35 Burst results for "Shakespeare"

"shakespeare" Discussed on Not Another Shakespeare Podcast!

Not Another Shakespeare Podcast!

02:19 min | Last week

"shakespeare" Discussed on Not Another Shakespeare Podcast!

"What's better <Speech_Male> but it's <Speech_Male> their partnership <Speech_Male> and is more of <Speech_Male> an equal <Speech_Male> both horrible <Speech_Male> than <Speech_Male> being more. The <Speech_Male> bathrooms fine until <Speech_Male> lady. Macbeth corrupted <Speech_Male> him <SpeakerChange> and <Speech_Male> sent him on this path. <Speech_Male> Yeah <Speech_Male> so. <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> I <Speech_Male> didn't mean <Speech_Male> i'd say <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> you know it depends <Speech_Male> on that and <Speech_Male> how everyone interpreted. <Speech_Male> I didn't <SpeakerChange> know how you <Speech_Male> interpret it. But <Speech_Female> yeah i think <Speech_Female> i <Speech_Female> i think i agree with you <Speech_Female> that the the staging <Speech_Female> can have a <Speech_Female> lot to do with it <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> and we have this <Speech_Female> crossover each <Silence> other. Don't they wear <Speech_Female> macbeth. <Speech_Female> Starts out is the one who sort <Speech_Female> of questioning it. And and <Speech_Male> has a bit more conscience <Speech_Female> about it <Speech_Female> and by the end. He's <Speech_Female> really unapologetic. <Speech_Female> Religious would <Speech_Female> have gone <Speech_Female> for it slaughtering <Speech_Female> <Silence> on a whim <Speech_Female> whereas lady <Speech_Female> macbeth starts out very commencement. <Speech_Female> Murdering is what they <Speech_Female> need to do. And then by the <Speech_Female> end she really like <Speech_Female> can handle <Speech_Female> just the one murder <Silence> that she did. <Silence> <Speech_Female> And i <Speech_Female> don't know that <Silence> her <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> of <Speech_Female> developing <Speech_Female> conscience in the later <Speech_Female> half of the play is <Speech_Female> is necessarily <Speech_Female> redemptive. <Speech_Female> I think it could <Speech_Female> also speak <Speech_Female> to the sense of women <Speech_Female> as being sort of weak <Speech_Female> minded or weak willed <Speech_Female> that she's <Speech_Female> not strong enough <Speech_Female> to handle having <Speech_Female> murdered somebody <Speech_Female> whereas with macbeth <Speech_Female> like that <Speech_Female> bloodlust just <Speech_Female> makes him stronger <Silence> as the play goes on. <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> I <Speech_Female> don't know it's <Speech_Male> it's a tough one because <Speech_Male> of call <Speech_Male> six point five. <Speech_Male> Yeah i think six point <Speech_Male> five seven. <SpeakerChange> I'm <Speech_Male> comfortable six <Silence> point. Five and the tradition <Speech_Male> of being <Speech_Male> slightly more generous. <Speech_Music_Male> Well <Silence> that's macbeth. <Speech_Male> <Silence> I enjoyed this on. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Sorry <SpeakerChange> we certainly <Speech_Male> did. we did. <Silence> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Yeah <Speech_Male> i wish we knew <Speech_Male> what happened <SpeakerChange> to flounce. <Speech_Male> Yeah <Speech_Female> maybe <Speech_Female> that's the sort of fan <Speech_Female> fiction for somebody <Speech_Male> to write the flounce <Speech_Male> story <Speech_Male> flame <Speech_Male> saga. <Speech_Male> Yeah the flames <Speech_Male> saga macbeth <Speech_Male> to <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> the flames on saga. <Silence> Someone needs to write <Speech_Male> it. <Speech_Male> Someone needs to go on right <Silence> now. <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> You've <Speech_Female> been listening to not <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> another shakespeare <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> podcast and <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> this is our prerecorded. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> If <Speech_Female> you like this episode <Speech_Music_Female> please review. 'em <Speech_Music_Female> subscribe <Speech_Female> if you hated this episode <Speech_Music_Female> mate share it <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> with a nemesis. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> You can follow us <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> on social media <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> at an age. Shacks <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> podcast or <Speech_Music_Female> check out our website <Speech_Music_Female> and eight. Shakespeare <Speech_Music_Female> podcast dot com. <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> Thanks for <Speech_Female> listening and see the <Speech_Male> next time.

Shakespeare Five six point both macbeth six five Macbeth seven eight
"shakespeare" Discussed on Not Another Shakespeare Podcast!

Not Another Shakespeare Podcast!

05:12 min | Last week

"shakespeare" Discussed on Not Another Shakespeare Podcast!

"Interesting. I didn't i didn't think it was coming. I thought it was going to be the oh. He's the son of jupiter's we did. We did appears medef's you're hoping for something more supernatural. I was actually. I was like you know if he was son of one of these witches. That'd be pretty cool. That would be a cooler ending. But now it's just that he was from his mother's womb. Untimely ripped the line so born born by caesarean. Still board yes. Yes and as a modern feminist. I feel i have to emphasize the women who give birth by c. section very much still have given birth women. They're still go through equal trauma in birthing. It's not a short. It's not easier and it doesn't mean that you weren't born board by a woman you fool. Yes by the c-section yeah. That's that's the gotcha. At the end of the play is that macbeth was from his mother's womb. Untimely ripped therefore does sorry mcduff was from mother's womb ripped therefore he is not of woman born. According to the logic of this play so macbeth is doomed. Because are all three of the prophecy. Things have come true right. Well bishop fat but but the other two country. It's a little bit of a cheat but we'll give it to them for now just to get to the end of the play. So macbeth is slain and macduff exits with his body and then we get the final last triumphant seeing worth take stock of the battlefield. They bring in macbeth's head in a bag or on a pipe could offer an armored head. Maybe be a an armored head like. Yeah russian armed head. Sorry in arm. Ted callback sleet. You had a helmet on. You wouldn't have to worry about it looking like a real head so much sucked which can be a problem in in some predictions and malcolm is hailed as the king of scotland and all appears to be well except and nobody ever talks about this or like people probably do talk about it but something that i didn't think about until quite recently flounces still out there and is still at some point going to be king or have a child who is king. So it's completely unclear. I guess unless you're an a scottish historian what comes next. How does malcolm does malcolm does not have any errors and so flounce or or flounces son becomes destroyers become king of some point. Well we we have this prophecy of rank close. Children being kings is still alive so it doesn't actually doesn't titled resentenced. No it doesn't not at all. Ooh rocking the tyrant is dead to mcgrath has been killed but it's not one hundred clear. What happens to fly on what happens to fly on of sought doodoo alad donald and we don't know presumably comes back at some point because his brother is the king. Now type those loosens shakespeare. Yeah come on. Shakespeare gives us a could've could've just had some so ham-fisted thing at the end about like..

Shakespeare macduff mcgrath three mcduff one scotland shakespeare two country one hundred scottish russian Ted alad donald macbeth malcolm
"shakespeare" Discussed on Not Another Shakespeare Podcast!

Not Another Shakespeare Podcast!

05:49 min | Last week

"shakespeare" Discussed on Not Another Shakespeare Podcast!

"Just say okay. So he's had these three apparitions. He's feeling good right. We're three for one deal again. We have one. That's a little bit concerning macduff. But nothing we didn't know before and to that seemed to really be in his favor then they have one more apparition for him and he they show this to him because he asks and he insists that the witches give this information shall banquo's issue banquo's descendants ever rain in this kingdom and they don't wanna tell him but eventually they do and we get a show of eight. Kings belongs with a glass a mirror in his hand and banquo. Good you know. Double dose of the banquo's ghost. We've done all the makeup we might as well make use of it so we have this parade of kings. And what's what's interesting about. This parade of kings is that it's usually interpreted sort of legitimizing james the first's while he's the six in scotland so legitimising king james of banquo. Because if you're going to kill king on stage which we do in this play spoiler alert macbeth dies. You better do it in service of propping up the mythology of the reigning monarch so macbeth is naturally quite upset by this and is is a little bit put off by the knowledge that he can't escape the prophecy that they gave them in the very first place the witches disappear they have you know some music the dance vanish and foreign games. Love isn't it for is which witches spin out. Give a few prophecies some and if you're person's bang job done gone days work you know. They don't make up the prophecies they just deliver them. Don't shoot the messenger. What make breath takes from. This is that he needs to murder. Mcauliffe's family mo-modern more. How'd you solve a problem. Credit mudder more so by the end of the scene. He's decided he needs to surprise the castle of macduff seize upon fife give to the edge of the sword. His wife has babes an unfortunate souls that trace him in his line. Just going to cut off the family just murder the children we're going full evil villain now..

scotland james Mcauliffe three six eight one three apparitions macbeth one more apparition fife james of banquo first place first Double dose one deal
"shakespeare" Discussed on Not Another Shakespeare Podcast!

Not Another Shakespeare Podcast!

04:15 min | Last week

"shakespeare" Discussed on Not Another Shakespeare Podcast!

"I guess i think in this case mcmath is more terrified but also annoyed. He might be verified and annoyed. That would be an interesting reading of it. Yeah that's my seat. what are you doing. you've come back just to steal my see how are you. I think he's more worried about the fact that banquo who is supposed to be dead is at the table and is covered in blood. I mean that would be quite disturbing but other that he might like see. Yeah that's i mean. I'm sure i mean they came in and you see probably get fucking killed. Yeah but magadov is not dead yet. But that's what i mean if he's alive and he sat in macbeth's favorite seat he would get killed immediately. So i'm just saying there must be something going on. You know bets brain some level. He's thinking shit broncos come back to haunt me and these in my favorite seat. There's nothing in the text to support. That reading doesn't mean that's not what sharks thinking that's true that is very true. I can't favorite see. I'm sure he did question as a question listeners. Is there any evidence that shakespeare had a favorite seat in his house or or any of the playhouses that he worked. Oh can't can't take shakespeare seat so my starts freaking the fuck out right because banquo dead is at his table sitting in his seat and all the things are like okay. Maybe we should leave. Maybe this dinner is maybe. this party's over. This is the point in the night where the host is is just too drunk to actually carry on having a party right. Macbeth needs to go to bed. And sleep it off lena. Macbeth tries to talk them into staying the ghost sticks around no one else. Let's see as brazil dude. He's dead instead. He's dead and flames escaped. So it's not like he's gotta worry about his child in the afterlife.

Macbeth mcmath lena magadov shakespeare brazil macbeth
"shakespeare" Discussed on Not Another Shakespeare Podcast!

Not Another Shakespeare Podcast!

02:38 min | Last month

"shakespeare" Discussed on Not Another Shakespeare Podcast!

