21 Burst results for "Shafran"

"shafran" Discussed on The Shawn Harvey Morning Show Podcast

The Shawn Harvey Morning Show Podcast

01:51 min | 4 months ago

"shafran" Discussed on The Shawn Harvey Morning Show Podcast

"And it just comes back to that if it wasn't force. Md's it wouldn't be a want morning show. Let's see the hearts chat show everybody some love heart a chat room westbound shafran chatroom heart set sydney. Let's go start with heart. Sat down with dr. Hey where the heart. Where the heart. Whoa hey sitting. In the general. Ed bread chatroom pin chat room access city. Let's down hey. Red heart sat down heart a walk. Hey hey hey. That's so funny that we're doing it like that because that's how to this retired..

sydney Ed shafran
"shafran" Discussed on They Walk Among Us

They Walk Among Us

04:41 min | 5 months ago

"shafran" Discussed on They Walk Among Us

"Damage the occupant from the defense suggested that hauling had approached chevrolet moss to steal a car he had supposedly planned to gather together over a hundred people whom he could all they would stage military coup in an old rate shafran country. It was stated by michael wall kind. Qc but to enact his plan hauling needed a vehicle to transport the far roms apparently hauling never intended to take a law given the defendants razzi can conflicting accounts. Whether or not his plan to amass an army was indeed the motive behind his actions would be question only.

michael wall over a hundred people shafran
Kansas Coach Les Miles Out Over Behavior With Women While at LSU

The Paul Finebaum Show

04:53 min | 5 months ago

Kansas Coach Les Miles Out Over Behavior With Women While at LSU

"And hello and welcome back. We continue to talk about the situation in kansas Formerly lsu were less. Mild is under employed in case. You missed it earlier. The headlines of course have been screaming since last night that les miles in kansas have mutually parted ways. That's a rather benevolent way of putting less were shown the door. He had a disastrous. Run there but it was what happened. In two thousand thirteen at lsu that ultimately got him fired. Reuss feldman has covered less miles for a very long time in bruce. Thanks so much for the time shafran we want to talk to you about including your pizza just hit about the the nfl mock draft. But let's start with less miles not a surprise. But what do you think Finally pushed kansas over the edge and And did away with less after what has been coming out for days if not weeks from baton rouge untenable this the idea. Kansas jeff long's the ad there obviously sec. Fans will remember from his time at arkansas. It's just been an abysmal run. And the fact that has searched process get less miles there in the first place was kind of a jolt in kind of a head scratcher but now after what had come out from Over the weekend. And friday from the lsu part of this. I don't know how in twenty twenty one kansas could say. Oh yeah we're okay with that just even if you look at the wording on how jeff long explained the move last night it was just like we got to win more games. It was like wait a minute. There were some really Disgraceful actions that are alleged against less miles from his time at lsu. And i don't know how they could look the other way with a straight face and say okay this a guy who the lsu administration had clearly put some you know unique situations around him and stipulations in dealing with people and some of those allegations are so troubling and so disturbing. I really think they had no choice but to move on. And the wording parted ways whatever they just had to make a change and get him out of there. And i'm suspect at some point in the nazi just future an after avenue. Ad as well. Yeah that was. Obviously a lot of people are going now and you know jeff. Long didn't exactly distinguish himself at arkansas. Were shown the door there and surprisingly or maybe not. Surprisingly the program has been on fire under hunter year. Check but i mean how can you. How can you possibly keep jeff long on the job after mean and football's only part of the problem. The basketball program has been under fire for years. Exactly i mean there's issues with the ncaa and the basketball program ac- basketball is a bigger deal there than football. But i think in this. It's so many issues. That are layered together. And i think it's the tone-deaf aspect Jeff lungs long relationship with last miles The allegations in the things in those investigations about less. They are really disturbing. Act act especially as they relate to student workers there. I think it's really troubling and the fact that k. You in jeff. Along the way it was explained. Even if you look back i think over the weekend. Less miles attorney gave us gave a statement that i think makes may kansas look quite honestly even worse that they kind of knew about it and that they were okay with it was almost like well because other people were alarmed by now that it was that it was something that was like shouldn't have happened just because of the perception on it i just think it all of it is made that tenure. Look so sketchy. And i just don't know how your kansas how you don't kind of rip the band aid off at this point and say hey we gotta make a different a different move here. I just think right now you look at it yes the. Ncaa extended the dead period much longer. So they don't really have to rush in through this coaching search process. But who's going to be making the new head football coach higher in this. I mean this is a lot of stuff for the kansas administration to sort out as they move on not just from last miles but i think as they move in a different direction for. Who's in charge of the parliament.

LSU Kansas Jeff Long Reuss Feldman Shafran Arkansas Jeff Basketball Baton Rouge Bruce NFL SEC Football Ncaa Long Kansas Administration Parliament
TV Dinners

