream like you can add less of something or more of something else to take care of whatever the issue is or correct so you blend and then we can also does chemicals and and we can those chemicals and we've actually. I certain customers in the army. We've actually set up a blending system either depending on you know what the exact situation is we we set up a number of ways but we'll do chemical dosing system either downstream or upstream. So we can put if there is if you don't have a recycle company or their own chemical program for the source water we can set up a chemical dosing system to try to achieve certain things prior to the blend. Oh Yeah Okay Yeah. Yeah so upstream or or downstream in that reactively. So we're watching the blend in. You're seeing what kind of chemistry is going on their full disclosure automation guy. Not a chemist. So you'll have to forgive me but you watch what's going on and then you have an automated system that can dose based on that so we can. We can learn what we need to what we need to know about the properties of of those two particular fluid sources and then dose based on that. And it's just a really. It's really neat to actually. We're learning so many different ways that we can apply the technology to kind of do a holistic take a holistic view in a holistic approach to that water-management. It's really pretty exciting. You know when you're when you're running. Automated equipment from monitoring the source to pumping to blending it chemical injection all your booster pumps and then all the way to the manifold. That's distributing this to the tanks. You have a lot of opportunity to interject at any of those points in. Try to work closer with your customers and work closer with the product. It's moving through the lines so now this stuff sounds very cutting edge so I assume not cheap right. There's been a significant investment both within select and the industry in general to have to do this. I think it's something that the industry has to do. We I think we all know it. You see it on the operator side. You see it on the service company side and and you see large investments all across the industry. We need to be more efficient. We NEED TO BE SAFER. We need to be. I think you can always be better. Environmental Stewards and I think these technologies allow us to be better environmental stewards. We reduce or your dramatically reduced the number of spills and you see that in just in general in the industry with with automation you reduce the amount if there is a spill sometime catastrophic things happen. The technology can detect that and you can reduce the amount of a spill. We can reduce the amount we are reducing. The amount of chemicals were using by using just straight produced water. That they're moving more. The industry's moving more to just Robert. Who Slaughter we kind of talked off? Line a little bit about how you know early on. We in our first talk ten years ago. They weren't using an produced water exactly and then when they started using producer. They really didn't know what to do with it. They were throwing it in pits and let in tanks letting it sit there and the frat chemistry couldn't handle it and now we've just come so far. Yeah Yeah that we. We really are streamlining things and we all know we need to do it. It is costly though I mean. I think it's costly across the Industry. So you see a lot of different companies. I mean you know. We're using it. Whether Service companies are operators. Were using this type of technology with the adoption rate would you say what percentage of operators in the Permian are actually using these types of systems on specifically the water transfer side. Yeah I would say it's fairly high. I would I hesitate to venture a pure guess for the entire industry. Because you've got you've got a lot of smaller a lot of smaller mom and pop type. Companies Likely can't afford to make the investment and they're still the water. Transfer market still pretty highly fractured. So you've got a lot of small companies that make up a large percentage of the total water transfer business and and you don't see a lot of automation there. You see really basic automation coming out of rental houses so a lot of the small transfer companies can go out and rent a pump that has some basic remote control on it. That's far from what we've been talking about intrinsic automation connected to all these different pieces of equipment. That doesn't really happen so as far as full automation on transfer. I'd suspect it's quite low. You're probably talking about. I don't know I really. I hesitate to wager a guess but I guess fifteen percent something like that. It's not a lot so there's a lot of room and and you know. We talked earlier about being careful about mentioning operator so not mentioning clients in general but just people you know. Can you name off some like early? Adopter types who were all over like that type of stuff without without stepping on. I think there's a way that you can do this. This is gonNA come as no surprise and I do not intend this as a cop out to your question but the larger operators are more thorough with their with their engineering of on the water so they they have a lot more focus on it. They tend to and they've been early adopters so I don't think that's a surprise or shocked many of your listeners. But the larger operators are more willing to invest in that engineering. And now I'm doing the engineering for the water transfer in in our team. But this doesn't happen in a vacuum when you start to deploy New Technology. We deploy with partners and it has been the case frequently. Those partners have been what the larger companies because they've got more personnel more time and more money to invest in that type of stuff. So if you WANNA ask generically. Who's WHO's been kind of pushing that it's been your larger your majors in your mid majors right. No that makes perfect sense. I mean they have the pockets and the larger operation the more imagine benefit from this rabs. Because you can replicate this and different sites and and you know have all the data you have the the people and the expertise to build based on what you learn. We have got out for multiple operators in multiple basins. Over the years as a part of a cohort of companies water-management companies where we work with this operator in. Everyone tries their idea. I try my idea. You know the guy down. The street tries his idea and the operator learns from what we're doing and they built their S..

cloud nate WanNa New Technology Pitt producer Robert
"shale" Discussed on World Oil's Shale Water Management