"Novato milford haven that we got the rights to use the tesco logo and it. I mean it's also an. I think it's a play. That really has a lot of Salience to borrow term from two fabulous scholars brindaban anonymity today. Who who talk about the difference between salience and relevance in shakespeare right like if we say shakespeare relevant. That's that's kind of giving him a lot of power and allow sort of foresight. But if we're talking about salience that's something that's that we find the resonances where we find the parts of it. That are speaking to us. In the present that are connecting to things that are happening now without giving shakespeare the the credit. For making that link. And i i think. It's a really salient play in a lot of ways. It's really salient play for brexit britain. It's a really salient play for women's rights and autonomy. It's a really end domestic violence. It's a really salient play for thinking about what britishness means. It's a a really interesting play from an echo critical angle because so much of it happens outdoors in his kind of invested in the outdoor environment. There's lots and lots of different angles that you can approach this from and it as complicated as it is. It leaves you space to read it in many different ways. So i like that. I'm teaching this play right now and my students and i were looking at a act. Three scene one. Which is the play of the scene. In which clinton in the queen primarily but also sort of cymbeline are basically being like fuck you roam we're not paying your tribute A lot of the rhetoric. My students noticed was very very very similar to a lot of the referendum rhetoric things about britain's a world by itself and we will nothing pay for wearing our own noses cymbeline commission a bus. You know i think. The advantage of being cymbeline and being a king in roman britain is. You didn't need people to agree with you. You could just declare a war. And it's done you don't you don't you. Don't and that's not controversial because an actual court actually ruled that it did not look it up. So that's simply cymbeline. Do you love it. Is that your favorite shakespeare play. Have you ever heard it before today. Are you going to go and read it now. Because you're so excited you want to know about. He'll wanna know more who you've been listening to not another shakespeare podcast and this is our prerecorded out tro. If you liked this episode please review. 'em subscribe if you hated this episode may share it with an emphasis you can follow us on social media and ain't shacks podcast or check out our website and eight shakespeare podcast dot com. Thanks for listening and see the next time.

tesco today two fabulous scholars Novato milford clinton Three scene one cymbeline roman shakespeare eight shakespeare britain
"shakespeare" Discussed on Not Another Shakespeare Podcast!

Not Another Shakespeare Podcast!

05:48 min | Last month

"shakespeare" Discussed on Not Another Shakespeare Podcast!

"Yeah yeah interesting. When we talk about this come to the end of it grew is like trying to like who the bad guys who the good guys. And then there's like this woman. Yes and i i feel that is in this one because the queen is so evil and she's really memorable but she's hardly in it she really. She really has like three scenes and the all over again. The hermit yeah crucial role. Not really thought people just die off stage. It's just yeah. It's a sort of lady macbeth. Death as cold yeah. We haven't you haven't heard that episode yet but we we talk about that too that she just sort of died off stage and it gets like reported to the king who maybe isn't as upset about it as you'd thought so as important as posthumous having a whole scene just talking to himself about how women's soccer yeah i mean and that's why this is night. Yeah i mean i i would even potentially put it up at nine. I said i really like him agenda. I think there's there's potential in performance for her to come across more empowered than she is kind of in the text. And i i do give a little bit of credit to the brothers for being i think truly the only characters in shakespeare who explicitly recognize someone they have seen before but is now in front of them in a slightly different context spot. You know i'll give them. That and lucius seems okay cases. Okay but everybody else. Yeah yeah you kept calling her fidelity to she's fidelity fidelity who's the guy felicia solarte's is that on his love-tokens you relatio- felicia us is poor. May no i..

three scenes lucius felicia felicia solarte shakespeare macbeth nine
"shakespeare" Discussed on Not Another Shakespeare Podcast!

Not Another Shakespeare Podcast!

05:55 min | Last month

"shakespeare" Discussed on Not Another Shakespeare Podcast!

"When he's in the in the three round that's true. I guess he promises a classic chair carp nine. that's true. Glad done i guess at a certain altitude in eagle able to breathe anymore. Yeah yes to switch. Yeah that's to put that eagle. Let's run free when he gets up to high. I guess yeah yeah and does he have to get eagles. He's just summary clicks his fingers jupiter. I think he can do what he wants. Yeah does he have an apple tablet battles. I'm in the prophecy app. Better call an eagle wine. Ghosts better get neagle. Oh okay so we have made it to the final climactic. Big revelation scene old. Shakespeare has five hundred lines to wrap everything up. Do we think he can do it. Yes do we can do it well questionable questionable but we have some fun on the way so all right. Let's go so the steen starts with cymbeline night. His two sons who he still doesn't know are his two sons for their bravery in the battle. Then we find out that the queen is dead randomly. She's like this. Character is like filled up by the evil queen with a with a poison and everything and she died behind the scene. We haven't heard from her She three and a half she got she was just the poisoning five. Let's you know it's all women are good for really getting poisoned in place and so yes yes so simply sad about this for a second but then the doctor tells him that she never loved him. She found him a bore and actually and she was only after his throne and she was also plotting to kill imaging and she was planning to poison him as well. So that clinton could be king. Dr how to listen. Keep this to myself..

five five hundred lines two sons Shakespeare clinton three round three and a half nine apple second
"shakespeare" Discussed on Not Another Shakespeare Podcast!

Not Another Shakespeare Podcast!

03:56 min | Last month

"shakespeare" Discussed on Not Another Shakespeare Podcast!

"It makes sense okay. So talk of act five. Yeah komo super guilty about slandering imaging and kind of indirectly leading to her. He thinks getting killed cymbeline gets captured in the battle and is rescued by his long lost sons who he does not recognize and posthumous helps in siblings rescue as also but also nobody recognizes him. How come they don't. He's not wearing his clothes anymore. he's different different clothes. You've got some clients offer giacomo. He's wearing a hat okay. So simply gets rescued by a combination of his sons and posthumous of whom he recognizes. Then in the next scene posthumous changes back to the roman side for reasons. I don't really know he's. I guess he's hoping to get killed. So he sort of bouncing between whichever side he thinks is losing the war. Yes ways to kill yourself yes. There are but we've established. The posthumous is the worst. So it sort of works. Because he gets captured by the brits Like a second later. And he's thrown into jail and he resigns himself to death but then just wait it gets weirder. His family appears as ghosts. Shakespeare was missing some this point here. Throwing everything that's played ghosts. Were really missing in this. Play as ghosts botch it. I did promise you supernatural elements. Yeah like a good supernatural good. We like a ghost. His dead father has dead mother and his dead brothers all up here and they surround him in his sleep and they beg jupiter to help him not harm jupiter. Yeah i'm are you ready for it to get even weirder. Yes shakespeare super fans will know what happens next. Jupiter descends in thunder and lightning sitting upon an eagle coup. Yeah why not. Why not point. So jupiter arrives..

Shakespeare giacomo Jupiter jupiter shakespeare act five cymbeline second later
"shakespeare" Discussed on Not Another Shakespeare Podcast!

Not Another Shakespeare Podcast!

05:58 min | Last month

"shakespeare" Discussed on Not Another Shakespeare Podcast!

"I'm i'm splitting apart. And then she running away to milford haven meet her husband. Who's supposed to not be in britain. Okay so she says. I just kill me now. I'm that faithful to posthumous that. I will let you kill me and desires like will we don't or just hear me out here. I have a different idea. Where don't kill you. And he says all right. Look i will tell posthumous that you are dead. I will tell him that. I killed you because apparently he just believes anything. Anyone says when it comes to you. And mr gullible mr gullible and imaging you instead are going to carry on to wales. You're gonna go to milford haven gonna disguise yourself as a boy we we've this is the fourth one we've done right. I'm just trying to get my head around the fact that we've got a woman disguising herself as a boy and every other shakespeare play that we've discussed so far in this series has had that same advice. Mary wives and as you like it as you like. It didn't didn't thought that was someone who was getting married yes..

wales milford Mary fourth one shakespeare
Bryan Doerries' 'Theater of War' Activates an Old Alchemy for Our Young Century

On Being with Krista Tippett

01:21 min | Last month

Bryan Doerries' 'Theater of War' Activates an Old Alchemy for Our Young Century

"Remember brian. Dory's likes to say in both physical and virtual gatherings you are not alone in this room and you are not alone across time. He is activating an old alchemy. For our young century ancient stories and texts that have stood. The test of time can be portals to honest and dignified grappling with president wounds and longings and callings that we aren't able to muster in our official places now performance of his public health project theater of war have been some of the most generative and repeatedly surprisingly joyful experiences of my pandemic year. This adventure began in two thousand eight at first bringing. Greek tragedies into many modern amphitheatres were trauma is present military bases and hospitals prisons even guantanamo bay. It expanded out from their offering sophocles and shakespeare and the book of job as crucibles for details and moving forward with the particular dramas of our time from caregiving and addiction and partner violence to the hidden wounds of war and open political fracture. Great actors have joined this company from bill. Murray to moses. Ingram from francis mcdormand to jeffrey

Dory Brian Guantanamo Bay Shakespeare Murray Francis Mcdormand Ingram Moses Jeffrey
Pepsi Mango - Alison

PepsiCo ads

00:55 sec | Last month

Pepsi Mango - Alison

"Introducing Pepsi mango mango the perfect match of classic Pepsi flavor and a splash of mango also introducing me Allison Allison. I'm look up my perfect match and it could be you you see just like Pepsi mango is the perfect match of Pepsi and mango Alison is the perfect match of brains and bicycles. I own my own cycling studio and I studied Shakespeare poem. It proved. It's it's Allison. What's in a name that what you call a rose by any other name would still smell as sweet speaking of which Allison has an extremely acute sense of smell a challenge. Number two. I smell mangoes Pepsi and someone in here eating Wasabi able to use Josh knew it think Allison just might be perfect match call this number or click the link below to shoot your shot. You could go on a real virtual day. They know this is real, right?

Pepsi Allison Allison Pepsi Mango Mango Alison Allison Josh
Trained Actress Becomes Jeopardy Champion

Why I'll Never Make It - An Actor's Journey

01:50 min | Last month

Trained Actress Becomes Jeopardy Champion

"I didn't have like a clear past exactly after graduation. I would say it wasn't like. I definitely have to move. La and do film. Or you know. I i like shakespeare alive and i like doing theater. And you know yeah. It was just a bit muddy. I think and i think. Probably a lot of actors who go through programs like that. There's often kind of a weakness in preparation for the actual world out there. I think you kinda get this training of like in this bubble this world where you're getting cast and stuff every quarter and and you're involved with all all the time with productions and stuff but it's only at the tail end that they start talking about the business and like very practical things. I think there at the time in my program. At least there wasn't really a clear map of like guidance post graduation. I felt like once college. What was that first reality moment for you. I was lucky somewhat in that. Like right after graduation was when i got cast in this movie this really low budget independent feature film that a friend of mine was making Had studied film in college and he was someone that i went to high school with. And he and his buddies were Putting this production together. And he asked me out to audition. I ended up getting that role in so pretty soon after i. I had that experience where we took a few weeks out and made a movie so that was really great to do that. And have that be like my first big post graduation experience Doing like a really juicy roll like that.