Gastropod

08:38 min | 6 months ago

TV Dinners

"How has food. Tv changed over time. And how has it changed us. All not just us gastropod. That's right. you're listening to gastropod the podcast. That looks at food through the lens of science and history. I'm cynthia graber. And i'm nicola twilley and this episode. We're taking a spin around the dial which sounds medieval but believe us when we say. Tv's used to not have remotes. You had to literally spin odile. Even i barely remember those wild and wonderful days. This episode is supported in part by cabot. Creamery cabot is a co-op of new england and new york dairy farmers who make award winning cheeses with pure rich milk straight from family farms their specialty cheeses include unique flavors like roasted garlic cheddar and their team of cheese graders indirect with every batch to ensure award-winning quality. Go to cabinet. She's dot com to find out where to buy cabot near you there. You'll also find pairings how to videos and delicious comfort food recipes like the best mac and cheese and more the first thing to know about the very earliest food. Tv wasn't actually on tv. It was on the radio almost as soon as a radio came into being in the nineteen twenties in the us food radio came into being. It was a really easy way for programs to be created because they were easy and cheap. They were obvious outlets for advertising for sponsorship for food products and appliances. So that's where we saw food before. Tv was even a twinkle in the eye. Kathleen collins is a librarian and professor at john jay college of criminal justice and she's the author of the book watching what we eat. The evolution of television cooking shows the stars of these very first food shows. Were hardly stars in today's cents. These radio shows were unglamorous. It was all teaching housewives. How to economize and optimize and generally do all their chores. Better one of the not remotely. Glamorous stars was a woman named and sammy who we can only imagine was supposed to be the wife of uncle sam which is kind of disturbing. She wasn't actually a person. It was a program delivered by an arm of the. Usda and the she was not just one person but several different actors around the country. Adopting regional accents similarly a figure. That's much more well known was betty crocker. She actually started on the radio and like aunt. Sammy was played by many different actresses and she was one of the first we. Could i guess call her one of the first cooking teachers in broadcasting And we have some fun you one for. You are cooking lessons. This week is on some new christmas cookies. And besides that with sending seven ethically recipes to order numbers of schools who had indicated that they want the wednesday menu ambassador. I hope you'll be sure to watch for them on. Sammy's show was called housekeepers. Chat and betty crocker's was the slightly more enticing cooking school of the air. That sounds as though it was all about meringues and souffles and all things fluffy which it decidedly was not and then the very first television station came into being in the nineteen twenties though at the time the technology was still super experimental and people did not have. Tv's in their homes yet. Even as late as nineteen fifty only nine percent of american homes had a tv set. Foot made the jump to tv before. Tv even made the jump to people's living rooms so more megan was thirst. Tv shafran her snapple titled Tv show was called suggestions for dishes to be prepared and cooked in fifteen minutes and that demonstrated single ring. Cookery back in hundred thirty six. This is julie smith. She's a food writer. And podcast and the author of a new book called taste and the tv chef and she's british so i will translate for her single ring. Cookery means the kind of thing you can make on just one burner in your bed. Sit which is british for a studio apartment. Thanks for the cross pen translation of my uses as well as my bizarre accident. True also interesting. Megan was doing this. Fifteen minute meal about eighty years. Before jamie oliver's tv show and book of the same title. We have a picture of her filming her show dressed in. What looks like a raincoat on our website. Glamour personified where was i but by the nineteen forties food. Tv show started showing up for real in the us to the shows were cheap to produce and they were sponsored by kitchen and food companies and they were pretty boring. It was a very practical probably rather dry and yet a lot of the airtime was filled with these programs in different markets around the country. These shows obviously targeted at women most. Tv's at the time. Were actually in public places rather than homes especially bars where there weren't a lot of housewives. There was a show actually the first national televised. Tv show was james beard and it started in the mid nineteen forties and despite everything i just said about how most of the tv shows and the radio shows were led by home. Economists james beard was not a home economist. He was a gourmet and he was really all about the food and so it was a little strange to have this show on. Tv in a bar being watched by men james beard was kind of a one off for a long time but still here we go right off the bat you can see a gender divide in food tv women were the ones who were proper and teaching viewers had cook the man a ormond. Just appreciate food for food. Food was a chore for women and a pleasure for men until the only lucas came along. So diani lucas. Like james beard was a bit of an anachronism. She was a cordon bleu trained chef. Who was born in. Britain came from a very artistically oriented family. Do you only had a restaurant and cooking school in new york and she treated the kitchen as her art studio. it was her serious creative outlet. Her recipes were complex and mostly french. And they took a lot of time to make she was also kind of a taskmaster her british accent and her scraped back hair and she did not cut corners. But kathleen says the. Tony did occasionally have a little sparkle in her eye. Like when she told viewers to use as much rama's they liked or needed in their cribs. Suzanne that show was on the evening and prime time and it ran from nineteen forty seven until nineteen fifty-six but she was kind of ahead of her time. I would not be surprised if many of your listeners have never heard of the oni lucas. She just came along at the wrong time for the public. Viewing audience at diani did have a big influence on one particularly important person. Julia child the french chef. I'm doolittle she was a california girl. She was not a spy for the cia before being cooking show guru as many people think she was a research assistant at the oh s the precursor to the cia but she was really one of these happy accidents. She married paul child who had a foreign service assignment. in france. They moved to france and she fell in love with food. And she got herself trained. You know at the core blows school which was really challenging as a woman and she just became. You know a master in nineteen sixty one. Julia published a book with two other. Women called mastering the art of french. Cooking it is eight home and that seven hundred fifty. Two page book provided the kick. That landed julia in front of millions of viewers happen was. Julia was doing the rounds promoting her book and she'd been invited onto a book show hosted by a local professor on w. g. b. h. Which is the boston public. Tv station and she decided she didn't want to just talk with the professor. She wanted to cook. She wanted to teach him how to make a proper french omelette. The professor wasn't a particularly skilled cook in this live tv cooking class but people wrote into the show after it aired. They called julia a hoot and the producer thought. Julia was incredibly well-spoken so gbh gave her her own show. It would eventually become the french chef. The show was a huge hit. It was on national. Tv for three decades and it not only made julia household name but it also kind of launched the modern era of food

Cynthia Graber Nicola Twilley Odile Creamery Cabot James Beard Kathleen Collins Betty Crocker Sammy Shafran John Jay College Of Criminal J Cabot Julie Smith New England New York Cabinet Usda Diani Lucas Jamie Oliver
Coronavirus testing must double or triple before U.S. can safely reopen, experts say

COVID-19: What You Need to Know

04:30 min | 1 year ago

Coronavirus testing must double or triple before U.S. can safely reopen, experts say