World Oil's Shale Water Management

05:18 min | 2 years ago

"shale" Discussed on World Oil's Shale Water Management

"We deploy simpler and simpler and simpler pieces of equipment in programming. The programming is caveman programming. On off. On off on off on off. And then as you go you you add those layers of abstraction and you get into the cloud level now. You're talking about the programming that you may be familiar with with. You know websites right. Html five and Java and that kind of stuff dot net we. We live in both those worlds and I wouldn't say that one is more complex than the other. I've got engineers that work for me on both sides and they understand each other but they don't really speak each other's language is a Lotta Times. Well tell me this because the people are listening to this are mostly engineers you know what operating companies so how hard because it seems really complex right so on the operator side? How does that all time for the operator? Okay we all hear about the benefits because then you have the big data and you can do the analysis and you do predictive maintenance and and do all those things but on the operator side does that tie into their it department or do you give an interface where they can just like. Okay now. This is all you need yes. So there's there's a number of answers to those to that question as there are a number. You've got a lot of answers. You got a lot of operators people want different things out so this is what I found is sort of a general case. Is that a lot we have you kind of have to to general cases? I guess I'm step back a little bit. We have to general cases and then a lot of edge cases but to general cases. We've got operators that actually don't get invested in this at all what they care about is reliability safety and that things run on time right. That's what they care about. Just get the job done. I don't care how you get your job done. Just get it done right and I respect that I recognize that. This isn't your business. You just want it to work. What they appreciate about the technology if you're if you're if you're at that level with what we're providing is in this paradigm. The customer actually physically drives the water transfer because all of this is triggered. The whole process is is flow based so at the FRAC tanks when they start pulling water off those tanks the tank levels drop that triggers the pumps right so you're actually controlling the water from the source without ever seeing it without ever having to call anybody without any kind of radio. All they've gotta do is do their job in. The machines automatically are going to do our job excellent. They like that. It's very. We have to be customer focused. Every business has to be customer focused. So that's not news but I think that the machines allow us to deliver a responsiveness to the customer. That's kind of unprecedented in the world of the old school world of getting on the radio and calling. You Know John. Down the way to turn things on right absolutely get rid of that that edge of unreliability and human nature so that that they like and then on when you have customers that doing gauge with you and we have this as well. They like being able to request specific data sets. They like being able to log onto our web portals and see things in real time they want to see it from Costa Rica. They want to see it from New York. They want to see it from their home. They WANNA see it from their office. They WanNa know what's going on there invested and they like that with this also opens up a whole new world for us in that it allows us to collect data. Not just that I want but that you want right so if I've got all this infrastructure there it's a it's a very minor deal for me to collect data for instance we've got. That's a new thing. It's got a lot of customers that are wanting no the Oxidation reduction potential for their pit their source water or maybe in a FRAT tanks prior to having all of this connected automation on site. If you ask me to do that. That's going to be a little bit of work because now I have to put calms out. They're not allowed to put the sensors. I have to have somewhere that since someplace for that sensor to go right now I have to supply and that's a whole extra amount effort. It's not a whole extra amount effort anymore. Now you tell me you want to know our pieces. We've got those you know where you want me to put it right. You've got this whole infrastructure out there. So you've got it infrastructure you've got networking infrastructure. You've got all of it so that's kind of cool and that's a that's a with your more engaged customers. They're asking for new data in it's opening up new worlds for them and I'm sure you'll have another podcast with somebody else's sometime and they'll tell you all about how they're using or companies. I don't know exactly exactly. No it really. It really does sound like the future and hopefully it will come back on future episodes in. Tell us about how you know how the different components whether it's pomp so the tanks or other how all that ties in to the automation system because I'm sure listeners. Love to hear that. So thanks for coming out the appreciate. Shit my pleasure. Thanks for listening. Please take time to subscribe and rate us in your podcast APP of choice. Send FEEDBACK AND SUGGESTIONS TO ASK. Wm PODCAST AT WORLD OIL DOT com..