Shakespeare LA
"shakespeare" Discussed on Not Another Shakespeare Podcast!

Not Another Shakespeare Podcast!

02:05 min | Last month

"shakespeare" Discussed on Not Another Shakespeare Podcast!

"It seems to me that you know. The guess redeeming character in the play has no religion over her own marriage And they're stuck with some old boss. Did who treats horribly. Can't get it up. Yeah that's i'm guessing. Probably that would just make sense. Yeah yeah so. We're averaging out at nine. Which is pretty up there i did. I did say in the very first episode. That i think i might eventually have to like take the misogyny up to eleven or twelve because ten feels like not enough for some of them but this is a solid ninety nine and a half for me nine average between our scores. Actually one of the kind of crossover thing is like is is the mad house where the real mad people are actually in the castle. Look like that. Yeah i mean there are actually genuinely more and stayed in the castle. Yes because no one actually go physically her or in a coerced house. You've lost basie. Who sorry as far as we see in the play as far as we see. We don't know what the treatment conditions are in this house. We don't know if it's one of these i don't. I don't think it's a great environment. But the the implication is that like well these this is why i say this kind of a class commentary in the play as well right that these noble people in the castle are not actually any more sane than the people who are locked. Up in the madhouse. You've been listening to not another shakespeare podcast. And this is prerecorded out tro. If you like this episode please review. 'em subscribe if you hated this episode may share it. With an emphasis you can follow us on social media at an a shacks podcast or check out our website and eight. Shakespeare podcast dot com. Thanks for listening and see the next time unfair the..

ten nine ninety nine and a half first episode twelve shakespeare one up to eleven Shakespeare shacks
Interview with Tuvia Tenenbom

Jonny Gould's Jewish State

08:51 min | Last month

Interview with Tuvia Tenenbom

"He's my absolute pleasure to welcome back to johnny gould's jewish state to via tenenbaum. Absolute pleasure to be with you again. You know you are a true free speech. Doyenne and for this particular podcast. I think it's the first thing verson ground rules as you can smoke. That's the first thing eight you're wanting to billion and the second thing is you truly opened my eyes to my own. I think tolerance of jew hate when we first met two years ago thinking because before that time you know. I've been conditioned i think in growing up in the uk in school where they're only three jewish kids to tolerate the what they call politely banter works erm you would call anti semitism and it did overstretched itself from time to time and i think that is a sort of shall we say looking for a better word but would have jimmy cued. I think from a lot of british people. And i think that's what you sean likes this book. Which is finally out in english. That's why it's called the tame taming of the ju. it's not just a take on shakespeare. It's the taming of the jewel. I mean giuseppe. Funding indicated biden. Own amazing to me edo deny or tolerate and sometimes joined together. Fox's would there accuse us we'd the hate us. That was shocking. I mean the fell. Shocking was citizen. This admit is imminent burden. I didn't expect it. I went to britain. Because i'm a tinto naomi's love english data. I said okay. My published opportunity mean sister. Go anywhere you want whatever you would like to go is i like to go to britain. I like to go. i like to see did out. I mean zane ought to do it better than anybody else. That's what i remember. And then the was black seed said. Okay i'll see you two belting stone which one stone i didn't expect anti-semitism and i didn't expect such a contaminating such a contagious. Such deepen. they semitism so deeply rooted. You know it on an island katelyn or in england which is the most important of course a bit of the uk but it was a frightening to sit and what is more fighting. Wants to see the basically. I'll kind of collaborating. Sometimes they had to fight jewish lead. Doesn't seem like law. Your people told me this and that your people told me i interviewed. People not told me are available. The life is a horrible thing so this is the common people and it took time. Tim's admitted but one that gate open has had them open and started talking. Honestly say to me you know. How many times have been told delta jew oh you know let us all kinds of dips and it's like amazing much so and little kits in manchester of hasidic. The auto talks kits in manchester and london will have had acts pelted them only storm so whatever it is i mean is a big addictiveness and we talked to jewish leaders saying even when the time used to say anything against wirelessly well owning two positions if to say one wowed against jimmy coleman only now's opt in the position you know as it became hewison you wayne saying that a one is easy allies. That are not going to be selected you know in a volume label for example district. Tina zero willing to say it was piping to see that one of the most disturbing rates. I think of british antisemitism and this might go around the world as well is. There is a sort of dog whistle so that someone can maintain that they're not anti semitic so someone who is an influence on me. Extreme left and concise something assiduously continuously hard left without. Referencing jews but then. His followers commend dog whistle a really serious anti semitic sort of betrayal of what they think themselves. I'm using an example of a very powerful voice. Which is john bishop. Who has who has three and a half million followers. He prostrate himself in front of ken loach on twitter. He said all this great interpreted it was as though he transferred the word. A jeremy corbyn for ken loach. I would kneel before him. And then if i couldn't anymore i prostrate myself in front of him which set off a huge torrent of jew hate and of course he a month ago on holocaust memorial day. Couldn't believe the terrible tragedies and then this is where the problems lie and that's an eye opener i think for british choosier surprising the anti-semites i mean disgust for britain and coastal are the places. You know that they took very nicely. Buddy dead jews in world war cho- you knows such nice people bubble and so bad and let's give some money to memorize them and and an make any fence you know maybe even endows of comments may be whatever it is making events you know in in a beautiful place to memorize their juice by the juice living was you know i mean it's like at all let's let you know what's album changes on the plane and of course the cord is a polish time. The code is is the stinian am am by itself. You know if you kill by the palestinians you know it doesn't mean that you don't like jews you know if you're critical officially doesn't mean that you're antisemites if you are cup only fizzle and if the only people who care about our justice palestinians because you killed by nobody else. Don't get about. Muslims in china while being tortured by million. Your don't care about syria. Don't care about libya you don't care about lebanon. You don't care about you. Don't even know what happens in yemen. Of course you never heralded by the war in chechnya and and distorted opening their head about anything. Only but it's going to stadiums you know is that there's a problem and they interesting thing when when i went into states and talk to the people and i tied to figure out. Why only this issue bottles you know. Other they show from people is back know underneath it. The other side was fight. Independence genius he. So did choose members alleys jews and a hall of people or some people would say something like you know what you will high. I don't know why feedbacks why feel about palestinians and i don't feel about anybody else. I have to think about it not over the palestinians up. You know it's like when. I wanted to start with like anyone to my my wife. Easy as you mentioned and i went to take a towards kamla sound everything and i'm gone to straight on that and i pick up young people young white folks as they call them. You know students. And i say i. My name is ahmed. And i'm from palestine. Would you like to appointing the individual cumberland. I say to say some wards full touma. Addison sister palestines and yet when you see slice cates looked like he must santana even studious and everything or well drafts. And the person free pop stein. And then he apologizes up. Tradit- day. Yes not yet picked up to join the battle. I'm just like you away. Think i'm posting. Think whether you might want to. Nobody looks like from his teens. You don't even have. Some people do not know the distance. When i asked him to stupid question between lemon palestine.

Johnny Gould Verson Jimmy Cued Britain Tenenbaum Jimmy Coleman Ken Loach Hewison Tina Zero Manchester UK Giuseppe Zane Biden Naomi Shakespeare Sean Jeremy Corbyn John Bishop FOX
Covid vaccine: PM to have AstraZeneca jab as he urges public to do the same

FT Politics

08:50 min | 2 months ago

Covid vaccine: PM to have AstraZeneca jab as he urges public to do the same

"When johnson talks about the uk's world-beating response to covid nineteen vaccine pogrom passes muster. It's been an unqualified success or one of the reasons. His conservative party are so far ahead in the polls over twenty five million brits have received their job so fall but the government unexpectedly announced show fall in the number of vaccines delivered in april juice. Supply issues and the debate has a geopolitical angle. To given the you struggling with its own vaccine rollout slovan the line. The european commission president on the block might even consider export controls. All options are on the table. We are in the crisis of the century. And i'm not ruling out any anything for now because we have to make sure that europeans are vaccinated as soon as possible so sarah. Let's begin with the overall state of the uk's vaccine pogrom based on what was set out in december. It's pretty much all going to plan fairly high levels of takeover ninety four percent i believe and the government is insisting that all over fifty will have had their first job by the middle of april. So what's the problem. Well a week ago we would have said. This was indeed the most Astonishingly amyloid success and a sign of vessel. Buoyant moved around it. Was that the with some very clear briefing to a couple of the saturday newspapers suggesting that we were actually going to move to the over forty's much sooner than expected so it was a bit of a jolt to find out on wednesday that in fact. Nhs people involved in the program had been told that they must hold booking any new appointments throughout april because the been a sudden very significant reduction in the supplies available so that really has put the first serious dent in the narrative which right from december the eight. I think it was the day. That william shakespeare became one of the first two vaccine as now suddenly. The government is in the unaccustomed position of having to explain what's happening and explain why some of the public expectations that they'd raised so hard may not be met to be fair to the government. They still absolutely insisting they're on track with the two big dates that they've set for this program that all over fifty should be vaccinated by the middle of april. And all adult britons. Who wants a job will have had it at the end of july. But there's no question that it's been a difficult political management problem for them this week and very much not the position that they'd hoped to be in the club. Let's have a look at why this might be happening and seven. I spent a lot of this week speaking to people. Whitehall trying to figure out exactly what was going on behind the scenes with matt. Hancock gave us a of clarity in the house of commons and the government is pinning own production issues. The first one is this batch of one point seven million jobs that we sent back for testing and the second thing is the supply from the soham institute of india which again the governor's put down to supply issues but others are saying that actions being blocked by modi's government from shipping out to the uk. Exactly it is pretty opaque what's happening. There are two elements. Here that can hold up. Supplies one is the genuinely technical difficulties in producing a complex biological process. I mean it's not straightforward zanu vaccine and a lot of the manufacturing sites haven't made this sort of marin a vaccine before it scale factor. You could say none of them have because this is the first one. That's the fiso won. The astra zeneca at novartis vaccine is also level to a complicated process. So there are technical supply issues and then there at the political ones. You alluded to and i don't know whether the serum institute of india supply has been blocked for political reasons because india was having rather a good downturn in covert cases. But that's turning up again. Unfortunately and there are feelings. That indian government wanted to have it at home. This is so. I think if we look at the context of this a lot of it is actually not that much of a serious problem that we were crunching the numbers this week and april is a significant moment in the vaccine program for the uk. Because yes they were vaccinated all over fifty which according to people like christie chief medical officer of england which uses ninety nine percents of deaths on messages the pressure on the nhc s. But eneko you have to install the second jobs. Really the po- gum began to scale up towards the end of january and eleven week window. The nhl is set between the first and second doses. That really kicks in april and but hancock said this week that really still going to be delivering about fourteen million jobs throughout april which is low though. It's been in march but it's still a pretty high number so it's probably good to keep it in context with feels really what's gone wrong. Here is expectations that the rogue briefing about forty s really feels like delivers come off the bush tourism bush. Johnson's tried to restrain for much of twenty twenty. One yes and i think some. Nhs officials were less than delighted about that huge raising expectations last weekend. In a way. I think this was always going to be a difficult point for the program. It was absolutely predictable that at the point at which second doses to scale up there was going to be a deep in first doses. So it's perhaps unfortunate that there wasn't more subtle public preparation. You're absolutely right international standards even in april. We're still going to be doing more. Vaccinations than many of our counterparts. So it's particularly unfortunate wasn't better preparation. Because i think in the minds of a lot of britain's the will now be a sense of this program isn't doing well it's stumbled. It didn't have to be this way that it could have been very differently presented. And after all as i said the government is still on track to meet those two deadlines that it says now clive. We need to put this in the context of europe as well and we heard from s. the von d'alene at the top. That and you still really struggling with its vaccine vo loud but the most baffling things. She's seen this week. Is the story about the astra zeneca job and how effective or side effects. That may have in this concern. Over blood clots we heard from the ama from the nhra in the uk from the world health organization. All saying there are no concerns about blood. Clots and ashes annika vaccine yet at didn't stop lawson countries from halting giving out the doses. It's a very complicated picture on side effects. At least the spotlight turned away from efficacy. Before countries in continental europe were worrying that the astrazeneca vaccine wouldn't work well enough to older people. I think the efficacy questions have more or less be answered now. The spotlight is on whether they're adverse side effects and a few of those have been discovered there. These two different sorts of blood disorders do with abnormal clotting thrombosis that have been detected in people who just been vaccinated in norway in germany elsewhere on continental europe. The numbers are tiny. I would say fewer than twenty around the continent. Investigation is still continuing. There's no proven link with the vaccine. But a lot of vaccine knowledge ists the might be a link. But that is no reason to stop the vaccination program when it's saving tens of thousands of lives probably and people have said that just by halting for a few days the astrazeneca vaccination and continental europe. This week until the european medicines agency said it was okay that would have cost lives. It loves cost lives directly because people weren't getting vaccinated and it also probably unfortunately of cost lives indirectly because all the publicity about ad side effects will just undermined confidence in the vaccine