"Corona virus is still overwhelming the American healthcare system. But here at the start of a new week there is a growing focus on recovery and what it would take to get us out of the house back to work back to school. Back to shaking hands again. A panel of four dozen economists social scientists lawyers and ethicists agree now. The country must dramatically increased testing before any reopening can safely occur. It's all part of what this bipartisan. Blue Ribbon panel calls a roadmap to pandemic resilience. Danielle Allen is a lead author and she joins us now from Harvard's Shafran Center for Ethics Doctor Allen. What's involved here so big picture is we need a massive ramp-up of testing tracing unsupported isolation so finding people who are positive for coveted tracing their contacts warning their context making sure they get tested when people have to go into quarantine or be isolated retreated. They'd be supported There's job protection that care packages yet access to countries and so forth during that period of isolation what does it mean to ramp up like that it means go really big It means five million tests a day. Not where we've been which is more about four hundred thousand two week right since really talking about big ramp up. Its moment for Candu America to really show up and missile to work. It almost sounds like you're describing a Marshall Plan for the United States. You can think of it as a Marshall Plan you could also think of it as Eisenhower's highway infrastructure Building all those roads reds across the country and this is really going to take. Everybody said we need the federal government but as for state governments and there's a role for city and county leaders and officials so at the end of the day. Contact tracing is going to be something happens on a local level and this is a lot bigger than say just getting everyone's temperature taken at the door before they walk into the office. This is bigger than that. This is about a disease containment disease suppression so really. It's about identifying who has the infection so that they can be treated and isolated prior to spreading it. One of the biggest challenges with Kobe is the number of people who are asymptomatic carriers so estimates are ranging Hard to zero in on a number but twenty to forty percents of people who have the virus are asymptomatic as one of the things. We've all been really surveying our heads against is the fact that the guidance instill that tests should just be symptomatic people. That means you've got a whole lot of people out there spreading virus around. We haven't been able to do anything about it so far. It's been about three months since the country's been living with Corona virus and we've tested one percent of the population. Is this doable? It's absolutely terrible. I mean it's an interesting thing that everybody's worried it's doable. The question is not whether it is just. How is it doable? That sequestering should be asking and they're really two parts to the how so there's an existing supply chain for testing and has a lot of choke points even with its existing choke points it could definitely ramp up capacity so with the existing supply chain of people who make swabs people who do the processing of tasks and so forth. We ought to be able to get up to two million a day if we organize it. Well if we kick in with some serious coordination driven by the Federal Government and federal procurement in addition though there's an innovation pathway to scaling up even further so one of the biggest choke points is really just swabs go up people's noses and the fact that when you stick swaps up people's noses. Everybody involved has to personal protective equipment. P. p. e. A mattress gets to be a really bad complicated enterprise. The good news is that just this past week. Rutgers was approved for a test and there are other spin tests in the work so we ought to be able to have a way of doing testing. Doesn't require P P. I'm a match and permit a pathway to ramp up but again that's GonNa need. Investment in coordination from the Federal Government's. Take those things that are technologically possible and real already and scale them up to the level of mass production and mass distribution speaking of investment. How much is this going to cost? Well when we think about costs let's start by remembering what the current situation is costing us so collective social distancing collected quarantine is costing US three hundred and fifty billion dollars a month. Okay got him over that three hundred fifty billion a month and we see the massive unemployment numbers. What will this cost fifteen billion a month? Okay so over two years of doing this. You can imagine that we'd have to spend somewhere between a hundred and three hundred billion so hundred to three hundred billion over two years as opposed to what we're currently losing three hundred and fifty billion a month's

Federal Government Danielle Allen United States Asymptomatic Candu America Shafran Center Harvard Kobe Eisenhower Rutgers
Big Thorn Farm and Brewery