New York Costa Rica
"shale" Discussed on World Oil's Shale Water Management

World Oil's Shale Water Management

11:38 min | 2 years ago

"shale" Discussed on World Oil's Shale Water Management

"So nate does a little bit about who you are. And what you do for select. Yeah I've worked at select for about almost a decade. Now Time flies when you're having fun. I it's honestly hard to believe. That's the case. But it is and by started the technology program with select about six or eight years ago just I saw a need for more automation more applied technology with what we do and everything that I've done so far in I've had three or four different roles. I'm currently vice president of Technology for the company but I've moved through different roles in operations basically building better tools for the company to do its job. Initially everything that we've done has been to create efficiency and make things better just in general for what we do to make us a better more efficient operator at the tasks that were given every day a lot of those things it turns out. Have you know a lot of application with our customers? So we've extended that in started offering some of those service lines to our customers but it's all started off as just ways to do our job better and I'm always. I'm a very very efficiency driven person. I I love to try to do things better. And faster and safer and just what helped me get up in the morning so it's been doing it for a few years and I love it. I basing so ten years you see a lot of changes then in water in ten years right a huge amount of change. Yes Sir we move from largely East Texas and Louisiana using aluminum arrogation pipe to a nationwide operation using fully automated transfer through twelve inch. Lay flat line. So it's been it's been quite a ride and we were all learning as we go the whole industry. I mean in so it's exciting. It's been on. I was tell people that. And that's the reason for this podcast. Is that this is for me. The most dynamic area of all upstream and long gas because it is evolving all the time. It's it's definitely a necessity when you talk about produced water and things like that. I mean it just. It just doesn't stop right and so loving and if you think about it as an operation oil and gas water transfer at this level is a very new aspect of oil and gas definitely definitely. We don't have the history or the knowledge of the background that we do in. You know much of the rest of the Industry. So it's it's definitely learning experience for all of us so now you guys just came out with this with this water one automation package right. And that's like you know from aluminum. Irrigation pipe to fully automated systems. That's like the other extreme. So tell us a little bit about the automation. The water one automation system. So it's the water one. Branding is really a recognition of the kind of the culmination of a process. We've been working towards this for the better part of ten years and it was it was it's been a very incremental process as you know as all great things are it's not. It's not an overnight. We turn this on. We declared it to be so it's been ten years of intense work by lots of people and we realized that we had reached a point where this is a pretty major accomplishment and really neat product and we sort of institutionalized that in the water one brand okay so but in the so ten years ago when you're looking at the different aspects of it right and you're like hey wouldn't it be cool if we could automate this. I mean when did the light bulb go on like hey was it from the very beginning? Was that part of the plan someday. We'll have all of these systems. Automated all talk to each other. It'd be wonderful I'd be lying to you if I said the very beginning it. It didn't take long to have that vision. But you know the execution the devil's in the details man and it's there's a lot of details a lot of devils there so we started off kind of you start the thought process as you start the logical process of actually doing the water. You see the problems as you approach them. And the way that we approach it in In select business I think in water transfer in general is it starts at the source right so the first thing that we automated was monitoring the source. So you would know. How much was there to begin with? And how much was there during an operation and that information needed to be delivered in real time to all stakeholders involved and that was the first step once you know. What's there in all of the stakeholders have the same information at the same time? You can take action on that information so the next step was moving to automate your pumps so you have a pump that sits there on that water source. That pump now knows it has water. How much water has. And at what rate it's getting so use that information to run your pump. So we started setting up remotely controlled remotely operated pumps the initial phases of it. Were strictly at the source pump. Just basically control that source pompous since. That's the that's the the primary the prime mover for the whole thing and initially and we always in one. We went down this road. We knew that I saw the future of going to a fully automated. Transfer string but you can't you know it's it's not a it's an iterative process. So we knew we had to start somewhere so we started with internal automation. And I think this is a key a key thing to recognize and something I think. A lot of the industry has struggled with continues to struggle with is. There's a remote control right right. There's remotely controlling in remote viewing of data. Which is not inconsequential and does have value. And then there's actual true automation where the machines know what they need to do that. Next level they have onboard logic controllers. And so they not only can be remotely controlled or queued they also run within boundaries that are intrinsic to the machine itself and in the absence of any control or any input by human being. They will still run within those bounds. And do what they're supposed to do safely and our paradigm or my paradigm that. I've managed to maintain select. Is that first and foremost every piece? Every asset has its own Intrinsic Control. That is innate to it and it's logic controller. It doesn't need to be cute by human and it doesn't need cellular communication or satellite communication. Because that can be fickle thing right so I don't want to. We had an operation. You know you don't just do something to do something that you need to be making it better. And we had people sitting at all these pumps traditionally the whole industry had an individual at every single asset on the water. Transfer string and that person had a radio all the folks were in communication and they can run this in. You know in concert and that works but it's a lot of people and with a lot of people driving around. You have a lot of safety issues you have. You have reliability issues that are just inherent to us being human right. But if I'm going to spend all his money to do this I need to be making it better. So the beauty of the human being on site is that human being has the logic in their head if a storm comes and cellular goes out. They're not gonNA run the pump till it blows up all right. Exactly they have some basic sense of how this is supposed to run so I wanted to make sure that we didn't lose that right. We need to move. And and this is automation industrial automation. In general. You WANNA move forward. You want to make things run like a well oiled orchestrated machine and everything knowing what everything else is going to do ahead of time. All that great stuff that comes from the networking aspect the Internet of things. Which is you know bandied about. You know big buzzword now but you also need to stick to. Kinda the old school principals of industrial automation that say process control is local control so core process controls always local. So that's something that I think is important to remember as you do any of the automation. That's that's a to automation folks in the industry professionals. That's nothing new but I think it's important to understand the broader audience that you don't you don't want remote control stuff you don't you. Don't want three thousand horsepower worth of diesel engines and produced water running at you know ten feet a second down this line to be controlled on an Amazon server in Virginia. Exactly I mean that's cool for. Netflix is not a good idea. If if a hiccup in the network can ruin the whole thing. So that's been our core. That's been my core mission. So we develop first automation at the machine level and then develop rules for each machine so that in a reaction on a reactionary basis. They'll play nice with the other machines either before them after them once. That process proves itself that you can. You can run a process with the independent logic on each machine in a complete vacuum of communication. Then you add a communication layer and that communication layer allows the machines communicate back to the operators to the individuals to the humans. And now we know what the machines are also powerful right right then. And that's just reporting. The next layer is supervisory control. Where you have the overarching umbrella. The server the cloud right the were you really get to the Internet part of the Internet of things. The things need to know how they run their job by themselves and then the Internet can pull that information. You can get it to the Amazon Server in West Virginia. And now you can make some preemptive decisions and you can do a lot with machine learning you can get you can get your big data benefits. The the safety everything is expanded. But that's just icing on an already beautiful cake and so we want to make sure we have a very solid foundation and that's been where most of the works come in man we've now reached that phase where we're moving data off to the cloud and we're about to. We're about to release a brand new version of the control software and supervisory software at the end of the year of the kind of larger culmination realization of water platform. Really proud of that. But I'm also extremely proud of you know a decade of work in understanding the processes at the machine level to get that logic written on the. Pc's that we've got hundreds if not thousands of deployed in the field. Now wow because that first step about having machine understand his parameters and being able to operate then isn't isn't it exponentially difficult to get the two machines to cooperate with each other or is that is that easy. And isn't that like programming stuff? Is that what it is? It is definitely and I would say that either side of that is more difficult than the other. They have their own challenges in their in. Their different types of professionals are really tackle. Those so when you're talking about the network doing things now you're bringing a network engineers you're bringing in what you traditionally think of as it right. You've got a lot of that going on there and that is everyone knows. That's complex right. That's that's a whole huge profession. You're marrying that. It type world with traditional automation which is done on programmable logic controllers repeal sees. Which are that's actually a little bit different world that it's very strange so the POC as it stands today is a small computer but it's logic the way that it at it at its core. Works is just on and off. It's just right relay bit logic and that programming is very cumbersome but it's also very powerful very easy to trouble shoot in the field and very very reliable..