UK Government Soham Institute Of India Astra Zeneca Serum Institute Of India Eneko European Commission William Shakespeare Whitehall Johnson Modi House Of Commons Sarah Hancock Novartis NHC Bush Matt
Shakespeare In The Park Returns To The Delacorte in New York For Summer 2021

Mark Levin

00:30 sec | 2 months ago

Shakespeare In The Park Returns To The Delacorte in New York For Summer 2021

"Well, Shakespeare in the park is returning this summer in New York City. After being closed last year due to covert 19. He was married velocity absence of arts and culture. The sense that the thing that gave us the most hope and spirit was gone. That was in many ways one the most painful realities. Public theater, announcing the city's annual summer event will return in July with the production of merry Wives. The free performances will begin July 5th and run through August 29th of Delacorte Theater. Along with safety

New York City Delacorte Theater
"shakespeare" Discussed on Not Another Shakespeare Podcast!

Not Another Shakespeare Podcast!

03:04 min | 2 months ago

"shakespeare" Discussed on Not Another Shakespeare Podcast!

"Just me this that kevin brasler can offer if you want is rosalind. I can make that happen and i can get her here. Meanwhile 'em she also there's so many antics in the play she also gets the letter from phoebe and silvius. Do you know what's in this letter. And he's like nah just delivered it. She said i should. So i did and roslyn reads it out to him. And it's like look you can do better than this woman. You don't have to be in love with her and he's really want her so rosalind kind of sets it up the okay. She's she's gonna make everything right. She's trying to scheme the ending of the plague. We're heading towards our our climactic final scene but twist ha. She and celia are woods and all of a sudden. This guy comes up to them in his like. Oh are you the shepherd that lives in the cabin and roslyn to disguise his getting me just like yes i am. What's going on turns out orlando has been attacked by a lion new. I told you plot twist twist lots. There are lions in this forest. Apparently orlando has been attacked by lion. He didn't die but he got pretty badly hurt. His his arm got bitten and it turns out that the man who's come to tell them this is oliver his brother with whom he has reconciled just behind the scenes yup whole ballpoint arrived in the forest tried. Some of the mushrooms felt better about himself and in philly this forest and they kinda enter into kind of like a feud either being like really about things or just like falling madly in love with people pretty much. That's an you've kind of nailed one of the big themes as the play. Which is that the forest. Is this sort of topsy. Turvy permissive fantasy world where anything can happen versus the court with all of its sort of strictures and it's paroles. Yes it's sort of kids go live in the forest. Yep just goes mushrooms. Shakespeare experience doses this forest but well shakespeare doesn't totally endorse this for us. Because you'll see at the end. Everybody goes back to court. They have to. You have to work at some point. So crushing depressing. But it's not it's part of life. We must maintain the status quo. Really which is why gin meet in orlando can never be together. She must be rosalind so oliver is turned up. He's turned over a new leaf. He's reconciled with his brother. He saved him from this lion. Very good of him and celia and oliver fall in love immediately again yes is it. Forest is kicking in the mushroom. Yep the mushrooms the forest whatever whatever drugs are in the air they are working their magic on celia and all of these people kind of in the court before. No not as far as i know..

kevin brasler roslyn rosalind Shakespeare orlando phoebe silvius celia shakespeare oliver one
"shakespeare" Discussed on Not Another Shakespeare Podcast!

Not Another Shakespeare Podcast!

05:03 min | 2 months ago

"shakespeare" Discussed on Not Another Shakespeare Podcast!

"Wow that some of the untold the unsung hero of the play. Right hello. I'm nora james and this is not another shakespeare. Podcast the podcast. That takes neither itself nor shakespeare seriously and today we are talking about a fan favorite play one of the ones that people just love to love as.

nora james today one
"shakespeare" Discussed on Not Another Shakespeare Podcast!

Not Another Shakespeare Podcast!

05:08 min | 2 months ago

"shakespeare" Discussed on Not Another Shakespeare Podcast!

"Shakespeare same. No no yeah. So we this kind of preview of what's happening with sylvia's and phoebe because they kind of eavesdrop on corn and sylvia's talking it over and koren's is sort of man he he's got bit more wisdom in him and Sylvia's is sort of basically being like you don't understand what it's like to be in love. He's yes besotted he is besotted yes very good. Very good word lovesick. Yeah i'll just keep bringing out these synonyms. Yes that's it that's it. We're out rather than an obsessed obsessed. He is obsessed lustful he is yes so am but roslin feels a kind of sympathy for him because she is also pining after orlando who she believes she will never see again because she's had to run off into the forest. Little does she know he is. Also in the forest will come to that later so sylvia sort of floats off in a in. A lovesick gust and corn sticks. Around and celia is like. Hey let's see if he has any food because we're really hungry and we decided not to eat those mushrooms. They could be really hungry for other reasons or they could be really. They've been spoken. Yeah they could. Have the munchies. That's true they could be. They could they could have the munchies regardless they're hungry and they need food and so they approached koran and they say. Hey we'll give you some money if you give us some food. Sounds more and more. Like the munchies. Through ubereats subaru reasons finds out. Oh we need nachos need nachos like right now corinth unfortunately can't give them nachos he He doesn't have any nachos his his nachos all belong to somebody else. He's a he's a sort of a contract worker shepherd. He does zero hours shepherd. He doesn't own his own flock. He doesn't own the cabin but he says you know. Come along to my sheep coat. My my little cabin And we'll see what we can do roslyn kind of picks up on the fact that he the they're trying to sell the flock and the cabin and in her of ganymede. Manley disguised says. Oh well you know we we could buy it and pay you to do it to to keep the sheep. I'm so they get a little little cabin out of the deal. They have a place to live now in the forest cabin in the woods. Yes an ice cab home and now this becomes.

Sylvia sylvia Shakespeare Manley phoebe orlando zero hours roslyn
"shakespeare" Discussed on Not Another Shakespeare Podcast!

Not Another Shakespeare Podcast!

04:26 min | 2 months ago

"shakespeare" Discussed on Not Another Shakespeare Podcast!

"Old charles. So all of our polls charles aside and look charles. I think you should kill my brother in the wrestling ring tomorrow. I think you should. You should just get rid of him for me and charles is a little bit reluctant at first and so oliver makes up a massive lie about his brother and basically says that well. If you don't kill him he'll try to kill you. So charles like well all right then. I guess that's what we're doing. So we have not that setup one ding one scene one very good. She liked my ding. Dang like wrestling thing. It does feel like you know you could do of this like with the kind of you know heavy wrestling theme. You get the rock. There's only there's only at get. Get those guys doing shakespeare. But it's going hard like we want. It's going to be primarily fighting and a few bits of pros just just just to. We can call it. Shakespeare but really. It's going to get raw so sort of like Sort of Those movies that my dad loves that all the old action stars are in literally expendable. Yes the expendable role those guys in the probably the word from must change days. Mashup of expendable shakespeare. Yeah i'd buy it. Could say it's a good crossover market really. Yeah i think a lot of people have been clamoring for that kind of thing. If you're listening movie producers just you know we. We can consult on something like that action shakespeare action franchise and why not start with this one which lends itself so well. You only know about once.

Shakespeare tomorrow charles shakespeare one scene oliver one one ding first about once
"shakespeare" Discussed on Not Another Shakespeare Podcast!

Not Another Shakespeare Podcast!

05:42 min | 2 months ago

"shakespeare" Discussed on Not Another Shakespeare Podcast!