The Brit and Yankee Craft Beer Pubcast

18:58 min | 2 years ago

Big Thorn Farm and Brewery

"With me sitting across all the Tree House Vaa which was about in just a second why are co-owners leaning into the microphone and and I'm Aaron Young together owner and you guys have seniors fabulous land which everybody needs to come bounds vermilion county. We're in a beautiful part of the county right off the little million river. We have an old armfield property that we waited for people. Come to our place and drink are yeah. I've been Brian for about ten years and I learned how to refers to work at a place called. Jt Walkers I. I knew I was going to be there to back. I wouldn't rolling we bought it. It was nothing it resistant dirt. We would bring people out. Show them what we thought in common we're. GonNa do like Brecca Cornfield. It is a field surrounded by trees so everywhere. You look out here coming up. Can we did see some neighbors on houses houses out there so you you offer rush hour decided to brewery and the era news oversee having four wanted to do something different. Why did you leave. We started this Afar Roy. The original idea called big farm with hops. We don't actually have anymore. We added Earth live herbs fruits and other things for brewing witnesses kept going through our minds venturing now. I have a degree in science from Missouri so basically none of Akron with what we do now in college we manager walkers actually when I graduated from I live with my mom. She lives in Muhammad where Berea and we work together. The property property there was nothing here there was no well no water no electricity or anything. Erin and I spilt everything here on the farm ourselves sweetser house brewery and then french-african Oliver Solar stuff win saw and that's one of the things you're agreed that really it means. We're not connected so any electrical utility. Everything we do is solar. We have a tiny bit of wind with the Council so lectures to run racer. I got sued separate systems. One run Shafran didn't warning from each side and Carolina but we are rising solution so we don't do anything I like having to. I think we probably start out with about one kilowatt combining it now they don't use really not however hundred one and a half kilowatt so if you wanted to run that Saint Peter's for one hour you would need one and a half kilowatt solar power running our I. I didn't really have no electric. We do have a generator that we used to. I was taking a lot of trips to get things running against the houses over nine. What exactly was there how did you I wasn't house brand just kind of went for they're using our plan Sousse. Oh maybe it's a glorified shares are more ammon. Aaron says well all year. That's what we did and we kinda made it into a tiny house. It's not a super cute tiny house and we did an addition so now it's the tiny for three hundred square feet rest the houses cannery revolt virtues in the Middle Beautiful. We can get away with a smaller space because we have a lot of outdoor space. We work outside outside constantly so we you know we can make this sacrifice to have all these cool outside space. They literally grassroots literally some cases right because you're adding cross but you're adding indefinitely ingredients that are not mainstream. Now we do everything from the waters with lawyers from our world. I'm with you everything with natural carbonation different tanks from other people use consumers electric line tanks and then reduced harvests in the kegs or bottles. Zurich just been consistent temperature brew house which is well. I think that that was the second and third they're building. That actually grew in our S- our goal talk about halfway up earth out about halfway up the building control temperature voice voice research kind of scratchy throat underground firms got to keep it better for that heating cooling like right now conditioning so so we use them in the winter. We've run air conditioning offer solar aw it was wondering direct pyro or electric dryer run them propane so you both ruining with known traditional degrees and oversee down in Aver Bernard scratch through well known for adding weird. What do you what your primary ingredients scratchy not cool to me. They know how to go into the woods. Find random things I might. I might not do so well without it. We're with drinking visa. We're just come to the guys in a minute but we just grow things and then use those for the most part we venture into the woods and I take three inches off trees Oak Hickory share and Sassafras as the beer and we found a few other ingredients but mostly arm for ingredients one of the things that is key to your furrier news mentioned this on your website everywhere is that you are for men to over something the word we'll how how does it work cut it down then we use light a flame reader most of the time also also down on south of a large jar the logs and you have small logs. Charles logs and add them directly to preventing veer and picks up a flavor in a matter of days so rather than a beer sitting on for like six months to a character would character. It's almost instant so you know do you actually getting any of the charring right when you're showering on the outside you're trying to get out from the beer yeah so that really deep charter boats of -sarily but sometimes we'll do uncharted twigs and branches because like Cherry Sassafras with with with our trying at all because they have so much aroma on a short. I guess I think it's really right under the party but when you boil like Cherry for example recoils oil for what ten minutes and it's returned cooling yeah. It's really cool I. It doesn't sound like they have barking up the wrong tree. Thank you for our do firewalls in some of your fears is is this the same theory I mean you don't put them in a bag or or you know just directly into the chart which sanitize crestwood so it's never had it right off the trees a variety of trees and I know this one that recently somewhere in this enormous swarms on it right that was so severe so that's the locus street. That's how we farm for that tree because the first thing this honey locusts there's honey locust sandblast but we harvested of those when we are yards. That was the first thing we built so we harvested about twelve of those because they're really rot resistance nineteen hours copter. You don't have to now about six years and we didn't want harvesting more frequently endeavor how much labor before getting what we want out what ingredients are throwing putting into the now we have busy. Take over there like this. Is your juice juice. Soaking a little bit of outback third anniversary anniversary is pretty much in the so the Jews Joseph Ours are have gooseberries before we only do one a beer with that but our plans got big enough real numbers so did wine called devil goose which is a highly off almost like a double life varies and the juices a sour with fairies charred wood wood hickory okay. I I have Jordan did you have I had that I wish is busy working silently taking now. What is this John The amber so Meraz. Yes graces the ryen stores. This is terrible. The ryen spice finish the double doubles delicious tried the Ginger Ri- which junior lick the rise really in writing and ember downgradings currently so in verses that I said it was much bigger than we anticipated. We could imagine and it was planned for twice. The thing is we could imagine times the big recently celebrated the anniversary say brewed any celebrate to reveal we did a bunch of different fierce for that we released the we all our collaboration with JT walkers though we had their version version on ours was this hour there's Halio ours would retain recipe because John John Gal Pale Ale. John Dow is our good friends that we've known for quite some time actually carpenter and he would bring hop Ernie. We'll start naming beers after because John Gal pal after when I still worked to eighteen New Zealand New Zealand top fears. I know that's really cool. We'll have to try that one. Definitely as we were in the second time was down here. It's a Saturday Europen business twelve noon to nine and and interrupted but it sounds like you got to and on Fridays. You didn't sell it. Also luckily with what what did you get in commiserating with black roemeling cross hostile so they already have sir. We're GONNA have to try that one then what soda what sort of ingredients favorite supportive and how do you never know the players so we plant the urban use. It can't acquire any other way I don't know until two or three of growing a lot of perennial herbs zone a lot lemon screw it we use the age and I've been used janning would time tart take time do allow go down there and just try and a beer we did. I I green great. Run another one and try try mall today. Driving arriving should say low alcohol is using it seems like they're always liked the Berlin lower and lower. What's the highest degree when you have to go all the way up to eight percent sometimes but I would.

Aaron Young Cherry Sassafras Tree House Vaa Brian Sousse Vermilion County Brecca Cornfield Council Afar Roy Middle Beautiful John John Gal Pale Ale John Dow Oliver Solar Aver Bernard Shafran Carolina Ryen Janning Erin
"shafran" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"shafran" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"The Washington nationals ace report his three hundred strikeout of the season. When it got Miami Marlins rookie Austin dean swinging on a three to slaughter that ended attempts at that. Being the seventeenth pitcher since one thousand nine hundred fan for hundred batters in the season showy at Tony is scheduled to undergo Tommy John surgery on his right elbow next week. After the conclusion of the two thousand eighteen regular season the Mets of activated third baseman David Wright from the sixty day DL of the head of Tuesday night's game right hasn't played in a major league game since may twenty seven two thousand sixteen. He's to start at their base this Saturday Kris Bryant was removed from Tuesday night's game against the pirates due to an apparent left wrist injury. Frank got hit on the wrist by a Chris Archer pitch and the bond mother. Fourth-inning Garcia will undergo arthroscopic surgery on his right knee, October second the knee has been bothering Garcia most of the season. I then Shafran this has been your fantasy sports radio network. News update fantasy sports radio network keyword fantasy on your iheartradio app. Koo-do I play high school softball for. I play for my mom and dad has never missed a game. I played for the smell of my leather glove, the sound of infield chatter, and that incredible feel of the ball jumping off the bat. I play for sacrificed bonds in sacrifice flies because they've taught me what it means to be a teammate. Whether they're playing for their teammates their classmates or their community high school student athletes in North Carolina, learn important lessons, they'll use for the rest of their lives like respect for the rules time management skills and the value of hard work and sacrifice. I played high.

Fourth-inning Garcia David Wright Miami Marlins Tommy John Austin dean Chris Archer Mets Kris Bryant Shafran Washington North Carolina softball Frank sixty day
"shafran" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