Amazon vice president of Technology nate Netflix Pc Louisiana East Texas Virginia West Virginia
"shale" Discussed on World Oil's Shale Water Management

World Oil's Shale Water Management

11:26 min | 2 years ago

"shale" Discussed on World Oil's Shale Water Management

"They're basically farming that out. They're not trying to keep that in house. They're they're hiring some firm. That handles all the water management for them. Is that right so I time I mean like about ten years ago most operated with doing it themselves and then they were talking some of the water to some mom and pop as WBZ's like especially with water is lower quality and most of it was done in house but it was always a little bit of an afterthought then around twenty fourteen fifteen that the media became starting to become very important to a lot of those operators cost started to increase because of volume came up became very important and we started to see some of those on water midstream companies being established and it was still very small operators. We're still doing it themselves. They were investing heavily in spades and they were starting to build their own midstream infrastructure and they were researching on technology. And now what we're seeing is. We're seeing a reversal now. That a lot of the operators are becoming more comfortable with those of Water Midstream. Companies who have become a lot larger. They are starting to outsource all that produced water-management to parties and that is a new trend because a few years ago the only thing that we had heard from different operative. I don't know if that what I've mentioned him. Company is GonNa Survive on Dante and that was a major concern opposes operators but I think those companies have grown sufficiently big operated the number comfortable all right quite a reversal. Actually because you have those companies were concerned about the water providers being around to to service them. Now they're using this opportunity to to sell those assets to them to raise funds to carry out their own operations right especially now with the constraints on on you know having to work within capital and stuff. So that's that's a good way for them to raise money and outsource and also you know if things change or new technology comes along. They don't have to worry about that. Oh I just invested millions of millions of dollars in this. You Know Bruce Water Recycling. Now there's a new thing that's not on them anymore so I think it's a good trend for them but now now really to the really good stuff. This is the exciting stuff that they do. Wood Mackenzie is. They know about all the deals. And what's going on because Evan was saying that there's a lot of consolidation right. You're seeing you know deals coming in and venture capital coming in from the outside so tell it. Tell us about some of the hot deals now. This is our first one. Our first episode. So you know I don't know go back as far as you think is is important but I mean it's happening all the time. These deals right. Yemen. Tia's why don't I walk through the the general trend that we've seen in deals and then if you think one's interesting hopping and talk about it so I think in the last twenty four months? We've we've seen thirty plus deals and a lot of these are are happening in the Permian because of the amount of produced water. That's coming out of the ground. That's that's really where a lot of the investment capital and the consolidation is taking place and deals have started to pick up in the in the last three months in so h two o midstream purchased Water assets follows any MP so in this case. They sold their water infrastructure. And T P G. Who's one of the world's largest private equity firms invested in good night about six months ago and that deal recently fell through so we can get more into why that was the case and just a few weeks ago? Ngo Energy Partners Bought Hill Stone. That was out in the Delaware and just this week at the conference. Jim and I are at we We heard from owl. Who's a water midstream? Company out in the Permian that they just got a new investment from a Canadian Infrastructure Fund. Wow so you think about the differences all the different in these deals. And there's a there's a lot of moving parts. Yeah it's it's amazing but the most amazing thing to me is that you know while investors seemed to be running away from oil and gas right when you're talking about like mutual funds. You know big money. Because they're getting pushback from their investors and stuff about we want you investing that dirty business water seems to be the exception of that right because everybody's that's green thing because we're trying to recycle it or we're trying to figure better ways to use it. I think that definitely any as cheapest bacteria in the sense that it makes to make a lot of sense to dot managing those resources carefully and therefore that is something that is open for infrastructure funds especially for example European funds that are a lot more green constraint or mm-hmm conduct greed and conscious thinking about and therefore especially when you're talking about recycling managing water. That is something that resonates another was those funds. Yeah I think I think the deals that have gotten the most attention in the market was the Was was what's been going on with good night. So maybe you wanted to talk about the TV deal and then more recently tail waters recapitalization and then after that you can talk about millstone and N. G. L. to. We're just getting so many questions about these deals. Yes so what we have seen is that the deal is what we need to see. What the trend in the market has been. I mean when we going back like Evan was mentioning seen a lot of deals over the last two years but at the beginning it was like two years ago it was still a lot of small deals. Small little private deals like Mo investments and not not very significant. And we're seeing now that a lot of the deals that becoming larger and has to do with that at the beginning if you're thinking about what a midstream. We had a little bit the kid a few years ago now in but teenage years and the whole industries county maturing meaning that the deal that getting bigger and that that also renewal of the type of investors that it needed we had a lot of smaller investors like that. You know a lot of those water companies. Were trying to get money from whoever they could get money from. And now we're seeing a lot of like a bigger investments so we discussed example T. PG looking into space. 'cause we also see for example. Asian Fund with ged investing in water bridge an estimate. So we're seeing a lot of Asian money infrastructure funds and very large private equity entering the market. And then we also have those even public company that are starting to look into the into space and a good example of data. Ngo Buying Mesquite like several months ago and now known as well and we know from our discussions that we're seeing a lot more strategic to meetings or the midstream companies looking at the space. That a lot of them have been waiting for those multiples to come down. And I think that was also one of the issues that repower g and the good nice deal had like a very high elevation so Ten almost eleven times a multiple. Meaning you have to wait eleven times to pay you a bit up. That was a nine hundred thirty million dollars deal and that was extremely expensive. And of course some of the you're not realized in-depth for the deal fell through and not one of the. Hey I've got a question. I got a question for you on the on the N. G. L. Dill. Why was why was that? A goodbye for hill stone. Wh- excuse me. I said that backward why was hill stone? Goodbye for N. G. L. N. G. L. that was a strategic acquisition. I The valuation became a lot more reasonable. They spend six million dollars at seven eggs multiple which we which is more in line with what we're seeing in the regular midstream industry like All in gas midstream. It becomes a little bit more at the end when he looking at where how what. Ngo actually thought in. If you're looking at the announcement day bought two different. They bought the long term contracts. That helps done was able to get find the last couple years. Additionally have also a great company that a great management team as well so it is like combinations of long term contracts and over one hundred and ten thousand acres under contract it out down some right of way as well and of course the Great Asset Management Team and therefore they can easily integrate it with mosquitoes and and yelled existing infrastructure Yeah I think I think the newest the newest announcement that's come out of the space is that owl isn't GonNa get sold to another water midstream company but rather they're just switching from one private equity sponsor to another and if you would add asked Evan for crystal ball. A few months ago I would have said they're probably going to sell their assets. Outright and their management team is GonNa go to the golf course overseen here is that just like what? Matiz was saying about it. It's not your traditional finance years of of lower forty-eight energy assets you've had the Europeans show interest and now you have a Canadian infrastructure fund coming in sinking a few hundred million dollars into a water company out in West Texas. It's fascinating stuff. Yeah now that that's crazy. And you know so good to have you guys on because I mean you guys have a vast amount of knowledge for listening world. All is really a technology magazine for for the upstream and so the deals part of it and the financing part of it. We don't really get into that so for me. It's fascinating I mean. What about for you camera do you? You're the one who puts all the digital stuff online. And do you see any I mean? Do we ever post anything about the finance end of it. Well we do cover. These deals in the new section of the website. So we do try to keep up with it but to your point it is instructive for me. I think for a lot of people to get to hear the totality of what's happening here and not just these little piecemeal. Here's something one company has done to get to look at the macro for the industry and for me. I deal with the tech companies a lot because yeah I mean. That's that's where I see it so for me. Having that having that you know ten thousand foot view really really helps. It puts everything into perspective. And and you can see it and you know on on future episodes. We're GONNA have you guys back. You can tell us about about the deals that are that that happened since the last month. So let's be every month you tell us about the deals in the last month and we can talk more in depth on some of the other trends. You guys are seeing so evan impetus. I really really appreciate you guys being on the show and we look forward to having you back absolutely. This is GonNa be a lot of fun and there's one other thing I forgot as an extra added bonus you will find in the show notes link to a pdf of that produced water tree that we were talking about. So if you're interested in it just look in the show notes click on that and you can get that free from McKenzie you guys. Don't waste our free offer only for you. Jim Alright. Alright guys thanks a lot. We'll talk to you next and this is Cameron Wallace. I'd like to thank our other sponsor. The Produced Water Society. The mission of the produced water society is to improve produced water management to the benefit of the environment and the.