"Tuck these shakespeare was visited by. I do not believe that Hello i'm nora james. And this is another shakespeare podcast. The podcast that takes neither itself nor shakespeare very seriously and today we are talking about a fan favorite play one of the ones that people just love to love as you like it as you like it as you like it. Do you like it like it. Actually i will confess to liking this one. There's a lot to like. It's a it's a jolly little rump through the forest. It's got you know. All all the classics of shakespeare comedy all the classics. Because it hit will the shakespeare's comedy ticks ticks every box. So how's it up someone pretending to be not yes. A disguised disguising his another gender. Yes evil evil uncle evil james. It's almost like i prep to you for this. Random supernatural entities. There's no ferries in this one. But the god hymen arrives at the end hybrid. Hymen the god not got us. We will note yet called hymen. The god of marriage. Not the god of a word vaginal anatomy god of consummation not specifically the god of consummation as far as i know no hymen mail got marriage. It makes sense. No it doesn't it doesn't actually make sense. It makes no sense. There's no there's nothing supernatural about. This play at all until hyman shows up. But i guess maybe he thought people might get so far through the play and be like where. Where are the supernatural beings. Yeah i was here for shakespeare. Play your last play. Had fairies in it bill. That's that's a midsummer night's dream reference. Okay all right. So let's talk about as you like it yes. it does. in fact have mistaken identities. Lots of disguises. They flee to a secondary location in order for the comedy to happen. Which is quite common in this sort of like twelfth night it is a bit like twelfth night. Yeah so would you say. The twelfth night is kind of like the christmas special..

james nora james today christmas shakespeare twelfth night night one of the ones disguises
Kenan Thompson's On-Stage Serenity

Conan O’Brien Needs A Friend

02:26 min | 3 months ago

Kenan Thompson's On-Stage Serenity

"I'm friendly with bill. Hader who i think is one of the funniest people in the world. And he's such a huge fan of yours he talks a lot about you and your serenity kind of on stage. You're very. you're so happy when you're performing but you're also serene and that it's very comfortable to be around and he's ideas and sketches and thought man. I wish ticket. I wish i could channel more of that. Which is i think maybe the highest compliment absolutely. I mean that's amazing it. I guess i'm putting up a good front. Because i'm actually pretty terrified doing stuff at the same time are you. Are you really though. Because i don't. I don't pick up any of that energy from you mean you've been doing this. You started being a professional sketch performer on television. How old are you fifteen. Yeah my guy you know. We was doing like recording tape. You know what i'm saying. Like the live element is a whole 'nother level so true true. it's just. It reminds me of theater. You know what i mean like. You're so nervous before you do your play and then as soon as you get out there and say your first word like all of that stuff just goes away or whatever so i try to anticipate getting to that moment more opposed to be nervous but also get to shake my jitters singing the warmer up. You know what i mean. It gives me my chance to be in front of those strangers that are going to be looking at me or whatever and get past that you know what i mean and then i can focus on the actual work and i think it's different for people when they their first time seeing people for the code open or if they're in the monologue something like that it's just like all those jitters to that point and then it's about waiting on your i laugh. Yup hopefully the first thing you say is a laugh and you can just get through that. Here's the way. I look at it. And i look at it like a any audience. It's a blind date. do you feel that. That's a unique thing to comedy. Because like if you're doing mike shakespeare's shakespeare whatever. Yeah but comedy. You have to earn a reaction every time. Well i can't say with any authority. Because i'm not an actor i've never been actually been told not to shakespeare that was in the part basically look good in tights and they. They didn't like the little thing they wanna be gone. and it really wasn't shakespeare. I was just trying to talk to him. Entites and the whole thing creeped everybody out and then later my lawyer said let's call it shakespeare in the park.

Hader Mike Shakespeare Shakespeare
"shakespeare" Discussed on Not Another Shakespeare Podcast!

Not Another Shakespeare Podcast!

05:36 min | 3 months ago

"shakespeare" Discussed on Not Another Shakespeare Podcast!

"They invite falstaff to come with them which is supposedly the sort of forgiveness line of the play where mistress page says sir john and all so everybody including you sir john falstaff you rogue hope you learned your lesson. He doesn't he doesn't really say that much in the bars. I think he's just embarrassed. Yeah he's he's been made quite the fool but master ford. Last line of the play is Let it be so sir. John as yes come with us falstaff and he says to master brooke you yet. Choke hold your word as you've you've achieve master brooke asked you for which was an affair with mr sport. He's to master brooke you yet. She'll hold your word for heat. Tonight shall lie with mistress. Ford legitimately like mistress ford. We're having sex tonight. I just told the whole town about it. Now you've got to do it. Yep i'm an asshole and x basically the end. Yeah that's pretty much the ending. So yeah i you know. I have mixed feelings about this play. I think it's fun. I really like the wives the titular. Ym's the two the two wives. I think their friendship is really beautiful. And i like the way that they stand up for each other and they stick together and they really and does it. Pass the bell tests. Then because there are two women do they. Are they talking about anything other than at any point in his play. Think so okay fail. Then yeah there. There are definitely scenes with no men in them but they're always talking about the dudes is that is that more. I guess more women than you'd get typically in a play from this era. it's not more women numerically. But it's a different kind of female relationship for so yeah you don't see that many friendships between women that get as much airtime as the two wives get in this play in plays written by men in this period. So that's that's that's a plus for shakespeare kind of but he has a few minuses already discussed. He's got several minuses already point. Though isn't it. I mean not. Sure your whole thing with shakespeare's the obviously there are some things that he does very well and there are other things that are problematic Questionable yeah exactly. i think he's. He's a very nice poet. There are some speeches and shake rose. He's good with pros and actually the other interesting thing about mary. Wives of windsor is that it is the shakespeare play that has the highest proportion of pros vs verse in a any of them..

john falstaff John falstaff john ford two two women tonight two wives Ford brooke Tonight each windsor shakespeare
"shakespeare" Discussed on Not Another Shakespeare Podcast!

Not Another Shakespeare Podcast!

04:15 min | 3 months ago

"shakespeare" Discussed on Not Another Shakespeare Podcast!

"Available women. But there's only one available woman okay and available and actually that is kind of what happens in the place. So it's one of those sort of subplots is that and pages this eligible bachelorette and there are three men in town who are sort of trying to win her favor. Her parents each favorite and she of course has a very different favorite. So her father has preference for mr slender. Who is a young gentleman. A relative of them a slender man. Yes he's he's not as scary. As the the pump culture is a culture counterpart of justice. Shallow so he's got some standing in the community. Her mother shallow shallow shallow. I think i believe he is yes as as the ailing shakespeare's naming the characters after their traits. Yes yes that happens a lot in this play. We have For example peter simple. Who is slender. Servant is a very simple man. Yes that is the implication. Meanwhile an's mother has a preference for Doctor kaya Who is a foreigner. He's french but he is a doctor. So you know yeah. He's got that going for him and an herself prefers the young master felton who gentleman and as the arden three which i have in front of me tells us in the in the list of roles. He's a former companion of the prince of wales. So you think somebody like that would be quite appealing to the parents. But but no they want these other guys. But i think we're getting ahead of ourselves. Should i jump into the main plot. I think start from the beginning. In the merry wives of windsor there is a character. Called falstaff and falstaff is a a well known shakespeare character. He's quite famous from the henry. The fourth plays. He's a companion of prince hall. Who goes on to become henry the fifth and At the moment when he becomes king. How quite famously. rejects falstaff. So he he's sort of comes into his own matures into the role of king hood and rejects falstaff. Who is kind of the embodiment of his more carefree and indulgent and sort of hedonistic days as a youth. Falstaff is notorious for being drunk. He's well known to be a liar. He fights in a in a war. The place but kind of doesn't actually help anybody at all. He sort of comically incompetent. I'm sure we can all think of some real life. Examples of people who fit that description of examples. Yes some maybe that you see on your television every day. Yes and in a variety of different countries on shore a global phenomenon it is a global phenomenon. Yes embossed is also needed. And so we don't really know why he's been knighted connections. Yes he's he's he's got connections but importantly no money right so he's over. Sched mobile yes. Here's an impoverished noble and he In this play comes to the town of windsor. Which is the real town of windsor in england and he attempts to seduce to very wealthy wives of the town. The titular merry wives. Yes for money for money. Yes also loves food. He's a really real stand-up gentlemen. Falstaff standup guy pillar of the community. So he He arrives in town and he is looking for opportunities to sort of snatch some purses. I see the face. You're making at me. Yes i do mean it in both senses. I wasn't i wasn't reading that in an innuendo but you said.

england Falstaff three men fifth peter simple fourth plays both senses one falstaff each favorite three french one available woman wales shakespeare felton Shallow kaya
'Nomadland' drops Frances McDormand into a rootless life on the open road

Pop Culture Happy Hour

04:45 min | 3 months ago

'Nomadland' drops Frances McDormand into a rootless life on the open road

"So nomad land is based on a nonfiction book of the same name by jessica bruder. It's about these folks who are in many cases older they're sort of battered by economic changes particularly the Economic meltdown of two thousand eight. They are left with very few options. And this fictional story about fern was written by khloe. jiao is also the director as we mentioned fern. This lifestyle is connected to her grief over her husband staff and it it leaves her at really the mercy of the weather and other people. She has no access to health. Care any kind of security. But there's also. I think it's safe to say a freedom in it that she appreciates at times She has a chance to see new things and be independent. There are a lot of kind of sweeping vistas of the western great plains and she starts to develop a relationship with a guy named dave. Who's played by david straight there and and obviously that complicates her wanderings somewhat. Glenn what did you think about nomad. Land. i mean this is pretty great right. I mean fair warning. It is unhurried. It is discursive it's also as you mentioned. It's in love with the natural environment which is very Khloe zhao thing. It's smartly a film that teaches you how to watch it because in those opening minutes we the audience are that woman that fern meets at the store. Were worried about her. Where the manager that gas station. We want her to find a shelter for the night. Because it's going to be cold She's been dealt a couple serious blows and the story of the film is her finding an equilibrium. It's not perfect and it's fragile and take some work to maintain we see the work it takes to maintain but he's got the strength and resolve to maintain it finds a community Found family which is something queer folk no little something about That said you take frances. Mcdormand out of the equation. I'm not sure. I'm still as invested. Because that actor is just an empathy engine. It just radiates from her Even when the role she's playing is more comedic as it is in fargo or even when it's a completely underwritten and onenote like it wasn't three billboards. There's not a trace of condescension in any role. She plays humankind essential or socioeconomic condescension. No actually remove no sense of judgment because francis. Mcdermott is a woman who graduated from the yale school of drama. She's married to a kohen brother. And what do the coen brothers love to do. More than make fun of a yokels. There's nothing about her holding fern at a remove when she's packing amazon boxes. That's fern packing amazon boxes. Even though it's france clearly packing boxes the scene where she goes on quite a bit about how she got more counter space in her van. E you play that wrong and that is a hollywood actor doing a ride along. That's fake but i mean there's something about are you just fall in love with firm. The way she smiles without opening her mouth There's such pain in it but there's joy now did i need fern to quote shakespeare at me. Nope did. I need the scene with her sister where she tells firm. That firm has always been strong in special and smart. Smells nice in this kind of puppies. I didn't need that either. Those moments felt like that was the film. Not trusting itself. Kind of putting on some training wheels So in the end. I think i was more taken by this amazing performance then by the movie itself. Interesting stephen i was taken by the amazing performance. And the film itself I think this is a wonderful piece of really subtle storytelling. It is so thoughtful. It is so respectful and careful and clever. You can tell that this movie. And it's makers spent time with its subjects and really got invested in their lives. This movie could have so easily tilted into mawkishness could so easily tilted into cynicism. It's so easily could've tilted into kind of capital. I issues based thundering and it never ever does. I mean it's funny. Glenn mentioned francis mcdormand's performance in three billboards outside ebbing missouri. The kind of purported to be about the real america kind of the real underbelly of america and it did so by throwing grotesques at us and this movie does the exact. It is a really human and lovely movie and its surrounds. Frances mcdormand and david strathern with nomads. With people who actually live this lifestyle and lets them tell their stories albeit fictionalised versions of their stories. And i just think that works beautifully. Well you can tell in spots when this movie is working with non-professional actors and you can kind of feel that but for the most part i just got totally lost in it. It is as glenn's had its unhurried. But i didn't find it slow at all. I loved this movie.