04:43 min | 3 years ago

"shafran" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"And there's a dark story there. I'll play a clip from that movie three identical strangers. Here's bobby's Shafran describing what it was like to discover in college that he had a brother and identical triplet named Eddy here is Bobby in the front who brought them together talking about the day that they met. I wouldn't leave the story of someone else retelling it, but it's true. They worded. It started on to college was the first day of school. All these people coming up to me seeing Eddie. How are you any? Hi. I'm like, hey, I don't know what you're talking about. This guy turned around. I knew it was that he's double. So you're not going believe a twin brother. A twin brother. A third one named David. I mean, this story, this movie. I mean, people were on the edge of their seats in the theater where I was Anton well structured, like a thriller. I'm part of what we're talking about too. Is that the the way that movie documentary movies are heavy volved over the years? And Michael Moore certainly led the charge. There's much more narrative tropes more thrills, more structured, withholding of information. You know it. It becomes like a thriller this movie. I'm seeing stories reporters saying that parents are sending their kids off to see the the latest, blockbuster, and then they're going to see the documentaries in the theater next door. Though I have to say we took our kids to see these movies too, because you know, we wanted them to have that experience, but it's an interesting phenomenon that's going on in some places. Yeah. Well, the other thing is that is that the net flicks of the world, you know, used to be back in the day that you had PBS you had HBO. It was all very granola. It was all very good for you. And now you have this exploding atmosphere. You have an and c. n. n. which made Rb g in three identical strangers. You have ESPN which made the Oscar winner a few years ago OJ made in America. You've got show time. You've got net GO which made the Jane Goodall documentary. Another feel good documentary, celebrating a hero, Jane Goodall, and then not flexes is just churning them out to even if they don't all you know, hit theaters. So we're, we're in a new golden age if you like, they talk about television, we'll television fuels a lot of these documentaries that do have theatrical life. Here's a clip from Mr. Rogers. Won't you be my neighbor? Fred Rogers explaining here, why he asked children that question, won't you be my neighbor on every episode of his show. To be my neighbor. But I suppose. It's an invitation for somebody to be close to. The greatest thing that we can do to help somebody. No. That they're loud and capable of loving. The music in the background, it's that hopeful sort of inspiring tone that you felt throughout that movie in. You got me going again. I got a lot of callers on my board. Let me get I in here. Charleston, South Carolina Kane is on the line. Hi, Kane. Welcome to the program. He got me. What did you think you saw? Won't you be my neighbor Kane? Did you? You loved it? Yeah. I loved it. And a friend of mine took me wasn't even my idea and. I kinda always thought that it was an act with Mr. Rogers and from hate to sound insensitive. Inagua thought he was a little creepy and then I saw the movie and then the by whole paradigm shifted. He is truly a nice person just good through and through. And the other thing I really liked about him is he tackled issues everything from racism. The gay issue, things like that in very, very subtle gentle ways, subtle ways that children could relate to and Thompson. You saw that throughout this movie over and over again. Absolutely. And I think a lot of people thought as she said that maybe he was a little creepy. Maybe they were. There was going to be a a reveal, you know, something awful in his past, and and I hate to be giving out a spoiler for those of you who haven't seen it, but it turns out he's really as nice as not nicer than we thought even raking, you know, boundaries in terms of of child psychology and figuring out how to reach children and and how to really engage them is that.

Fred Rogers Kane Inagua Jane Goodall bobby HBO Eddie Michael Moore Anton Thompson David Eddy Shafran ESPN Oscar c. n. n. America Charleston
"shafran" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:07 min | 3 years ago

"shafran" Discussed on KQED Radio

"A military wife things like independence day shows what america's all about three new us citizens on what independence day means to them bobby shafran david kelman and nettie gallon met each other when they were nineteen years old in one thousand nine hundred eighty and discovered they were triplets separated at birth and reared in three different families it was brotherly love at first sight they have the identical curly hair widegrinning jenny bullion charm and many of the same tation mannerisms it's ridiculous we all the same cussing we always time i'll start a some he'll finish it we all like chinese food russell is at one time this triplets moved into gather and became minor kisha liberties clubbing posing for photos opening restaurant and even doing a movie scene with madonna but in time they also discovered why they had been taken from each other at birth they're hurt confusion and anger is at the center of three identical strangers documentary directed by two mortal that when a jury awarded sundance and is in theaters now tim mortal joins us from new york thanks so much for being with us thanks i'm mexico what are the triplets find each other suddenly and it was just over a period of a few weeks yeah it was an extraordinary coincidence one of them bobby shafran went to college in upstate new york is first day that turned up and immediately everyone greeted him like he'd been if he is guys are kind of up to slapping on the back goes a kissing him he's never been there before he doesn't know what they're talking about an eventually someone comes up to him and says will you opted and he says yeah i was and this guy says i think you have a twin brother and from the he finds his brother eddie they appear on the front page of variety of newspapers in neo carrier and next day they get cool from someone saying on reading about you guys in the paper and i see a picture and i looked just like you i think you're not twin's triplets on the third wow what are the brothers the triplets notice about each other initially when they met they had all these things in common they they realized they'd like to say music same food they would like to older women they smoke the same cigarettes so do these incredible similarities that couldn't be accounted for by chance or really by them because they'd grown up in very very different families all from the same adoption agency of course the louise wise agency in new york don't adoption agencies usually make it a point to keep siblings together they do so it was very unusual that these brothers had been separated at birth doubt they weren't the only identical siblings had been spits up by this agency who are who has to be set a very high end adoption agency yeah well that that's when we need to ask what was going on because there was at least one scientists with another agenda wasn't there yeah i mean i should probably spoiler alert for anyone who wants to see the movie because i think is going cold but turns out they were split up as part of a scientific experiments run by a prominent new york based psychiatrist looking into nature versus nurture and the the relative importance of heredity versus environment i'm going to mention the name of the doctor who's experiment this was dr peter neubauer who was director of the child development center in manhattan i'm not sure we can fairly expect an answer from you or anyone but how how could a man of science and medicine showman who was himself the son of holocaust survivors in austria do this to people that's the central question of the film one of the central questions is why to good people sometimes too bad or unethical things are not interested in trying to portray him or any of anyone who ran this experiment as evil or bad i think it's really interesting there's gray areas of human behavior peter navarro was.

america bobby shafran nineteen years
"shafran" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:19 min | 3 years ago