Evan Produced Water Society Canadian Infrastructure Fund Jim WBZ Ngo Energy Partners Yemen golf Ngo Buying Mesquite Wood Mackenzie Asian Fund Tia Delaware Cameron Wallace T. PG Mo repower N. G. L.
"shale" Discussed on World Oil's Shale Water Management

World Oil's Shale Water Management

12:21 min | 2 years ago

"shale" Discussed on World Oil's Shale Water Management

"I'm here today with my co-host Cameron Wallace afternoon APP. He's the digital editor at world oil. So he's a he's an important cog in the wheel that is world right. That's right and one of the fastest spinning cogs in the wheels world. Oil You go exactly and also we have with us today from Wood. Mackenzie Evan Tika. And Matijas Blue Nagin. And so we're here to talk today about shale water management. That's what this podcast is about. She'll water-management one hundred percent and I don't know we'll just take a camera would take a couple of minutes here and explain. Why why there's no podcast on water management out there? But this is in my estimation one of the hottest places in oil and gas markets these days. There's a lot of money in there. It's a big problem. Need Solutions Right. Yeah it really feels like. This is a part of the business to where we re raced forward with drilling and completion technology. And now we need to decide. What is that next? Step going to be going to advance forward again or is this a place where we have to take a pause and some of the momentum falls out so this is a really important topic absolutely and evident Matijas. They are the water experts over Wood Mackenzie and so they got well Cameron. I can talk in generalities. They can talk in in specifics. So let's get evident. Empathy is on here Evan. Good to see again now. Yeah thanks for having us. Jim's is a great opportunity. And you know we're we're also super excited about the space and I wholeheartedly agree with you guys that it's moving in a million miles an hour and you know it's important to get it right definitely so so. What do you do officially over there? Which are what your title. So I'm a part of our management consulting group and so we do. The spoke engagements shorter stint projects. And most of the work. I've been doing over the last eighteen to twenty four months. Have been in the produced water space and with a particular focus with working with a bunch of our financial partners on any kind of acquisitions that they're looking at and you know certainly telling a story from the macro view why we think this is an attractive space and who who are the players that are really moving the needle in the water space awesome. So Matias what is it you do over? There wouldn't Mackenzie. Hi Jim. Yeah I'M A director in the auction consulting team and I have been leading the water practiced at With my CABELA's couple years we really started working for the different operators and then has mentioned we worked a lot for financial st- private equity and infrastructure funds helping them acquire water Mitchum companies. You so you guys are a team then you and as we all right all right. Yeah we are. We are known as Aquaman number one and number two off. That's awesome and so yeah in the intro where it was just talking about how important it is here. You know how. Why do a podcast on Shell water-management? Maybe you guys can can throw some numbers some numbers about produce water and stuff around. Yes I think from a macro perspective when we started to identify water as a growth market. A lot of it started with getting familiar with the premise. That for every barrel of oil that comes out of the ground you get two three five sometimes ten times as much water coming out of the wellhead so when I talk to people they. They're kind of surprised when I tell them you know we're we're really in the in the water business you know oil. Oil is aside hydrocarbon. That comes out. I mean what are you? What are you going to do with all this water? Because it's it's not a commodity it's very much a waste product that you have to deal with right. Mit as we're does that water come from for people. Why why is there such a big? This called the water cuts right the ratio of oil to water. That comes out I mean. Is that from water that we pump down to fractured Iraq's or is that already down in the formation. So it's both so I you're GonNa get a big on what we industry call slow back. Some of the amount of water was punching cracking than is gonNA come back but then you also have a lot of water. Homefront we call formation water also coming back and the big difference between Shell and conventional is in conventional oil and gas usually dug water. That is coming back is usually we pumped back in the same formation to keep the reservoir pressure buzz you in a shell unfortunately because of his because their formation is so tight it is not possible to pump that water back way came and that's why we have such a big water problem. Yeah and it is a. It is a huge problem. Now you guys you know like you were talking about you. Guys do a lot of consulting you know for for people. You know sovereign wealth funds. Everybody right trying to come into the space and so You guys put together a really good report that I've seen and one of the charts in there is very interesting. It's kind of a decision tree or a tree for the different paths of produced water. Can you run us through that real quick? So she got produce water coming out. What are the first two things you gotta do with a one? You could use to things that you can do. The first one is disposing. It and gather option is recycling so if we go the disposing route the first and most common one is to be injected in at WTI saltwater disposal. Well that is the most common. That's what has been done for a long time. Those are the usually critical. Well that checking water in different formations another option to inject the water is to use that. Whatever for whatever in cortex meaning moving water transporting not wanted to conventional basins like the central basin touch long and using that Produced water from Michelle to use