Jessica Bruder Khloe Zhao Jiao Khloe Fern Glenn Mcdormand Yale School Of Drama Amazon Dave Frances Mcdermott Fargo David Francis Francis Mcdormand Shakespeare France Hollywood Stephen
How theater weathers wars, outlasts empires and survives pandemics

TED Talks Daily

04:07 min | 3 months ago

How theater weathers wars, outlasts empires and survives pandemics

"Oh firm use of fire that would ascend the brightest heaven of invention a kingdom for a stage princes to act and monarch to behold the swelling scene. Though to be totally honest right. Now i'd settle for a real school day a night out and a hug from a friend. The words that i spoke at the beginning firm use a fire etc are shakespeare's. He wrote them as the opening to his play. Henry the fifth and there are also quite likely. The first words ever spoken on the stage of the globe theatre in london when it opened in fifteen ninety nine the global go on to become the home for most of shakespeare's work and from what i hear that shakespeare guy was pretty popular but despite his popularity just four years later in sixteen zero three. The globe would close for an extended period of time in order to prevent the spreading and resurgence of the bubonic plague and facts from sixteen zero three to sixteen thirteen. All of the theaters in london were closed on and off again for an astonishing seventy eight months here in chicago in two thousand sixteen new theaters opening as well. The steppenwolf had just opened at seventeen hundred theater. Space the goodman down in the loop had just opened its new center for education and engagement and the chicago shakespeare theatre had just started construction on its newest theatre space. The yard today. Those theatres as well as the homes are over two hundred and fifty other theater companies across chicago are closed due to covid nineteen from broadway to l. a. Theaters are dark and when or if the lights are ever going to come on again. That means that tens of thousands of theater artists are out of work from actors and directors to stage managers. Set builders costume designers. It's not like it's an easy time to go wait tables. It's a hard time for the theater. And it's a hard time for the world but while theaters may be feeder as an art form has the potential to shine on how we can process and use this time apart to build a brighter more equitable healthier future together. Theater is the oldest art form we humans have. We know that the greeks were writing plays as early as the fifth century. Bc but theater goes back before that it goes back before we learned to write to call and response around fires. And who knows maybe before we learned to build fire itself feeder has outlasted empires weathered wars and survived plagues in the early sixteen hundred. Theatres closed over sixty percent of the time in london. And that's still looked at is one of the most fertile an innovative periods of time in western theater history. The plays that were written then are still performed today. Over four hundred years later unfortunately in the early sixteen hundreds a different plague was making its way across the ocean and it hit the shores of what would be called american sixteen nineteen when the first slave ships landed in jamestown virginia. Racism is an ongoing plague in america but many of us in the theater like to think we're not infected or that we are at worst as symptomatic but the truth is our symptoms have been glaring onstage and off. We have the opportunity to use this intermission. Caused by one clegg to work to cure another. We can champion a theater. That marches protests burns bills. We can reimagine the way our theaters institutions work to make them more reflective. And just we can make this one of the most innovative and transformative periods of time in western theater. History one that we're still learning about celebrating four hundred years from now. What we embody in the theater can be embodied in the world. Why because theater is an essential service. And what i mean by that. Is that theater is in service to that which is essential about ourselves. Love anger rage despair. Hope theatre not only shows us the breadth and depth of human emotions. It allows us to experience catharsis to feel our feelings and rather than ignore compartmentalize them move through them to discover. What's on the other side

Seventeen Hundred Theater Shakespeare Center For Education And Engag Chicago Shakespeare Theatre London Chicago Plague Goodman Henry The Globe Jamestown Virginia America
David S. Reynolds on Abraham Lincoln

This American President

06:47 min | 3 months ago

David S. Reynolds on Abraham Lincoln

"Our guest. Today is dr david. S reynolds historian who has written extensively on the civil war era. He's won numerous awards including the bancroft prize. And the ambassador book award just to name a few. And he is the author of the book. Abe abraham lincoln in his times professor reynolds. Thank you for being on our show. Great to be here richard. Thank you great. So much is made about president. Lincoln's lack of experience and his many supposed- professional failures prior to winning the presidency. But you seem to push back against this narrative. So what's the real story here. yeah One of the best books on him david. Donald to lincoln one of the better known books actually says very frankly that no president has ever entered the highest office being the least prepare less prepared than than lincoln that is the least prepared ball and on the surface kind of looks that way because he had less than one year of education just primary school education and Thou that was it and He didn't go through any formal formal of self education. Either but what i found is that he had something far more important. A insatiably curious. If he were on the law circuit around illinois he would go to a farmer and say. How does that machine work. And what brand of cow is that and and the pig over there. What can you describe that to me. Very very curious about the world around him And also he loved to read poetry in particular newspaper small so poetry and poetry kind of organized his thoughts and he memorized shakespeare by the page. She didn't do it to impress people but Suddenly suddenly would come out with a shakespearean soliloquy though is on his hard disk his brain and Or burns poem or something like that. So he was a really exposed to different levels of culture so much so that his contemporary emerson said There's one hero who stands out from the rest as somebody who bridges the entire range of experience from the very highest shakespeare of the opera. And all of that to the lowest. He like body humor and grotesque Frontier humor and emerson said he went down as far so the the very dogs believed in him so In a way who's very very open to experience and is that lincoln that i'm really interested in the songs he loved the poems he loved and what really made him a what what was going on inside of him right and you talk about. Lincoln's ran as an era of sensationalism. Violence susannah humor surreal the surreal in the bizarre which i think for anyone that follows politics now is a bit comforting to know that it's it's been like this for a while. So can you expand on just what you meant by that. Well i think there's been interesting sensationalism for a long time in many cultures but the difference was that because of changes in print printing techniques and also distribution techniques. Suddenly this was available to the masses and so the newspapers they used to be used to six hundred suddenly were once the penny papers and they were filled with sensational stories about murders and suicides and oh adultery and all all all this stuff and so yeah. I mean Linking grew up in this kind of culture. Also in popular humor lincoln said it was characterized by grotesque nece and it was a very violent kind of humor of gouging and and scrapping and scraping and a often feature these kind of frontier types. That were just wild men and people get a lotta thrills out of these kind of very very wild escapades in the crockett manuscripts the davy crockett manuscripts almond accents. Helper and p.t barnum. Who was a sensation. He was founded show business and wasn't in the circus business back then but he was in the museum business and he put on sensational displays like a fiji mermaid. Who is this beautiful blonde. Half naked woman had presented that way in in the posters. But actually it was just a a monkey's torso tied to a salmon's tail assistant in some water. And anyway the biggest. The smallest the fattest put things on display so in a way Lincoln had to serve accommodate culture as well because he was sold as as abe. That's book is called the kind of rough frontiers men with his sleeves rolled up and he's wielding an axe in these splitting the rails and by the time that It was advertised that way. It had been many years since. He's splitting rails because he was a respectable lawyer by the time war. Good suits and all of that and it was making a good income but he allowed himself to be sold as a even though he hated the name but he said without names like old. Abe uncle abe Honesty i wouldn't have been elected. I would not have been elected. So he was sort of put on display almost in a barnum barnum like way in eighteen sixty.

Dr David Ambassador Book Award Abe Abraham Lincoln Reynolds Lincoln Emerson Donald Trump Richard Illinois David Fiji Barnum Barnum
Riley Arthur shares journalism and publishing tips

Photofocus Podcast

05:23 min | 3 months ago

Riley Arthur shares journalism and publishing tips

"This schmear young. And i'm joined by my co host. Who's dealing with the frigid. Fifty degree weather in florida right now. Skip cohen own. Showing you get not. I mean it's hysterical. Because it's the way we dress down here like today. I've got on shorts flip flops and a flannel shirt that makes no sense and if the fashion police came by most of us would be arrested. So that is. Let's get into today's program because you end. Our guest are both hanging out in a very cold place in the country right now when it's perfectly appropriate to do a hot podcast. How's that that sounds great because it is twelve degrees right now. Right things that. I'll i'll do my best not complain about having to put the top up. Okay hey seriously. Riley joins us today and she is a testimonial to a combination of the grapevine and social media. And here's the fun aspect of how i got to know riley. A good buddy of mine in boston sent me an. I am and a link to her work and said hey you need to go talk to her so a phone call later. That opened the door to this michigan based documentary photographer. She's an art director. She's an accomplished author. She's a big believer especially in themed projects like her diners of new york. Which is a a personal favourite of hers. And i happen to love the just to if you've lived in the new jersey new york area. Then you know that diners are just an incredible Concept she's a national geographic explorer. She's a fulbright fellow and her work has been published in numerous magazines and is in the permanent collections of seven. Different museums nine. Oh there's probably nothing. Riley can't photograph but as a journalist. What i love most about her work is. it's just about the simplicity of life And sometimes obviously more complex than a complex and less simple in any event riley. If i haven't screwed up something in technology here welcome to the mind. Your own business podcast. Thanks for having me well. It's good to have you here and i really am. I'm outnumbered today. Because i'm always complaining about the weather or or making shamir aware that she's in the coldest place in the country right now and now. The two of you can share that misery law like complaint. It's nice to have some company. Let me tell you and and riley. I'm so excited to chat with you because it sounds like you've had a very interesting journey. And we were kind of chatting in the pre interview chat and it was interesting to learn that you are not originally from michigan. But from the lemme say this right. American samoa correct yes. Correct soren and raised. That's somehow you ended up here in michigan. Where we're just happy to be in the double digits today and so kind of. Let's kick things off by having you kind of tell us about your background. how you ended up doing what you're doing today and just how you got here well since you mentioned where i was Warren raised american saw. I think that would be a great place to start off so you guys might know. American simul from a number of things like you know american football players to you know a variety of other cultural touch points. But you know the first person to make american samoa on the mainstream was the anthropologist margaret mead and some of her photographs and writings about american samoa. so you know and Independent som- so you know. When i was young american sama as i told you earlier is the third wettest is place in the world gets a tremendous amount of rain and one of the things that happens is that mold grows on just about anything including photographs and vhs tapes. You know back when there while people are using those so we had a you know a a system where we would take photographs When our film was ready would send it off to get you know in the mail to get back in the day and we get our photographs back. My mom would fill a photo album and then she sent it off to our grandparents the store because if we kept them on island they would mold in a number of years. We'd have no relics of our family. History so i became kind of fascinated by sort of documenting a place in time and the fact that where we were from. We couldn't really keep our photographs if we wanted them to actually survive more than say three years so that sort of drive to document is really becoming a leading charge in fascination with documenting things and being sort of for that picks niche interests. That might be sort of going away. So that's sort of a long answer to your question How i got started in my career was. I had my senior thesis in my undergraduate degree. I interned at the oregon shakespeare festival as a theatre photographer

Skip Cohen Riley American Samoa Michigan New York Shamir Florida Boston New Jersey Soren Margaret Mead Warren Football Oregon
A Live Animated Stage Production... Wait, what?