"shafran" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The age of seven and for her july fourth is all about family i feel like more than ever right now being able to share the love that i have for my family with them is so important when they're people who are being torn apart now getting to spend time with their children and that's something that we have taken for granted for so long but it's such a great blessing another blessing there's that she gets to celebrate the holiday with her husband he's in the us military and deploys later this year so this is going to be one of the few hot as we get to spend together he's gone for christmas and the rest of the holidays it's also very special because it's a military wife things like independence day shows what america's all about three new us citizens on what independence day means to them bobby shafran david kelman nettie gallon met each other when they were nineteen years old in one thousand nine hundred eighty and discovered they were triplets separated at birth and reared in three different families it was brotherly love at first sight they have the identical curly hair wide grins and a bogan charm and many of the same tastes and mannerisms it's ridiculous we all the same discussing well his time i'll start sentencing he'll finish it we all like chinese food russell is at one time this triplets moved into gather and became minor kisha liberties clubbing posing for photos opening a restaurant and even doing a movie scene with madonna but in time they also discovered why they had been taken from each other at birth they're hurt confusion and anger is at the center of three identical strangers documentary directed by two mortal that when a jury awarded sundance and is in theaters now tim mortal joins us from new york thanks so much for being with us thanks i'm go the triplets find each other suddenly and it was just over a period of a few weeks yeah it was an extraordinary coincidence one of them bobby shafran went to college in in upstate new york i turned up and immediately everyone greeted him like he'd been there for years guys are coming up to slapping you on the back goes a kissing him he's never been there before he doesn't know what they're talking about an eventually someone comes up to him and says will you adopted and he says yeah i was and this guy says i think you have a twin brother and from the he finds his brother eddie they appear on the front page of a variety of newspapers in the new york area and next day they get cool from someone saying i'm reading about you guys in the paper and i see a picture and i looked just like you i think you're not twin's triplets on the third wow what are the the brothers the triplets notice about each other initially when they met they had all these things in common they realized they'd like to say music same food they would like to older women they smoke the same cigarettes so do these incredible similarities that couldn't be accounted for by chance already by viral because they'd grown up in very very different families all from the same adoption agency of course the louise wise agency in new york go adoption agencies usually make it a point to keep siblings together they do so it was very unusual that these brothers had been separated at birth turned out they weren't the only identical siblings had been spits up by this agency who are who has to be said a very high end adoption agency yeah well that that's when we need to ask what was going on because there was at least one scientists with another agenda wasn't there yeah i mean i should probably put a spoiler alert here for anyone who see the movie because i think is going cold but turns out they were split up as part of a scientific experiments run by a prominent new york based psychiatrist looking into nature versus nurture and the the relative importance of heredity versus environment i'm going to mention the name of the doctor who's experiment this was dr peter neubauer who was director of the child development center in manhattan i'm not sure we can fairly expect an answer from you or anyone but how how could a man of science and medicine showman who was himself the.

nineteen years
"shafran" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:05 min | 3 years ago

"shafran" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"News and the new york conversation david kelman robert shafran were triplets separated at birth and joyously reunited at the age of nineteen the incredible story hit the papers in the world by storm in one thousand nine hundred but later turned sinister when the circumstances of their separation was revealed to be part of a psychology experiment in the new documentary three identical strangers filmmaker tim wardell tells a story that unfolds one layer after another as it examines the age old question of nature versus nature versus nurture tim mortal is a bafta nominated director and executive producer of the award winning london based production company raw his projects have ranged from the study of violence to murderers in prison for life his first feature documentary three identical strangers just won a special jury prize sundance for storytelling it opens cynthia hitters tomorrow and i'm very pleased that it has brought him to the show today welcomed him thanks dwi espy here so it's a tremendous film i'm curious to know how you describe it to people when people ask you what the film is about what do you say it's it's very tricky because i don't want to give away but i generally say it's the story of three brothers triplet brothers separated at birth and raised by families completely unaware of each other's existence until they were reunited in new york at the age of nineteen in one thousand nine hundred eighty you were pitched the story of the triplets by producer while you were head of development rod how did she come across the story i'm not entirely sure actually we sounds crazy but she she boost in i think she may have read a little bit about it in lawrence wright's book lawrence right as a journalist who writes a famous writing the looming tower and appears briefly in in the film and he he rose a little bit about the study and this story back in the ninety s so when you first were told the story what inspired you about what stuck for you i think it's just the most extraordinary human story i've ever come across this is incredible story of these brothers separated reunited and sort of separated again over the course of the film but it also works on these other levels as you say expose nature versus nurture the family free will destiny says big themes and so you got the initial pitch this sort of bones of the story how did you dive into researching it was hard the hardest thing is that exists in this kind of pre internet era with people still alive and able to talk about it but there isn't all that much online resource or information out this we had to do quite old fashioned journalism go and meet sources meet people who are involved research in archives libraries things like that it was tough so how did you get the brothers in the families to get involved in the project was at a long it was it was a long process it took took four years in title which sounds crazy i mean took five years the whole films are kind of realized this point now when you hear the full extent of what happened to them and their story you you understand why they might find it harder to trust people earning that trust was huge pile of making this film so did i understand you correctly of four years was the time you spent sort of engaging them to get them to come on board yeah i mean they live this kind of truman show existence where their lives were being manipulated and controlled in ways that they had no idea about and the film kind of exposed that and so trying to earn the trust the people who've been treated like that is is pretty tricky indeed so how did you earn their trust i think it was just spending time with them and their families and listening to their stories and being very honest about the film that we wanted to make i think it also helped being british ashley was sort of i was a bit of curiosity to them and and i think they were intrigued by the fact that i was so keen on this story so obviously there was some trepidation at the beginning but when it came together and you.

robert shafran new york david kelman four years five years
"shafran" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"shafran" Discussed on KCRW

"The business and i'm kim masters were listening to a conversation between matt hoffman and director tim wardell whose documentary three identical strangers open some theaters on june twentyninth the film tells the story of bobby shafran eddie gallant and david kelman triplets who were separated at birth only learning of each other's existence when they were reunited by chance in one thousand nine hundred eighty when they were nineteen it turns out the boys were part of a psychological experiment that involves separating identical siblings who were put up for adoption separately to study the impact of nature versus nurture when wardell was seeking funding for his film he didn't know whether he'd find out how the experiment was authorized in the first place or whether the brothers would succeed unsealing their records that was an issue for potential backers in the uk we did get was in the uk particularly people saying what was the third actor this film how does it end an i would say well look here's some things with thinking about these these areas with boys we think it could go oh but ultimately this documentary we don't know and when you talk about stories in the pasta and you can articulate them very clearly and really plot out all the you know the narrative arcs and all that kind of stuff but when you're dealing with stuff that's happening in the present tense you don't know how it's going to end and no one in the dot world in the uk was prepared to take a punt on that whereas in the in the us people got it and they were like yeah we understand you don't know how this is going to end but we think there's enough here that justifies us investing in this phone so the the film itself was funded both by an english company and an american company.