it to reinject into the ground for for maintaining the water pressure. Maintaining the reservoir pressure boss that is still under development but a lot of people are starting to think about other opportunities that we have for disposing of the water. Evaporation so unfortunately ponds and empowerment like Ben. Basically building a little lake in waiting for the water to vibrate has not been economic. It works and it's been used across the forty eight in other states but be peration rate is quite slow and therefore it costs a lot of money to build those on's and definitely not economic the other options. Is that what we call an operation and basically here? We're talking about boiling the water in. That could be just a little bit on the top and then using the rest of the water to injecting enlisted weeds. It could be also evaporating. How about half the water to get it to a slurry? Get something they very concentrated or even evaporating all the water and being left wherever solid residue. There's also a different disposal option available or being under development under recycling side. We have what we call views which is aching produce water for fracking operations and that is currently done. Two different ways. One is to just mix the produced water with freshwater to have a nice calm consistent quality of water for fracking operations and That is a very common. But you don't get rid of all that water and you still have to use freshwater. Being adopted very fast lately is also like be thinking that water to a Brian Quality. We shouldn't forget that produced water is when we talk about what it's a very salty water that comes up with salt a which has a lot of the solids lot of iron these a lot of particles in it and it needs to be cleaned. And so it's being cleaned all the way back to Brian. Quality so a very salty water only one company in the forty eight has been recycling water and removing all the salt and India. Build a plant in West Virginia. But that option seems to be very uneconomic even shut in plant a few weeks ago to be wait and we cannot accept that. Yeah because that diesel stuff right. I mean that's like diesel like taking ocean water making drinking water right. That's that's really expensive process. Yeah it is benefiting here. We shouldn't forget that we're not talking about salt. Not Talking about seawater. Were talking a water that is like sometimes four to six times more salty. See what some of the technologies don't work and it created a lot of different operational issues and shout out to the team at Viola. I'd really nice conversation with them earlier this week at the shale water expo which. Jim saw you there long shaking hands and our friends of Yulia told us that they're looking to get to around the the two fifty two to three dollars a barrel. They think that if producer or to pay that that's something that they could build out on a on a larger scale potentially in the Permian data. That's crazy because there's so much more expensive than than recycling or any other US right. I mean they're talking. Like sub fifty cents a barrel for recycling and when someone says. Oh No. It's three dollars to to make it in a good water. That's that's still but you know everybody wants to be seen as green these days right. So maybe they'll be people take it up. Yeah and then. Also what what? There's some other weird uses right. You got for recycling so you can do all that stuff you can make it same but in your charge you have other uses right like agricultural stuff but that is what everyone is dreaming about it especially I mean basin. We're very dry area so everyone wishes they could actually use some recycling technology so that they could be used that water either jumping into a river. The river for example or use it for agriculture is a London calling a lot of almonds for example in south eastern Mexico while using even for potable water water systems for example the city of Midland's getting water up to one hundred miles radius and so it could be for example and that's something that everyone is striving to but unfortunately hasn't been economic. Yeah that's always the problem when you get it clean enough for those types of uses. You're pretty far down the road in the expense and that's one of the things on this podcast ruining explore all those areas in more detail. Not only in in the trends. And what's going on which you guys are experts at? But we'll talk to the technology experts as well and that'll be the second segment of each podcast. So we'll start. We'll talk about you. Know THE TRENDS. And what's going on in the deals that are happening because he's guys with. Mckinsey they know all the deals and then in the second half will talk to technology leaders so yeah let's get to the meat man. What are what are the big trends? What are the big trends? You guys would. Mackenzie see in. Not Not only just on the produce waterside but also on the just just water in general. Yeah so I think one of the reasons that we're really really excited about the space that right. Now we've seen all this great technology and all these great minds come into the industry of a bunch of venture capital funded water midstream players coming in a bunch of you. Know very very small. Water technologies with some cool patents under their belt and from from consolidation perspective. At just like we've seen in the gas gathering and we're seeing right now in the EMP. Space that the need for scale is something that that operators really want. And they're and they're they're willing to value it and so we're seeing a huge offloading of water assets from the MP's themselves so whether that salt water disposal wells or empowerment or water gathering lines and also seeing some of the water midstream. Companies merged that they can build their scale for their pipelines and disposal. And we're also seeing seeing some some acquisitions between technology companies take an x Ri Blue in Fountain Quail for example. Well here's a question then in that in that space so you're seeing the EMP companies themselves..