Kottke Ride Home

05:13 min | 3 months ago

A Live Animated Stage Production... Wait, what?

"Thing. I feel like i haven't spent enough time. Thinking about is how the pandemic will change arts not just what kind of pandemic themed stories will see and have already begun to see but literally how it will change the medium for some things. It's something that a lot of other people have been thinking about. However and some technologies that were previously relegated to low budget. College tinkering are starting to get their moment in the spotlight and the funding to boots. Here's one example. The royal shakespeare company in england is putting on a virtual production using real time animation created by actors in a motion capture space who will interact live with virtual audiences basically they have actors in motion capture suits and facial regained with corresponding avatars of their characters. The audience will be able to see both the actors and their characters as they move around and perform inside a virtual forest scene and as they go about the story. The actors and audience will be able to interact. What exactly that will look like in real time. I don't have a clear sense of. But on their website the royal shakespeare company says quotes audience plus to get holders take on the role of firefly's helping to light the forest and interacting with their mouths track pad or touch screen the actors respond to audience interaction and direction making each performance. Unique and quotes won't many different groups around the world have been working on similar technology. The royal shakespeare company claims to have been the first to pioneer this technology for a live theater performance. Back in two thousand sixteen with their production of the tempest in that performance. The actor who played the spirit ariel was kitted out with sensors that were translated into live animation on stage enhancing the magical sense of the character for audiences as our a artistic director. Gregory doran said at the time the way the technology was being used means quote. The actor becomes the marionettes and the puppeteer at the same time and quotes old now. Almost five years later. Technology has advanced even more allowing them in partnership again with epic games's unreal engine to make more sophisticated of multiple actors plop them into a virtual setting and allow an audience to interact in real time. The show itself is not a complete play like the tempest was but rather a fifty minute experience. Based on the world of shakespeare's a midsummer night's dream led by puck you as the audience will explore the forest and meet other sprites and ferries from the play working to prevent an oncoming threats of destruction. If you want to experience what they're calling simply dream you can get tickets at the lincoln the show notes if you just want to watch. Tickets are free. You don't even need to reserve them in advance but if you want to be a part of audience plus get to interact with the performers. It's ten pounds. And i think you may need to actually be based in the uk to participate in that. Their site checks the compatibility of your device before allowing you to purchase audience plus tickets and no matter which browser device were vpn. Trying to use. I couldn't get mine to be marked as compatible so you can try it yourself but definitely you can tune in for free if you are not in. The united kingdom shows are march twelfth through the twentieth at various times through the afternoons and evenings. So even if you're watching from another time zone you may find one that works for you but getting back to the technology of dream another cool thing that they're doing that as you're on that journey with the fairies if you interact or the actors change things up based on audience response the musical score will change accordingly quoting again from. Sec dream features a symphonic score based on recordings by the philharmonia orchestra conducted by principal conductor and artistic adviser sullivan. The recordings are expanded by music. Created in real time by the movements of the performers this living dynamic soundtrack adapts and interacts with the narrative and the prerecorded orchestral tracks and quotes. I'm super fascinated by this technology. In terms of its impact on both live in virtual theatre in general but also as an interpretation of shakespeare and other older plays you know so often performances of shakespeare set in his time with stuffy elizabethan costumes and settings feeling so intensely old and uninteresting to many people but shakespeare and his contemporaries were cutting edge. They were innovators. They pushed the limits and once he got over the paranoia of this being the devil's work. I think shakespeare would have been really into this giant leap forward in live. Theatrical portrayals are a or director. Dora thinks similarly telling the observer quote this is a twenty first century reimagining of shakespeare's play which is giving us a completely different vocabulary of imagery. That's extraordinary when we did the tempest in two thousand sixteen explored the opportunities that the digital world could give to us. I really did think then quoting the play. This is a brave new world. There's so much opportunity out there. It says if technology is now providing us with this amazing paintbox. We've a lot of very exciting talent that can find uses for those new tools and quotes.

Royal Shakespeare Gregory Doran Shakespeare Royal Shakespeare Company Ariel England UK Lincoln Philharmonia Orchestra SEC Sullivan Dora
Actor Christopher Plummer, best known for "The Sound of Music," dies in Connecticut

5 Things

00:43 sec | 3 months ago

Actor Christopher Plummer, best known for "The Sound of Music," dies in Connecticut

"Christopher plummer has died. The legendary canadian actor graced the stage movie theaters and television screens for six decades plummer starred in a number of shakespeare productions and also played captain. George von trapp in the musical film the sound of music. Do you agree Warmer would go onto win academy award for one of his later films beginners and he won two tony awards and two primetime emmys. Christopher plummer died at his home in connecticut with his wife lane taylor by his side. He was ninety. One

Christopher Plummer George Von Trapp Plummer Academy Award Tony Awards Lane Taylor Connecticut
Bonding: It's like 50 Shades of Gray... But Funny

Ask Me Another

05:25 min | 3 months ago

Bonding: It's like 50 Shades of Gray... But Funny

"Our first guest star in the netflix. Show bonding which is about a subject. We can't really talk about on a family show. Think fifty shades of grey. But funny. and you're kind of their brendan scannel and matt lucas. Welcome to ask me another high for having us welcome. I just want to start by saying. I love that bonding as a show as a topic exists. Absolutely it's definitely one of the shows where as it was coming out. I was like i wonder how my family is gonna feel about this. I'm like i'm deeply irish. Catholic has eight siblings and my dad has five in all my aunts and uncles are like love that show with all the whips and rather everything. Everything i ever do. I'm half-naked end so at this point. I'm just kind of used to it right at some point. You're like i and a hat that's too much to buy. I know this season. They had this season. They had a like a jumper made for me and with an apron over. And i was like whoa. I'm like i'm clothed. I'm actually fully clothed. Like what a strange turn. Sure all right well. Are you up for some games. Would you guys like to play some games. I love games. That's you do so you're gonna take turns answering questions in this first game. Here's what's going to happen. We're going describe fictional animals as if they were presented at a competition like the westminster dog show so some of these animals are dogs but some of them are not you. Just tell us the name of the animal or the title of the work that it comes from. Okay brendan this is for you next in the working group. We have a great dane who deviates from the breed standard. He's over five feet tall. The judge will never watch gate and look look at this. He's walking on hind legs. Some highly unusual behavior from this dog as he seems to be leaning over to talk to his handler shaggy. Yes he say shaggy. A i mean this has to be miscue be do. I always love the mask. Reveal they would have the double mask reveals to. It was a ghost and then like they took it off and it was someone and they took the mask off. That person someone else surprised at. How many people's first names were old man when we go them. I'm i'm definitely old man. Old man lucas. This one is for you. Okay this entrant. In the herding group was raised on a farm and found his true calling hurting sheet. He looks comfortable in the stack position. But the judge is a little confused by spoofs and curly. Tail says first time here at madison square garden but he seems to be adjusting to being a pig in the city babe pig. I never seen that. It's supposed to be adorable though it is it is pretty. I mean talking animals. I have no problem with talking animals. Yeah and pigs are so key. There's a there's someone in my neighborhood that has a pet pig and they walked i live. I live in the village and new york city. And like there's a person who has a pet pig And he walks the pet pig around my neighborhood. And it's really cute you very nick. I'm in brooklyn. No one has a pet pig. I feel like was something wrong here. Officially bushwick arianna guerande also has a pet pig. Really just out of curiosity. Is the pet. Pay any coats or call that ever. Although i do follow. Listen i'm gonna. I'm going to plug this. I follow this pig on instagram. Because he has an instagram account. Its arms giblet the piglet so you can like actually go check out given the piglet and see what i'm talking about and give you the piglet follows me. I feel very proud of him. That's very nice. Follow back for is give it active does giblet like comment and like what you're up to and i would just expect a lot of like political means. Yeah i guess if you ever get sick of it just like a couple. Bacon jokes over. Yeah all right. Brendan for you now. We have the toy group literally. This junior handler is a precocious six year. Old boy whose conversing with his stuff tiger while walking around the ring perhaps we don't see the tiger the same way he does. Oh i know this. Oh it's philosophers you guys. I'm very young this time it's i forget. Yes calvin hobbes. There you go.