kim masters matt hoffman tim wardell eddie gallant uk us director bobby shafran david kelman
"shafran" Discussed on WVNJ 1160 AM

WVNJ 1160 AM

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"shafran" Discussed on WVNJ 1160 AM

"'cause mergers and stuff now when you say when i might ask you a quick question backup net flicks it means seven hundred shows many of which will have multiple episodes yes hundred series says what is what i'm saying i i can i don't know if that's actually correct but they certainly have scores of original shows seven hundred series it's just like impossible i mean that's more than any of the major networks have because remember i said what abc cbs twentyeight shows plus the half hour sitcoms thirty five shows but each one of those thirty five shows we'll have up to twenty two or twenty three episodes now imagine having almost twenty times as many shows as cbs abc doesn't sound right does well so i mean all netflix shows are created equal some of them have higher production is another some of them are original shows but they're actually being brought in from other markets so the next netflix here in the states has purchased the distribution rights i say you know like there's a bunch of princeton south korean soap operas for instance that i know rang around and netflix so that's an original show but it's not actually being produced by netflix and the production value on really isn't all that hype was most of operas we've got a lot more to come with brian shafran of the mac observer talking about what apple is doing in terms of original tv content and sounds it's going to.

abc cbs netflix princeton brian shafran apple mac
"shafran" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

KBNP AM 1410

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"shafran" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

"Complaining about google glass from an invasion of privacy standpoint and the big key difference between what apple could do with any kind of glasses like device is by keeping the data local to both the glasses into your phone rather than sending it off the servers and how you know having having everyone you see in everywhere you go added to your profile what could go is doing and it's it's apple would not be doing that because that's not apple's business model and that's how you do glasses right at least from a from a principal standpoint from a technology standpoint you still have to be able to have the display on the glasses you still have to be able to have the glasses be able to censure your environment and those things are certainly hard and we may still be years away from that i i'm not sure we know that apple's working on glasses like project but we also know that apple is considered canny at probably because the technology isn't here yet it remains to be seen well that's of course the difference between apple and these other companies apple is not going to bring technology market that doesn't feel is at least ready for first product maybe not completely finished but not ready for first products like the iphone they also have to be able to control he components are key technologies we've got we've got a rapid here man we could have gone another two hours with this a r a r brian shafran how do we find more.

apple google principal brian shafran two hours
"shafran" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"shafran" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"To tell businesses the darna not even allowed to voluntarily get the federal government evolved yeah and you have a ito you have the mayor of oakland livvy chef yes she actually tweeted out a warning of an impending raid and she tweeted it out it was a fourday raid that happened last week and because of her tweet the federal government is now saying that there were a convicted criminals who fled jeff we had illegals who had been issued a final order of removal and fail to depart or have been previously removed from the country and come back in dislike the guy who shot kate styling right so she's there this warning signs of helping criminals yes uh some of them some of them were convicted of child sex crimes prior felony convictions for child sex crimes weapons charges assaults a serious and violent offenses and she let them know that the the law was coming that oakland mayor liberty shafran says she's done nothing wrong though i continue to feel confident that what i did wasn't the right thing and it was legal i did not give specific information that could have endangered law enforcement i encourage people to not panic but to know their rights let me ask you a question i'm not a lawyer some in advance his agenda either my so this will be perfect to be great swivelled lawyers on the radio but we are you allow to tell some one of the for instance if i know that the feds are common it'd they're coming to arrest year when you're you know you're my friend and i call you up and i say hey they're coming to get ya isn't that awesome kind of like obstruction of justice that the left is so fond of prosecuting attorney certainly sounds like you're getting annoy right would if he is so is always it's okay if you're here illegally you can get the heads up but if you're a citizen and you get the heads up a crime has been committed by i don't know that's why she's coming under so much fire for this too so uh and and.

oakland federal government jeff mayor liberty shafran attorney fourday
"shafran" Discussed on WVNJ 1160 AM

WVNJ 1160 AM

02:26 min | 3 years ago

"shafran" Discussed on WVNJ 1160 AM

"High sea era which was supposed to be the bug free performance release which didn't happen like the ticktock release in that was not take not talk but i have another word but i don't want to use it rate okay so didn't work out quite so well at least the hardware seems to be reliable and then of course theories the throttle gate and a few like that term frontal gate i think you know what i'm talking about i do we're talking about right and it's interesting i think i use it almost ahead of everybody in then brian shafran that the mac observers using it as well and we're talking here about the fact that back with a ten point two point one update apple made a change to iphones when the battery was deteriorating eight smooth performance peaks thus slowing performance to prevent shutdowns when they were picked demands that the battery couldn't handle that it was a good thing but apple didn't think to add two sentences saying with this feature that we've installed it may slow down your maximum performance on your device and if that happens you should have your battery checked now two or three sentences they could have said that of course they didn't so apple got themselves in a heap of trouble and kind of wonder how they managed to do so something that was so darn foolish but they did the end this shows the kind of a black of attention to detail that has resulted in issues where i think apple i hope is learned the lesson you know now they're going to have a way to check battery health in iowa s eleven point three a way to turn off the performance throttling feature if you don't want it and then you don't care if your device shuts down within and tim cooke was asked after the quarterly conference call with analysts do you feel it now that you've pushing the updates the replacement for batteries making them so cheap for the year people are going to say i don't need to buy a new iphone i'll just keep mind working for a bit longer and he said in care rate i don't know if i believe that or not but i guess he was really dragons that may be kicking and screaming her to say her to say anyway let's continue on with all this excitement that we have here what do you think about.

brian shafran apple iowa tim cooke
"shafran" Discussed on WVNJ 1160 AM

WVNJ 1160 AM

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"shafran" Discussed on WVNJ 1160 AM