Mackenzie Evan Tika Jim Cameron Wallace Matijas Blue Nagin EMP Brian Quality editor management consulting group Wood Mackenzie Iraq Matijas West Virginia CABELA Michelle Matias US India director
"shale" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"shale" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Me the shale fast I have he's confusing I'd be a little bit shocked at that because I saying that women and men are equal anger tends to go regulation city bank because we don't have enough gratuitous anger in America Citi bank shame on city bank you fools you truly foolish human being hurting chill the Dennis Prager show live from the relief factor pain free studio due to the demand from this network of trump supporters noble gold has just released a second edition trump coined the new president trump commander in chief calling just in time for the twenty twenty reelection campaign trail celebrate Donald trumps historic presidency with a new edition of the point that you helped make famous the front of this new silver one ounce coin features the handsome boss the president trump with his hand over his heart with the American flag flying behind him the reverse side of the coin features president trump promised to the American people we will make America strong again we will make America proud again we will make.

"shale" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"shale" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"When he was facing life in shale for fighting against communism in the Soviet invasion. His mother escaped at the same time. They fled to the UK. He learned from an early age to fight the war against fascist communist, and Nazis became a world expert in fighting terrorists wrote the book why we fight joined the Trump team the White House staff in twenty seventeen and twenty nine thousand nine he takes this battle to a national radio platform. This is America first with Sebastian Gorka. Welcome to the new age. Greetings, friends. The last hour of the show wet did the loss to go like a. I'm Sebastian Gorka, foam strategist of the president hosted.