Brendan Scannel Matt Lucas Netflix Brendan Arianna Guerande Madison Square Garden Lucas Tail New York City Brooklyn Nick Bacon Calvin Hobbes
Healing The Child Within

Awaken To Empower with Kay Sanders

03:37 min | 3 months ago

Healing The Child Within

"Levels on your spiritual awakening but going back to the topic today. I wanna talk about the healing of the inner child because he the inner child is so very important. Because everything that you've experienced as a child no matter how bad it was. How good it was the inbetween. You have experienced many things as a child that you were as you were growing up and it can affect you to date so if you feel as if you are holding back or a few are having a hard time really stepping into your power if you're not allowing yourself to really shine your light and put yourself out there man do more of which you know deep within you are meant to do. Usually that comes from things that you've experienced asa child so he looked in. Our child is really really important. Because i get it. I mean our adult mind thinks rational and when you think about certain things that you've experienced as a child you may think yeah makes sense. You know why it happened the way it did and what's going on. What not but you see the things your your child mind because your inner child your younger self is still part of you right. It has never left. It's just you grew up but in our child is still part of you so your child mind part within you that still that child does not understand right because all timelines they kind of come together so your younger self your future self your current self. It's all want you all are one. You all are part of each other right so you adult mind may think about something had happened when you were a child and it make sense why it happened away. I did ride why you couldn't do certain things a why you experienced the things that you experience or whatnot but your child self your younger self amine. At that time it didn't understand right. So let's say you're of your parent walked out on you. What now you as adults self. You may understand why your dad or your mom didn't spend much time with you why they did walk out on you or whatnot. Maybe now you understand your from the rational thinking you understand but that child self of you that experienced the agony the pain the disappointment the abandonment of losing their parent. It doesn't right so like i said you may understand it intellectually but there's part with immune still deeply hurt and scared and it can affect you today. Let's say your parents have gone through divorce right. May than a child. You may have taken on the belief that well marriages don't last. You know so even though now you know better because you've seen it you have friends and other family members who have been married for years but still the child part within you at younger self still knows the pain that you experienced when your parents were going through a divorce so no matter what shakespeare s a chop anything that was somewhat on the negative side effect that you as a child and it also affects you today because at that moment when it happened when your child it imprinted certain believe certain emotions onto you and now as you're trying to put yourself out as you're trying to go about creating the life that you want a wakeham spur tally and really trying to

ASA Shakespeare
Hisham Matar Reads Colm Tibn

The New Yorker: Fiction

03:58 min | 3 months ago

Hisham Matar Reads Colm Tibn

"Heike sean lowe deborah so the last time that we were doing this together we talked about shakespeare's memory by bore. His one minus one is a very different story a very different kind of story. What draws you to it. Well story. I love but it's also. I wanted to choose a story that i had read in the magazine and remember vividly the the encounter with us and it just affected me very very deeply and a for how simple it is. It is in very subtle ways. It's about such complex things. And i think for that reason over the years since i read it occasionally fought back on it and found more and more layers than us with the stories about a man from ireland living in the us who returns home As his mother is dying. And you've also written in fiction and nonfiction about exile about the loss of a parent about estrangement. There's something in the subject matter that speaks to you or is it more in the writing. Come tobin does that very well in his work at something that he manages to open up. That's space of ruthlessness that has touched very very much. So i'm sure. I'm sure there's a connection. I also have a very slightly embarrassing our relationship to ireland and to irish literature that i think has made me susceptible to us. Don't be embarrassed embarrassing. Because when i was seventeen years old i had come under the influence of all these great irish writers felt so drunk by their brilliance beckett's and enjoys keats and and i thought this is got to be a magical place having never been to ireland knowing nothing about ireland except those writers and i made a promise to myself seventy that where i go to ireland. Must kiss the ground. And i'm not fond of kissing the ground general for that reason to stay true to by seventeen year old self. I never went to ireland. I avoid until. I was shortlisted for a prize. My first book and the price was being judged by a writer that i admire took. Healy passed away a few years back and the mc for the prize was going to be calm toibin. So i thought. I can't miss that i must go and And it was magical but to negotiates kissing the ground. When i got off the airplane. I pretended as though i was betting tiber shoelace and kissed my finger and touch the ground. I thought that's a good compromise. But you know from that trip. Really a group of irish rises dirk mitch and roddy doyle and a few other writers of took me really embraced me and made me feel very welcome and i had such a natural connection and correspondence with them that has stretched for a long time to to this day. And i think it's got to be connected in part at least to some of the experiences that irish writers have gone through sadly whether it's censorship or exile and so they felt they felt very close to me an uber reading these irish writers. Seventeen year old. You were in egypt. I was in cairo My family had left libya but seven years before then and certainly for me. Then there were the most powerful reading experience. If you want to call it does in the english language. Partly because of what i was into but also i think because of what we're

Ireland Heike Sean Lowe Deborah Shakespeare Tobin Toibin Beckett Dirk Mitch Healy Roddy Doyle United States Cairo Libya Egypt
Which Matters More, a First or Last Impression?

No Stupid Questions

09:19 min | 4 months ago

Which Matters More, a First or Last Impression?

"Emails from a listener named sam cohn who happens to be a nursing student and he wants to know this our first impressions or last impressions more impactful question or you're thinking about the colonoscopy study i mean honestly there's only one cold i'll give you study will. There are many colonoscopy studies in the medical literature but only one in the psychology literature that i'm aware of exactly that social scientists would know about and that's the famous economy and colleagues study about peak and end the peak and theory. So can you tell us. About the pecan therion. How colonoscopy works to illustrate that so danny katamon and his colleagues did a study where everybody in. The study is getting a colonoscopy. You are randomly assigned. These are people who are already going to be getting on us. Yes i think. It was a collaboration with physicians. If only there were experiments that we could sign up for four which we get a colonoscopy decide. The i would prefer the chemotherapy pleased survey. I'm going to prefer the high fat diet one. This study randomly signs patients who are already signed up for a colonoscopy to either get colonoscopy as usual which i am told and as they say in the article is a pretty unpleasant experience because of the mechanics of the whole thing and the experimental condition is where the exploratory equipment of they have to put into. You is held there for a little longer than would necessarily be the case and your instinct might say oh. That's the bad version of the experiment right because you get more pain but what was so clever about this experiment is that yet. It's more pain. But because you're just having the tip of the scope to sitting there in the rectum. It's more moderate level of pain than what it's moving around during the colonoscopy itself. I think they would probably just call it a mild discomfort compared to a greater discomfort. I mean i can't imagine what it's like to have. The tip of a colonoscopy will come back in a week or two and give us the details so the reason why is interesting. Is that patients who underwent the extended procedure with the additional. Moderate level of pain actually raided the overall experience as less unpleasant and the reason why this was so important is that congressman was at the time developing a theory. Where there is the remembering self and the experiencing self and he says the experiencing self is just experiencing moment by moment. How happy my house. Adami anxious in my hungry am i but the remembering self is consolidating all of that and collapsing it into a memory and he had the theory that when the remembering self processes information and collapses a whole string of moments into one impression. Two things are going to take additional weight. One is the peak of the experience of the high in the low points and the other is the end points and so this famous study affirmed the hypothesis that the end of an experience takes disproportionate weight when we evaluate the overall experience. Now knowing the colonoscopy study what will i ask for if i had the chance to ask my doctor you say gimme the katamon colonoscopy please exactly the katamon special so it's interesting. Is that even though. This finding is a sturdy finding. I don't want the extra pain although since you're inexperienced in colonoscopy so we'll have to see if maybe you'll change your mind after you have but let's say that we want to take it out of the realm of the colonoscopy which i probably should and let's say we want to steer this back toward what sam is asking about the first impression or the last impression imagine a family vacation but say you are apparent with kids and a spouse or whatnot and you go on a family holiday. What would you rather have of the to a great beginning or a great ending y. So oh gosh. I think i would like to have a great ending because i do think the peak end effect does hold true so my ambivalence at my colonoscopy if the vacation we're say four days i would rather have a terrible first day and a wonderful fourth day than the opposite that makes sense because as you were describing the lasting thing is the memory so of course you want that to the positive one. Yeah the whole memory is going to be colored by the last moments more than like the mid point or something. I have to say. Ever since i read that paper years ago and interviewed donald reddell meyer one of the co about it. I have tried to apply the peak in theory all the time in my life in interviews with my family and random encounters with strangers. The minute something good happens. I just stop so you just leave when i learned about this. It made me think first of all of so many rituals that are part of our lives that seem to capitalize on the peak in theory. So dessert why desert last. Why don't we eat it. i. I don't know how much yoga you're doing these days so much. Okay so shiva's nina. Do you know this corpse pose at the end. Of course it feels so good to be sitting there and completely relaxing. And there's a reason. I think that every yoga practice ends with shibata so the next time you think. Do i wanna do yoga. Your memory is least colored by that. But that's challenge this notion so i think you've done a pretty good job persuading everybody. The last impressions are really powerful. But let's talk about first impressions. I mean there's this whole mountain of cliches about that right. You never get a second chance to make a first impression and so on and let's go back to that vacation if you show up with your family to this place where your vacation for four days in your first impression is terrible. Doesn't that set a tone that will be impossible to recover from and from which no final impression is possible to save the experience yet to argue that last impressions take on disproportionate. Way does not say that first impressions. Don't matter disproportionately also for different reasons. First impressions can carry more weight than the mid point or some other point in experience. So one reason is that first impression. Has this kind of path dependency so say you have a really bad day of that. Four day vacation. Everybody's now on a sour mood now. You're all fighting on day two and then because you were fighting on day two day. Three is a total catastrophe. Even those comes out you get off on the wrong foot as it were. And then everything. Kind of goes downhill from there. You know when. I first read this question from sam our first impressions or less imprisons more impactful. My initial impulse was to try to answer it. Like we're trying to do now but my my second impulse and the deeper one was to view it as i do as a writer which is to say wool. Both i think for everything i've ever written whether to book an article Podcast script whatever. I'd probably spend three to ten times more effort on the beginning and the end than on anything else because as a writer was informed years and years and years ago by my experiences a reader which is at the beginning really really matters the ending really really matters and there's also a notion expressed in various places. I don't know where i got it from. Maybe the talmud or shakespeare that the best beginnings have a little bit of the end in them. If the writing is good so i do wonder if maybe sam is pursuing an either or choice when the answer in fact should be an end answer. Both end is usually the answer to checkoff and the great multiple choice of life. The way that this question was framed. It's like when we are meeting another person or when you open a book or you start an article or you start listening to a podcast or watching a movie. It's so clear to us when we just think about those experiences. How the very beginning. It does matter because you are very quickly coming to judgments. And there is this research on thin slicing by among others nominee embody. Maybe you did freakonomics episode on this note. I read about thin slicing in one of malcolm. Glows books blink. This is the idea that you can come to very quick impressions and they're not even necessarily verbally articulated ones but just got feelings of like good or bad in milliseconds and that these very quick impressions can be predictive of later judgements. That are much more deliberative and so forth. That's an argument in favor of a strong first impression because in some cases lake with a move your book or a person if the first impression is not a good one there will be no opportunity for a final impression where the final impression will be one second after the first impression right hopefully less with people and more with like net flicks. So imagine there a job interview and your first impression of candid. It is a positive one. Well danny ottoman would remind us that then confirmation bias is gonna kick in and then for the last fifty eight minutes of the hour long interview. You're just going to be confirming your own positive impression. And so there's a path dependency in judgment and not just the path dependency in life events.

Sam Cohn Danny Katamon Donald Reddell Meyer Adami Shibata SAM Nina Malcolm Danny Ottoman
Gregory Sierra Dies: ‘Sanford And Son’ And ‘Barney Miller’ Star Was 83

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

00:30 sec | 4 months ago

Gregory Sierra Dies: ‘Sanford And Son’ And ‘Barney Miller’ Star Was 83

"The family of actor gregory sierra best known for his role as julio fuentes on the nineteen seventies sitcom sanford and son reveals. He died earlier this month. This is only for this pleasure. The new york city native also worked at the national shakespeare company later. Detective and tv's barney miller and had parts in films including the towering inferno a spokesman for sierras family says he died of cancer january fourth. He was eighty

Gregory Sierra Julio Fuentes National Shakespeare Company Sanford Barney Miller New York City Sierras Cancer