"Your battery it's not impossible to do it now we're not used to changing things in the iphone you know with a lot of android phones you pop off the back and you buy a battery for twenty bucks and and replace it and it's really easy since we can't do it that simply would we don't think about it and at least one thing is happening here is that people were going to become more where it rightfully can change the battery wouldn recommend you do yourself even though you can buy kits to to do this with the tools in the batteries but it certainly possible to do it and it's not ridiculously expensive well maybe apple will learn some from a class action lawsuit maybe if they settled this may mean well obviously nobody's going to get one hundred million dollars off this what happens with these class action lawsuits is apple may settle quietly maybe even under nda and then each person who participated gets where a 10dollar gift certificate with a happier right the united nations dorthe certificate the for the go spend the money annapolis they're going to buy more stuff anyway and yeah selling of what's going to happen here but i just hope they're chastened by the children who wrote a bit further in in this cycle count apple has a web page where they talk about how to determine battery cycle camper mac notebooks let's discuss that in the next segment the but later brian shafran of the mac observer joins us i'm gene steinberg you're in the tech 9 out alive thank you for listening to the end be sure to visit chief ian live dot com today regional brainer a big murky waters the one you need period we need a water tower the.

iphone apple united nations web page android brian shafran ian one hundred million dollars 10dollar
"shafran" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

KBNP AM 1410

02:58 min | 3 years ago

"shafran" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

"What's going to happen next you never know with you're listening to the tech dial live with gene steinberg two we have brian shafran of amac observer in his final appearance on this show this year unless he decides to come back next week which i find highly unlikely loyalist make of that i don't know i have no idea anyway we have here now throttled gate from apple for holgate you had antenna gate as had been gate but not then gay like the thing that you put on your shoulders had been then get gate right we've had gate gate now we haven't yet the thing i wanted to ask first before we go on okay why do we call this gate because you see with watergate it wasn't water watergate was the name of the hotel apartment complex more but the evidence convenience an easy handle for anyone to slap on any kind of controversy just get i'll give it sort of an instant understanding of of the idea little it's a controversy must have been going on for years an attorney precedes apple and as i said it is a gate but you know we've had things happening before were apple as had alleged scandals like antenna gate was a fake ben gate was a fake i mean there was an antenna and it was tribal and who was a bending issue to well okay the antenna issues supposedly was not unusual for smartphones an apple had this set of youtube videos up for awhile showing other smartphones they can also have their reception hurt ben gate they actually tested the iphone six plus which was the offending product consumer reports tested and found that it met the standards for rigidity or whatever and yet they're stronger today so you know yeah but the thing is here noticed this the following year with the iphone for saf trenton a gate apple revised the antenna system using what they called diversity antenna where the signal is compare with two different antennas i'd like to do in cars and then in the iphone six s plus apple made the structure stronger so even though technically the previous products that were subject to a scandal were acceptable apple made them more acceptable okay put another way whether or not they were up to standard apple still had something.

gene steinberg brian shafran apple attorney iphone youtube
"shafran" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

KBNP AM 1410

01:46 min | 4 years ago

"shafran" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

"Apples you don't have syrian stuff like that but unless you are tied in the apples ecosystem and you wanna use i tunes for whatever reason can't you just get a roku for less money well you you can i mean you know apples advantage there is is integration syrian gatien with a with a broad array apple ecosystem the ability to to use your iowa's devices the more tightly with with apple tv than you camden yet advice and you know the does things all those things all matter of your roku roku is cheaper in part because it has to be to to compete against google and compete against apple need competing with cable companies but what did the cable companies do now other than maybe absorbing some of what these other people are doing like i said with the streaming services from dish network and tv what do you mean what are they do well here's the thing here cable growth his pretty much stalled people looking for options and they half those options put not as flexibly except for something like what direct tv and dish offers more to come with brian shafran this the tech night out alive of ha ha attack of the rokko has been well received by critics a reversal like it's a thrill eminem store you'll never forget a former us military intelligence officer is haunted by intense dreams of other beautiful woman pleading for his help after a terrible battled.

iowa apple dish network brian shafran officer camden google eminem us military intelligence
"shafran" Discussed on The Brutal Truth About Sales and Selling

The Brutal Truth About Sales and Selling

01:50 min | 4 years ago

"shafran" Discussed on The Brutal Truth About Sales and Selling

"We we lived on email marketing for a long time and then that sort of fell out of bogin egg got hard to do cold email marketing at the same time traffic to our website started increase which sort of made up for it within bound leads the website but then this scale we realised we really need to spend up at outbound engine and so we hired a bunch of sales evolving reps originally there wasn't very much structure in process and in we're sort of you know and captain wing it mode we're we got a guy in the door named jake shafran who had been in sdr in his last and pioneered a lot of uh the process at discover oregon helped us or to figure out what's possible in that role but then what we ended up with in in the play we've sort of been running for the last couple of years is uh running a combination of using outreach dot ieo in putting our customers or a prospects into various sequences we've experimented with segmenting those sequences by what we call company type sort of a industry if you will and so we've got messaging specific to each industry in by persona so were messaging towards uh our messaging towards a sales leaders different than that and marketing different than that to to sales ops officer sort of technical buyers uh what we've realised are or were beginning to realize sort of recently is that plays is getting a little saturated it feels like the volume of messages i get from sales developer wraps that is that are you know now it's become evident that there clearly automated they're written in this sort of one to one tone but it's clear that they're automated in that i'm being dropped into sequences realizing that that again that play is getting a little bit saturated and it's probably going to lose some of its effectiveness i think in the next six months.

jake shafran oregon developer officer six months
"shafran" Discussed on WVNJ 1160 AM

WVNJ 1160 AM

01:37 min | 4 years ago

"shafran" Discussed on WVNJ 1160 AM

"Right this this is his irs jeans this week on the tech night ally would be featuring kirk michael her and maybe we'll get some fearless for fearsome ww dc predictions from him a little bit later brian shafran of the lack of server will play the same game or may be give us something else in i'll never know what's going to happen next on the tech night how live so kirk mackel harm before we started you mentioned to me that i tunes has this big movie bundle then titles for twenty dollars ten titles for twenty dollars two dollars each for a movie two dollars a movie the done this in the past they've had blundell's i believe it was by movie studio oh so mgm mourners it cetera i think it was the same price ten for for twenty dollars and so yeah i was looking at it and it's pretty cheap to bucks the movie but when you look through the thorough water movies do just not gonna wanna watch who you've already seen in you don't wanna watch again so in the we've.

brian shafran blundell irs twenty dollars two dollars