Sebastian Gorka Trump White House president UK America
"shale" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

03:43 min | 2 years ago

"shale" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Thanks. So when I think about the US shale, I mean, the whole market over the last few years to this lay person myself kind of looking at the energy space. It's really just totally changed with the advent of US shale production. So does the sense that this growing commitment in the US to this development of the shale oil output does that suggest oils lower for longer? That this far far more supplies. And would it be? In the two thousand we would never advocate advocates in any way. We we said look you can cross cold at one hundred and fifty dollars a barrel. Ultimately, everything is oil. But this news unlocking technology is is that pretty staggering. And you've got to keep in mind, the recovery rates in the Permian at the moment around. Well oil in place. Supply-side looks abundant to say the least. Is is based on the fact that we think demand continues to. Know what we call the Tessler effect. Arithmetic is that is wildly overstated by the market. But that's where I wanted to go. Where is the dynamic right now the dynamic right now for demand is it is it airplanes flying around in the sky. Is it just trucks and cars, where's that at the margin? Where is that demand dynamic? Well, it's. Beedle jet fuel essentially one hundred million people a year, according to Boeing take a plane for the first time every year. So that continues to grow. Well. The time we got left. All of our listeners wanna know this from pulse. Saiki the time. We've got left somebody's. Oh, so precious if they got money, they're driving a tesla. What are they driving? If they don't have money. Maybe Uber whatever. But then they're taking their plan to London or their plane to Washington to their plane dole hair. What how does it pro like you respond to a guy saving be green and electric car when the jetting around the world? Simple. Simple arithmetic. I mean, the fact is. With a sixteen year. Car car maker causing being cold. There's almost no effects from electric vehicles for the next fifteen years. It's really marginal. As you say very much. Everyone else is basically Bill buying gasoline for somewhat more efficient cars, less efficient trucks. But far more from it. Every time I get on the shuttle to wash your gas guzzler am I burning up tons of oil in a car or. I mean, there's no real potential for an electric plane testing number. And the main thing is is trucks and an economic activity rolled diesel fired. Okay. As long as that keeps coming. The other thing is she'll wake population is still estimated to go up. The Chinese okay? We got to leave it there. Pulse. Thank you. Brazil encyclopedia club. We'll do this again soon. Paul Sankey on oil futures. I'm going to say, it's flat. Pulse. Rudy at top speed. Stay with us. This is Bloomberg. This is what percentage of global GDP is the United States half two-thirds. Guess again America is just twenty four percent, which means that seventy six percent of global GDP comes from outside of the United States Oppenheimer funds believes opportunity..

US Permian Boeing tesla Paul Sankey Bloomberg Rudy Oppenheimer Brazil America Washington Bill London seventy six percent twenty four percent fifteen years fifty dollars
"shale" Discussed on The Interchange

The Interchange

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"shale" Discussed on The Interchange

"Wait. So you guys are literally recording down the hall from each other today. Yes. Even if you could figure out the technology to allow us to record in the same room. It wouldn't be an issue. So tell me able what is the most annoying thing that shale dozen the office, you know, it's hard to describe the most annoying, but I I'd like to refer to shale as the yeti one one mission because he's he's always absent he's always travelling in New York office to seize LP's, maybe some companies, and I have the the dubious distinction of actually overlooking the front door. So I am the office creator. I get to see shale come and go whenever he wants. Which is you know, maybe once every couple of weeks, I see his yeti issue face in the office. I like to keep things mysterious, you know. Rely on me. Do you guys have a bell that you ring that when you close a deal to intimidate the other person while the problem with that is that we'd be ringing it like every month? Ooh, wee Papa bubbly water. Like any good VC? Would we pop up in a LaCroix? What we actually do we go to the ring, which is of course, in the portfolio company, and we ring the bell just to make sure that it pops up on shale and kassy's phone. I keep forgetting that the ring is video doorbell and once in a while just starts talking to me through the doorbell. And it freaks me out that has happened. Well, coming up we ring two very different kind of early stage investors, they put their differences aside and tell us why cleantech venture capital.

kassy LaCroix New York
"shale" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"shale" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"Excuse me. Tom shale. What you do what? What sorry Jamal? Got a guy in here. Okay. Got it. Thank you. Say would say. Tried to tell them you tanks dead. He doesn't he's not he refuses to believe it. So. At the end of black. He is alive. Stacey you did a story on them. A couple of years back. The black Hebrew is Colt. That's what they are. They believe in Mary's three four different women at a time a whole bunch of women. They call them. Somebody a pedophile black Hebrew is why girls thirteen fourteen to fifty and claimed that its own. Because it was done in the days of. Is like if you people don't know convey are they make no Ku Klux Klan, why the human rights pay. You were rather deal with somebody from the nation of Hughes law deal with somebody from the black. He is that. That. Well to be fair. I don't know that that groups ever had. I don't know what are their political rivals killed. So there's that. Let me let me just say let me just say this. Because now I. Those boys that were doing the school chant to drown out. The black. Hebrew, Israelites were loving every minute of it. And I don't blame them. That's that's why they're smiling they're smiling because these jackasses has been Yellen all this horrible crap.

Jamal Ku Klux Klan Tom shale Stacey Hughes Mary